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ISSN: 2041-3653

Autumn/Winter 2011

DefenDer

Peru bans wild animal circuses New UK laws on animal experiments Exposed: Stun guns used on animal movie stars Rescue News â—? Research Without Animals


ANIMAL DEFENDER ISSN: 2041-3653 published by Animal Defenders International incorporating The Campaigner, published by the National Anti-Vivisection Society

UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LoNDoN, SW1P 4QP, U.K. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 Fax: +44 (0)20 7828 2179 e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

© Tim Phillips / Animal Defenders International

Editorial

Welcome to the winter 2011 Animal Defender. As we look forward to the Christmas season, we anticipate the challenge ahead as the Coalition Government decides the fate of laboratory animals. The public consultation on the new legislation to bring the European Directive into law in the UK has closed and the proposals will be announced next spring. We’re pressing for major changes on freedom of information and public accountability. There’ll be lots you can do to lobby for the animals next year.

USA: 6100 Wilshire Blvd., # 1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048, USA Tel: +1 323-935-2234 Fax: +1 323-935-9234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org web: www.adiusa.org

We’ve followed up on the story of Anne, the elephant we exposed being beaten at the winter quarters of Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus earlier this year. Papers have now been laid for a prosecution.

South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. e-mail: contacto@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org/adi_south_america

The circus issue has been one of our greatest UK political battles. Following years of promises from both the previous government and this, MPs got fed up with waiting and no less than two debates were tabled in parliament. A vigorous backbenchers debate resulted in a resounding call for a ban on wild animals in circuses. This one is not yet safely in our grasp.

editors: Creamer/Phillips Design: Creamer/Phillips/Elson Cartoons: Paul Taylor Contributors: Jan Creamer; Tim Phillips; Alexandra Cardenas; Phil Buckley; Christina Dodkin; Thomas England; Jessamy Korotoga; Lisa Mitchinson.

Sadly, this year we said goodbye to poor Rhanee, the lonely old female elephant people saw so terrified as she was beaten at the winter quarters of Mary Chipperfield Promotions in 1997.

©2011 ADI. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced for commercial purposes by any means whatsoever without the written permission of ADI/NAVS.

The stories of hope to end our year were the arrival of Tina, a companion for Tilin, the lonely Hamadryas baboon from the Bolivian circus. There was joy for the 29 lions from Bolivian circuses at their new homes in the US. Peru quickly followed Bolivia with a ban on animal circuses, and we have measures tabled in Brazil and Colombia.

ANIMAL DEFENDERS INTERNATIONAL: Founded 1990. To educate, create awareness, and promote the interest of humanity in the cause of justice, and the suppression of all forms of cruelty to animals; wherever possible, to alleviate suffering, and to conserve and protect animals and their environment. NATIONAL ANTI-VIVISECTION SOCIETY: Founded 1875; the world’s premier anti-vivisection group. Millions of animals suffer and die in cruel, unscientific, and futile experiments. The NAVS advocates the total prohibition of all animal experiments, and, pending the achievement of this aim, we may support partial measures which would provide steps towards reform.

Thank you so much for your support throughout the year, which continues to inspire us. May the holiday season bring peace to you and yours, and of course a better future for the animals we all fight so hard for. Jan Creamer, Chief Executive

LORD DOWDING FUND: Founded 1974; a department of the NAVS; sponsors non-animal scientific and medical research.

Where there’s a WILL there’s a WAY to help suffering animals If you knew animals were being abused, could you rest in peace? Sadly, throughout their lives, the last thing many animals experience is peace. Toto the chimpanzee, for example, was imprisoned in a circus for 25 years and forced to perform tricks and smoke cigarettes for people’s entertainment. He was one of the lucky ones because he was rescued by Animal Defenders International (ADI) and returned home to Africa where he now lives with his own kind. ADI is a major international force in animal protection. Please help us to help other animals like Toto to live in peace by making a bequest today to Animal Defenders International.

If you believe in reincarnation there are some animals you wouldn’t want to be. Imagine a life imprisoned in a cramped cage, subjected to constant experimentation; a lifetime of suffering followed by a painful death. That’s the cruel, futile fate suffered by millions of laboratory animals in the name of research. The National Anti-Vivisection Society is the world’s premier and leading group working to end the suffering of animals in laboratories. We lobby Parliament; produce scientific reports, educational materials and videos; conduct undercover investigations and expose law breaking. We fund nonanimal scientific research. Please help us to help laboratory animals by making a bequest to the National Anti-Vivisection Society.

Help finance an evolution. Will you leave a lasting legacy of compassion, and help scientific advancement? The Lord Dowding Fund finances scientific and medical research without the use of animals. We believe that cruel animal techniques have no place in 21st century science. We have supported major advances in many fields, including neuroscience, cancer research and safety testing – we developed a humane British Standard Test for the toxicity of dental fillings. Your legacy could help save the lives of animals and advance scientific research. Help finance an evolution in medical science and leave a lasting legacy with a bequest today to the Lord Dowding Fund.

For a free guide to making a Will and helping animals, call us today on 020 7630 3340

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www.ldf.org.uk NAVS & ADI


EU Lab Rules Campaign

ADI & NAVS

UK lab rules update As reported in recent issues of Animal Defender, the UK government is currently re-drafting legislation on animal experiments following the adoption of a new european Directive, 2010/63/eU. The 25 year old Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986 will be replaced with new rules based on the principles laid down in the Directive. european Member States can choose to either adopt the bare minimum of standards in the Directive, or they can

maintain the UK’s higher standards, where they exist. NAVS is campaigning hard to maintain these standards, but also for stricter measures in key areas. NAVS has met with Home Office minister Lynne Featherstone, held several consultation meetings with officials, and participated in a Home Office public consultation (see overleaf). An important part of our lobbying of both the UK Government and MPs is for the introduction of specific mechanisms to

Above: ADI Chief Executive Jan Creamer and Caroline Lucas MP with ADI’s giant inflatable beagle outside Parliament; Below: The Cutting Edge mobile billboard goes to Westminster.

© National Anti Vivisection Society

The NAVS’ Kick Animal Testing Out of the House campaign has been long and hard-fought: having achieved a UK ban on cosmetics testing in 1998, followed by a full Europe-wide phase-out from 2009 which is on-going, we’ve been steadily making progress. Another step forward came in July when the government announced its commitment to ending the testing of household products on animals. Similar to the great ape and cosmetics bans, the government intends to use licensing powers provided under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. However, they intend to consult with companies currently using animals to establish the anticipated “economic impact”, as well as speaking to other stakeholders on the issue. This is a positive sign from the Coalition Government at a time when the testing of household products on animals in the UK is relatively low. It seems unlikely that there would be a significant economic impact on the industry, given that in 2010 only 24 animals were used, and none at all in 2009. The public backing for such a ban is huge. As we have seen many times in the past, however, a commitment is by no means a done deal. NAVS will be working to secure the best possible outcome for animals, and encourage the government to make the changes as quickly as possible.

© National Anti Vivisection Society

Household testing ban commitment

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© National Anti-Vivisection Society

© National Anti-Vivisection Society

© National Anti-Vivisection Society

UK Lab Rules Campaign

replace the use of animals in research and testing and also, where animals are used, for greater protection of laboratory animals and restrictions on their use. One of these measures would be the introduction of a system of thematic review of specific animal experiments or animal use. Therefore we pressed for inclusion of a question on ‘thematic reviews’ of animal experiments in the public consultation, which was subsequently included. Thematic review is an important stepwise approach to the replacement of the use of animals in research and testing. It would allow binding targets to be set, which has proved to be effective in other areas, for example testing of cosmetics on animals (more on thematic review below).

Ten key policy targets

Below: Our campaign postcards and consultation answer guide.

The NAVS has described ‘top ten’ key steps we are urging the Coalition Government to take, and for MPs to support, which would move UK legislation toward the principal goal of Directive

2010/63/EU, which is: “full replacement of procedures on live animals for scientific and educational purposes”. These ten simple demands would, if adopted by the government, show a real commitment to phasing out the use of animals in laboratories:● Ban animal testing of household products. ● No weakening of the UK’s existing animal protection measures; where we have stricter measures, these must be maintained. ● Commit to replacing experiments conducted on monkeys in UK laboratories. ● End the capture of wild monkeys by laboratory dealers. ● Set clear limits on the pain laboratory animals are allowed to suffer. ● Increase the transparency of decision making and public accountability on animal experiments, before permission is granted for animal use. ● Increase compulsory data sharing to prevent unnecessary experiments.

● Establish a UK co-ordinating body to

both develop and validate non-animal replacement methods. ● Ensure the effective implementation of non-animal methods – if these are available, they must be used. ● Institute a system of regular ‘thematic reviews’ of specific animal experiments or uses of animals – all stakeholders to be involved (including NAVS), to examine candidate experiments and set deadlines for replacement.

Government Consultation The three-month Home Office public consultation provided the opportunity for input and opinions on the government’s plans. The responses to the consultation will feed into the final proposals that the minister will lay before parliament. Responses from expert groups such as NAVS, Lord Dowding Fund and ADI, as well as members of the public, were invited and we provided supporters with postcards and letters to enable them to contribute to the consultation, as well as write to their MP to press for a full parliamentary and public debate once proposals are laid before parliament.

Will there be public debate? An extremely important matter for debate will be the method the Coalition Government chooses to transpose the provisions of Directive 2010/63/EU into UK law.

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© National Anti-Vivisection Society

UK Lab Rules Campaign

Currently, the Home Office has indicated that government lawyers are considering the use of the European Communities Act, which would allow the minister to write the legislation and place it before parliament as ‘secondary legislation’ (or statutory instrument); this means that parliament would not be permitted to debate each provision of the legislation. parliament would only be allowed a ‘yes/no’ vote. This would also have the effect of shutting down a good deal of public input and debate. The NAVS is pressing for the minister to introduce the legislation in such a way so as to allow public and parliamentary input and full discussion of the new law. The government’s lawyers are looking at the options and plan to make a recommendation to ministers by the end of 2011, with legislation to follow in the spring of 2012. The deadline for the transposition of the Directive into UK law is November 2012, and all EU Member States will have to apply the provisions as of 1st January 2013. The suffering of animals in research is highly controversial and arouses enormous public concern. It is vital that MPs and public have the opportunity to comment on the proposals.

ADI & NAVS

In June, east Riding Council refused planning permission for Yorkshirebased B&K Universal to erect new buildings for breeding beagle dogs for use in experiments, citing traffic concerns surrounding the site. NAVS objected to the proposal and alerted our supporters to write to the Council. We presented oral evidence to the planning committee, highlighting that the application was against the thrust of the new European rules on animal testing (Directive 2010/63/EU), which emphasise that animal experiments should be replaced with advanced technology. We also mentioned that the Home Office statistics show that science is moving away from testing on dogs: the number of procedures on beagles in the UK had dropped from 7,317 in 1999 to 5,864 in 2009, thus the economic future of the facility was already compromised and unlikely to create sustainable jobs. In addition to animal suffering, we outlined the scientific case, including species differences between dogs and humans which make data taken from them unreliable for application to human medicine, for instance there is no obvious canine equivalent of human type 2 diabetes. We concluded by

saying that there is also very strong local public concern due to noise, nuisance, smells, contamination and depreciation of property due to the bad publicity, amongst others. We understand that B&K has appealed the decision. NAVS has responded to the claims made in their appeal.

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Above: Many supporters and campaigners gathered at East Riding Council offices for the meeting where NAVS presented oral evidence to the committee.


© W. Turner Webster / ADI

Campaign News

Thank you Wendy! TV presenter, author and long-time ADI supporter, Wendy Turner Webster, showed her support for ADI’s work by giving a series of talks on a Fred olsen Mediterranean cruise. Armed with ADI leaflets, Wendy made a presentation to an appreciative audience, speaking on our campaigns for animals and our dramatic rescues. We are extremely grateful for Wendy’s support, and are also glad to learn that ‘us veggies’ are very well catered for on Fred Olsen cruises.

Abuse of Anne the elephant at Bobby Roberts

© www.thesun.co.uk

A man was gored to death at a Spanish fiesta after taunting a bull with a pink umbrella. The bull attacked the man shortly after its release into a narrow street. The total population of California condors, a species once nearly extinct, was expected to reach 400 by summer 2011, the highest on record since the 1920s. This is due in part to captive breeding in zoos. Many have been reintroduced to the wild, making the wild population approximately 180. American researchers used monkeys to show that eating a high fat diet during pregnancy increases the risk of stillbirth. Twenty-four pregnant Japanese macaques were fed a diet comprised of either 32% or 14% of calories from fat, over a period of at least four years.

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In March, ADI’s exposé of the beating of Anne the elephant and other animals at Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus winter quarters in Polebrook, Northamptonshire, caused a storm of media pressure and public outrage. Images and video swept around the world and opened the eyes of millions to hidden circus suffering. The resulting pressure finally compelled Mr & Mrs Roberts to hand Anne over for retirement. In May, Roberts also handed over Monty the camel to a UK wildlife park. This means that Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus is now wild animal free, but the ponies and horses remain. As a result of the pressure, the Roberts made a private arrangement to allow Anne to retire to Longleat, a proposal which ADI and other groups backed on the basis that it was an immediate place

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of safety where Anne could receive veterinary attention. Her state of health could then be improved while options were considered for her long-term care at a specialist sanctuary.

EXPOSED! They thought no one was watching but ADI caught the evidence of abuse on video at the beginning of this year.

© Animal Defenders International

A novel adenovirus has been shown to jump from animals to humans — and then to infect other humans. The team that discovered it found that the first human to be infected was the researcher in closest contact with the Titi monkeys that suffered an outbreak.

NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

Anne’s condition has improved enormously in the past few months. Her arthritis medication has improved her mobility and her activity around the enclosure is much improved. She plays

ADI & NAVS

in a small pool and dustbathes in a sand heap. This, together with regular brushing and bathing by keepers, has improved her skin enormously. Whereas before, she was chained to one spot 24 hours a day in the winter quarters, Longleat assures everyone that Anne is now only chained for veterinary and skin care – about 30 minutes a day. It was acknowledged from the outset that facilities at Longleat are rudimentary – they have not held elephants for over a decade and the building is outdated. Anne has a basic paddock and night quarters which are shared with a rhino; so the animals must take turns in using the outdoor facilities. Our greatest concern is that she is still alone and remains on public display; it’s not the kind of retirement that we would have chosen for her. We will continue to monitor Anne’s progress as well as Longleat’s plans for her, as we are cognisant that she has brought the Park huge donations and increased visitors, which will surely be a factor for a commercial operation when considering her permanent home. For now, the sun on her back, a few logs, a shallow pool, a sandpit, and freedom to move must be a welcome break for her. ADI’s legal team has assembled a file and laid charges for the prosecution of Moira and Bobby Roberts under the Animal Welfare Act 2006. An initial hearing of the case is expected by the end of the year.

EXPOSED!

HELP US TO DO MORE!

Anne, with Bobby Roberts Super Circus in 2002.

Help us to expose animal abuse – consider giving a donation to fund our undercover investigations. Without these investigations, the animals will continue to suffer in silence. Thank you

More than a year after the catastrophic BP oil spill in the gulf of Mexico, studies show that the mortality rate for dolphins, narwhals, whales and turtles are still about 50% higher than normal, as evidenced by the bodies of animals found on shore. A restaurant in Los Angeles painted a donkey pink as a publicity stunt to increase business for Cinco de Mayo; instead of improving business, protesters organised a boycott. Rhinos have a new saviour in a treatment for their horns that is harmless to them, but affects anyone that consumes it. The treatment is a mixture of drugs normally used to kill parasites living on the surface of the host, and has been developed by the Rhino and Lion Reserve in Kromdraai, north-west of Johannesburg. It is not lethal to humans, but causes unpleasant symptoms. Added to the mixture is a neon pink indelible dye that shows up on X-ray scanners at airports. Sarah, a sick 54-year old elephant at the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus collapsed while attempting to climb the ramp up to the train after the last performance in Anaheim, California. ADI has filed a complaint with the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) demanding an investigation of the incident in August, supported by several witness statements. The complaint seeks the seizure and retirement of Sarah from the circus.

© A. Sanghvi

© Animal Defenders International

Campaign News

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Campaign News At the Animal Rights National Conference in LA in July, US Campaigns Director Matt Rossell participated on the ‘State of the Movement’ panel, discussing our vivisection and circus campaigns in the US. He also discussed ADI’s undercover work on the ‘Conducting Investigations’ panel, which was met with great enthusiasm. At our booth in the exhibition hall, we showed our undercover footage of behind-the-scenes elephant abuse during training at Have Trunk Will Travel, and distributed leaflets and magazines. The event was attended by over 1000 activists and we met a large number of people interested in joining our campaigns.

Right: US Campaigns Director Matt Rossell speaks at the Animal Rights National Conference.

© Animal Defenders International

ADI stand (far right).

© Animal Defenders International

Animal Rights National Conference

Following the Conference, we partnered with Los Angeles restaurant ‘Vegan Grill’ to hold a fundraiser for ADI – raising almost $1,000. A success all round!

Animal Test Figures 2010 The “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals” for 2010 were published by the Home office in July. The report revealed that over 3.7 million experiments were undertaken on animals in the UK last year and that the number of animals used had risen since 2009 by 101,265 (3%) to 3,642,517. The statistics provide an insight into the shockingly high level of animal testing in the UK, and calls into question the government’s claims that animals are only used when absolutely necessary.

In 2010, a total of 4,688 procedures were carried out on non-human primates in the UK, representing an overall increase of 10%. A closer look at the figures also reveals that the number of procedures on new world primates (i.e. marmosets, tamarins) has increased from 619 to 1,103 – an appalling rise of 78%. Other trends included a 6% increase in the number of tests to produce genetically modified (GM) and harmful mutant (HM) animals, to over 1.6 million procedures. Experiments involving GM and HM animals now make up 54% of all tests, raising many welfare concerns.

Other notable changes included a rise in the number of procedures conducted without the use of anaesthesia to 69%, up from 67% in 2009. Animal use in universities continued to rise, with a 10% increase in the numbers of procedures for fundamental research. For the first time since 2008, animals were used for household product tests (24 animals). However, the Coalition Government has since pledged to end the testing of household products on animals (see page 3).

2009 total primates

4,263

2010

2010

new world primates

total primates

4,688

2009 new world primates

619

1,103

© National Anti-Vivisection Society

PRIMATe USe

References: 1. Home Office (2011) “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals: Great Britain 2010” - http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/science-research-statistics/research-statistics/scienceresearch/spanimals10/spanimals10?view=Binary (Accessed 08/08/11). 2. Home Office (2010) “Statistics of Scientific Procedures on Living Animals: Great Britain 2009” http://www.homeoffice.gov.uk/publications/ science-research-statistics/research-statistics/science-research/spanimals09/spanimals09?view=Binary (Accessed 08/08/11). 3. NAVS 2011 “The NAVS condemns the rise in UK animal experiments” http://www.navs.org.uk/about_vivisection/27/46/2208/ (Accessed 08/08/11).

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NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Parliament votes for ban A political storm followed our exposé of Bobby Roberts Super Circus, resulting in a vital step towards an end to wild animal circuses. Our exposé of the suffering of 57-year-old elephant Anne at the Bobby Roberts Super Circus, as she was repeatedly beaten and kicked, brought home the reality of life in UK circuses and jolted the political establishment into action. We sent the footage to all MPs and Defra ministers demanding an immediate ban, and, after receiving droves of letters from ADI supporters, over 200 MPs signed Early Day Motion 403 calling for a ban – making it the second most signed EDM in the animal welfare category. ADI Ambassador Brian Blessed and MPs visited 10 Downing Street to urge the Prime Minister to support a ban; this was followed with letters from celebrities including Ricky Gervais and Brian May. Meanwhile, our supporters got active, distributing leaflets, and protesting outside Bobby Roberts Super Circus.

Making the case for a ban After weeks of media speculation, on 13 May, Defra announced it would not be banning wild animals in circuses but, instead, would introduce a licensing system. They claimed there was a pending legal case against Austria for an “attempt” to ban wild animals in circuses, making it impossible to proceed. ADI’s Stop Circus Suffering campaign is active around the world, and our team had followed the situation in Austria. The case cited had been heard before the European Commission and closed in 2006; the European Ombudsman had reviewed and rejected it in 2010. We contacted the Austrian Constitutional Court and the Court of Justice of the European Union, and confirmed that

ADI & NAVS

there was no case currently being heard. Defra’s statement was inaccurate. We quickly distributed a briefing on the inaccuracy of the ministerial announcement and, on 18 May, held a meeting with the minister Lord Henley, together with MPs Mark Pritchard and Neil Parish, to discuss how best to proceed. We were determined that the facts be laid before parliament. A few days later, a highly charged debate took place in the House of Commons, during which the Defra minister Jim Paice MP was put under intense pressure to explain the government’s position. He admitted that his comments about the legal case were incorrect and that no proceedings were active in the Austrian court, although he insisted a case was in preparation. He also suggested that a ban might be illegal under the European Services Directive and may also breach the UK’s Human Rights Act. ADI instructed our lawyers to research the claims. Their advice again concluded that an outright ban would not be in breach of the European Convention on Human Rights, the UK Human Rights Act 1998 nor the European Union Services Directive. The legal opinions were distributed to Defra, to ministers and to all MPs. We saw no justification for refusing a ban.

Victory!? By early June, MPs from all parties were calling for a debate – this resulted in both an adjournment debate and a special backbench committee debate, including a vote on a motion urging Defra to ban animals in circuses. We provided

briefings for MPs on the main legal and political aspects of a ban. On the day of the backbenchers’ debate, dozens of ADI supporters travelled to London to lobby their MPs. Hours before the debate was due to start, it became clear that the government was applying serious pressure on MPs to vote against the motion. Mark Pritchard MP, one of the key organisers of the debate, announced that he had been contacted by Downing Street to force him to drop the debate. We were up against a Prime Minister personally opposed to a ban, flying in the face of the conclusions of Defra’s examination of the issue. Nevertheless, MPs voted unanimously for a ban!

Urgent action alert Alhough a huge boost to our campaign, this decision is not binding on the government and ministers immediately cited “legal obstacles” as the reason for not introducing an immediate ban. Possibly encouraged by the controversy, we understand that Circus Krone may be attempting to re-submit the case in Austria. Please write to your MP and Defra, requesting that they respect the will of the House of Commons, and the nation, and implement a ban without delay.

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Above: ADI supporters join MPs (Bob Russell, Zac Goldsmith, Mark Pritchard, Gavin Shuker, Mary Creagh, Jim Fitzpatrick, Neil Parish) and ADI Ambassador and celebrity designer Meg Mathews with Zac Goldsmith outside Parliament before the debate and vote in June. Below: The giant postcard presented to 10 Downing Street by ADI Ambassador Brian Blessed and crossparty MPs; Our Parliamentary Briefing for the vote.


Campaign News

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Torn from the wild in Thailand, and sold to Mary Chippperfield in 1970 – Rhanee endured a life of suffering all too typical of the entertainment industry

Above from top: Rhanee with Santus Circus, where she was viciously hooked and hit; Rhanee and Costa (in the foreground) at Valwo Zoo; Rhanee at Wroclaw Zoo last year.

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Rhanee, the elephant that caught the heart of the nation following ADI’s exposé of the UK circus industry in 1998, has passed away. Rhanee was torn from the wild in Thailand in 1970 and sold to Mary Chipperfield. By the 1990s Rhanee was one of many animals being hired to circuses and for private events by Mary Chipperfield Promotions. In 1996, an ADI field officer working undercover at Santus Circus filmed Rhanee chained by the legs and being viciously hooked and hit with a bullhook. But worse was to come. An ADI team infiltrated the Mary Chipperfield Promotions winter quarters in Hampshire from 1997 to 1998 and filmed horrifying abuse. Five elephants, including Rhanee, did not leave a barn for months and were systematically beaten on hundreds of occasions. ADI’s investigation shocked the world, and led to a huge public outcry. The UK animal circus industry halved within six months. ADI launched criminal prosecutions against Mary Chipperfield, her husband Roger Cawley, and elephant keeper Steve Gills. Gills was jailed for cruelty in 1998 and the Cawleys convicted and fined in 1999. Mary Chipperfield Promotions closed down and Rhanee was secretly sold. ADI scoured Europe and finally tracked her down to Valwo Zoo in Valladolid, Spain. Rhanee stood alone in a small, barren pen, repeatedly bobbing her head. We launched a campaign in Spain and the UK to ‘Give Rhanee a Break’ which secured huge public support. We negotiated with the zoo to try to free her. However, she was a valuable asset and, although the pressure secured improvements to Rhanee’s enclosure, they refused to set her free. A female elephant named Costa was introduced and, after Costa’s death, a male named Toto. When ADI learnt that Valwo Zoo was to close, we again offered to relocate both elephants to ARK2000 in California. Unfortunately the zoo sent her to Wroclaw Zoo in Poland to end her days. Rhanee was euthanised on 30th July 2011 suffering from liver failure. She was 41 years old.

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© Animal Defenders International

Farewell to Rhanee


Kari Johnson, the other Have Trunk Will Travel co-founder gives an elephant a taste of a bullhook as opposed to a marshmallow

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

gary Johnson, cofounder of Have Trunk Will Travel, electric shocks Tai while she performs a headstand.

Joanne Smith, on-set trainer with Tai during filming of Water for elephants, at Have Trunk Will Travel giving an elephant massive electric shocks with a stun gun.

Movie Star Electric Shocked

Water for Elephants.... and electric shocks and bullhooks.... Water for Elephants is a romantic drama set in a 1930s animal circus in the USA, starring Reese Witherspoon and Robert Pattinson. The biggest star of the film is 45-year-old Asian elephant Tai, who plays Rosie, provided by the performing animal supplier Have Trunk Will Travel, of California. In the film the elephant is brutally attacked by the circus owner who beats her with a bullhook. However the producers, stars, and trainers were at pains to stress that Tai was trained with kindness, marshmallows, and positive reinforcement. We felt that this was not just big screen romanticising of the circus – depicting the exception of those few cruel, bad apples – but a worldwide promotion of elephant training. gary Johnson, co-founder of Have Trunk Will Travel claimed: “Tai was never hit in any way at all.” American Humane observed the animal action during filming and said: “We’re here observing prep on Water for Elephants and so we’re here to make sure that everybody knows that not only the action on set but also the prep is humanely done, all these animals have been treated fairly and humanely throughout the entire course of their training.” As the film opened across the world ADI released undercover footage from inside Have Trunk Will Travel showing the elephants being repeatedly betean and electric shocked. Tai cried out as she was shocked with a stun gun to force her to do the very tricks that would later appear in the film. The horrifying images shot around the world and ADI launched a legal action.

ADI puts the behind-the-scenes animal abuse in the spotlight

ADI Chief executive Jan Creamer talks live on US television about the exposé.


Animals in

Our investigations of the use of animals in the entertainent industry in the US eventually brought us to Have Trunk Will Travel (HTWT), a supplier of performing elephants for movies, advertising and public appearances. The work was unpublished, as the project was ongoing. However, when ‘Water For Elephants’ was released - a film featuring Tai, an elephant supplied by HTWT and bundled up with a ‘American Humane Association Approved’ certificate, together with strong assurances that the animals had been trained “fairly and humanely”, having “never known mistreatment”, we were outraged and knew that our evidence simply had to be released. The elephants were not trained with love: they were forced to perform their tricks with electric shock devices and beatings. The public – and quite possibly the filmmakers themselves – were being duped by the elephant trainers. And we weren’t about to let them get away with it. So we released footage showing the very same elephant, Tai, who played ‘Rosie’ in ‘Water For Elephants’ being electric shocked and beaten with bullhooks. We also began an all-out battle to shut down the lies being churned out by Have Trunk Will Travel, and show the world that animals like Tai are trained with cruelty, not kindness.

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Shortly after the release of Water for Elephants, another movie, Zookeeper, featured another of the HTWT elephants called Rosie. We produced leaflets for audiences about both Water for Elephants and Zookeeper. We’ve sent our footage to actors, directors, producers, studios and distributors, requesting meetings. We’ve written to the American Humane Association and asked them to reconsider their position. We’re now lobbying other companies that have been hiring animals from HTWT, including zoos and towns who’ve used them for parades and county fairs. ADI has launched a legal suit against HTWT for misleading business practices – as they claimed the elephants were unharmed during training.

Forced to perform unnatural tricks Our investivations into the circus and entertainment industries have shown time and time again that animals used for entertainment are trained with force.

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Zookeeper

In public the bullhook is used as a nasty reminder, but the elephant certainly doesn’t forget how it is used in private.


© Animal Defenders International

Campaign News

ADI’s shocking video shows: ● elephants repeatedly given electric

How You Can Help Prevent the Suffering of Animals like Tai

shocks with handheld stun guns. ● elephants crying out when being

shocked into performing a headstand. ● elephants beaten about the body

and legs with bullhooks. ● A baby elephant is hooked in the

mouth and cries out. ● An elephant is pinned with

bullhooks while her tusks are sawn down, close to the bone. ● Have Trunk Will Travel co-founder

Kari Johnson viciously striking an elephant. ● A baby elephant being hit over the

head and dragged by the trunk. ● elephants being hit and jabbed with

bullhooks. ● elephants chained by the legs only

able to make one step backwards or forwards, for 12 hours a day. It is clear from our evidence that there is no love in this relationship between elephant and trainer. See how you can help....

● Email info@ad-international.org to ask

for a Water for Elephants/Zookeeper Letter Writing Pack; includes sample letters to actors, movie makers, newspapers. ● Write a letter to your local paper about the abuse of Tai and Rosie and educate the public that animal suffering is never entertainment. ● Contact the director, producer and stars of Water for Elephants and Zookeeper; politely ask that they make this the last film in which they will use live animal actors. (Contacts in our letter writing packs, see avove.) ● Spread the word – link to the video on your Facebook and other social networking sites. Visit www.adinternational.org to watch the video and get the facts. ● Leaflet moviegoers at a cinema near you to educate them about the abuse of Tai, Rosie and other performing animals. Contact ADI to order leaflets. ● Boycott Water for Elephants and Zookeeper and tell your family and friends to take a stand to only support films without animal actors.

Some film makers are making a stand against animal cruelty. The makers of Rise of the Planet of the Apes refused to use any performing chimpanzees. Instead they used computer generated images. Support those films! Don’t pay to see, rent or buy films that use performing animals.

ADI & NAVS

Support films that don’t use performing animals Most films don’t use performing animals – there are lots to choose from!

© Animal Defenders International

in Sierra Madre have now cancelled the HTWT elephant from their Independence Day parade, and we are hoping other cities will take similar measures. Meanwhile, the director of Santa Ana Zoo, Kent Yamaguchi, has said publicly that he would immediately end the rides if proof of abuse surfaces. He told ADI that the city and zoo are aware of video footage, he had viewed it, and they are investigating and taking the matter seriously. We are working to ensure these rides are banned.

Below: Our Water for Elephants leaflet, which we produced for supporters to distribute outside cinemas showing the film in the UK, US and South America.

Films featuring elephants supplied by Have Trunk Will Travel, who train with bullhooks and stun guns, include: Ace Ventura When Nature Calls Evan Almighty George of the Jungle Jungle Book Larger Than Life Operation Dumbo Drop Vanity Fair Water For Elephants Zookeeper Britney Spears: Circus

Santa Ana Elephant Rides: It’s not harmless fun Have Trunk Will Travel also hire their elephants out for rides at weekends, when elephants are trucked from Perris, California to Santa Ana Zoo. It is the same trainers and elephants that appear in our shocking video (see opposite). elephants are also hired out to festivals across the State of California. US Campaigns Director Matt Rossell has addressed councils across the state, showing our footage and urging them to cancel the use of elephants. City leaders

Above left: ADI Chief Executive Jan Creamer and Campaigns Director Tim Phillips launch the case against Have Trunk Will Travel.

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Below: ADI USA Campaigns Director Matt Rossell presents the ADI video evidence to the Santa Ana City Council.


© Animal Defenders International © Animal Defenders International © Animal Defenders International © Animal Defenders International

Life begins fo At the end of last year, securing a ban on the use of animals in circuses in Bolivia, we completed the rescue of EVERY animal from circuses across the country. Six monkeys, a coati mundi, a deer and horse were relocated in Bolivia or returned to the wild. We then moved all the remaining lions to the US in the biggest airlift of its kind: Operation Lion Ark. Now these lions are living free, in family prides, in four massive natural enclosures covering 80 acres at The Wild Animal Sanctuary near Denver, Colorado and they will be funded by ADI for the rest of their lives. Having received veterinary treatment, including extensive dental work, our lions were introduced into new family prides and enjoyed a remarkable return to health. Finally, the 25 Bolivian lions have been released into their new outdoor enclosures. Operation Lion Ark was one of our biggest challenges to date and culminated in a record-breaking airlift of 25 lions, bringing them to the US (see our Spring 2011 issue). The repercussions from the Bolivian rescue are still rippling through the region – Peru has become the latest country to ban wild animal circuses (see page 21), something they would likely The Animal Defender & Campaigner l

have been reluctant to do had we not proven that there are people willing to ensure such laws are enforced. Most of all, this operation has been about the animals we have been able to rescue from those filthy, rusting cages and bring to a place of sanctuary.

Recovery and rehabilitation In February, when the lions arrived at The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS),they were first placed in our specially-built ‘biosphere’ – a custom-built heated habitat of enclosures with trees and grass, under a fabric roof that lets in sunlight. This allowed the lions to adjust to their new surroundings, enjoy space, and start to be introduced to one another. In some cases, immediate veterinary attention was needed: Colo Colo, by far the most aggressive lion of the group back in Bolivia, was in urgent need of dental care. Thanks to the Peter Emily Foundation, who specialise in advanced veterinary dental services for captive NAVS & ADI


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

or the Lion Ark Prides exotic animals, he and others with mouth problems were able to receive treatment and all have since made a full recovery.

Their new homes Meanwhile, thanks to a generous donation by ADI Ambassador and American TV personality Bob Barker, expansion had begun for the construction of vast new enclosures. Everything went over-budget, but our generous donor did not mind. ADI and our partners at TWAS wanted the lions to have a life experience as close as possible to that they would have in nature. We wanted the years suffered in captivity by the older lions to be put far from their minds and the three cubs to grow up in an environment as close to freedom as possible. Eighty acres of land were transformed into separate enclosures. We planned to group the lions into new ‘prides’, and give each pride its own space to roam. As well as putting the necessary fencing and basic safety measures in place, the team installed a variety of enrichment facilities – wooden constructions to climb and play on, hill-like mounds and underground dens. The result is a diverse and exciting space with plenty to keep the lions busy and stimulated, and surrounded by incredible views of the mountains which circle the rolling grassland (lions like views). These are the biggest lion sanctuary enclosures in the world. ADI & NAVS

The new prides By the time the new outdoor enclosures had been constructed we had begun to introduce the lions into their new groups. Of course we already had some family groups – BamBam and Morena and their boisterous family, Marta, Maria, Rosita, Rosa, Rosario and Campeon; Hercules and Kiara and their family of five (including the three cubs); Colo Colo, Muneca and Lulu, who were the most clearly traumatised when we found them, made up our third pride. Making families out of the others, however, would be rather more difficult to work out. India, shy and small, had lived her life alone in a tiny cage with only the company of humans. Our first step was to try to introduce her to another lioness, Kenya, who had also spent her life in solitude and without knowing other lions – her cage was completely enclosed by four metal walls. Boxed in, she was agitated and nervous when we found her. Though they appeared to get on fairly well at first, it became clear that their mutual nervousness and agitation was too much. It was decided that Kenya would be introduced to live with a group made up of the two brothers: Temuco and Pancho, who would be placed with the two playful sisters, Chitara and Dalila. The idea was successful, and Kenya slotted into the group without confrontation.

India, meanwhile, was matched with the oldest solitary male lion of the group, Kimba, whose relaxed and open nature ensured the two got on very well. After 11 years in solitary confinement, Kimba had a little friend.

Their first steps onto grass Once the lions had settled into their groups and their outdoor areas were fully constructed, it was time to plan their release. We would let the lions into their new enclosures in three stages. First, BamBam’s pride of eight were released. Then the mixed group – Temuco, Pancho, Chitara, Delila and Kenya. Lastly, the final three prides: Kimba and India; Colo Colo, Muneca and Lulu; Hercules, Kiara, Fida, Panchula and the cubs (Bob, Nancy and Percy). As the release of the first group began, despite the weather reports that this would be a dry day, it started snowing. It was windy and the snow was coming in sideways. The TWAS and ADI teams were anxiously waiting outside the new lion habitat. As soon as the gate was opened, the lions approached the opening to sniff the Colorado air. At first they were very wary, peeking out hesitantly. Then eventually, beginning with Maria and Rosita, the lions started to emerge and, all at once, they were outside, exploring, running, playing and rolling around. Even

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Rescue News

Now we need your help for the final chapter – freedom – forever. We want to do this for more animals. With your support, we can continue to fund our investigations, campaigns and rescue operations. The cost of food and care for the lions is enormous – please help to give them the life they deserve, and send a donation today.

Thank you.

© Animal Defenders International

We first met some of these animals in 2005. ADI field officers in Bolivia had filmed and photographed them in some of the most shocking conditions: alone, in tiny crates; pregnant lionesses forced to jump through rings of fire; travelling from country to country. A cycle of deprivation, confinement and violence, with no end in sight. And now we were watching those same lions walk into paradise: a rolling expanse of grass and trees, in the Colorado hills. Now, we need to raise the money to pay for their upkeep for the rest of their lives. Our undercover investigations are the engine-room that set them free. We followed that with the public awareness campaign and lobbying for the new law.

© Animal Defenders International

PLEASE HELP

© Animal Defenders International

Campeon was trotting around and keeping up with the rest of the pride. Soon, the lions were roaming around the whole 20 acres, the colour of their coats blending in with the prairie. By the time the second group were ready to step out a month later, the plains had been transformed. Where there was once a rusty coloured expanse stretching out Savannah-like, the enclosures were covered in a thick layer of bright green grass, sparkling over the enclosures and reaching right up to the edge of the biosphere. Pancho and Temuco came racing out, running and playing from the start. The two big male lions, who once lived in a cage about the size of a bed, were now charging about and lying in the sun, with 20 acres at their feet. Chitara, Dalila and Kenya followed them out. Slowly at first, they roamed through the long grass. Then all at once they burst into a sprint across the plain. Finally, it was the turn of the last three groups. As the last lions emerged, we realised this was perhaps the most special release. It was May, and wild flowers and long grass had bloomed – above knee height on us, but so tall that some of the lions seemed to just disappear into it. Once released, it was a beautiful sight to see their shaggy golden faces coming in and out of view, tails occasionally whipping up over the top of the grass. All five prides had finally stepped out into their vast new enclosures and looked completely at home. After a while watching them all gradually settling down, we left them to it. Their future now stretches in front of them.

© Animal Defenders International

Animal Adoptions more important than ever In the last year we faced our most challenging animal rescues and relocations. Never before has an organisation emptied an entire country of circus animals. We currently support 31 lions, 6 primates and 2 horses in our international network of sanctuaries. When we rescue animals in distress we commit to them for life and we keep up to date with their health and wellbeing. We invest significantly in the highest standard of care and facilities – we’re building a new woodland enclosure for Tilin and his new companion, Tina (see opposite). With an increasingly uncertain financial climate, now more than ever, we need your help. For the animals, thank you.

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NAVS & ADI


©Animal Defenders International

No longer alone

ADI and Lakeview have been seeking a non-breeding companion for our wonderful ex-circus baboon Tilin, who had spent at least 17 years with the circus, entirely alone. So we were desperate for Tilin to a companion. Finally, we found the lovely Tina (above, grooming Tilin).

Tina and Tilin meet

Upon hearing of Tina’s situation, the opportunity to give them a life together was too good to pass up.

On arrival at the sanctuary Tina was introduced into her new quarantine accommodation, a room next to Tilin’s, where they could see each other but not touch. While Tilin was in his outdoor enclosure, Tina carefully inspected both his room, and her own. She was then moved back to her own room and Tilin was brought in for the night. He’d heard her speaking when he was outside, so was very interested – he approached slowly and, although Tina appeared nervous at first, Tilin was calm and not aggressive. A great deal of baboon talk followed, as they settled down for the night in their adjoining rooms. During the ensuing days Tilin remained cool and laid back and Tina decided she liked him.

How you can help

You receive:

Tina is also a Hamadryas baboon, around seven years old, born in a captivebreeding farm in Israel and exported to Cyprus with another monkey for the pet market. When her owner could no longer handle her she was taken in by a donkey sanctuary, where she lived for about five years, her main playmate a German Shepherd dog.

You can adopt one of our precious charges and take care of them for life. You can even give an adoption as a gift for birthdays or Christmas. The adoption scheme provides long term care and costs as little as £4 per month for a single animal, or more for family groups of animals. You can make a one-off annual payment or pay by monthly direct debit. For details on Christmas gift adoptions, see page 24. ADI & NAVS

Whenever Tilin nipped outside, Tina would call to him and he would scamper back. They were bonding.

The future After a few weeks Tina and Tilin were properly introduced, under careful supervision. They spent the afternoon grooming each other and by the end of the day they were sharing Tilin’s bed, grooming. After years of isolation, Tilin and Tina are together forever. Now, we want to build a special enclosure in the woodland for them – where they will have trees, bushes, insects – the best life we can provide.

Please donate today and help us build a permanent home for Tilin and Tina.

● A beautiful certificate with a drawing of your animal(s) ● Toto News, newsletter, three times a year ● DVD – about your rescued animal ● Animal Defender magazine!

To adopt an animal, please: – complete the form enclosed, or – call us on 020 7630 3340, or – email info@ad-international.org. Thank you. The Animal Defender & Campaigner

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Campaign News Animal Defenders International

Help Animals and WIN Title ..................... Initial ............... Surname ................................................................ Address ........................................................................................................................ ...................................................................................................................................... ............................................................................. Postcode ......................................... Tel ................................................................................................................................ email .......................................................................................................................... Signature ...................................................................................................................... Location

Corfu

Istanbul

Tenerife

Innsbruck

Edinburgh

Stockholm

Example

3

4

0

0

5

1

Entry 1 Entry 2 Entry 3 ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

Banking Standing order To the Manager of ................................................................................................ Bank Branch address ............................................................................................................ ...................................................................................................................................... .................................................................................. Postcode .................................... Please pay Prize Provision Services Account number 45915687, Sort code 60-60-05 The amount of ■ £4.34

£8.68

£13.02 per calendar month.

Starting from .................... / .................... / .................... (For office use only.) My account name ......................................................................................................... Account number

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Sort code ____ ____ - ____ ____ - ____ ____ And thereafter until further notice quoting my membership number of:

........................................................................................................... (For office use only.) Signature ...................................................................................................................... Print name .................................................................................................................... *NoTe: Please remember to make sure the cost of your entries indicated in your standing order applications matches the number of entries you intend to play. ....................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................................

or pay by credit / debit card Please note each 6 number entry costs £13 per quarter

■■■ ■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■

Card type ....................................................................... Security code Card number

Expiry date

■■ ■■

Please debit my account the amount of

Issue number

■■

■ £13 ■ £26 ■ £39 every quarter.

On receipt of this confirmation & thereafter every quarter (13 weeks) until further notice.

£25,000!! Would YOU like to be in with a chance to WIN £25,000 every Friday? This scheme is similar to the National Lottery, but it benefits Animal Defenders International! The ‘Lightning Lottery’, gives YoU a chance to win £25,000 every Friday! At no cost to us, this is a great way to help animals while getting a chance to make bundles of cash! HoW DoeS IT WoRK? Choose six numbers from 0 to 9 and enter them in the table opposite. Fill in the form and send to The Weather Lottery, Derby House, Retford Road, Mattersey, Doncaster, DN10 5HJ. If your numbers match the last digit of the daily Fahrenheit temperatures in Corfu, Istanbul, Tenerife, Innsbruck, Edinburgh and Stockholm, you win the top prize of £25,000! You can pay by standing order, cheque or credit/debit card. Please make cheques payable to: Prize Provision Services Ltd. HoW MUCH DoeS IT CoST? Each entry line (i.e. each set of 6 numbers) costs £1 per week. There is a draw every Friday. HoW Do I KNoW IF I'Ve WoN? You can check your numbers in the Daily Mail or at www.theweatherlottery.com (although all prizes are guaranteed and sent out automatically).

Please join us in the ADI Jewellery Recycling Collection! Any jewellery can be turned into money for us, even broken items. Simply post them in the FREEPOST envelope provided, or free of charge to: Animal Defenders International, FREEPOST, RSKJ-AJAB-GSYA, Fundraising, Sutton Coldfield, B75 5BH.

To raise much needed funds to help stop the use of animals in entertainment we have teamed up with Richer Sounds, UK Hi-Fi and home cinema specialists, to sell our elephant pin badges. Our pin badges are £1 each, look out for them, in our colourful display units, in Richer sounds outlets across the UK.

Signature ......................................................................................................................

The Animal Defender & Campaigner Autumn/Winter 2011

Print name .................................................................................................................... Return the form to: The Weather Lottery, Derby House, Retford Road, Mattersey, Doncaster, DN10 5HJ.

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Campaign News

Lab Animal Week 2011

© National Anti-Vivisection Society

As the government began considering the biggest overhaul of regulations on animal experiments for 25 years, NAVS hit the streets with an eye-catching Cutting Edge Not Knife Edge billboard van that toured the UK. Our billboard travelled from Manchester to London, stopping at seven other cities in between, with MPs and supporters greeting the van and leafleting in each city.

On the eve of World Lab Animal Day, NAVS also held a vigil outside the Institute of Neurology (ION) in London. We displayed the pictures of the monkey Elisa, taken at the ION when she was used in brain research fifteen years ago. We have not forgotten Elisa’s suffering. It was a moving event and we remembered the millions of animals that suffer and die in labs every year.

evidence has been uncovered of plans to “farm” imported white rhinos commercially in China for their horns to be used in medicine. Reporters found detailed business plans to sell and market rhino horn products, including pills, to make 60 million dollars profit annually. “Knut” a 4 year old polar bear has died at Berlin Zoo. Knut was a major attraction; in 2007, the zoo even registered his name as a trademark.

© National Anti-Vivisection Society

University of Kent research has shown that serious behavioural abnormalities are endemic among captive chimpanzees. These include self-mutilation, repetitive rocking, eating of faeces and drinking of urine. It stated that “abnormal behaviour is endemic in this population despite enrichment efforts.” All 40 animals studied showed some abnormal behaviour.

Get Active for Animals Urgent appeal! We receive no state aid and cannot carry out our investigations, briefings, research and lobbying without your help. Please send a donation – and urge friends and colleagues to donate too. Join our Letter Writers’ Club – YoU have the power to instigate change in the form of letters to MEPs and MPs, television

ADI & NAVS

ADI USA at the 2011 Worldfest earth Day Festival in California in May, right. Worldfest is a 100% vegan and solar powered event filled with education and entertainment and exhibits from over 100 environmental, humanitarian and animal welfare non-profit groups. It was a very successful day.

networks, councils and companies to gain support for our campaigns. We can provide template letters. Please contact us to join today. Campaign online – spread the word, put our information on your website and on discussion boards. Send links to our sites to friends and colleagues and add links on your site to screen our videos.

The Nagoya Aquarium, Japan announced that a Pacific whitesided dolphin died after landing outside its pool while rehearsing a jump routine. ADI applauds Allerdale Council, in Cumbria, for voting to ban circuses with wild animals from performing on council land. The motion, tabled by Moorclose Councillor Denis Robertson, was approved unanimously in April and follows our recent exposés. Prior to the debate, ADI sent Allerdale Councillors a copy of our report ‘Animals in Travelling Circuses: The Science on Suffering’ and our video of supporting evidence.

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Left: The NAVS candle lit vigil. Below left: The NAVS mobile billboard went to towns across the country.


Europe Following our recent exposé at Bobby Roberts Super Circus, several members of the European Parliament have taken steps to protect circus animal welfare at EU level. In response to a question from Charles Tannock MEP in May, the Commission clarified that it had no jurisdiction to deal with the issue and that it is a matter for the national authorities concerned. Similarly, Graham Watson MEP asked the Commission what it was doing to enforce animal welfare standards in European zoos and circuses. The Commission replied that: “circuses are specifically excluded from the scope of the Zoos Directive, and not covered by any other EU legislation. Therefore, the welfare of circus animals remains the responsibility of the Member States”. We continue to monitor any activity at EU level.

Ireland

Below: ADI and ARAN supporters demonstrated outside Duffy’s Circus in Limerick in August.

As well as holding regular demonstrations at circuses across Ireland, our Irish partners Animal Rights Action Network (ARAN) have supported our UK campaign. ARAN are also currently planning a nationwide tour of schools with exciting new campaign © ARAN / Animal Defenders International materials.

Austria In June Cirkus Krone filed a complaint before the Austrian Constitutional Court challenging the legality of the ban on wild animals in circuses. This followed incorrect claims made by minister Jim Paice MP about the possibility of such a case (see page 9). We immediately got in touch with the Federal Chancellor, who is acting as the opponent party of the complaint, and submitted a briefing with legal and political arguments to assist the defence. We will continue to monitor the case.

Germany The Hessen region is considering a ban on the keeping and use of certain species of wild animals in circuses such as

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monkeys, elephants, bears, giraffes, hippos and rhinos. An initiative was first considered in 2003, but did not progress. We contacted the Hessen authorities with supporting evidence, including our report Science on Suffering, a Stop Circus Suffering DVD and our review of the scientific literature on the effects of captivity and transport on wild animals.

Greece Following an intense campaign led by ADI and our campaign partners, the Greek Animal Welfare Fund (GAWF), the draft animal protection bill was published in July by the Ministry of Agriculture and Foods. The draft includes a ban on the use of all animals in circuses as well as provisions on humane stray management, tail docking and neutering programmes. GAWF met earlier in the year with the junior minister, Mrs Milena Apostolaki, to discuss key issues of the legislation. Currently, the draft bill is pending the signature of the minister before being introduced in parliament.

Norway Our campaign partner NOAH is currently putting pressure on the government to implement a ban. The package will include the Stop Circus Suffering Norway DVD, updated with NOAH’s new logo. The video will be sent to key politicians, celebrities and media.

Bolivia There are of course no animal circuses in Bolivia, but we continue to support the draft legislation on animal protection.

Brazil The bill to ban the use of animals in circuses is currently pending debate in the Chamber of Deputies. The President of the Chamber appears to be delaying the debate so the ADI team is meeting with congress members to ask them to write, to maintain the pressure.

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We are currently organising a meeting with the President to present a public petition in support of the ban.

© Anim al Defen ders In ternatio nal

Right: Supporters carry ADI circus posters and banners at the Bogotá “March for the Animals 2011”; ADI representative Eduardo Peña receiving recognition, on behalf of ADI, from the Commander of the Colombian Police.

© Animal Defenders International

Stop Circus Suffering

Colombia A new bill banning animals in circuses has been introduced in the Chamber of Representatives of the Colombian Congress. Bill No. 052 was drafted by ADI and sponsored by Congressman Augusto Posada. We have been lobbying to get cross-party co-sponsors and the bill has been signed by 19 members so far. We expect the bill to have its first reading soon. Over 4,000 people marched alongside the ADI team in Bogotá in May to support the ban on animals in circuses and the reform of the animal protection law. Congress members and local politicians from all parties attended, as did high profile celebrities such as soap opera actress Margarita Ortega. Representatives of ADI and local groups then went into the Congress with a statement supporting the new legislation. ADI hold weekly information stalls throughout Bogotá and we recently received a commendation by the Colombian Police in recognition of our "leadership in the development of activities for the protection of animals".

Ecuador In March, we held a press conference in Quito, and screened our Unnatural Acts video. We also met with the vice-minister for the Environment and his team to discuss a resolution to ban animals in circuses. The Ministry expressed support. We continue to campaign and have met with local groups in Guayaquil and Cuenca, and with local environment authorities to gain regional support. We have also begun a census of circus animals.

NAVS & ADI


Victory: Peru bans wild animal circuses

Victory in Peru Here, we look back over ADI’s six year operation leading up to this enormous victory.

Collecting the evidence Back in 2005, ADI field officers went undercover, investigating seven randomly selected circuses in Peru. This was part of a huge operation carried out inside circuses across South America – one of our most comprehensive investigations to date. The evidence in Peru showed systematic violence against circus animals,including lions with Circo Las Galaxias whipped and struck with weapons; abuse of a capuchin monkey with Circo Zafari Kids and an ocelot; many animals were subjected to verbal intimidation. The footage also showed shocking levels of confinement and deprivation, including three lions living in a tiny beast wagon, with no access to natural daylight; primates permanently chained down and other animals in tiny boxes.

The battle for national legislation Our Stop Circus Suffering campaign was launched in 2007 with the support of the local groups in Lima. We prepared a DVD and a report that included the results of our investigation in Peru and the other South American countries. The ADI team presented this evidence to the Peruvian Congress and drafted a proposal to ban wild and domestic animals in circuses. The campaign built up a head of steam. Congressmen Alejandro Rebaza and Jose Antonio Urquizo immediately tabled bills banning the use of animals in circuses, which were joined together and discussed by Congress. In May 2008, ADI produced the report Science on Suffering, with the scientific evidence we would need to back up our arguments. Though we had got off to a successful start, the going was not easy. For the bill to become law it needed to be debated and approved in both the Agrarian and the Andean Peoples commissions; selected for priority by the Board of Spokespersons for debate in the Plenary; and finally handpicked by the President of Congress to be discussed on the day. There were many hurdles.

Peruvian Congressmen Alejandro Rebaza and Jose Antonio Urquizo, and ADI’s Jan Creamer launch the two bills at the Congress to ban animal circuses.

We met every member of each Commission and circulated our briefings. The bill was finally debated in March 2009 and approved as an amendment of the National Animal Protection Law rather than as a separate law. The bill was then sent in its new form to the Andean Peoples Commission where it was again approved unanimously in May 2009. The first two hurdles were behind us. The debate before the vote, in July of this year.

© J. P. Almos / Animal Defenders International

With this ban, Peru is the second country in South America to take national steps to stop the suffering of animals in circuses, following the ban in Bolivia.

© Animal Defenders International

on 21st July, following an investigation of circus animal suffering and a long campaign by ADI and local animal protection groups, President Alan garcia of Peru signed into law an end to the use of wild animals in circuses.

Key events preceding the ban

2007

During an ADI undercover investigation of animal circuses in Peru we capture footage and images of animal abuse including that of a restrained woolly monkey screaming in terror as his handler forces the animal’s head into his mouth (right).

July: ADI launch Stop Circus Suffering with local groups in Lima, Peru. New “Stop Circus Suffering South America” report published (right). A circus lioness escapes onto a main highway in Lima. october: Congressman Rebaza tables Bill No. 1917 banning animals in circuses.

ADI & NAVS

© Animal Defenders International

2005 & 2006

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Victory: Peru bans wild animal circuses Right: ADI Global Campaigns Manager, Alexandra Cardenas and South America Representative, Juan Pablo Almos are interviewed during the photography exhibition at the Congress, Lima.

We now faced the challenge of getting the Board of Spokespersons to prioritise the bill. The ADI team stepped up its lobbying campaign and held meetings with 100 congress members, whilst also organising a series of events promoting a public petition requesting the bill to be put on the agenda.

More suffering exposed, celebrities speak out In May 2010, ADI carried out a new undercover investigation in South America and the latest evidence became the core of a new film titled Unnatural Acts. The film was launched in the Peruvian Congress, and the suffering exposed was so horrific that the event received widespread TV, radio and print

© Animal Defenders International

Circo Africa de Fieras, Perú

© Animal Defenders International

coverage. We also presented our petition, which by now had generated over 3,000 signatures, to the President of the Congress. The Board listened and, just weeks later, prioritised the bill. Now all we needed was the President of the Congress to pick our bill for discussion on the day. Several Peruvian celebrities – including musicians Julio Andrade, Miki Gonzalez, William Luna, Toxico, and Grammy award winning band Aterciopelado – came out publicly in support of our campaign. After watching a video featuring them speaking out, a number of Congress members personally wrote to the President of the Congress asking him to discuss the bill in the next sessions. A march was also held in the city in support of the bill.

© Animal Defenders International

However, the circuses weren’t going to give up without a fight. Shortly after the celebrities spoke out, the circuses started lobbying the Congress claiming that our investigation lacked validity. ADI responded quickly with a new video refuting the circuses’ claims, and produced detailed briefings to counter them. At the same time, public pressure was mounting with events in support of the bill continuing around the capital.

Securing the ban As the 2011 Peruvian elections were taking place, ADI met the President of the Agrarian Commission where it was suggested that it might be wise to look at other legislative routes to get the ban approved.

2008 April: Congressman Jose Antonio Urquizo tables Bill No. 2382 banning animals in circuses. May: ADI press conference at Congress to launch “Animals in Circuses: The Science on Suffering”. © Animal Defenders International

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NAVS & ADI


Victory: Peru bans wild animal circuses Left: Congressman Jose Antonio Urquizo is interviewed during the Unnatural Acts launch. The ADI 3 metre high inflatable lion goes on a public awareness tour. ADI publications included publicity for the photography exhibition; political briefings; the video of our investigation and Economic, Public Safety and Domestic Animal briefings.

ADI has now started working with the Ministry of Agriculture, drafting regulations for the implementation of the ban. We will be providing a draft text and carrying out a circus animal census to establish how many circus animals are in Peru. Special thanks to the local groups: Unidos por los Animales (UPA), Amazon Shelter, Perú Antitaurino, Amar, Conciencia Animal and orca.

Victory! The bill was fast tracked and approved by the Plenary of the Congress on 16 June and signed by the President in July.

URGENT APPEAL: Please send a donation to help fund these campaigns in South America – they rely completely on funding from ADI.

Circo Zafari Kids, Perú

© Animal Defenders International

After exploring several options, the Commission suggested adding an article on the use of animals in circuses to the Forestry and Wildlife Bill, soon to be heard in the Plenary. Although the Commission did not accept a full ban on wild and domestic animals in circuses (given that the bill was on wildlife only), it accepted some of our amendments and we compromised on a ban on circuses using wild animals.

2009

2010

2011

March: Agrarian Commission combines the 2 bills, debates and approves. May: Andean Peoples’ Commission debates and approves the bill. November: ADI takes inflatable elephant to Congress and holds photo exhibition.

May: Launch of Unnatural Acts. June: Board of Spokespersons prioritizes bill. July: Presentation of public petition and postcard to the President of the Congress. october: Launch of Cruelty is not Culture.

June: Ban approved in Congress (in Forestry and Wildlife law). July: President Alan garcia signs the law.

ADI & NAVS

© Animal Defenders International

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Christmas Catalogue 2011 All proceeds from Christmas sales go towards our campaigns for animals, so please help by buying from us! To order: ● online (find more gifts): www.ad-international.org ● or use order form (enclosed) ● or call 020 7630 3340

Christmas Gift Adoption Pack

Mountain Hare Hiding SIZE: A SPX028 £4.99 in the amily F l a S Snow IZ 9 E: A S .9 Anim 4 PX027 029 £ X P S £4.99 A : E IZ S

Cards

Cards come in packs of ten (of one design) with envelopes. Sold in aid of ADI, NAVS and LDF For card sizing details, please see table below.

Give the gift of life this Christmas by adopting one of ADI’s rescued animals. You can help us care for these beautiful animals for life and provide the perfect gift for someone special. Step 1: Choose the animal or animals you would like to adopt Step 2: Choose from three Adoption Gift Packs – Bronze, Silver or Gold – with either cufflinks or a framed photograph. Christmas offer: All adoptions for the same price (usually family groups of animals cost more).

Bronze Adoption Pack: Adoption certificate Adoption newsletter, Toto News ● Animal Defender magazine ● Animal Rescue DVD ● A Christmas card from your adopted animal. The adopter receives Toto News three times a year and Animal Defender twice a year. ● ●

ADO001 £48

g Sun Mornin 2 £4.99 SPX02 SIZE: A

g as Son Christm 021 £4.99 X SP SIZE: A

Monkey Business SIZE: A SPX023 £4.99

Cats’ Choir SIZE: A SPX024 £4.99

Come and Pla y, Mum SIZE: A ! SPX02 6 £4.9 9

Silver Adoption Pack: Winter Forage SIZE: A SPX01 6 £4.5 0

includes our bronze adoption pack (see above), plus a pair of animal cufflinks. ADO001A £63 Animal Cufflinks Beautiful rhodium plated cufflinks. (approx. 25x12mm/1x½”). Available in three designs: Lions SAJ007B Elephants SAJ007C Mice SAJ007D

In the Forest SIZE: B SPX018 £4.99

+

Includes a pair of cufflinks of your choice (lions, elephants or mice).

Gold Adoption Pack:

Bumper Christmas Card Assortment! 6 designs, 24 cards & envelopes. less than 25p per card! Contents may vary. SIZE: C SCA001 £5.99

Card size (approx.) Code

127x127mm/5x5” A

114x160mm/4½x6½” B

Variety C

includes our bronze adoption pack (see above), plus a beautiful framed photograph from our Images of Freedom range and a letter from the photographer explaining how the image came about. Make your choice from the photographs opposite. ADO001B £100

+

Includes a Framed Print of your choice (see right).


Images of Freedom

One of our 6 Prides of Lions From Bolivian circuses to a huge enclosure, built specially by ADI. These lions can now live life to the full.

Toto Rescued by ADI from a circus in Chile and taken home to Africa. Toto now lives with a group of other chimps in a natural sanctuary.

Tilin Rescued by ADI from a circus in Bolivia, and Tina a companion for Tilin, happy in a sanctuary in the UK.

Caesar & Sarah saved from a circus in Portugal, now living in a huge ADI natural bush enclosure in South Africa. They are inseparable.

Tim Rescued from a circus in Bolivia, and Rosita a companion for Tim, both now safe in a sanctuary in Trinidad, Bolivia.

The 3Bs Three macaque monkeys, Baloo, Betty and Boo, from a European vivisection laboratory. Happy in a UK monkey sanctuary.

Remarkable photographs from our wild animal and rescue collection, each capturing a unique and moving moment. Poignant and often uplifting, these images are beautifully presented on a cream card mount, in an elegant 400x500mm/16x20” dark wood frame (European Ash stained to resemble African Wengé). Each image is printed to order, and the cream mount signed by the photographer. Accompanied by a letter from the photographer describing the story behind the photograph.

One step to freedom. After a long journey from a circus in Portugal, Caesar arrives at the ADI sanctuary. SAF032 £60

Pride NEW! Saved from a circus in Bolivia they now have a future of freedom in the USA. SAF039 £60

Freedom Awaits NEW! One of the litter of 3 cubs born into the circus, who were then saved by ADI and now have their lives of freedom ahead. SAF040 £60

True Love Saved from the circus together, Sarah and Caesar are inseparable in their ADI home in the African bush. SAF030 £60

A Snuggle of beagles Rescued from vivisection, beagle puppies cuddle up together. SAF011 £60

His first day of freedom What was he thinking as he strode into his new world? SAF036 £60

Mother and baby Wild elephants on the move with an infant rushing to keep up with Mum. SAF037 £60

Fur coats are worn by beautiful animals and ugly people A wild fox shows his class. SAF033 £60

Toto: This is Freedom The day he reached Zambia after his rescue from a circus in Chile. SAF001 £60

Baloo’s Opinion Saved from a laboratory, this was Baloo’s first moment in his outdoor enclosure. SAF038 £60

Select picture from

Images of Freedom

Thoughtful Tilin We rescued Tilin the baboon from a Bolivian circus. SAF035 £60

order online at www.ad-international.org use the enclosed order form or call 020 7630 3340

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© Lord Dowding Fund

LDF funding continues to produce internationally reviewed findings Above: The fMRI scanner and (right) MEG scanner in use, at Aston University.

The continuing partnership between Aston University’s Brain Centre and the LDF has produced four papers in international peer reviewed journals in the last six months. The LDF project, led by Professor Paul Furlong involves the funding of “scanning hours”, allowing the grant to cover a wide range of studies concerning neurological research in humans. The group has been studying visual processing and perception in humans, and are increasingly able to characterise neural network activity in ways previously only thought possible using invasive methods. The studies focus on how, despite distinct visual areas in the brain, we have a unified perceptual view of the world. This research is important as it may provide an insight into consciousness itself. Using (magnetoencephalography) MEG and (functional magnetic resonance

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The Animal Defender & Campaigner

imaging) fMRI, the team studied the synchronisation of different neurons and the role of low frequency electrical brain activity that occurs during visual processing. They concluded that the changes in the electrical activity “may relate principally to changes in visual attention”. The neurodevelopment and clinical research seeks to apply basic research to clinical issues, and find replacements for experiments on animals. It improves understanding of brain changes during development – studying neurodevelopmental disorders facilitates the development of diagnostic and treatment strategies. Studying brain changes and linking them to behaviour through noninvasive, integrated research allows the study of the cognition and development elements unique to humans. The neuroimaging group have carried out pain research in humans with l

Autumn/Winter 2011

© Lord Dowding Fund

Research Without Animals

interesting results. Brain regions associated with pain were studied in healthy patients during a visceral pain experiment. Anatomical MRIs were obtained, then baseline, anticipation, pain and post-pain phases were studied using MEG. The results provided new findings about the functions of several pain associated brain regions and showed that the detailed study of pain systems in humans is made possible by combining imaging techniques. Pharmacokinetic research at the centre has resulted in the publishing of important data “highlighting the value and importance of neuroimaging techniques to determine the nature and extent of cortical areas of drug interaction in health and disease”.

NAVS & ADI


Research Without Animals

Interview with Professor Dewhurst Left: Prof. Dewhurst receiving the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education, 2005.

What interested you about alternatives to animals in your field of expertise? I supervised a final year honours project in 1985. It was a project to capture the responses of a frog’s sciatic nerve on computer, then build those responses into a program to allow students to simulate them on a computer. I was so pleased with the result that I started to use it to replace the real frog nerve experiments with several classes. The LDF became aware of the work we were doing and so began a working relationship spanning 25 years. When you embarked on your career, how did you picture the situation would be in 2011? When I started this work personal computers had only recently been introduced into teaching. My first experience of using computers was the

BBC microcomputer and at that time it was impossible, at least for me, to foresee the impact technological developments, particularly the Internet would have on my personal and working life. I may have imagined that computers would become more mainstream but mobile computers, smartphones and touch-screen technologies were something I could not have imagined. What is your overall impression of the last 25 years? Mainly very positive. I have been fortunate to work with some leading academic colleagues from UK and international universities and have been very fortunate to have employed some very competent and creative computer programmers. Perhaps most special was my team winning the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education in

© David Dewhurst

Professor David Dewhurst is Director of Learning Technology at the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine, University of edinburgh and 2011 marked an amazing 25 years of funding from the LDF. As Director of educational Information Services in the College of Medicine and Veterinary Medicine he has College-wide responsibility for educational technology issues

2005 which was presented to me by the Queen at Buckingham Palace. What are your thoughts regarding the progression of teaching without animals for the next 25 years? I think, currently, this is difficult to predict. It is clear that the increasing range of available alternatives can meet the educational needs of the majority of university students studying courses where physiology and pharmacology are significant components. This is probably true for students of medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy and the healthcare professions.

Current LDF research

© Dr. D. Holliday / Lord Dowding Fund

© Prof. g. Pilkington / Lord Dowding Fund

ADI & NAVS

3D breast cancer model Dr Debbie Holliday’s project at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine aims to validate two in vitro models of breast cancer; a 3-dimensional cell culture and a tissue slice model. These are being validated against published data on animal models to show that they are viable replacements. The first 6 months of the project, has resulted in: ● The extension of the 3D cell model to include a new cell line and the incorporation of several primary cell populations into the 3D models as validation that the models are representative of human disease. ● Successfully cultured primary breast tumours in the tissue slice model. These have been treated with different doses of two breast cancer drugs. ● The team assessing the biological endpoints of the assays in different ways to compare the endpoints to animal data.

In vitro blood brain barrier (BBB) and brain tumour model Professor Geoffrey Pilkington’s team, using a human in vitro BBB model, is investigating the role of several genes in the spread of cancer cells into the brain. The hypothesis is that genes in different types of cancers affect their propensity to cross the BBB. This research is important as 20-30% of cancers spread to the brain, adversely affecting the patient’s prognosis. Over the first six months of work, the team at the University of Portsmouth have prepared growing cultures of the component cells used in the 3D BBB model and have obtained a variety of cancer cell lines to use in the experiments, including skin cancer, breast cancer, lung cancer and colon cancer. These have been cultured, characterised and their gene expression is being identified.

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Left: Members of Dr. Holliday’s team (top) and Prof. Pilkington’s team (below) working on our latest projects.


© Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

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■ I would like to give on a regular monthly basis, please send me more information. ■ Please send me more information about ADI, NAVS and LDF. ■ Please send me more information about Animal Adoptions. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Stop Circus Suffering leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Huntingdon Life Sciences EXPOSED leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Animal Experiments the Facts leaflets. Please send me ■ 5 ■ 10 ■ 25 ■ 50 .......... (other) Rescued Animal Adoption leaflets. ■ Please sign me up for ADI, NAVS and LDF email alerts! My email address is ........................................................................................................................................ Animal Defenders International UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LONDON, SW1P 4QP, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 e-mail: info@ad-international.org US: 6100 Wilshire Boulevard, # 1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048, USA. Tel: +1 323-935-2234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. e-mail: info@ad-international.org www.ad-international.org • www.navs.org.uk • www.ldf.org.uk

Profile for Animal Defenders International

Animal Defender Magazine Winter 2011  

Animal Defender magazine, the magazine of Animal Defenders International, the National Anti-Vivisection Society, and the Lord Dowding Fund f...

Animal Defender Magazine Winter 2011  

Animal Defender magazine, the magazine of Animal Defenders International, the National Anti-Vivisection Society, and the Lord Dowding Fund f...

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