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ISSN: online 2158-5059

Winter-Spring 2012

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CONGRESS: Bill to ban wild animals in circuses. Help make it law


Editorial As we embark on the challenges of 2012, it is also an opportunity to reflect on what has been achieved for animals in 2011. It was a year of great progress but we also set the stage for what lies ahead. We were off to a flying start in February, with the completion of the rescue of all the animals from circuses in Bolivia. Primates, lions and other animals were relocated to sanctuaries or the wild and the Lion Ark airlift brought all of the lions to the U.S.

HELP US DO MORE! If you share our passion to protect animals, please donate. We can only continue to expose animal abuse, rescue animals, present evidence to legislators and educate the public with your donations and support. It’s easy to make a donation to help us continue our work. You can call us (see below), or donate online, or use the form in the magazine or just put a check in the mail.

Thank you so much. ANIMAL DEFENDER ISSN: 2158-5032 published by Animal Defenders International US, Inc.

Animal Defenders International 6100 Wilshire Blvd., #1150, LoS ANgeLeS, CA 90048. Tel: (323) 935 2234 Fax: (323) 935 9234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org web: www.adiusa.org UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LoNDoN, SW1P 4QP, U.K. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 Fax: +44 (0)20 7828 2179 e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org

South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia. e-mail: info@ad-international.org web: www.ad-international.org editors: Jan Creamer and Tim Phillips OUR MISSION

To educate, create awareness, and promote the interest of humanity in the cause of justice, and the suppression of all forms of cruelty to animals; wherever possible, to alleviate suffering, and to conserve and protect animals and their environment. Founded 1990. ©2011 ADI. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced for commercial purposes by any means whatsoever without the written permission of ADI.

We took a quick breath and launched undercover footage of the abuse of 57-year old Anne, at Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus. She was Europe’s oldest circus elephant. The scandal caused a media storm, which forced the owners to place Anne with a safari park. This was quickly followed by the international release of the movie ‘Water for elephants’. We were incensed by the assurances given about the training of Tai, the elephant star. We released our footage of the elephants at Have Trunk Will Travel being electric shocked, screaming, being beaten and hooked with bull hooks. The ‘Zookeeper’ movie was then released, featuring another of the group, Rosie. Our exposé aims to change animal use by the movie industry. We made front page of the LA Times and caught the attention of the industry heartland. We lobbied zoos and county fairs who rent these animals for elephant rides, to take responsibility for the suffering these animals endured in order to subdue them for the rides. The news that Santa Ana Zoo has abandoned the rides confirms that change is possible. Some claim that because abuse is not seen when the animals are in public or on set, a customer is not responsible for their life experience; that is not acceptable. Corporate bodies that rent these elephants create the demand; their continued use of them implies approval of the way the animals have been treated. This issue is like deciding not to use products made by child slave labor; responsible organizations would see this as part of their commitment to corporate social responsibility and not rent such animals again. Good news followed in the summer, when our campaign in Peru achieved another nationwide ban on animals in circuses. We drew our year to a close with the launch of H.R.3359, the Traveling exotic Animal Protection Act (TeAPA). This will end the use of wild exotic animals in traveling circuses. Now we need you to ensure that this new bill succeeds! This work is a very heavy lift for such a small organization, but we will work hard to achieve our dream and we know that, with your support, we will win. We do like to win! Sadly, the low point of the year is that we have suffered a massive drop in income and are facing the prospect of cutting back on vital work such as investigations and rescues. We urgently need funding to continue – if you can help us at this critical time, it could be the most important thing you do for animals this year. May 2012 bring success, peace and harmony to you and yours.

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Now the sufferi ng can be stopped Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act (TEAPA) launched in Congress 18 months of painstaking preparations led up to the final two days in Washington D.C., when ADI and the Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) launched H.R. 3359, the Traveling exotic Animal Protection Act (TeAPA), together with Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA), ADI Ambassadors Bob Barker (philanthropist and TV host of The Price Is Right) and Jorja Fox (known to 73 million CSI viewers as Sara Sidle). Up early on November 2nd, ADI’s celebrity Ambassadors were already busy with media interviews, even before the congressional press conference had begun. Members of the press and congressional staffers were squeezing into the standing-room-only Appropriations Room B308, in the prestigious Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill, while Team ADI was behind-the-scenes resolving last-second technical glitches and making

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“These exotic animals in their natural habitat, remain with their mothers for weeks, months, even years, they don’t leave their mothers. But if they’re going to perform in a circus, in a traveling circus, then they are torn from their mothers, almost at birth, when they’re only months old. It’s a terrible psychological thing for the mother, and it’s a terrible psychological thing for the baby. But the baby is then taken and put into training when it’s only a few months old. Training to perform the ridiculous tricks that they’re going to be forced to perform in the circus. And how do they train them? They have to dominate the animal. How do they dominate the animal? They beat it. With clubs, fists, blackjacks, axhandles, golf clubs. They shock it with all sorts of electric devices. They use bullhooks on them. They deprive them of food and even water in order to make them do these tricks. And they don’t stop. Once they’ve taught them these tricks, they continue to beat them. They beat them throughout their entire lives. They never know a day that is really pleasurable. And finally after 20, or 30, or maybe even 40 years, they die. And that day that they die is probably the best day of their lives. Isn’t that a horrible thought? Bob Barker speaking at the Congressional launch of TeAPA

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with Bob The day kicks off television. live on national

“We’re supporting this Bill with scientific, white papers, as well as the empirical evidence, where our people have worked undercover, inside the circuses, and filmed what they saw. Our objective has been to show what it’s really like for circus animals behind the scenes. The use of these animals in traveling circuses causes an unacceptable level of suffering. The lightweight facilities that the animals are kept in, the stress that they’re put under when they’re being forced to do things that they don’t want to do, make these animals dangerous when they’re in close proximity to the public..... So, for the sake of the animals, and for the sake of the public, we need to end the use of these animals in traveling circuses.” Jan Creamer, ADI President sure the stage was perfectly set for what was about to take place. At 10:30 a.m., streamed live online (to over 3,000 viewers) and serenaded by the clicking of cameras capturing this historic moment and electrifying the room, ADI President Jan Creamer led the distinguished panel of six experts who announced the first-ever legislation aimed at finally ending the suffering of wild animals in traveling circuses. First, respected Congressman Jim Moran, serving his 11th term for his Virginia district, opened the press conference describing how this bill will ban the use of exotic and wild, non-domesticated animals, like elephants, lions, and tigers, in traveling entertainment productions if the animals were moved in mobile housing units during the previous 15 days, noting “The intent is

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g the Bill Barker announcin

ADI hits the Hill: Jan Creamer , Tim Phillips, Dave Wenhold, Matt Rossell, Mel Richardson, and Jorja Fox .

to restrict the most egregious and inhumane conditions.” He added “How we treat animals is a reflection of our nation’s moral d as Bob Barker Ranks of media are captivate character.” circus animals endure. lives ic trag the Rep. Jim Moran, flanked by Jorja Fox and Bob Barker introduces H.R. 3359. ADI’s President Jan Creamer then outlined the detailed scientific papers, reports and empirical proof—video and photographic evidence gathered in our undercover investigations—that provide the evidence underpinning H.R. 3359. Jan introduced the new ADI video, lights were dimmed and thundering music opened with the bold title, “This is happening in the United States Today” followed by a flurry of undercover scenes with elephants, tigers and other wild animals in U.S. circuses being viciously hit, hooked, and shocked by their handlers. The animals pacing endlessly in tiny “[In the circus] you make the cages cages, or straining at the end of short small, and you don’t let the animals chains, gave attendees a brief glimpse into out of the cages, and you have to the misery that makes up the life of circus travel every single day, you have to animal, and it was punctuated with the use weapons on the animals. message, “You can make it history.” We wanted to bring some of the ADI’s presentation was followed by ed Stewa Barker p tools of the trade of the circus with Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) us today, but Tim was told that he co-founder Ed Stewart, who described how we wanted to bring in examples of the would be arrested and put into training tools of the circus trade—bullhooks prison for 20 years if he brought a and stun guns—but Capitol security told us bullhook or a stun gun into the that we would be arrested if we brought chambers here. So, it’s violent. such weapons into the building. He gave The training a lot of times is the perspective of a sanctuary caring for violent, the travel is horrendous. It wild animals noting that any captivity is a doesn’t make any sense to me that compromise, “I can tell you right now: there is no “state-of-the-art” keeping animals in we’re teaching our children in the captivity. The “state-of-the-art” is United States, in 2011, that it’s Zimbabwe, and India, and the wild.” okay to have an elephant standing Congressional staff and members of the on its head in the middle of a ring, media then heard from Dr. Mel Richardson, and call it education. There is no a wildlife veterinarian for ADI with more education in that.” than 40 years experience, “There is no ed Stewart, Co-founder PAWS way you can provide the physical,

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Break the Chain

psychological, social wellbeing of any wild animal in a traveling situation.” Cameras flashed as CSI star Jorja Fox advocated for the bill, addressing whether circuses provide an educational experience for children. She concluded that children “would actually be very disappointed in us for bringing them to these places.” “The intent is to restrict the most Finally, beloved game show host Bob egregious and inhumane Barker anchored the event with a message conditions that exotic animals are that tugged hard on the heartstrings, as he subjected to when used solely for passionately described the training and the entertainment of the public. r outlines lifelong suffering of circus animals. This Bill only affects traveling Questions from the media lasted another shows, circuses, and exhibitions thirty minutes before the event wound that keep their animals on the road down with journalists returning to news for most of the year, where the rooms with briefing packs, to spread the animals effectively live in their very word that they just witnessed the beginning tightly confined transporters or of the end of circus suffering in the U.S. trailers. .... it’s not gonna happen The rest of the day was a frenzy of overnight. It’s probably not gonna meetings with Members of Congress on the happen within the next year. But it Hill. The first ten sponsors of the Bill were secured, with bi-partisan support including will happen....” Representatives Bob Filner, (CA-51) Representative Jim Moran Dennis Kucinich, (OH-10), Jerrold Nadler, (NY-8), Jared Polis, (CO-2) Nick J. Rahall II, (WV-3), Steven Rothman, (NJ-9), Fortney Pete Stark, (CA13), Chris Van Hollen, (MD-8) and ranking Republican Congressman Bill Young, (FL-10). We were exhausted and elated, but off to an amazing start. But passing b Bo d , David Skiles an art, Tim Phillips r this bill is not going to be we po of rs pound the corrido Jan Creamer and Jorja Fox easy and it will not be discuss the Bill with Representative Dennis Kuc inich. realized by people simply forwarding messages on Facebook. Everybody needs to actually get involved. These animals have a lobbyist—and it’s not any professional working in Washington. Every one of us who cares about this issue, will make the difference. Co-sponsor Congressman Sam Farr and Bob Barker share a lighter moment.

Whether you have spent endless hours at circus protests, have written letters or checks, or even if you are just reading about this issue for the first time and are inspired to act. The circus animals need you now, to permanently end their suffering once and for all. The bill is gaining momentum, with three new co-sponsors as we go to print; Representative Sam Farr, (CA-17), Jerry McNerney, (CA-11), Congresswoman Jackie Speier (CA-12), and Walter B. Jones Jr., (NC-3). We can win this. With your help, we will pass this bill, but our Break the Chain

“A question that some of you may be asking right now, is “Well, what about my kids? You know, can’t my kids have the same chance that I did to go to traveling circuses or maybe, circuses that your parents went to, and I’ve thought about this at length. I think our kids look to us for what is right, and for what is fun. And I think that we can do more for our kids by doing the compassionate thing, and the respectful thing. These animals do deserve our kindness, and they do deserve our respect. And I think that often our kids understand that better than us, most of the time. If our kids knew how cruel and violent these events were, I think they would actually be very disappointed in us for allowing this.” Jorja Fox

questions. The panel answers media

ADI the USA Toda A scene from In launch. screened at the

y, the video

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Break the Chain grassroots campaign needs volunteers across the country to participate, to contact their member of Congress today, to rally others to do the same, to write letters to the editor, to host TEAPA parties to educate friends, to help with outreach and to grow this movement. Representative Moran summarized it best responding to a press question about the likelihood of the bill’s success: “Anything that’s worth doing is not likely to be easy. But we know it’s not going to happen if we don’t make the effort.”

“I’ve worked with captive animals for 40 years, the first 10 of those was as a caretaker, zookeeper, research technician, and then I became a veterinarian. Let me put this perspective: Imagine living all of your life on a queen-size or king-size bed. That’s the space we’re talking about. That’s the space that’s written into the regulations. I’ve treated the abuse that’s occurred from chains, from hooks. I’ve treated the feet from when elephants are standing in chains so they can’t get away from their own urine. I’ve treated the cats, that are breaking their teeth off ‘cause they’re chewing at the bars.” Mel Richardson, ADI Veterinarian

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It’s time for Americans to step up and break the chain of circus suffering. Make the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act a reality.

Contact your Members of Congress now! You can find sample letters and talking points to help you write a personal letter on our Break the Chain grassroots campaign site: www.breakthechainus.com And you can send an email message to your Member of Congress on our site here: http://bit.ly/TEAPAactionalert To ‘opt in’ to our Break the Chain Mobile Action Team, and get timely text messages on your cell phone that allow you to react instantly to action on Capitol Hill, text the word CHAIN to the number 55678 (Standard text message fees apply.) To sign up for our enews and Action Alerts, email our Los Angeles office at usa@ad-international.org Become a Break the Chainer and resolve to do at least one thing each week, or get one more person to send a letter to their Member of Congress each week. You can get this bill passed. You can: ● Distribute ten leaflets to neighbors, friends, colleagues, family to educate them about the issue ● Get ten friends/family/colleagues to write letters ● Send a donation to keep the campaign going.

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10 Reasons to Support H.R. 3359, Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act Protection of animals 1. Traveling circuses cannot meet the complex needs of wild animals, due to long, arduous journeys, confinement and social deprivation. It is increasingly difficult

to justify this in our advanced society. 2. Making animals do tricks requires extreme physical coercion and violence. 3. Objective scientific measures can determine the well being of a wild animal. Even with the best of intentions, the abnormal pacing, swaying, weaving and bobbing movements that we see in circus animals shows that they are not coping with the hard life on the road. Safety, health and oversight 4. Traveling circuses pose a serious threat to public safety, as they keep large and wild animals in close proximity to the public. Animals have escaped, workers and the public have been killed and maimed. 5. Diseased animals pose a public health risk. An estimated 12% of captive elephants in North America have tuberculosis (TB), which is contagious and can be passed from elephants to humans. 6. Enforcing the Animal Welfare Act is costly and fraught with difficulties because circuses are constantly on the move, animals and handlers change. economics 7. Constituents want to see wild animals protected. Like all American businesses,

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Break the Chain circuses must change with the times to stay relevant and profitable. An educated public prefers humane entertainment and human-only circuses are thriving. 8. The show, and jobs, will go on. Research shows that most circus workers have multiple roles; staff could be retrained as the circus evolves away from exotic animal acts so jobs are not lost. 9. H.R. 3359 will likely be good for the economy and save money. A survey showed that a decline in animal circuses was matched by a rise in human only circuses. So removing wild animal acts could actually increase the circuses’ bottom line. Ringling Bros. Circus, in a settlement with the USDA, paid out an unprecedented $270,000 penalty related to alleged violations of the Animal Welfare Act. Costly fines, legal fees and animal care expenses will be eliminated with H.R. 3359. Also, taxpayer money dedicated to USDA inspections can be saved. Americans will no longer have to pick up the tab for government licenses and expensive inspections of these animals.

Southampton, NY, Green Bay, WI, Richmond, MO, and recently Irvine, CA. H.R. 3359 is an important animal protection measure that will relieve an enormous amount of suffering, save resources and protect people.

Please donate to support this campaign ADI is in desperate need of funding to continue with this work. our investigations provide legislators with the evidence they need to take action. In 2011, we: ● Rescued every animal from Bolivia’s circuses ● exposed the beatings and electric shocking of elephants at Have Trunk Will Travel ● exposed the beating of Anne, the elderly circus elephant ● got a ban on wild animal circuses in Peru ● Launched H.R. 3359, with a massive public education campaign Please keep our investigators in the field, exposing the abuse and keep our grassroots campaign alive. Visit our site to make a donation today! www.adiusa.org

Kiara’s cubs were the last animals ever to perform in a circus in Bolivia. This picture was taken the day after ADI seized them from the circus. Don’t you want to be looking at a picture of the last ever animal to perform in America?

The time has come 10. The Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act is a narrowly focused and well reasoned step forward for animal protection and public safety. Countries such as Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Costa Rica, Singapore, Peru, Bolivia and more than 30 cities in 17 states across the country have taken action to restrict wild animal acts including

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Shockingly Cruel Entertainment Elephant Actors and Fairground Rides

In our last magazine, we reported on our undercover footage at gary and Kari Johnson’s Have Trunk Will Travel (HTWT) performing elephant supply company in Perris, California. We showed how elephants were beaten, electric shocked, and screamed and shouted at during training and daily handling. So playful, enjoying a shower with mom (above). It is hard to imagine who would even go close to a baby like Tucker with a bullhook. But they did. (Right) Tucker is pulled by the trunk and hit over the head.

When the movie ‘Water for Elephants’ was released early this year, we were outraged by the cynical assurances given to the media about humane treatment and training with treats and kindness, by the Johnsons, the film makers and American Humane. We released our footage of the training of the elephant Tai, to show how the public was being duped. ‘Water for Elephants’ was soon followed by the release of ‘Zookeeper’. So we then released footage of the training of another Johnson elephant, Rosie. ADI’s undercover footage—showing elephants crying out as they are shocked with stun guns to force them to do the very tricks that later would appear in the movies—has created a public dialogue with hundreds of news stories about the abuse of animal actors behind the scenes, and whether the fleeting moment of entertainment is worth a lifetime of

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suffering that the animals must endure. Such cruelty suffered by these animals in the name of human entertainment is a blight on our society.

Lawsuit Attorneys for ADI and two members of the public launched a case in Federal Court against HTWT and Gary and Kari Johnson for misleading the public about how their elephants are trained and treated. Our position is that these performing elephants are rented out like any other ‘product’, and to support sales of the product, HTWT falsely claims that the elephants have been trained with kindness. Therefore HTWT has duped the public and companies that rent their elephants.

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HTWT’s assurances to the media about animals being treated humanely during training amount to nothing more than a cynical advertising ploy. The court recently ruled that, based on plaintiff’s allegations, Have Trunk Will Travel’s misconduct rose to the level of violating California’s Unfair Competition Law and False Advertising Law. As is unfortunately common in cases involving efforts to protect animals, the court determined that the plaintiffs did not have standing and the case was dismissed.

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Campaign News The ruling that HTWT’s misconduct rose to the level of violating California’s Unfair Competition Law and False Advertising Law is a significant conclusion and supports our assertion that these false claims are fraudulent.

Elephant rides at zoos and fairs HTWT elephants are also rented out for elephant rides at zoos and county fairs. We believe that it is important that the authorities hiring these elephants demonstrate a proper sense of corporate social responsibility: they are creating the demand for the elephant rides and are therefore culpable over the suffering that goes on beforehand, in order to subdue the elephants so they can be used for rides. We also believe they are therefore implicated in the fraud on the public. Since the release of the footage, ADI has led a coalition of groups and citizen activists to stand up for these abused elephants—Tai, Dixie, Becky, Rosie and Kitty—by educating the CEOs of Hollywood movie studios and contacting the leadership at venues across Southern California where HTWT is contracted to provide elephant rides; including the Santa Ana Zoo and the San Diego, Los Angeles and Orange County Fairs. This has involved meetings with authorities and handing out tens of thousands of leaflets to fair and zoo-goers where the elephant rides are taking place. ADI’s Campaigns Director, Matt Rossell has helped organize outreach events and has testified at public meetings in front of the Santa Ana City Council, and the public Board of Directors meetings for the Fairs.

...VICT OR elephan Y: Santa An a t rides ended.. We have also cooperated with multiple investigations into the abuse of elephants at HTWT by providing video, expertise and other evidence detailing how the video depicts violations of California statute, goes against the guidelines of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA), the recommendations of the American Veterinary Medical Association, and even against the sworn statements made by the owners of HTWT when they testified on behalf of Ringling Bros. Circus in federal court. Dr. Mel Richardson, a captive wildlife vet, has attended these meetings alongside ADI to put the video footage into the context of his more than 40 years experience working with exotic animals.

Disappointingly, the San Diego Fair Board decided in a split 4 to 3 vote to table the decision and will continue the elephant rides until they bring it back on the agenda for discussion in 2014. This vote came after months of discussions and presentation of further evidence which refuted the claims that the abuse was somehow in self defense. On the day the decision was handed down, dozens of animal advocates and HTWT friends and industry insiders provided testimony to San Diego Fair Board Members. All of this education and campaigning for Tai and her elephant friends has made the local news in dozens of ongoing stories throughout Southern CA, keeping the issue alive in the public’s mind. ADI is anxiously awaiting the decisions from the Los Angeles and Orange County Fair Boards.

Kari Johnson hits an elephant hard with a bullhook at Have Trunk Will Travel.

Making progress Shortly after the release of the HTWT investigation, the AZA appeared to have no choice but to separate themselves from the kind of practices that were exposed, and announced a new protected contact elephant management policy. This means that no keepers are allowed to share the same space with an elephant, thus ending the use of elephant hooks and the abuse. Next we were delighted when the town of Sierra Madre, where Tai had been booked to lead a local 4th of July Parade, immediately canceled her appearance when city leaders and parade organizers saw the evidence. Then in December followed the fantastic news that Santa Ana City Council inquiry resulted in the decision to end the elephant rides at the zoo.

What You Can Do to Help Prevent the Suffering of Animals like Tai and Rosie • Email usa@ad-international.org and ask for a Water for Elephants and Zookeeper Letter Writing Action pack; this will help you write to your local newspaper, to the film makers of Water for Elephants and Zookeeper, and more • Spread the word - link to the video on your Facebook and other social networking sites. Visit http://www.adiusa.org to watch the video and get the facts. • Boycott films with animal actors and tell your family and friends to do the same.

Tim and Jan outside the LA Court.

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Campaign News Farewell to Rhanee:

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Panama Lions start new life in ADI Biosphere The 15,000 square foot biosphere that ADI funded to house our 25 Operation Lion Ark lions while they acclimatized to wintry Colorado after a very hot Bolivia, has some new arrivals – three lions from Panama. Most of the ADI Bolivian prides at The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS), are now living in underground dens in their vast outdoor enclosures (see page 18) but the massive biosphere is now helping more animals. TWAS rescued the three lionesses called Elena, Alyssa and Kaitlin, from a fairground in the small town of Chorrera, outside of Panama City. The 14 year old lionesses were being kept inside a small cage only 5ft x 8ft, and fed food scraps from local butcher shops. They have even made a friend! Kimba, the oldest lion rescued from Bolivia by ADI, investigated the new arrivals from across the breezeway, and let out a great roar to greet them. The three lionesses were immediately transfixed by his call! The lucky lionesses have certainly found a wonderful home.

ADI crates in Oakland tiger rescue

© Oakland Zoo

Rhanee, the elephant that grabbed people’s hearts following ADI’s exposé of the British circus industry a decade ago, has passed away. Rhanee was torn from the wild in Thailand in 1970 and sold to Mary Chipperfield. By the 1990s she being hired to circuses. In 1996, an ADI field officer, working undercover at Santus Circus, filmed Rhanee chained and being viciously hooked and hit. Worse was to come. An ADI team then infiltrated the Mary Chipperfield Promotions winter quarters in Hampshire from 1997 to 1998 and filmed horrifying abuse. Five elephants, including Rhanee, did not leave a barn for months and were systematically beaten on hundreds of occasions. ADI’s investigation shocked the world. The UK animal circus industry halved within six months, Chipperfield and two others were convicted of cruelty, and Mary Chipperfield Promotions closed down. Rhanee was secretly sold but ADI tracked her down to Valwo Zoo in Spain – alone in a small, barren pen, repeatedly bobbing her head. We campaigned and secured basic improvements and companionship for Rhanee but ADI’s offer to relocate her to the PAWS ARK2000 Sanctuary in California was refused. Years later when the zoo closed down, ADI again offered to relocate Rhanee. Instead she was sent to Wroclaw Zoo in Poland to end her days – a miserable climate for an old, arthritic elephant. Rhanee was euthanised on July 30, 2011 suffering from liver failure. She was 41 years old.

© Animal Defenders International

Torn from the wild in Thailand, and sold to Mary Chippperfield in 1970 – Rhanee endured a life of suffering all too typical of the entertainment industry

The tragic life of an elephant who never found her place in the sun

ADI helps lion and tiger rescues

ADI recently loaned the crates to transport four rescued tigers, Molly, Milou, Grace and Ginger, to Oakland Zoo. A Texas couple hand-raised the tigers, using them as roadside money-spinner. The couple divorced, the cats became too expensive, and they were confiscated when they weren’t being fed. They were taken by the USDA to the Gladys Porter Zoo where they lived for four years before the zoo’s tiger capacity reached its limit. The zoo had vowed not to split up the four females and Oakland Zoo stepped in to take all four. They were flown to their new home in Oakland in the ADI travel crates which had originally brought the first four lions we rescued in Bolivia to the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary in California – so the crates are clocking up some air miles!

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Campaign News

© Animal Defenders International

A Royal Appointment.... In recognition of their achievements for animal protection, ADI President Jan Creamer and Vice President Tim Phillips were recently invited to the Queen’s garden Party at Buckingham Palace.

Protected contact ensures there is a barrier between keeper and animal. Above, a lucky elephant at ARK2000.

AZA to end ‘free contact’ with elephants

The Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) recently announced the approval of new standards for human interaction with elephants. The new ‘Protected Contact’ standards will provide greater safety for elephant care workers as well as enhanced animal welfare at AZAaccredited and AZA-certified facilities. Protected Contact requires that keepers work with the animal protected behind barriers and consequently eliminates the use of weapons, such as bullhooks, to control and punish the elephant. It is a system that ensures the safety of the keeper and the welfare and comfort of the elephant. Protected Contact also eliminates elephant rides as this practice is inherently dangerous. The new Protected Contact policy states: "As soon as possible, and no later than September 1, 2014, elephant care providers at AZA facilities shall not share the same unrestricted space with elephants” and will “train their elephant care professionals to manage and care for elephants with barriers and/or restraints in place that provide employee safety." All AZA accredited zoos or AZA certified facilities must comply with these new guidelines or they will lose their AZA accreditation or certification. Until now, nearly all zoos and other facilities have been using the Free Contact system which allows elephant keepers and handlers to share the same space with the elephant while using the bullhook to hit, poke and generally intimidate the elephant as a means of control and domination over the giant creatures. This system has caused injury and death to care takers and trainers, and has caused substantial psychological and physical suffering to elephants. The AZA decision was announced shortly after ADI’s exposé of the horrific abuse of elephants at Have Trunk Will Travel where elephants were filmed being beaten and electric shocked during training. Enormous credit for this progressive move must go to the pioneers who promoted Protected Contact by putting it into practice such as our friends at the Performing Animal Welfare Society sanctuary, and also to the AZA accredited zoos who became early pioneers such as Oakland Zoo, San Diego Zoo, Detroit Zoo, and North Carolina Zoo. The AZA's decision shows the importance and strength of cooperation among all who strive for better living conditions for captive wild animals.

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A man was gored to death at a Spanish fiesta after taunting a bull with a pink umbrella. The bull attacked the man shortly after its release into a narrow street. A novel adenovirus has been shown to jump from animals to humans — and then to infect other humans. The team that discovered it found that the first human to be infected was the researcher in closest contact with the Titi monkeys that suffered an outbreak. U.S. researchers used 24 monkeys in a 4 year experiment to show that eating a high fat diet during pregnancy increases risk of stillbirth. Pressure mounts to move Toronto’s three elephants to California. After a plea from Bob Barker, Toronto Zoo's board has upheld a decision made by Toronto City Council to send the elephants, Toka, Thika and Iringa to the Performing Animal Welfare Society ARK2000 Sanctuary. After an earlier vote to close the elephant exhibit, an Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) accredited facility was sought for the elephants. PAWS – despite being acknowledged by many as perhaps most the impressive captive elephant facilty in the world – is not accredited by the AZA. The AZA has now threatened to withdraw Toronto’s accreditation.

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© Animal Defenders International

Campaign News

West Hollywood fur ban West Hollywood, California recently became the first city in the U.S. to ban the sale of fur products after a strategic campaign of local activists and groups, collectively named FurFree WeHo, and Councilmember John D’Amico, who pledged to work for a fur-free city during his election campaign. Dozens of activists, including ADI’s Campaigns Director, Matt Rossell, waited late into the night for a chance to testify in support of the ordinance, with the vote finally taken after 1:00 a.m. the next morning! The City Council voted 3-1 in support of the fur-free ordinance, which goes into effect on September 21, 2013 and will ban the sales of apparel that is made from the skin or pelt of animals with hair, wool or fur in West Hollywood. The Fur-Free WeHo campaign was a coalition of West Hollywood residents, local animal activists, non-profits like Last Chance for Animals, Animal Alliance, and ARME (Animal Rescue, Media & Education) along with city councilmember John D’Amico. D’Amico argued that the law was about the “impacts we have on the world. This is really an opportunity for our city to lead in a very specific and thoughtful way.”

72 beagles saved from lab

UK Household testing ban After several years of pressure from the ADI Kick animal testing out of the House campaign, the UK Government has clarified its pledge to end the testing of household products on animals. However, despite earlier indications that the ban would cover the testing of finished items and their ingredients, a recent ministerial statement says that only licences for finished products would ceased to be granted. Pressure needs to be maintained for similar measures to those ADI secured on cosmetics testing across Europe – a ban on the testing of ingredients and finished products. As it stands the latest “wonder ingredient” for dishwasher tablets or similar can still be tested. Nevertheless a positive step and one which if echoed in the US, would save lives.

© ARME

Animal Rights National Conference Congratulations to our friends at Animal Rescue Media education (ARMe) who stepped in to save 40 dogs when a vivisection laboratory in Spain closed. 32 beagles were relocated in europe leaving 40 dogs with time running out. ARMe quickly organised a flight for all 40 to come to Los Angeles where every dog has now been homed as part of the group’s Beagle Freedom Project.

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At the Animal Rights National Conference in LA in July, ADI Campaigns Director Matt Rossell (left) participated on the ‘State of the Movement’ panel, discussing our vivisection and circus campaigns in the US. He also discussed ADI’s undercover work on the ‘Conducting Investigations’ panel, which was met with great enthusiasm. At our booth in the exhibition hall, we showed our undercover footage of behind-thescenes elephant abuse during training at Have Trunk Will Travel, and distributed leaflets and magazines. The event was attended by over 1,000 activists and we met a large number of people interested in joining our campaigns. During the Conference, we partnered with Los Angeles restaurant ‘Veggie Grill’ to hold a fundraiser for ADI – raising almost $1,000. A success all round!

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ADI


Campaign News

© Animal Defenders International

Ringling Pays $270,000 in Settlement with USDA for alleged violations

Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Circus is to pay a massive settlement—$270,000—the largest of its kind in the history of the Animal Welfare Act (AWA), for alleged violations dating from June 2007 to August 2011. While Ringling “does not admit wrongdoing or any violation of USDA” in their press release, savvy observers are seeing things differently. The Los Angeles Times penned a scathing editorial about the announcement, “Ringling Bros., they're elephants, not clowns”, detailing some of the contents of the USDA inspection reports and noted that the USDA had also launched four investigations into the circus over the last two years “…that might have led to findings of more serious violations before the settlement ended all inquiry.” The Times piece flatly called for Ringling to retire the elephants and for circus patrons to boycott the show. The settlement agreement noted that more than a dozen inspections had resulted in reports of noncompliance with regulations, some of which according to the USDA inspection reports included a zebra escaped over some fencing and ended up on a busy highway, handlers lost control of an elephant, and circus staff were found using the same wheelbarrows for tigers’ wastes as their food. Animal Defenders International (ADI) is delighted to see the USDA taking firm action against Ringling and sending this clear message to other USDA licensed circuses and exhibitors. Further, this unprecedented punitive settlement is a clear indication for the need to pass federal legislation to protect wild animals in traveling circuses. Congressman Jim Moran (D-VA) who recently introduced H.R. 3359, the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act (TEAPA) alongside ADI, highlighted the USDA announcement and called for the passage of this bill. “Today’s [USDA] announcement indicates that mistreatment of animals in violation of the law – despite claims to the contrary from the traveling circus industry – is widespread and persistent,” said Rep. Moran. “The mounting evidence of inhumane treatment and growing public concern for these animals demands that we reconsider the appropriate living conditions provided for these intelligent, social creatures.” TEAPA aims to end the use of wild animals in traveling circuses in the U.S. – turn to page 6 to find out how you can get involved.

ADI

Summit for the elephants, 2012 – March 28, 29, 30: organised by the Performing Animal Welfare Society and hosted at the oakland Zoo. ADI President Jan Creamer and Vice President Tim Phillips, will be among the speakers at an event bringing together experts from sanctuaries, zoos, campaigners and researchers studying elephants in the wild. Admission for three days is $250 general; $175 student. For details and to register: www.pawsweb.org Laboratory beagle factory farm B&K Universal have been refused planning permission for breeding units in Yorkshire, UK. ADI presented evidence opposing the application. B&K has appealed. Research shows behavioral abnormalities are endemic among captive chimpanzees, including selfmutilation, repetitive rocking, eating feces and drinking urine. All 40 animals studied showed abnormal behavior: “despite enrichment efforts.” A Pacific white-sided dolphin died at the Nagoya Aquarium, Japan after landing outside its pool while rehearsing a jump routine. Atlanta “Doggie Wedding”: Stedman and Phoenix, a Beagle and a Papitese. Sarah Segal, mother of the groom, encouraged guests to donate to ADI. ADI Volunteer Linda Lee Baia, made a presentation about our work. In case you were wondering, these newlyweds are spayed and neutered!

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Campaign News Great Ape Protection and Cost Saving Act If passed, The Great Ape Protection and Cost Savings Act (GAPCSA) (H.R. 1513 / S. 810) will spell the end to all invasive research on great apes. An estimated 511 federal government owned chimpanzees are currently held in U.S. laboratories, with a further 122 held at a national, federally funded chimpanzee sanctuary. Over half of the 450 privately owned chimpanzees in laboratories are also supported by government funding. The bipartisan bill currently has 148 co-sponsors in the House and 12 in the Senate. GAPCSA will phase out the use of chimpanzees in invasive research in both federally funded and private laboratories, release more than 500 federally owned chimpanzees to sanctuaries, and prohibit future breeding of chimpanzees for experiments. ADI in coalition with Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine and other animal protection groups, recently participated in a Call-In Week of Action, mobilizing supporters to call their representatives in Congress and ask them to co-sponsor the bill. The U.S. is one of only two nations in the world, alongside Gabon, that continues to use chimpanzees for invasive research and it is well recognized that chimpanzees’ biological, emotional and social needs simply cannot be met in a laboratory environment. Although chimpanzees are our closest genetic relatives, significant differences exist in genetic expression, physiology and disease susceptibility between humans and apes, which result in different responses to drugs and pathogens. The bill’s sponsor, U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett, who himself was involved in primate research, has stated that “Americans have to decide if the benefits to humans of research using chimpanzees outweigh the ethical, financial and scientific costs. The evidence is mounting that they do not.” The campaign got a recent boost with the release of the Institute of Medicine’s study, which determined that chimpanzees are almost never necessary for biomedical research, followed immediately by the National Institute of Health (NIH) announcement they will stop funding new research grants for experiments involving chimps. How YoU can help: Please contact your representatives in Congress and ask them to co-sponsor this important legislation. You can send a email straight to representatives about GAPCSA, simply go to: http://bit.ly/GreatApeProtection

© Animal Defenders International

Pictured right: Our mobile billboard heads towards the British Parliament.

ADI takes lead on EU laws on vivisection U.S. isolation on the use of chimpanzees in experiments is confirmed by Europe’s Directive 2010/63/EU which formally prohibits the use of apes. An intense 8 year campaign by ADI secured this and other measures to protect primates including ending the wild capture of monkeys by dealers and restrictions on how monkeys are used. In a year’s time the Directive will be enforced by national

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laws in every European country. The battle is now on as the animal experimentation industry desperately seeks loopholes or to use the Directive to undermine existing laws. As the new laws are drafted across Europe, ADI has established this set of priorities for the transposition of the new Directive: ● No current laboratory animal protection to be downgraded

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● Greater transparency, accountability, and mechanisms to challenge animal research ● Increase in requirements for the justification of proposed animal experiments ● Establish mechanisms for the implementation of nonanimal alternative methods ● Mechanisms to ensure that guidance rules can be regularly updated ● 'Thematic review’ of animal use and certain experiments,

to set targets for replacement ● Restrictions the use of Non Human Primates in research and ending the wild capture of primates for research.

ADI


Campaign News

ADI brings case against circus bosses over elephant abuse Bobby and Moira Roberts, owners of Bobby Roberts’ Super Circus, are being prosecuted on criminal charges over the mistreatment of Anne the elephant. The charges followed a daring undercover investigation by ADI which exposed sickening abuse of Anne, the UK’s last remaining circus elephant, at the circus winter quarters. In an audacious operation an ADI Special Investigations Department team placed a camera that continuously monitored Anne for over two weeks. The 57 year old Asian elephant (torn from the wild as a baby), is severely arthritic. She was permanently chained by two legs, barely able to move, throughout the period. Defenseless Anne was in severe pain and repeatedly beaten, kicked and punched by circus workers – almost 50 incidents were captured. Monty, a camel, was spat at and hit, and miniature ponies and horses hit. The footage caused an outcry as it swept around the world and the Robertses were forced to hand over Anne, then Monty, to safari parks. Throughout, the pair insisted that Anne had been well cared for and loved. ADI’s legal team secured testimony from experts all over the world, analyzed and indexed 519 hours of footage so lawyers could identify each charge, and prepared criminal prosecutions under the UK’s Animal Welfare Act 2006 (AWA). The case was laid before the court during the summer and then in November, the UK’s Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) agreed that it would take up the ADI prosecution. At the pre-trial hearing in December, the circus owners pleaded not guilty and trial date was set for June next year. This is the first prosecution of a circus under the new AWA and the first ever prosecution related to circus animal husbandry (the chaining). The only other circus prosecution in the UK legal history took place in 1998 and was also brought by ADI – this won the cruelty convictions of trainer Mary Chipperfield and her husband, and their elephant keeper. The case for Anne will test whether the UK’s new AWA can bring owners to justice. Owners are responsible for providing their animals with a safe, secure and appropriate environment. The charges relate to not preventing her mistreatment, and allowing her to be permanently chained to the ground. © Animal Defenders International

© Animal Defenders International

Projects currently being funded by our humane research wing

ADI

Professor Paul Furlong, at Aston University; scanning to allow a wide range of studies concerning neurological research in humans. The studies of visual processing and perception in humans are increasingly able to characterize brain network activity in ways previously claimed to be only possible using invasive methods in animals. Dr Debbie Holliday, at the Leeds Institute of Molecular Medicine, aims to validate two in vitro models of breast cancer; a 3-dimensional cell culture and a tissue slice model. These are being compared with published data on animal models to show that they are viable replacements.

Professor geoffrey Pilkington’s team is using a human in vitro Blood-BrainBarrier model to investigate the role of several genes in the spread of cancer cells into the brain. The hypothesis is that genes in different types of cancers affect their tendency to cross the BBB. This research is important as 20-30% of cancers spread to the brain.

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No longer alone

© Animal Defenders International

BABOON BLISS!

Torn from his mother as a baby, Tilin spent the next 17 years of his life with the circus. Constantly chained by the neck, living in a small box, Tilin’s only company a pride of lions.

© Animal Defenders International

Step one to happiness: Tina is checked by the ADI team on arrival at Heathrow Airport, London

We first met Tilin in 2006, when our undercover investigators filmed him traveling with a circus. Lonely and depressed, Tilin needed his own kind. We determined that this campaign would not leave anyone behind – even one lonely male baboon. Following the circus animal ban in Bolivia, Tilin was finally handed over to ADI, along with his lion companions. While the lions headed to the U.S (p21), but Tilin was not so welcome. There were several counts against him: males are almost always

unwanted and difficult to home, Tilin’s age was against him, and there are almost no homes for Hamadryas baboons. The U.S. does not allow entry for stray rescue primates, so this immediately reduced many of his options. These concerns were uppermost in our minds as we started the search for a suitable home – then Tilin got lucky.

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The specialists at Lakeview primate sanctuary in the UK agreed to take Tilin, provided we would build the special accommodation he needed. Tilin is much larger and stronger than the other primates at Lakeview, so none of their accommodation was suitable. We would need to build both a quarantine unit and then later, a permanent enclosure. We also needed help ensure that he did not remain alone and provide financial support for any future companion. With the UK requiring at least 6 months’ quarantine, Tilin would need both an indoor room with platforms and an outdoor secure enclosure – this unit was the priority. The baboon quarantine facility was completed with the generous support of Bob Barker and features two indoor units and an outdoor climbing area. It will be the first

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Rescues

Tina is found The enquiries went out to sanctuaries and contacts around the world, and eventually we were alerted to the lovely young Tina (pictured grooming Tilin). Tina is also a Hamadryas baboon, around seven years old, born in a captive-breeding farm in Israel and exported to Cyprus with another primate for the pet market. When her owner could no longer handle her she was taken in by a donkey sanctuary, where she lived for about five years, her main playmate a German Shepherd dog. We felt that Tina would be the perfect companion for Tilin and arrangements were made for her to move to the UK.

They meet The ADI team met Tina at Heathrow Airport and saw immediately she was calm and had travelled well. We then headed to Lakeview. Tilin was exploring his outdoor pen when we arrived and he was shut outside whilst we released Tina into the first of the indoor units. As she cautiously emerged, she called out. Outside the big, burly Hamadrayas baboon froze – it was like a person who had been stranded on a desert island for years suddenly hearing a voice calling out in the evening air. Then Tilin was let into his night quarters adjoining the unit with Tina . They could see each other but not touch through the cage. His excitement was palpable. He headed to see her and she nervously

ADI

from that Hellish cage with the circus and bringing him all the way from Bolivia was an achievement but the greatest moment was ending his loneliness. Both Tilin and Tina have been deprived of the life they would have known, with their families in the wild. We need to do what we can to return some of that dignity and freedom of choice to them. © Animal Defenders International

home for all new large primates arriving at the sanctuary. The gentle and handsome Tilin arrived after a long journey from Bolivia, via Spain to the UK, which he appeared to enjoy enormously. From the moment Tilin arrived, he was a star. He quickly trained the Lakeview carers to do his bidding, and he enjoyed sitting quietly observing them as they talked to him. After he had settled in for a few months, the next step was to find Tilin a nonbreeding companion. Everyone deserves a chance at a life with their own kind.

Tilin : e r o f Be lone &a caged circus e h t h wit

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retreated. He settled into his bed and watched her. Very excited, but a perfect gentleman, Tilin clearly adored Tina from the moment he saw her. She was not so sure and at first, shouted at him – but Tilin’s patient and gentle nature won her over and she started to come close to the wire to be near him. A stream of low-key chattering followed as they settled down in their adjoining rooms. During the ensuing weeks Tilin remained cool and laid back in his interactions with Tina, who finally decided she liked him a great deal. Whenever Tilin nipped outside, Tina would call to him and he would dutifully scamper back. They were bonding. After a few weeks it was safe for Tina and Tilin to be brought together and they immediately started grooming. By the end of their first day together they were sharing Tilin’s bed. Tina has an implant so they will not breed After years of isolation, Tilin and Tina are together – forever. Saving Tilin

Tilin and Tina need a permanent enclosure of their own at Lakeview, where they will spend the rest of their days in peace, living among the trees, making their own choices and masters of their own lives.

HELP RAISE

$160,000

To build a huge natural woodland habitat for Tina and Tilin. This will include a night-house and be designed to allow sections to be added to accommodate other rescued primates.

Please donate today for Tilin and Tina’s dream home.

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Rescue News

Lion Ark: © Animal Defenders International

The adventure continues When ADI secured the ban on animal circuses in Bolivia it presented a new challenge. Next we had to race across Bolivia, closing down every circus, seizing every animal. Then the record-breaking lion flights to the US. The first group of four went to California. The rest, 25, on one flight to Colorado. Even after touching down the rescue continues to break new ground. The lions now roam as prides in the largest habitats of their kind in the US - up to 25 acres for a single pride. It is as close as we can get to returning these animals to the wild. With our sanctuary partner, this is a staggering achievement in rehabilitation and animal care.

© Animal Defenders International

For ADI this huge project will last as long as the lions live – some 20 years – we are committed to funding their care for life. And, that’s where we need your help.

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Winter – Spring 2012

Our policy on animal rescues is that our responsibility does not end when they arrive safely at their final destination. While day-to-day care is entrusted to our sanctuary partners around the world, we pay for food, veterinary care, construction of facilities and overheads. So our costs are not just for the rescue and relocation, but for the lifelong rising expenses of a sanctuary – it just happens the animals are residing in Colorado, California, Europe and Africa. So especially in these hard economic times, we very much need your support to help us keep these animals alive. By having sanctuary partners rather than running our own sanctuary,


Rescue News ADI is able to maintain our focus on our core work to secure permanent change. But when animals need to be saved in extraordinary circumstances, such as Operation Lion Ark, we are ready to take on what appears to be impossible. When we first met Pat Craig of The Wild Animal Sanctuary (TWAS) and outlined what we were doing with Operation Lion Ark, we knew our two organizations were a perfect match. Here was a sanctuary absolutely maximizing the space for the animals, giving them acre upon acre to roam. There and then, TWAS committed 80 acres of their land to Operation Lion Ark and ADI committed the funds – thanks to the generosity of Bob Barker – and construction began of this enormous facility. This included the huge biosphere to help the lions acclimatize, which is already being used to help more animals (see page 10). But what most excited us about TWAS was their commitment to making family prides of lions, to working towards a life for these animals as close to how they would live in nature, as possible. We felt very strongly that we did not want these families and friends split up and that they have the right to a family life. Since their arrival in Colorado, the most exciting development in this project has been seeing these sad and broken animals become prides – a massive achievement in itself.

Lions becoming lions again Within days of seizing the 25 lions from the circuses in Bolivia, the ADI team began the rehabilitation process. Our MASH-style temporary field station was set up on a small piece of land given to us by the Mayor of Santa Cruz. We started with proper food, nutritional supplements, and veterinary treatment. We built temporary cages so that we could maximize their space and they gradually returned to health, slowly transforming from the thin, parasite-infested lethargic animals we had removed from the circus. Although we knew their complete rehabilitation would not be possible until they had space to run at full speed. We began to profile their personalities and placed in adjacent cages, those lions we

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felt could become good friends and could eventually form prides together. Some were already living in groups – all of Bam Bam’s pride of eight had been crammed into one small cage at the circus! But others came as ones and twos and carried all the psychological problems of living isolated in a small barren cage. Males and females had to be separated, but families kept next to each other. The importance of keeping families within sight and hearing of each other was a policy that was reflected in the loading of the aircraft; we devised a color-coded loading plan for the flight to ensure that nobody would be frightened or split from family or companions. It was not possible to undertake full veterinary surgery in the field station so for those scheduled for major treatment, such as dental surgery, interim treatment was designed to just make them as comfortable as possible. Several lions needed urgent dental work on arrival in Colorado and we are very grateful to the Peter Emily Foundation, specialists in advanced veterinary dental services for captive exotic animals, who undertook the work. The lives of those lions were transformed.

Life begins in Colorado After the Lion Ark touched down in Denver, the lions were released from their travel crates into our specially-built ‘biosphere’: a custom-built heated habitat of enclosures with trees and grass, under a fabric roof that lets in sunlight. The joyful reunited families ran, played and tumbled together. Over the next few days all of the lions were anesthetized, given veterinary treatments, and the females given contraceptive implants. This allows for social balance in the prides without risk of a population explosion or fights when females are in season and is key to building families. Of course we already had three family groups – BamBam and Morena and their boisterous family, Marta, Maria, Rosita, Rosa, Rosario and Campeon; Colo Colo, Muñeca and Lulu; Hercules and Kiara with Fida and Panchula and the cubs - Bob, Nancy, and Percy. The others had come from all over Bolivia in ones and twos. There was sweet, shy


India, taken from her parents as a cub, she had never seen other lions before. She was stereotypic and the only lion initially scared to leave her tiny circus cage. There were the good natured Pancho and Temuco – they charged out of the circus cage into the ADI holding pen and played and played. Kenya, taken as a cub and put in what was little more than a cupboard, was scared and lonely. When she first emerged from her circus cage, Kenya grabbed a tire in her new pen and clung onto it – her first ever toy. There were Chitara and Dalila the affectionate sisters who had spent their lives together. Then there was old Kimba; half blind and completely alone for a decade.

The Lion Ark Prides The process began bringing together these disparate lions who had endured so much. Kenya and India were brought together, and then we introduced them to Pancho and Temuco, and then Chitara and Dalila joined the group. Although at first, it appeared to be going perfectly to plan, slowly India turned on the boys. Probably because she was halfblind from a cataract in one eye, and because of the mental damage from her miserable life in the circus, this family would not work out for her. So India was introduced to Kimba, the lonely male, and they like each other. They both have sight problems and so it is hoped that if these are dealt with, they could settle down together well – the sanctuary team will monitor and move forward slowly. The recently rescued Panamanian lions (p10) are now sharing the Bolivian Lions’ biosphere and they may eventually join their family group as well.

Running wild

© Animal Defenders International

While the lions acclimatized the huge outdoor enclosures were constructed. Each is around 20 acres of undulating natural countryside – not unlike African savannah during the summer. There are mounds and high points enabling the lions to survey their world (they like views); each has a lake, a waterhole, shelter from the sun, and underground dens – which they appear to enjoy very much. The lions are fed and monitored but do really lead their own lives, as they wish, living as naturally as possible. The first pride to leave the biosphere was Bam Bam’s group of eight with one of the

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naughty young females, Rosario, leading the charge. They quickly found the underground den and moved straight into it – the whole pride sleeping together. Next were Kenya’s pride – yes, once timid and hugging a tire, Kenya now leads the pride! Pancho and Temuco charged into the grassland, racing for 100 yards before pausing. They then settled to watch Bam Bam and his family next door. Kenya, meanwhile, led Chitara and Dalila on a mission exploring the whole enclosure. When it was time for Colo Colo, Muñeca, and Lulu to leave, Colo Colo first charged the fence where we were watching, just to show he was still the boss and to be feared, then off they headed. Hercules and his family were re-united inside the biosphere – Fida, Panchula, Kiara and the cubs, Percy, Nancy, and Bob. The cubs had been separated when in the circus, after being attacked, but the family were now settled. The cubs had grown fast and led the family out at breakneck speed, running, chasing and playing, their tails bouncing in and out of sight in the long grass. Kimba and India continue to spend time together and have permanent access to outdoor areas. Their rehabilitation is not complete yet; they are a work in progress which could go on for years.

We urgently need your help From tiny, stinking rusting cages in Bolivia to this paradise, our campaign secured the ban on animal circuses, continued on to the seizure operation, the airlift and now the rehabilitation. But it is not over yet. Every quarter we must raise $18,000 to support these Lion Ark lions. Please help us with a donation towards our sanctuary work. You can also adopt the lions, or give an adoption as a gift and receive regular updates on their progress.

Unless we can raise more funds we simply cannot afford to undertake operations like this in the future and we will struggle to care for the animals we have already saved. We need your help today – please send what you can. Thank you.

Winter – Spring 2012


© Animal Defenders International

Our Californian Pride

© Animal Defenders International

Camba, the female of the first pride of lions from Bolivia, has been separated from her brothers Dactari, Bambek and Simba by a fence, in order to prevent breeding and possible fights when she is in season. The team at the Performing Animal Welfare Society (PAWS) ARK2000 Sanctuary in California has been monitoring Camba and the boys to establish what the relationships are, and to consider how best they can be brought together. Having one female and three males has added a complexity to the dynamics of this family, so things have moved forward cautiously. First order of the day has been the breeding issue. once it was felt that Camba had reached full physical fitness the permanent surgical option was considered but Camba proved to be unsuitable for this, so she will go on the annual implant regime, the same as the females in Colorado, where it has allowed the integration of the males and females very successfully. We’re sure Camba will be delighted to be back with her brothers. Throughout the process she has remained very close with them, and most days has slept against the fence alongside them. Thank you to everyone who has adopted these four lucky lions! You have saved their lives and you are ensuring that they have a long and happy future ahead of them, living as lions should – occasionally chasing off anything in their enclosure, and lying in the California sunshine. Thank you.

For details on how to adopt a lion, contact our Los Angeles office at: Toll-free: 1-800-978-ADII (2344) Local: +1 323 935-2234 email: usa@ad-international.org


The Greatest Circus Protest on Earth?

Contact our Los Angeles office for leaflets and posters when the circus comes to town 323-935-2234 or usa@ad-international.org.

Help get TeAPA passed - turn to p6, right now!

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ADI acts after sick elephant falls

© A. Sanghvi

over 500 animal advocates greeted circus-goers at the Staples Center in Los Angeles for a massive demonstration which has been called “The Greatest Circus Protest on Earth”. Organized by ADI in conjunction with several other activist groups, the protest took place on the opening night of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus in Los Angeles. Circus-goers were asked to ‘Break the Chain’ by staying away from Ringling’s circus performances; thousands of leaflets were distributed. A video of the protest can be viewed on ADI’s YouTube channel by going to this link: http://bit.ly/RinglingProtestLA Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus recently settled a case with the USDA for violations of the Animal Welfare Act (see page 13). The $270,000 fine paid in November is the largest in history for such violations. Owner Kenneth Feld, CEO of Feld Entertainment, denied any wrong doing and said in a statement, “We look forward to working with the USDA in a cooperative and transparent manner that meets our shared goal of ensuring that our animals are healthy and receive the highest quality care,". Feld also adamantly argues that the Traveling Exotic Animal Protection Act (H.R. 3359) is completely unnecessary and is an “attack on an American tradition.” Also, in November, the Piccadilly Circus, a traveling animal circus act passed though Southern California, however, due to lack of interest and poor ticket sales, the circus canceled most of their performances.

Sarah, a sick 54-year-old elephant at the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, collapsed while attempting to climb onto the train after performing in Anaheim, CA. ADI has filed a complaint, calling on the USDA to investigate and retire Sarah. Ringling Bros. had previously been cited in a recent routine USDA inspection for a “repeat noncompliance” for lack of adequate veterinary care related to Sarah suffering a chronic, inadequately diagnosed condition resulting in pus-like discharge in her urine. In the report, a government inspector noted that staff were not following Ringling’s own senior veterinarian’s treatment regimen. ADI is concerned that the pain, stress and fatigue from this contributed to Sarah’s collapse in Anaheim, and Sarah needs to taken off the road immediately, with an appropriate elephant companion for support, so she can be properly rested, evaluated and treated. Many traveling circus animals continue to perform while sick – and incidents like Sarah’s fall underline the dangers faced by animals chained and caged in this impoverished life on the road. Sarah’s plight has received local, national and international attention, and one eye-witness video has been viewed by more than 100,000 people after it was featured on the Huffington Post. Sarah continued to perform when the circus moved on to Ontario, CA. where the circus was met by more ADI and other protestors.

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Victory!

Peru circus ban

Six years of investigations, exposés, lobbying, demonstrations, events and more conclude as Peru bans wild animals in circuses. Here we look back on the intense ADI campaign that has ended the misery of circus animals in two South American countries. And we ask, are you ready to help us step up the pressure for more bans?

Back in 2005, ADI investigators worked undercover in seven randomly selected circuses in Peru. The evidence showed systematic violence against circus animals, including lions with Circo Las Galaxias whipped and beaten with weapons; abuse of a capuchin monkey with Circo Zafari Kids, and an ocelot; many animals were subjected to verbal intimidation. Levels of confinement and deprivation were shocking, for example , lions living in a tiny beast wagon, without access to natural daylight; primates permanently chained down and other animals in tiny boxes.

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D E S O EXP

© Animal Defenders International

Collecting the evidence

D E N N A B

The battle for legislation We launched the Stop Circus Suffering campaign in 2007 with the support of the local groups in Lima. A report and DVD featured evidence from Peru and other South American countries and this was presented to the Peruvian Congress with proposals for legislation. The campaign built up a head of steam. Congressmen Alejandro Rebaza and Jose Antonio Urquizo immediately tabled bills banning the use of animals in circuses, which were joined together and discussed by Congress. In May 2008, we produced a further report, Science on Suffering, including scientific evidence on the effects of captivity and confinement. Despite a successful start, the going was not easy. For the bill to become law it needed to be debated and approved in both the Agrarian and the Andean Peoples commissions; selected for priority by the Board of Spokespersons for debate in the Plenary; and finally handpicked by the President of Congress to be discussed on the day. There were many hurdles. We lobbied every member of each Commission, with our briefings.

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L to R: An emaciated lioness confiscated from Circo Africa de Fieras after our original investigation; ADI President addresses the Peruvian Congress alongside Congressman Urquizo; ADI and local campaigners demonstrated outside circuses all over the country.

One of the most chilling images from our original investigation: A woolly monkey is terrorised. A few weeks later the monkey was dead.

BANNED


Above: As the ADI field officers moved from circus to circus more and more horrors were exposed.

Below: Just some of the many publications and videos that we produced during the campaign. From the outset the campaign was based on hard evidence.

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As the horrific footage came back from our undercover te but we knew we had to try. Six years of hard work later a The bill was finally debated in March 2009 and approved as an amendment of the National Animal Protection Law. It then passed in its new form to the Andean Peoples Commission where it was again approved unanimously, in May 2009. The first two hurdles were behind us. We now faced the challenge of getting the Board of Spokespersons to prioritize the bill. The ADI team stepped up the lobbying and met with 100 congress members, while also organising a series of events promoting a public petition in support of the bill.

More suffering exposed, celebrities speak out In May 2010, we undertook another undercover investigation and the new evidence became the core of a new

Key events on the road to ban.... 2005 & 2006 ADI field officers are embedded in the South American circus industry, tracking them across borders, monitoring their every move.

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film titled Unnatural Acts. The film was launched in the Peruvian Congress, and the suffering exposed was so horrific that the event received widespread TV, radio and print coverage. We also presented our petition of over 3,000 signatures to the President of the Congress. The Board listened and, just weeks later, prioritized the bill. Now all we needed was the President of the Congress to pick our bill for discussion on the day. Several Peruvian celebrities – including musicians Julio Andrade, Miki Gonzalez, William Luna, Toxico, and Grammy award winning band Aterciopelado – came out publicly in support of our campaign. After watching a video featuring them speaking out, a

number of Congress members personally wrote to the President of the Congress asking him to discuss the bill in the next sessions. A march was also held in the city in support of the bill. However, the circuses weren’t going to give up without a fight. Shortly after the celebrities spoke out, the circuses started lobbying the Congress claiming that our investigation lacked validity. ADI responded with more video evidence and detailed briefings to counter the claims. At the same time, public pressure was mounting with events in support of the bill continuing around the capital.

2007

2008

April: In Lima ADI releases the shocking findings of the investigation. Huge publicity, intense lobbying, demonstrations and awareness drives follow. In October the first Bill to ban animal circuses is tabled.

An ADI press conference at Congress announces two Bills from the two main parties banning animal circuses. Our report Animals in Circuses the Science on Suffering is released later in the year.

Winter – Spring 2012

Securing the ban During the 2011 elections, we met the President of the Agrarian Commission where it was

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eams we scarcely dared to believe it could be stopped – and the misery we exposed has been banned. suggested that it might be wise to look at other legislative routes to get the ban approved. After exploring several options, the Commission suggested adding an article on the use of animals in circuses to the Forestry and Wildlife Bill, soon to be heard in the Plenary. We recommended text for the amendment. The Bill covered only wildlife, so the hope of getting all animals, both wild and domestic (as we secured in Bolivia) was dashed. Nevertheless, a ban on all wild animals went through and this in itself was a huge victory.

ADI has now started working with the Ministry of Agriculture, drafting regulations for the implementation of the ban. We will be providing a draft text and carrying out a circus animal census to establish how many circus animals are in Peru. Special thanks to the local groups who worked alongside us: Unidos por los Animales (UPA), Amazon Shelter, Perú Antitaurino, Amar, Conciencia Animal and Orca.

URGENT APPEAL: This victory required a huge commitment by ADI. Our field officers were undercover in South American circuses for almost two years before we even launched this long campaign. Our work does not end here. We must ensure the ban is enforced – as we did in Bolivia – and we must maintain our campaigns in Brazil, Colombia, Chile and Ecuador where we are making progress. This vital work in South America relies entirely on our U.S. and U.K. offices for support. With your help, we are making a difference for animals, don’t let it stop now. Please send a donation today.

2010

2011

Our Unnatural Acts video is released with new investigation evidence. The Board of Spokespersons Prioritises the Bill. ADI’s Cruelty Is Not Culture campaign is launched with Peruvian artists and celebrities backing a ban.

In June, a ban on wild animals in circuses is attached to another Bill on Forestry and Wildlife and approved by Congress. July, President Alan Garcia signs the law.

Victory! The bill was fast tracked and approved by the Plenary of the Congress on 16 June and signed by the President in July.

2009 ADI releases videos and the Agrarian Commission combines and then approves the two Bills. The Andean Peoples’ Commission approves the Bill. ADI stages a photo exhibition at the Congress. Our inflatable elephant visits Congress.

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Stop Circus Suffering

British MPs vote for a ban on wild animal acts

Anne (below) was saved following the ADI exposé but the British Government has stalled when it comes to ensuring it never happened again.

comedian Ricky Gervais, and special debate in Parliament actor Brian Blessed threw which including a vote on a their weight behind the ADI motion urging Defra to ban “I hate to see wild campaign; 200 Members of animals in circuses. On the animals in circuses. It is Parliament (MPs) signed a day of the key vote, dozens heartbreaking to see motion calling for a ban; an of ADI supporters travelled to these poor animals ADI commissioned opinion London to lobby their MPs. confined in small cages poll showed 72% of the What followed was and carted around the Two years ago ADI filmed inside the British public want a ban. extraordinary in political country with little great British Circus elephant tent when But in May, the Government terms. It became clear that respect for their welfare staff thought no one was looking. The department responsible Prime Minister David and well-being. I have video of elephants being punched, kicked (Defra) announced it would Cameron was personally made my feelings and beaten was not the first ADI exposé to not ban wild animals in opposing a ban and known previously on horrify the UK public, and it wasn’t the last. circuses but, instead, would instructed that all this subject and I Following this, the British Government held introduce a licensing system, believe an outright ban Government MPs must vote a public consultation: 95% demanded a because of against it – using party is long overdue.” ban on wild animals in fears of a legal Sir Paul McCartney powers usually reserved for circuses. A ban was challenge. votes like economics or war. promised, but an election They claimed a ban was not Starting the debate in Parliament, Mark changed the Government and possible because of a Pritchard MP announced that he had been silence followed. pending legal case against offered advancement if he dropped the So in a technically difficult Austria over its ban on wild issue and threatened that his career was operation, ADI secretly filmed animals in circuses. In fact finished if he continued. Other MPs the UK’s last circus elephant, the case the Government reported similar pressure. Facing Anne (Bobby Robert’s Super was relying on had been widespread defiance, the Government “Animal Defenders Circus), in her barn over the heard and closed by the relented and MPs voted with their International’s recent winter – chained, alone, European Commission in conscience. They voted unanimously for a footage of Anne the arthritic, beaten, kicked and 2006, and rejected by the ban on wild animal acts. elephant being beaten spat on. We released it in European Ombudsman in The vote directs the Government to act; it graphically displays why March. Surely enough was 2010. ADI submitted is not binding, but the government should enough? evidence on both occasions. carries considerable ban wild animals in Sir Paul McCartney, Queen The Austrian Constitutional weight. circuses. I am appalled guitarist Brian Court and the Court of that wild animals are However, the Coaliton May, Justice of the European still kept in circuses and Government seems to fully support the call for Union confirmed that the be dogmatically Government’s statement was a ban. It is high time sticking to plans to that Government got on inaccurate. “regulate” this cruel and implemented one.” ADI and a delegation of MPs industry. Ricky gervais presented Defra with ADI has responded “The use of wild animals statements from the with a report ‘Out of in circuses is cruel, European Commission and Austrian Court Control’ including case distasteful and and the Defra Minister was forced to admit studies showing how unacceptable in the 21st that Parliament had been misled. Then the inspections have failed century. Our present Government claimed that a ban might be to detect abuse, and government is currently illegal under the European Services seriously ill animals backing away from Directive (freedom to trade) and breach the being concealed. ending this abhorrent UK’s Human Rights Act. practice. We call on In a strange ADI submitted independent legal advice coincidence, after the David Cameron that a ban would not be in breach of personally to act now, June vote a circus the European Convention on Human and take a step towards challenged Austria’s Rights, the UK Human Rights Act making Britain worthy of ban. Their case was 1998 nor the European Union its desired status as a dismissed by the Services Directive. nation of animal-lovers.” Austrian Constitutional Court By early June, MPs, furious with the Brian May in December. Government misinformation, held a

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Stop Circus Suffering: Global round-up Austria

Some of the thousands at the Bogotá “March for the Animals 2011”.

Cirkus Krone have filed a complaint before the Austrian Constitutional Court in an attempt to overturn the ban on wild animal acts. ADI has submitted a dossier to the Federal Chancellor who is opposing the complaint.

Germany In November the Bundesrat (a constitutional body similar to the U.S. Senate) passed a resolution that calls upon the Federal Government to submit an ordinance to ban the use of animals such as elephants, monkeys, bears, and giraffes, in circuses – they have allowed for an extension that would include big cats and all other exotic animals. Meanwhile, the Hessen region is considering a ban on the use of certain species in circuses such as monkeys, elephants, bears, giraffes, hippos and rhinos. ADI has supplied the Hesssen authorities with supporting evidence.

Greece Following an intense campaign led by ADI and our campaign partners, the Greek Animal Welfare Fund (GAWF), the draft animal protection bill was published in July. This includes a ban on the use of all animals in circuses as well as provisions on humane stray management, tail docking and neutering programmes. The bill is awaiting the signature of the minister before being introduced to parliament.

Norway Our Norwegian campaign is being revitalized for another drive for a ban with partners NOAH. ADI’s investigation in Norway revealed elephants and other animals touring in freezing temperatures.

Bolivia There are no animal circuses in Bolivia after ADI closed every one! However our team there drafts legislation on a range of animal protection issues.

Brazil

Ireland ADI’s Irish partners Animal Rights Action Network have been demonstrating regularly at circuses and a nationwide Stop Circus Suffering tour of schools is planned.

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The bill to ban the use of animals in circuses is currently pending debate in the Chamber of Deputies. The ADI team in Brazil has been meeting members of Congress to try and speed up the process, organizing a meeting with the President to present a petition in support of the ban.

Colombia A new bill banning animals in circuses has been introduced in the Chamber of Representatives of the

Congress. Bill No. 052 was drafted by ADI and sponsored by Congressman Augusto Posada. To date the bill has been signed by 19 members and we expect the bill to have its first reading soon. Over 4,000 people marched alongside the ADI team in Bogotá in May and presented Congress with a statement calling for a ban on animals in circuses and reform of the animal protection law. The huge demonstration was supported by Members and soap opera actress Margarita Ortega. ADI holds weekly information tabling events throughout Bogotá and we recently received a commendation by the Colombian Police in recognition of our "leadership in the development of activities for the protection of animals".

Ecuador ADI’s Unnatural Acts has been launched in Ecuador with a press conference in Quito. At a meeting with the Vice Minister for the Environment, the Ministry expressed support for a resolution to ban animals in circuses. We have begun a census of circus animals in the country.

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Animal Defenders International U.S: 6100 Wilshire Blvd., # 1150, LOS ANGELES, CA 90048, U.S.A. Toll-free: 1-800-978-ADII (2344) Local: +1 323 935-2234 e-mail: usa@ad-international.org UK: Millbank Tower, Millbank, LoNDoN, SW1P 4QP, UK. Tel: +44 (0)20 7630 3340 e-mail: info@ad-international.org South America: Apartado Postal 359888 BogoTÁ, Colombia.

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Tilin and Tina. After years of isolation, they are now together, forever.

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