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#07

UNITY AND LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE • YOUR EQUINE COMMUNITY AND LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE • YOUR EQUINE COMMUNITY AND LIFESTYLE MA

YOURS FOR FREE KYALAMI, BLUE HILLS, DAINFERN, FOURWAYS, CROWTHORNE, CARLSWALD, MULDERSDRIFT, PRETORIA EAST

Horse & country

APR MAY 18

PLUS TWO DELICIOUS BAKING RECIPES FUN ACTIVITIES PAGES EQUESTRIAN QUESTIONS ANSWERED HORSES FOR SALE

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Welcome

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he autumn months of April and May are a wonderful time of the year. We may not get the rich red and orange colours that other regions of the world experience, but our leaves turn a decided yellowish brown, assuring us that a change in season is in the air. For those who hate the heat, such as myself, this is a relieving time of the year as temperatures cool. Our horses undoubtedly feel the difference as well and we no longer need to feel too guilty about riding at 3pm. Enjoy our seasonal activity pages, especially our golden pullout poster. We’ve also included some gymnastic exercises so that you can bounce your way to a stronger horse, as well as some equestrian questions and answers. If you’ve ever been curious about the creatures who share your garden, read up on how to identify geckos and lizards on page 22. Our recipes in this issue are for those with a sweet tooth – enjoy two easy baking recipes on pages 6 and 24. Until next time, enjoy your read and keep sending us your pics!

WANT TO ADVERTISE YOUR HORSE WITH US FOR FREE? Email hac@panorama.co.za

Contents 4 Sneak peek What’s in the next HQ?

21 Spot the difference 6 Sweet tooth Whip up this classic shortbread 8 Bounce your way to a stronger horse Let the exercises do the hard work 12 Q&A Your equestrian questions answered 14 Colouring-in

Charlotte

20 Find your way

22 In your garden Garden geckos vs lizards 24 An apple a day Apple and cinnamon turnovers 26 Annual jabs Keeping track of your horse's shots 28 Q&A Your equestrian questions answered

16 Pull-out poster 30 Horses for sale

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18 Sudoku puzzles 32 Events 19 Word search

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HORSE & COUNTRY ISSUE 07 PUBLISHER Urs Honegger EDITOR Charlotte Bastiaanse charlotte@panorama.co.za SENIOR SUB-EDITOR Vanessa Koekemoer SUB-EDITOR Nicolette Els

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Copyright HAC is published frequently and is available in the greater Gauteng area currently. All rights reserved. Reproduction of this magazine in whole or in part is prohibited without prior written permission of Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd. Copyright © 1994-2018 Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd. The views expressed in HAC are not necessarily those of Panorama Media Corp and the acceptance and publication of editorial and advertising matter in HAC does not imply any endorsement or warranty in respect of goods or services therein described, whether by HAC or the publishers. HAC will not be held responsible for the safe return of unsolicited editorial contributions. The Editor reserves the right to edit material submitted and in appropriate cases to translate into another language. HAC reserves the right to reject any advertising or editorial material, which may not suit the standard of the publication, without reason given. HAC published by Panorama Media Corp.

Published By Panorama Media Corp (Pty) Ltd. Private Bag X4, Kyalami, 1684, South Africa. 92 Campolino Road, Kyalami. Tel: 011 468 2090 Fax: 011 468 2091


READER SUBMISSIONS

What’s up?

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mail your pics and letters to us at hac@ panorama.co.za and see them featured in the next issue of Horse & Country! Make sure to send us a high-quality image with a caption.

4 YOUR PHOTOS

1 Sent in by Minette Beukes via Instagram 2 Long, quiet walks with your equine buddy are the best! Sent in by Shanleigh Heale 3 Blissful moments, sent in by @maseeha__fit via Instagram 4 Nikki and Max at London Lane 5 Jade and Chewy, photographed by Shanleigh Heale 6 Liampie, sent in by Xante Chadwick 7 A photo of my favourite things: my husband, my horse and my bump! Sent in by Tanya Valentine 8 Show day, sent in by @k.e.rosenzweig 9 Nicole and Fairford, photographed by Shanleigh Heale 10 Tori and her beloved Muse, photographed by Shanleigh Heale

MAILBOX! You can keep sending your photos and letters to hac@panorama.co.za and see them featured in the next Horse & Country!

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SNEAK PEEK

Get your equestrian fix What’s on offer in HQ

Horse and rider

UP AND AWAY

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BE STRICT ABOUT HALTING AT THE MARKER

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Up and away

THE APRIL ISSUE

IN FOCUS HORSE SPORT IL | 2018 ISSU E 132 APR

Howduciting’sCallahdo’sonyoueng IAN MAGAZINE PREMIER EQUESTR SOUTH AFRICA’S

Pro sport horses for auction

The away show Tips and guidelines for first-timers

Best foot forward

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| €3.00 | $4.00 R43.48 EXCL. VAT OTHER COUNTRIES

R50.00 incl VAT ISSUE 132 APR 2018

Diagnosing lameness in the feet + pastern injuries in profile

TAKING THE TneEss inPyour horse ThoolinS X NE g light cises for sc 5 exer

RESISTANCE IN THE HALT

TEXT: HQ PHOTOGRAPHY: SUPPLIED

Halt

Walk

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Five exercises for achieving lightness

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term ‘light e often hear the in in the hand’ or ‘heavy does the hand’, but what in this actually mean that Lightness means terms of the horse? an a soft contact in a horse works with through appears to glide uphill frame and . Heaviness his movements effortlessly A heavy horse would means the opposite. unaccepting of or be hard in the mouth, and on the forehand, contact, the against in his body. Horses move with a stiffness their weight on their naturally distribute of is why the majority front legs, which the youngsters, are on horses, especially we should always forehand. As riders, have light horses who strive to produce from their hind end. learnt to work more at some useful This month we look and develop encourage to exercises youngster. lightness in the

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A Exercise 1

basics. te the value of your Never underestima horses well as more advanced Younger horses as transition work. You can benefit from walk-halt point. in the arena as a halt will use each marker use cones or cavaletti If the arena isn’t marked, ly 12m spaces approximate blocks and make the arena. the of outside apart along the The exercise is accuracy. The aim behind this despite you working markers come quickly, a as this may seem like in a walk. As much room there is still straightforward exercise,

is More importantly be great if you could. balanced in the halt. that your horse stays the will take a step off An unbalanced horse

a hindquarter or shoulder. track or try swing straight, ride a 10m If he struggles to stay better and try support him circle to the inside seat he stepped out. Your according to where –i be perfectly balanced and position should reflected in your horse’s not, you will see it shoulders back and movement. Keep your towards your hand your pelvis tilted slightly show no signs of Your horse should th into or when moving resistance in the halt of the reins and that includes yanking for error. walk, when you halt. body. Firstly, be strict about or hollowing in the with walk, your horse marker and halting When asking for the Concentrate on each not one light off the leg. He with the marker – your stirrup in line should be quick and not happy and you you’re If it. transition the behind step forward or shouldn’t lag into get h inside and squeeze lightly to a 10m circle to the with the halt, ride should only have to kic accurate you feel the urge to marker with a more return back to the to move forward. If your halt horse’s reaction to then you need to work halt. You want your or dig your spur in, for in a separate Importantly, the aid aid to be immediate. on your horse’s reactiveness to your seat and not from this exercise. Aim halt should come from session before doing transitions all the w your hands. have perfect halt-walk is important, and a both reins before try on straightness arena the horse’s Your around need lightness. You don’t good reflection of his exercise two. square halt, but it would to have a perfectly

First and foremost

uphill and off the Unless a horse is naturally long hours true lightness takes forehand, achieving and training. Realistically, of consistent schooling to d horse can take years a young or inexperience that doesn’t mean you become light. However, You the horse comes of age. until nothing do should bad the horse to develop certainly shouldn’t allow to correct difficult be will they as habits early on, you There are simple exercises later down the line. lightness advanced towards can do that will work the beneficial in preparing training and will be perfecting are work. Examples horse for this type of the your horse in front of transition work, getting aids. to be 100% on your leg, and schooling him

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Horse and rider This issue starts off with a six-page feature on achieving lightness in your horse’s schooling – five detailed exercises to improve your horse’s responsiveness and keep him working from his hind end. We then look at how to navigate the chaos of a show warmup arena with courtesy towards your fellow riders. Also in the horse and rider section is a report on the Young Horse Performance Series finals, held at Kyalami Park Club.

Horse and yard • The away show for first-timers • What to do in a rider emergency • Yard profile: Waterfall Equestrian Centre


Subscribe to HQ for six issues for only R250 and we will add a seventh copy for FREE – saving you R100. Go to www.coolmags. com and follow the HQ subscription process. At the checkout, fill in the coupon code ‘Horse&Country’ and your free HQ will be added to your order. Offer ends 31 May 2018.

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Horse and health This issue of HQ includes some insightful health-focused features. We first look at the Masterson Method, a unique and concentrated body work technique practised by a few qualified specialists in South Africa. We then look at diagnosing lameness in the hoof, by looking at conformation and movement in the horse. Avoiding infection can be difficult when wounds won’t heal. Read up on how best to treat tricky wounds. How much do you know about what goes on inside your horse’s ears? Learn about how your horse’s hearing system works, and natural enemies in the ears. Lastly, we look at pasterns in profile and the impact of injuries and trauma to the area.

Horse and country • Behind the scenes of the Callaho Auction • Local rider with an Olympic dream • Riding holiday of a lifetime in Tuscany

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IN THE KITCHEN

TEXT: HULETTS SUGAR PHOTOGRAPHY: SHUTTERSTOCK

Sweet tooth Whip up this classic shortbread METHOD 1. Place all the ingredients in a food processor and process until combined into a ball. Do not over-process. If you don’t have a food processor, work the mixture with your hands until combined. 2. Press the mixture into a rectangular tray (or two 20cm round pie dishes). With the prongs of a fork, prick the mixture well. Bake at 160ºC until it just starts to turn golden (35 to 40 minutes). 3. Remove from the oven and immediately slice into serving portions. Sprinkle with extra sugar while hot. Hint: It is important that the butter is soft, though not melted. For best results use butter, not margarine.

To make the cookies into shapes, use a cookie cutter when you’ve pressed the mixture down.

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INGREDIENTS • 500mℓ (2 cups) cake flour • 60mℓ (4 tablespoons) white sugar • 45mℓ (3 tablespoons) cornflour • Pinch of salt • 250g butter (soft but not melted) • Sugar for sprinkling


10 cool things

If you want to perform your best at school, health matters. Just as well some of the things you may have handy in your pantry count as superfoods – so make sure you (or mom) add them to your daily meals

GARLIC Not only handy for warding off vampires (or undesirable

romantic advances), garlic has been shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol as well as prevent colds and certain cancers.

EXTRA-VIRGIN OLIVE OIL Cook with this to cut down on heart disease and

inflammation. But don’t fry with it – heat damages its nutrients.

BROCCOLI Yeah, we know … but this green wonder contains loads of vitamin C and folate (a natural folic acid). It also helps prevent heart disease.

APPLE Eat one a day to deter diabetes, asthma and some cancers. It’s packed with antioxidants and fibre.

ONION It may not be everyone’s favourite, but onion contains a powerful anti-inflammatory antioxidant (quercetin) that reduces blood pressure and cancer risk.

WALNUT It’s a super nut! It has the highest antioxidant activity out of any nut and is the only one containing omega-3 in significant amounts.

TOMATO Low in starch and sugar, this mini hero is

high in fibre, vitamin C, beta-carotene and antioxidants. Cook it in olive oil to increase its potency.

BEET Purple power! Eat this to get loads

of iron and folate. The nitrates lower blood pressure and increase your performance when you exercise, so eat one before athletics!

SPINACH Popeye had the right idea – spinach is filled

with bone-strengthening calcium, vitamin K, vitamin A and iron.

SALMON A bit pricey, but worth its weight in advantages – it reduces

the risk of heart disease, lowers blood pressure and is high in omega-3, vitamin D, some B vitamins and selenium. And it’s yummy in sushi!

p.11

WIN!

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Fast and furious Hurricane facts

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growing young minds

CANDY CRUSH p.16

Toe-tally COOL Learn more about p.8

the human foot

Why are we obsessed with sweets?

Squeak!

Burning Q&A

Can your pet make you feel better?

• How many mosquitoes would it take to drain all your blood? • Is your cellphone keeping you awake? • How many inventions did Thomas Edison patent? • Is it possible to #BreakTheInternet for real? • Can you sneeze with your eyes open?

p.34

Amazing animals

• Squeaky snails • Leg-growing tarantulas • Cube-shaped wombat poo

LANDINGS THE GREAT WALL LUNAR OF CHINA Who will be next to land on the moon? p.42

VOL 01 ISSUE 02 2018

SADC countries: R30.70 (Excl. TAX)

Price R35.00 | €4.00 | £3.00

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• WHEN AND HOW WAS IT BUILT? • CAN IT REALLY BE SEEN FROM SPACE? • HOW LONG IS IT?

3

EDITION 03

PLUS!

Learn how stars are born p.6

This article appeared in VI Junior Issue 1. Are you curious for more very interesting articles? See the Inside Back Cover for VI Junior details.


IN THE ARENA

Bounce your way to a

stronger horse Let the exercises do the hard work

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TEXT: HQ PHOTOGRAPHY: SHUTTERSTOCK


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ot only does your horse lose a degree of fitness over the holiday period, but he will likely also lose a bit of strength. Any working horse will quickly recover both, and bounces are super exercises for building up body strength and are suitable for horses of all disciplines. Perhaps you’ve felt like your horse has been needing to put in a big effort lately to clear jumps. He may be lacking hind-end strength and the ability to ‘ping’ off the ground. We look at some simple bounce exercises incorporated into grid work to improve physical strength. HOW DO BOUNCES HELP? Essentially, bounces are a series of low jumps that require the horse to take off for the next

Bounce exercises can help sharpen up a careless horse

jump as soon as he’s landed from the first, so that there are no cantering strides between the fences. This movement requires strength on the horse’s part, as the pace over the bounces needs to be slow and controlled, and the horse can’t use speed to build up momentum for the bounce – especially as soon as the fences start getting bigger. Bounces can be as low as cavalettis and advanced horses can jump bounces up to 1m. Not only will bounces develop body strength, but they are also great for teaching a horse to back off fences if he has a tendency to rush. Running through bounces is not only difficult but also dangerous, and a horse will quickly learn that this is the type of exercise where speed won’t work. Bounces are also

super for a horse who tends to hang his feet or knocks quite often as a result of carelessness. Successfully navigating a bounce requires sharpness from the horse, as he will need to learn to quickly snap up his front legs to get over the front fence as well as tuck his hind legs in order to propel himself forward again. TEACHING THE YOUNG OR INEXPERIENCED HORSE TO BOUNCE You can’t reap the benefits of bounce exercises if your horse doesn’t know how to do them properly! If you’re teaching bounces to a horse for the first time, lay out four canter poles, spaced out with 3m in between each pole. Canter your horse over the poles and feel what he does with his body. Does he hesitate in any way, or is he too forward over them? Adjust the distances slightly if need be, especially if you have a particularly large or small horse. Use cavaletti blocks or cavalettis to start introducing height. Set the poles on the lowest height so that they’re basically raised canter poles. Once your horse is going over them confidently, you can set them on the highest option and see how he tackles them. Practise these over a few days before tackling exercise one.

EXERCISE 1 Set out three or four uprights 3m apart from each other. Position the bounce line somewhere in the arena that allows you to jump the line from both ways. Set the height according to your horse’s level of schooling. Start with low cross poles for young or inexperienced horses, and 50cm uprights for more advanced horses. Place two poles at the entrance and exit of the exercise as illustrated to encourage straightness. Unbalanced horses can have a tendency to fall to one side to compensate for the difficulty of the exercise, so pay close attention to what your horse’s body does. Balance and rhythm are very important when approaching the exercise and make sure that you canter straight out of the exercise for a few strides before turning left or right. Repeat the exercise on both reins before raising the poles. Advanced horses can jump bounces up to 1m, but this requires a lot of physical strength from the horse. You may need to push distances out slightly as the height increases.

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IN THE ARENA

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EXERCISE 2

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Only attempt bounces on a curve if your horse is very balanced and confident with bounces on a straight line. This exercise requires quick thinking on your horse’s part and develops suppleness, as he will need to maintain a degree of bend through his body as well as move forward. Again, we use placing poles at the entrance and exit of the exercise to prevent the horse from falling in or out. Start by picking up a rhythmic canter on a circle and ensure that your horse is bending around your inside leg. Avoid using your inside rein to create bend. Approach the exercise on a slight curve. Don’t twist your upper body, but rather stay straight and make use of a firm inside leg to ask for bend. Use your outside rein to prevent the shoulders from drifting outwards. You can open, but not pull, your inside rein to guide the horse’s direction. Keep cantering on the circular track after the exercise, paying attention to your horse’s straightness and rhythm.

EXERCISE 3

This simple gymnastic exercise incorporates bounces in between two uprights. It teaches balance, rhythm and pace and especially assists young or hot horses. Place an upright and then walk eight paces to three bounces (four paces, 3m apart), and then another eight steps to another upright. Set the height relative to the horse’s abilities. You can use placing poles at the entrance and exit again if your horse struggles with straightness. Simple as it may seem, an even pace is very important through the exercise because if your horse is too quick, he’ll likely land far off the upright and you will be deep to the bounces. If you’re too slow, your horse will land short and then have to push for the bounces, which will result in him getting long. There is no room to circle out, so an accurate ride in is of paramount importance. Again, your body control is very important because if you get left behind or fall onto your horse’s forehand, you will upset your horse’s balance. The greater the height of the uprights and bounces, the more demanding the exercise becomes on your horse.

EXERCISE 4 This exercise assists horses who battle with jumping combinations. Without a good rhythm and canter, the combination is often where riders will take a rail in a course. Horses who rush in don’t leave themselves with space to clear the second obstacle and horses who are too slow might need to chip in a half stride in between fences. Horses also rely on their momentum and physical strength to clear combinations and this becomes especially more difficult as the jumps get bigger. Set a placing pole 3m to three bounces, one stride to an upright and one stride to an oxer. Don’t be too fussed about height for this exercise: it’s more about creating rhythm. The placing pole is there to set you up correctly for the bounces. Ensure that there is enough energy in the canter on your approach and that you maintain it throughout the exercise. Don’t let your horse get too long or short or you will run into problems at the upright and oxer. You can make use of V-poles at the oxer to maintain straightness and to encourage your horse to make a big effort at the fence.

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EXERCISE 5 This exercise teaches horses to back off the second fence in a related distance. It can become difficult to contain a hot horse in greater related distances, especially if he tends to run long and flat. Bounces not only prevent the horse from running, but also encourage the hot horse to take shorter and more upward strides. Set an upright, three strides to three bounces and then two strides to an oxer. You will need quite a bit of space for this gymnastic. Set the heights of the jumps as they would be at a show, and the bounces relatively low. Your approach to the first jump should be forward yet controlled. Your ride to the bounces should be even and going over them should just be like exaggerated canter steps. Your horse should still be uphill and forward coming out of the bounces and in the two strides to the oxer. He should not have gotten any longer or on the forehand through the exercise.

2 strides

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LGH_ Half page_march 2018.pdf 1 01/03/2018 9:54:49 AM

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Q&A

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ARE PORTABLE X-RAYS AS GOOD AS THE ONES DONE IN THE CLINIC? In South Africa, there are an increasing number of portable x-ray machines available, which means that many of us do not have to take our horse to the vet for an x-ray anymore, but instead can have the vet or technician come out to the horse to take the images. This obviously saves on the inconvenience of trucking to the vet, but owners do need to be aware that portable x-rays simply aren’t quite as good as their ‘inclinic’ counterparts. There are several reasons for this. Firstly, your yard will need a

Q A

HOW CAN YOU HELP A NERVOUS HORSE COPE WITH SHOW STRESS? In the case of an inexperienced horse, or a horse who has never been to a show, it’s likely that shows away from home will be both exciting and potentially stressful. Luckily, there are a couple of things you can do from home to prepare your horse for a future show. Start with loading, unloading and going on short drives to ensure he is comfortable in

a horsebox. The more the show environment reflects things that are familiar at home, the more relaxed the horse will be. Expose him to music and loudspeakers, set up flags and umbrellas, and get your friends to cheer and clap on the edge of the arena. Have a group lesson and get him used to having horses coming towards or up behind him. If you are planning to jump at the show, try exposing your horse to spooky fillers and colourful poles. Some dressage and showjumping venues also put pot plants on

either side of the jumps, or at the dressage letters, so let your horse have a look at those too. If you are planning to go to an indoor show venue, book a practice session in a covered arena to get the horse used to the indoor environment. If you are able to, ask a show venue if you can pay a ground levy and come ride your horse in their arenas. Even if it’s not busy, it’s an opportunity for your horse to experience being ridden away from home.

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reasonably dark, sheltered area with level, dry ground in which to position the horse, near a power supply. This is often not easy to find, and if these conditions are not met, the quality of the images will be negatively affected. To be of clinical and diagnostic value, the x-ray images do need to be of a certain quality. Therefore, if the images fall below this standard, they will be of little to no use. This is especially a problem for portable x-ray machines where the images are not processed on site, but instead back at the clinic, as follow-up visits (at an additional cost) may be necessary if the image is found to be of inadequate

quality when examined later. Portable x-ray machines are also generally speaking much less powerful than the static ones found in the clinic setting, and apart from the very newest systems (which are few and far between in South Africa), few can acquire good-quality images of the back and neck. The portable machines also tend to struggle with the shoulders and stifles of larger horses. It is obviously much easier to guarantee good-quality images in the clinic as the facilities there are purpose-built and thus optimised for getting the best images possible. Repeat images are also easy to take in a clinic setting, and a full set of high-quality pictures can easily be taken in just one session. Furthermore, the static x-ray machines are more powerful and can therefore generally take more in-depth and useful images. With all things considered, it is therefore generally best to still opt for the in-clinic option for x-rays. However, if this is just not an option for your horse due to issues with trucking or long distances to the nearest facility, the availability of portable machines is certainly useful. Asked by Mischa Karmen

ARAGON

Stables

Stabling and lessons available. Clients winning at both graded shows and inter-school competitions jennyf@aragonstables.co.za | www.aragonstables.co.za 158 Mountainview Drive, Muldersdrift | 082 666 3728

Q A

WHAT ARE V-POLES USED FOR? V-poles are extremely handy in fixing a horse who knocks, as well as fixing horses who drift or run out. When you set it up, allow the tips to rest on the top pole of the jump, and don’t make the V too narrow because it may put the horse off and he could then refuse. The shape

of the V pole encourages the horse to round his body over the jump and bring his front end up more. A diagonal pole across the two top poles of an oxer will also encourage your horse to bascule over the jump because the idea is that he looks down slightly at the diagonal pole, therefore rounding his back over the fence.

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To advertise

Contact: NORA 011 468 2090 nora@panorama.co.za

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COLOURING-IN

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Trotter at sunset Photography: Makarova Viktoria

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18 Three

Four

One

Two Answers Answers

Answers Sudoku #1 SudokuAnswers #1 One Sudoku Sudoku 9 9 7 1#14 2 3 64 5 7 8 1#1 9 8 7 6 13 4 7 21 3 598 5476 8213 6947 8 1 5 46 2 32 3 97 57 41 9 5 6 4 32 7 9 8 68 5 2 9 7 43 4 1 86 6257 7943 1 524 3 891 7 3 4 1 6 2 7 9 3 54 8 6 1 9 6 1 9 5 7 8 3 4 215 6 1 9 5 7 862 315 498 2 2 5 4 6 153 8 3 9 7 2 3 5 8 78 32 49 4 923 6158 67 87 1 532 34 89 76 82 45 9 134 1289 6 376 5 728 14 92 65 8 6 35 1 741 82 92 3 965 7 486 1 2 5 6 3 71 8 2 9 5 46

4 42 2 1 1 8 8 3

Sudoku #5 Sudoku 2 9 8#53 2 1 9 7 85 3 6 13 76 54 68 3 2 6 7 4 89 5 5 9 6 28 79 1

5

Sudoku #3 Sudoku 1 5 3#34 14 5 8 4 5 7 3 7 8 2 6 5 7 23 6 1 7 2 83 1 4 2 9 8 6 49 91 6 1 59 61 1 4 5 7 68 49 72 38 9 2 3 4 9 9 5 5 2 2 7 7 3 36 86 8

9 92

2 8 8 7 7 6 6 3 3 4 41 15

Three Sudoku #3 Sudoku 1 2 5 8 3#3 6 74 63 14 9 2 57 1 83 8 7645 3 49 9 65 7 1 372 1 486 5 1495 3623 4 961 5 872 54 52 76 38 9 314 8 129 5 827 7 486 3549 1 291 8 273 4 861 75 95 2 916 2 936 8 514 7257 9368 9 768 5 149 6272 34 83 78 1 9 6 2 43

Sudoku #5 Sudoku 2 1 9 7 8#5 5 63 5 63 6 921 1397 7 885 4 9 3 76 8 713 9 254 4 568 7 435 9 662 2 147 53 89 4 3 91 256 6428 1579 7

2 21 18 86 67 79 94 45 53 3 9 92

28 87 76 63 34 41 15 5

4 42 21 18 83

3 35 56 62

28 84 49 91 17 7

6 63 31 14 45 58 82 29 97 7

Challenging Sudoku by KrazyDad, Challenging Sudoku by KrazyDad, Volume 6, Book 6 Volume 6, Book 6

Challenging Sudoku by KrazyDad, ChallengingSudoku Sudoku by KrazyDad, Volume 6, Book 6 Volume 6, Book 6 Sudoku #2 #2 Two Sudoku Sudoku 5 7 9 1 6#2 5 9 6 #22 3 4 82 3 4 7 1 8 5 6 6 2 3 7 97 1 8 26 3 8 49 74 12 85 1 97 3 8 4951 4 263 5 14 2 7 3 8 6 1 87 9514 4 372 2 938 5 661 87 95 43 29 56 42 2 6 89 1 7 57 85 42 3 126 9389 6417 75 58 31 93 64 6 9 7 5 8 2 16 83 95 94 74 51 82 16 38 49 7 3 3 5 4 2 6 1 31 5 4 4 3 91 2 678 6231 8 554 9743 19 26 62 85 97 81 4 1 35 94 6 386 92 18 5 741 7235 94 63 29 57 72 8 4 1 7 58 24 3 169 9 584 7617 32 58 42 31 95 76 23 4 5 72 98 2 6 1793 5845 4672 3 189 26 17 58 64 31 5 2 9 6 7 3 85 4 2 19 6 7 8 4 1

5 8 6 54 82 69 47 21 93 79 15 38 93 5 4 82 36 47 21 61 76 15 12 6 3 57 28 3 9 74 8 9 4

2

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8

81 14 49 93 35 57 72 26 6

7 76 65 58 81 12 29 93 34 4

5 1 7 6 59 13 78 64 97 39 82 45 74 96 21 53 42 64 15 37

72 78 68 6 9 93 3

Four Sudoku #4 Sudoku 9 6 5 #41 9 6 53 1 4 8 6 41 8 3 5 6 2 7 1 2 2 8 53 9 7 25 49 8 1 23 35 47 1 6 2 4 3 8 57 6 9 4 7 8 6 5 1 92 7 9 67 13 4 2 9 8 7 3 4 8

Sudoku #6 Sudoku 9 8 7#63 95 84 7 6 31 5 41 6 3 2 15 3 1 2 7 5 8 59 7 1 53 84 89

8 8 7 7 4 46 69 95

25 2 3 3 1 1

Sudoku #4 Sudoku 2 9 7 6 3 5#4 41 29 3 53 1 4 16 4 75 68 2 9 9 58 22 341 6 937 1 865 3 112 6 429 9578 8 753 1 725 4 394 85 81 76 32 78 53 3 247 8116 96 24 6838 2 175 4169 9347 6486 1851 4 792 5379 4 67 8913 7 5 298 6 24 5 5 7 9 3 64 2 8

Sudoku #6 4 Sudoku 13 6 9 2 8 5 7#6 42 6895 2 384 5 776 1 931 27 9 8 53 3 662 9 815 4 41 7 37 9 237 14 15 6428 8 659 36 2 571 1753 49 84 6 298

8 2 87 29 74 93 46 31 69 1 7 95 78 86 64 45 5

52 23 31 1

7 75 56 64 43 32 21 18

3

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32 29 95 58 81 14 47 76

89

4 6 2 42 68 23 27 89 34 73 9 2 41 36 25 17

5 57 76 64 49

4

41 18 87 76 69 93 35 52 2

1 19 98 86 62

Try out the addictive game of Sudoku. The aim is to fill each block with a number from 1 to 9. Each number must not appear more than once in each row, column and square. If you cannot finish the puzzle, see the solution.

Sudoku PUZZLES


WORDSEARCH

Dog breeds COCKER SPANIEL GREAT DANE JACK RUSSELL NEWFOUNDLAND

GERMAN SHEPHERD GOLDEN RETRIEVER LABRADOR BEAGLE

Can you find all 20?

DACHSHUND DOBERMANN POMERANIAN CHIHUAHUA

PUG BULLDOG GREYHOUND YORKSHIRE TERRIER

SCHNAUZER POODLE RIDGEBACK WHIPPET

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MAZE

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Can you find your way?

Help this bunny bury his way back to his family!


Spot the difference

Can you find all 10 differences?

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See the solution at www.horse.co.za


IN YOUR GARDEN

Garden

geckos lizards

E

ver looked at the little creature who wiggles his way up the wall, or over the paving, at the speed of light, and wondered exactly what he is? Is he a gecko or a lizard? There are over 200 species of lizard and 61 species of gecko in South Africa, and some of them inhabit our gardens and homes. This article will highlight the differences between the creatures.

TEXT: KIM ROBERTS PHOTOGRAPHY: SHUTTERSTOCK

UNUSUAL SURVIVAL TRICK Both reptiles can shed their tails to distract a predator and make an escape. The tail writhes for a short time after detaching. A new tail will grow over a few weeks. They both rely on camouflage and some lizards play dead to fool a hunter. Both run for cover to places of safety.

LIZARD FACTS

GECKO FACTS

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• Nocturnal – out at night. • Hides in wall cracks, crevices, trees, rockeries and garden walls. • Large eyes with no eyelids. • The tongue is used to lick the eyes clean. • Oviparous – two hard-shelled eggs are laid. • Toes have adhesive pads (scansors) which help them to ‘stick’ to smooth surfaces. • Geckos make complex sounds – squeaks, clicks, growls and barks. • Mobile tails make curling movements in territorial fighting. • Grows from 7.5 to 15cm and lives up to five years.

• Signals to intimidate rivals or attract mates with body postures, mouth gaping, tail wagging and push-ups. • Lizards live in a wide variety of places – from treetops to places below ground. • Some are brightly coloured. • Lizards are diurnal – active by day. • A skink is a common garden lizard. • Sit-and-wait hunters – carnivorous (meat-eaters). Smaller lizards are insectivorous (insect-eaters). • Lizard skin is shed in pieces as they grow. • These ‘ecotherm’ reptiles must bask in the sun to gain heat to be fully active. • Their tongues can be extended outside the mouth. • The skin is covered with overlapping scales to reduce dehydration. • Lizards are found in deserts, near the ocean, at the Arctic Circle or equator.


GARDEN-PROTECTING BENEFITS Both eat many common garden pests and keep them under control. Geckos eat moths, termites, crickets, beetles, mosquitoes and fish moths. Lizards eat ants, crickets, moths, cockroaches, grasshoppers, caterpillars, flies, snails, slugs, millipedes and isopods.

BE A BUDDY Avoid the use of chemical sprays, as both geckos and lizards are very sensitive to them. If absolutely necessary, only spot spray the affected plant. If a poisoned insect (killed by insecticide) is eaten, it will poison and kill the lizard too. Cats and dogs can catch them, so discourage this when you are home to save these little garden protectors.

23


IN THE KITCHEN

RECIPE: COURTESY OF CHEF LOUISE GILLETT OF BARTHOLOMEUS KLIP. FOR MORE VISIT THE FOOD ROUTES INTERACTIVE WEBSITE ON WWW.FOODROUTES.CO.ZA PHOTOGRAPHY: SUPPLIED

An apple a day … Apple and cinnamon turnovers DIRECTIONS 1. Peel the apples and grate. Put the grated apples in a wide saucepan with the sugar, butter, lemon juice, mixed spice and vanilla pods. 2. Cook over a medium to low heat for 30 minutes, until the apples are just soft and glossy. Remove the vanilla pods. Set the apple filling aside until it has cooled down. 3. Roll out your store-bought puff pastry (thawed) on a floured surface and cut out large rounds with a cookie cutter. 4. Place filling in the centre, fold the pastry over to form a half-moon, and then draw the two corners together to form a rounded bonnet shape. 5. Press tightly to seal. Brush with egg wash on top and sprinkle with cinnamon sugar. 6. Bake for 20 minutes at 180°C or until golden brown.

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INGREDIENTS • 1 packet puff pastry • Egg wash • Cinnamon sugar for dusting APPLE FILLING • • • • • •

Juice of one lemon 8 large apples 300g castor sugar 50g unsalted butter 2 vanilla pods 1 teaspoon mixed spice


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HORSE CARE

Annual jabs Keeping track of your shots

K

eeping your horse safe is undoubtedly at the top of your priority list. According to equine veterinarian Dr Emma Alsop of Baker and McVeigh Equine Hospital, vaccinating regularly and correctly is the first step in preventing a variety of dread diseases.

26

ABOUT VACCINATIONS A vaccination stimulates an immune response against a specific disease. It is necessary to have a programme of vaccinations to ensure maximum protection. However, warns Dr Alsop, it is important to keep in mind that vaccinations are not 100% effective in preventing your

TEXT: PETA DANIEL PHOTOGRAPHY: SUPPLIED

horse from contracting the disease you are vaccinating against. Thankfully, “symptoms will be milder in vaccinated horses than in nonvaccinated horses, with fewer deaths and less spread of the disease,” says Dr Alsop.

WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF VACCINES? The most common side effects include mild muscle stiffness, swelling or reaction at the site of the injection and, less commonly, some muscle wasting.

WHO SHOULD BE VACCINATED? Every horse should be vaccinated, regardless of his discipline, age, purpose or area. Competition horses in particular must be vaccinated against influenza and African Horse Sickness (AHS) according to the regulations of the event committee or organisation. Usually, presentation of an updated, signed vaccination certificate is necessary.

CAN I STILL RIDE MY HORSE? After most vaccinations, it’s a good idea to allow a bit of time for stress reduction. Heavy exercise up to 48 hours after vaccinating is not advisable as it will increase the chance of an adverse reaction. “During AHS vaccinations, the horse should be kept in only very light work, especially through the second week post vaccination,” advises Dr Alsop. “It is not uncommon following AHS

vaccination for horses to have a temperature and/or filled legs.” VACCINATING FOALS The foal’s vaccination requirements depend upon the vaccination history of the mare, explains Dr Alsop. If the mare was correctly vaccinated throughout pregnancy, the foal will receive the correct antibodies, which will protect him for the first few months of his life. At between five and seven months the foal should start a vaccination programme, which should include a combined influenza and tetanus course of shots: two boosters between 21 and 90 days apart followed by a third about six months later. Routine vaccinations can follow.


Previously unvaccinated adults must do a primary course of two injections four weeks apart followed by a booster at six months for influenza and West Nile virus. SOME OF THE DISEASES YOU CAN VACCINATE AGAINST: Influenza This major disease causes flu-like symptoms and is constantly appearing in new strains, making it difficult to protect against. Tetanus Tetanus occurs when bacteria found in soil enter the horse’s bloodstream via an open wound. It doesn’t matter how small the wound is, the bacteria can still enter. The incubation period for the illness is seven to 21 days, meaning the wound is likely to have healed by the time the first symptoms become apparent. If the wound is small, you may not even know that your horse had a wound to begin with. “Approximately 90% of unvaccinated horses who develop tetanus die,” says Dr Alsop. You should vaccinate against tetanus at least every two years. You can combine this vaccination with the flu vaccination. Strangles Symptoms of this highly contagious bacterial disease include nasal discharge, fever, swollen lymph nodes,

depression and loss of appetite. “The strangles vaccine is given as an injection into the upper lip and should be given every six to 12 months,” says Dr Alsop. It should be repeated at times of high risk of disease outbreaks. Equine herpesvirus (EHV) Equine herpes is highly contagious and can cause abortion in pregnant mares. “It is usually recommended that only broodmares and horses in race training
are vaccinated against herpes,” states Dr Alsop. African Horse Sickness (AHS) AHS is a highly infectious, vector-born viral disease which occurs naturally on the African continent. The Culicoides midge spreads the virus. “By way of the Animal Diseases Act (Act No 35 of 1984), AHS has been declared a statecontrolled disease, thereby empowering the state to implement measures to control the disease,” says Dr Alsop. “The Act requires that all equines (horses, donkeys and mules) be vaccinated at least once a year with an approved AHS vaccine. “Ideally vaccinate during the low vector activity period (June to October). This ensures that optimal vaccine immunity is provided during the highrisk periods of March and April. This increased vaccine coverage will reduce the

Influenza causes flu-like symptoms and is constantly appearing in new strains, making it difficult to protect against

impact of outbreaks and the risks of the rapid spread of the disease in high-risk periods,” advises Dr Alsop. Rabies Rabies is an invariably fatal disease that has a low incidence in horses. The vaccine stimulates rapid and excellent immunity. Horses should be vaccinated annually, while pregnant mares must be vaccinated four to six weeks before foaling. Foals must be vaccinated from six months of age. Botulism Symptoms of botulism include the inability to swallow, leading to paralysis and death. “There are conflicting thoughts on whether to vaccinate for botulism or not,” says
Dr Alsop. “Reactions are common and can be severe. The vaccine available only covers for some of the strains of botulism toxins, so it is not a complete vaccine. Whether to vaccinate or not has to be considered carefully and each horse’s individual status considered. Some insurance policies may

also be affected by botulism vaccine status. It is advised that botulism vaccination is discussed carefully with the owner’s own veterinarian.” VACCINATING STUD HORSES Mares and stallions must be vaccinated for influenza, tetanus and AHS. West Nile virus vaccinations are recommended. Vaccinate mares for herpes, as this virus can cause abortion. The strangles vaccine should not be used on pregnant or lactating mares. WHICH VACCINATIONS SHOULD MY HORSE GET? The following vaccinations are essential: • Influenza • Tetanus • African Horse Sickness The following vaccinations are optional and should be discussed with your veterinarian: • West Nile virus • Herpesvirus • Strangles • Botulism • Rabies

27


Q&A

Q A

WHAT IS A TRIPLE CROWN IN HORSERACING? Let’s confirm what all Triple Crowns have in common. The first condition is that there are always three races of varying distances involved. Normally, the first race in the series is the shortest and the last is the

longest. However, this is not always the case as can be seen with the American Triple Crown where the shortest race is in the middle. Secondly, they are all restricted to three-year-old horses, normally colts (the fillies have their own Triple Crown, called the Triple Tiara, which we can discuss another time). There have been cases of fillies

competing and winning some of the races of the Triple Crown but, to date, there has not been a female Triple Crown winner. Thirdly, in order to be a Triple Crown winner, the horse is required to win all three races in succession in one year. Since there is an age restriction, they only get one chance to try. Answered by Alex Page

Q A

WHAT ARE SUITABLE NON-EQUINE COMPANIONS FOR HORSES? Horses are social herd animals by nature, so they are happiest when they are in the company of other horses. Due to the owner’s circumstances, a horse may live a solo life but this could lead to problems such as depression and anxiety. Always try to source another horse as a companion for your horse – be it a retiree, a youngster growing up, or a horse who

Q A

WHY ARE ARABIANS THE MOST SUITABLE BREED FOR ENDURANCE? When it comes to the physical and athletic demands of endurance racing, no one does the job better than the Arabian. Arabians prevail in a variety of conditions: unbearable heat, bitter cold, rocky mountains and deep desert sand. They are able to cover vast distances with minimal food, water and rest. The breed’s physical attributes are in favour of the nature of endurance. They’re slight in their size and weight, their bones are dense, they have a

28

deep heart girth and their huge nostrils allow for maximum oxygen intake. They naturally have stamina, their feet are strong and durable, they can carry substantial weight in relation to their size, and they are one of the most intelligent and spirited of all horse breeds. This combination of a balanced body, natural athleticism and competitive mind make for the ultimate endurance competitor. Careful breeding has improved these desirable traits without losing any of the breed’s quality, and therefore Arabians have

only improved in their performance and athletic ability. Whether they are racing across deserts or

mountain ranges, Arabians have always been at the forefront of endurance competition.


can never be ridden. These are low-maintenance options who will make for a perfect buddy. Even Miniatures or ponies would be suitable. If another horse is not on the cards, goats and sheep are your next best options. They are fellow herbivores,

and they also find safety in numbers. Cows aren’t a bad idea either, but they’re as high maintenance as horses, so you’ll likely not be looking for one of those. Strangely enough, donkeys and horses don’t always get on well together, even though they’re the most closely related. Cats and dogs who are raised with horses often make for wonderful companions and it’s not unheard of to see a stable cat cuddling up to a horse. The only downside to these companions is that they don’t share the same herd-like need as horses, and they certainly don’t spend their days grazing. Cats especially are wanderers and that might leave your horse feeling alone for a lot of the day.

Q

WHAT ARE THE CHANCES OF SURVIVAL FOR A PREMATURE FOAL AND HOW DO YOU GO ABOUT CARING FOR HIM? Premature foals are at greater risk of developing septicaemia, an infection of the blood, and prompt veterinary attention to all premature foals is highly recommended. Survival depends on many factors, but early veterinary attention increases the chances of survival. Most foals are hospitalised to improve the prognosis for survival. A quick physical examination and further diagnostics can help formulate a more accurate prognosis. Answered by Fourways Equine Clinic

A

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Hor$es 4 sale WANT TO ADVERTISE YOUR HORSE FOR FREE? Contact hac@panorama.co.za. See below for our advert format, and don’t forget to send us a highres image!

Five-year-old grey Warmblood mare by Udokes. Winner of YHPS Four-year-old Potential Showjumper 2017 and was voted top SA Bred Warmblood by Canadian judge. Eventing, working hunter, equitation, dressage and 1m showjumping. This young horse has not put a foot wrong since backing. POA. Contact Laverne on 082 490 3131.

16.3hh Warmblood mare for sale. Concorde/ Carrick. Winner of all major Open equitation and Open working hunter titles. Also graded for Elementary dressage and 1.30m SJ. POA. Contact Laverne on 082 490 3131.

Warmblood gelding by Dageraad Axel, standing 16.1hh. Currently competing in Novice dressage with points, and schooled EM at home. Level-headed with a clean jump, full of scope! Asking R75,000. Contact 071 487 7374.

Redemption for sale. Warmblood mare by Rademus (Burgraff) currently competing in the 1m classes with points for 1.10m. Clean show record! Huge scope. POA. Contact 071 487 7374.

Your horse’s photo here 50 words max

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Warmblood gelding (2011) by Peter Pan standing 16.1hh and currently competing in the 1m classes. Huge scope. POA. Contact 071 487 7374.

Send us details about your horse’s gender, age, height, colour, breed, sire and dam. Email details to hac@panorama.co.za. Include a short description about his experience or level. Remember to include an asking price, location, contact name and number.

For all the trail riders out there – Azhar is up for half bait! Very talented, great on outrides and a fun ride for a confident rider. Standing at SA Trails JHB, with access to Northern Farms. Can join weekly guided trail rides with SA Trails every Saturday and Sunday. R1,350. Contact lalique.v@gmail. com for more info.


Grey WB gelding for sale. Six-year-old (Parco x Uron M) standing 15.3hh. Great allrounder and confidence-giving ride. Ideal junior or small lady’s ride. Brave and never spooky. Hacks out alone or in groups, very good doer, barefoot and easy to box. POA. Contact Charlotte on 083 368 0222.

M’bela Midnight Run. Five-year-old Namibian Warmblood (Davetsaub Meteor x Lecture) standing over 16.2hh. Confident youngster who is turning into a great all-rounder. Jumping tracks of 90cm and shows promising movement. Scopey and careful jump. Hacks out, loads easily, barefoot and good doer. Asking R180,000. Contact Charlotte on 083 368 0222.

Photographer: Kim Gorn

Warmblood mare (2012) sired by Zonjati Nicander (Consuelo). Currently standing 16.3hh and competing in the 90cm classes with scope to go higher. Level-headed and easy to ride! POA. Contact 071 487 7374.

Kerstin Garbade on Voigtskirch Avartar www.namibian-warmblood-horses.com

31


CALENDAR Do you want your event listed here? Email hac@panorama.co.za with your event name, date and venue.

Events calendar What’s happening in the area?

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Date

Event

Venue

24 March to 2 April

Nissan Easter Festival

Kyalami Park Club

2 April

Training show

Fourways Riding Centre

7-8 April

All grades showjumping

Penbritte Equestrian Centre

14 April

60cm to 1.30m showjumping

Maple Ridge Equestrian Centre

14 April

Riders Series Leg 2

32 Mane Road, Sun Valley

14-15 April

Warm-up dressage graded show

Hollyberry Hall

14-15 April

70cm to 1.30m showjumping

Fourways Riding Centre

20-22 April

90cm to 1.40m showjumping

Burlington Stables

22 April

Easter training show

Equidome

26-29 April

Midrand World Cup Qualifier

Kyalami Park Club

28-29 April

Pro/Amm Series Leg 2

Fourways Riding Centre

1 May

60cm to 1.30m showjumping

Maple Ridge Equestrian Centre

1 May

Training show

Fourways Riding Centre

5 May

Training show

Kyalami Park Club

5 May

SA Indoor Champs

Equidome

5-6 May

Riders Series Leg 3

32 Mane Road, Sun Valley

11-13 May

DSA Challenge

Eaton Farm

11-13 May

90cm to 1.40m showjumping

Burlington Stables

19-20 May

All grades showjumping

Kyalami Park Club

26 May

All grades showjumping

Fourways Riding Centre


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The iconic ‘thunder lizard’, Brontosaurus, used its long neck to pluck leaves from high up in the canopy. It must have eaten hundreds of kilograms of plants every day to fuel its huge body.

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VOL 01 ISSUE 02 2018

STUDYING

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The Late Cretaceous valleys and plains of western North America would have been alive with the bellows of Parasaurolophus, a duck-billed dinosaur that used its gaudy head crest to make sounds.

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Triceratops is famous for its horns, with one sticking up from the nose and one from above each eye. These plant-eaters probably used their horns to

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HEAVYWEIGHTS

p.30

p.42

TYRANNOSAURUS

TOP

Squeak!

p.14

• Could a sea sponge save your life? • What takes longer to break down: glass or plastic? • How much liquid can your stomach hold? • Sudoku, riddles and crossword inside!

PA

p.8

the human foot

deadliest earthquakes

Cool tech

p.16

p.42

Toe-tally COOL Learn more about

Why are we obsessed with sweets?

Natural disaster The world’s

• How did 6 regular people get to space? • What is Mars One? • Who was the first African space tourist?

PLUS!

• Amazing LEGO facts • Drones and 3D printers • Death by digging • Weird stuff about your body • How magic tricks our brains

p.16

EDITION 02

ASTRONOTS!

EEEK! BRING THIS BUG TO LIFE USING AUGMENTED REALITY! p.40 THE WORLD’S TALLEST BUILDINGS

EYE SPY HOW MUCH DO YOU

growing young minds

p.6

SADC countries: R30.70 (Excl. TAX)

Growing young minds

How close are we to living on Mars?

EDITION 03

CANDY CRUSH

Floating cities

One-way ticket? BIG BANG

Fast and furious Hurricane facts

The Lego Ninjago Movie DVD

• WHEN AND HOW WAS IT BUILT? • CAN IT REALLY BE SEEN FROM SPACE? • HOW LONG IS IT?

PLUS!

Learn how stars are born p.6

Stegosaurus has one of the most recognisable profiles of any dinosaur. It probably used the plates on its back as display billboards, and the sharp spikes on its tail to ward off predators.

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AFRIC A LARG ’S EST PET EVEN T

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Horse & country 07 all  

Bounce Your Way To A Stronger Horse Lizards In Your Garden Your Horse’s Annual Jabs Pull-out Poster Two Delicious Baking Recipes Fun Activi...

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