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Document Activity Level 2 Unit 4   VOCABULARY Grocery store

College

The moon

Manager

Short

Jewelry

Small

Tall

Big


Young

Old

Slow

Fast

Waiter

Waitress

Fish

Fork

Beef

Spoon

Chicken

Knife


Napkin

Beans

Bowl

A fountain

Potato Stairs

Butter

A statue

Pepper

A painting

A hill

A drum


A band

A museum

A temple

A church A movie

Famous

A mosque

a towel

Theater

A synagogue A zoo

Shorts


VERBS Drive

Smile

Cost

Answer Laugh Rent 路

Ask Wear

Bring


CONTENT Simple Present Simple Present Conjugacion Verbo TO BE en Presente Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I am Student/ at Home You are Student/ at Home He is Student/ at Home She is Student/ at Home We are Students/ at Home They are Students/ at Home You are Students/ at Home It is Student/ at Home

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I am not Student/ at Home You are not Student/ at Home He is not Student/ at Home She is not Student/ at Home We are not Students/ at Home They are not Students/ at Home You are not Students/ at Home It is not Student/ at Home

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Am I Student/ at Home? Are you Student/ at Home? Is he Student/ at Home? Is she Student/ at Home? Are we Students/ at Home? Are They Students/ at Home? Are you Students/ at Home? Is it Student/ at Home?

Conjugacion de Verbos en Presente El Do (I, you, they, we) y Does (It, He, She) son auxiliaries que nos ayudan a negar y a preguntar

Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I work in a school You work in a school He works in a school She works in a school We work in a school They work in a school You work in a school It works in a school

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I don’t work in a school You don’t work in a school He doesn’t work in a school She doesn’t work in a school We don’t work in a school They don’t work in a school You don’t work in a school It doesn’t work in a school

More Examples from Rosetta: Do you have a question? Yes, I have a question. Do you have questions? Yes, we have questions. We live here. I’m busy now. I’m free now. How much does this piano cost? They live downtown. They don’t live downtown. He’s angry. He’s happy. He’s sad. Don’t swim here. Don’t drive here. What do you see? I see a man on the stairs. I’m happy because it’s sunny.

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Do I work in a school Do You work in a school Does He work in a school Does She work in a school Do We work in a school Do They work in a school Do You work in a school Does It work in a school


She’s happy because it’s her birthday. Excuse me, Where is the temple? First, go to the park. Then, turn left. Thank you.

Simple Past PASADO SIMPLE (Simple Past) Conjugacion Verbo TO BE en Pasado Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa)

Negative Form (Forma negativa)

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa)

I was Student/ at Home You were Student/ at Home He was Student/ at Home She was Student/ at Home We were Students/ at Home They were Students/ at Home You were Students/ at Home It was Student/ at Home

I was not Student/ at Home You were not Student/ at Home He was not Student/ at Home She was not Student/ at Home We were not Students/ at Home They were not Students/ at Home You were not Students/ at Home It was not Student/ at Home

Was I Student/ at Home? Were you Student/ at Home? Was he Student/ at Home? Was she Student/ at Home? Were we Students/ at Home? Were They Students/ at Home? Were you Students/ at Home? Was it Student/ at Home?

Conjugacion de Verbos en Pasado Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I worked in a school You worked in a school He worked in a school She worked in a school We worked in a school They worked in a school You worked in a school It worked in a school

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I didn’t work in a school You didn’t work in a school He didn’t work in a school She didn’t work in a school We didn’t work in a school They didn’t work in a school You didn’t work in a school It didn’t work in a school

More Examples from Rosetta: We used to live here. In May, I took a photo in the woods. In October, he took a photo of his friends. He found his glasses. He returned the bicycle. What did you do today? First, I ran for thirty minutes. Then, I went to the grocery Finally, I cooked dinner.

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Did I work in a school Did You work in a school Did He work in a school Did She work in a school Did We work in a school Did They work in a school Did You work in a school Did It work in a school


Present Continuous PRESENTE CONTINUO (Present Continuous or Present Progressive) Formula: este tiempo va con verbo TO BE + otro verbo con ING + Complemento Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I am working You are doing the homework He is learning French She is studying English We are running They are watching TV You are drinking wine It is raining

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I am not working You are not doing the homework He is not learning French She is not studying English We are not running They are not watching TV You are not drinking wine It is not raining

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Am I working? Are you doing the homework? Is he learning French? Is she studying English? Are we running? Are They watching TV? Are you drinking wine? Is it raining?

PASADO CONTINUO (Past Continuous or Past Progressive) Formula: este tiempo va con verbo TO BE en pasado + otro verbo con ING + Complemento. Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I was working You was doing homework He was learning French She was studying English We were running They were watching TV You were drinking wine It was raining

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I was not working You were not doing homework He was not learning French She was not studying English We were not running They were not watching TV You were not drinking wine It was not raining

More Examples from Rosetta: He’s taking a photo of her. He’s looking for his glasses. He’s returning the bicycle. What time are you arriving? We’re coming at seven o’clock. How many people are arriving? Four people. I’m packing my suitcase. She’s unpacking her suitcase.

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Was I working? Were you doing homework? Was he learning French? Was she studying English? Were we running? Were They watching TV? Were you drinking wine? Was it raining?


Future Will Simple Future Formula: Pronombre + will + verbo en infinitivo + complemento Ej: Yo trabajare / Yo no trabajare / Trabajare? Nota: cuando es negacion se puede usar el Won’t o el Will no. Es lo mismo. Affirmative Form (Forma afirmativa) I will work You will do He will learn French She will study We will run They will watch TV You will drink wine It will rain

Negative Form (Forma negativa) I will not (won’t) work You will not (won’t) do He will not (won’t) learn French She will not (won’t) study We will not (won’t) run They will not (won’t) watch TV You will not (won’t) drink wine It will not (won’t) rain

More Examples from Rosetta: We will live here. Will you dance with me? Will you read to me? I will call you after work. I will go to work this evening. I will play the guitar in a famous band. We will play in the same band. How long will the band play? T He band will play for two hours. He will return the bicycle. You will be able to ski in November. We will be able to play with this tomorrow. It will be windy.

Interrogative Form (Forma interrogativa) Will I work? Will You do? Will He learn French? Will She study? Will We run? Will They watch TV? Will You drink wine? Will It rain?


Pronoun Possessive Apostrophe PRONOUNS The ONLY personal possessive pronoun with an apostrophe is "one's". NOUNS 1. The standard rule: Use 's for the singular possessive, and a bare apostrophe after the plural suffix -s or -es for the plural possessive. For example:

Singular Nominative Possessive

Plural dog dog's

dogs dogs'

2. Nouns ending with an [s] or [z] sound (this includes words ending in "x", "ce", and similar examples): The plural suffix is -es rather than -s (unless there's already an "e" at the end, as in the "-ce" words), but otherwise the rule is the same as above: Singular Nominative Possessive

Plural class class's

classes classes'

(The possessive plural is what is wanted in "the Joneses'". This is short for "the Joneses' house", which is not "the Jones's house".) There are, however, examples where the singular possessive suffix is a bare apostrophe: Singular Nominative Possessive

Plural patience patience'

patiences patiences'

(In most such examples, the plural is rarely used.) For nouns in this category, many people would consider the 's suffix and the bare apostrophe to be acceptable alternatives. The rules listed below may be taken as "most common practice", but they are not absolute. A. The 's suffix is preferred for one-syllable words (grass's) or where the final syllable has a primary or secondary stress


(collapse's); B. The bare apostrophe is preferred: - for words ending in -nce (stance'); - for many classical names (Aristophanes', Jesus', Moses'); - where the juxtaposition of two or more [s] sounds would cause an awkwardness in pronunciation (thesis'). C. Usage is divided in the situation where the final [s] or [z] sound falls in an unstressed syllable (octopus'/octopus's, phoenix's/phoenix', and so on). The question of which suffix is correct arises less often than one might imagine. Instead of saying "the crisis' start" or "the crisis's start", most native speakers of English would say "the start of the crisis", thus avoiding the problem. 3. Plurals not ending in s: Use 's for the possessive plural (men's, people's, sheep's). More Examples from Rosetta: A man’s swimsuit

A woman’s swimsuit

Men’s sandals

Women’s sandals


There is – There are Positive Sentences We use there is for singular and there are for plural. • • • •

There is one table in the classroom. There are three chairs in the classroom. There is a spider in the bath. There are many people at the bus stop.

Contractions The contraction of there is is there's. • There's a good song on the radio. • There's only one chocolate left in the box. You cannot contract there are. • There are nine cats on the roof. • There are only five weeks until Christmas.

Negative Form The negative is formed by putting not after is or are: • • • •

There is not a horse in the field. There are not eight children in the school. There is not a tree in the garden. There are not two elephants in the zoo.

The Negative contractions are: There's not = There isn't There are not = There aren't

There Are with ANY When we want to indicate that a zero quantity of something exists we use there aren't any.


• There aren't any people at the party. • There aren't any trees in my street. We also use this structure with uncountable nouns: • There isn't any water in the swimming pool. • There isn't any sugar in my coffee.

Questions To form a question we place is / are in front of there. Again we use any with plural questions or those which use uncountable nouns. We also use there is / are in short answers. • • • • •

Is there a dog in the supermarket? - No, there isn't. Are there any dogs in the park? - Yes, there are. Is there a security guard in the shop? - Yes, there is. Are there any polar bears in Antarctica? - No, there aren't. Is there any ice-cream in the freezer? - Yes, there is.

How Many with Are There If we want to find out the number of objects that exist we use How many in the following form: How many + plural noun + are there (+ complement). • How many dogs are there in the park? • How many students are there in your class? • How many countries are there in South America? How many Star Wars films are there? More Examples from Rosetta: There are a lot of sailboats

There is some snow


Would Would is an auxiliary verb, a modal auxiliary verb. We use would mainly to: • talk about the past • talk about the future in the past • express the conditional mood We also use would for other functions, such as: • expressing desire, polite requests and questions, opinion or hope, wish and regret... Structure of Would subject + would + main verb The main verb is always the bare infinitive (infinitive without "to").

+ Positive Negative ? Interrogative

subject She She Would

auxiliary verb would 'd would not wouldn't she

main verb like

tea.

like

whisky.

like

coffee?


Notice that: • Would is never conjugated. It is always would or 'd (short form). • The main verb is always the bare infinitive. Use of Would Would: Desire or inclination • I'd love to live here. • Would you like some coffee? • What I'd really like is some tea.

Would: Polite requests and questions • • • •

Would you open the door, please? (more polite than: Open the door, please.) Would you go with me? (more polite than: Will you go with me?) Would you know the answer? (more polite than: Do you know the answer?) What would the capital of Nigeria be? (more polite than: What is the capital of Nigeria?)

Would: Opinion or hope • • • • •

I would imagine that they'll buy a new one. I suppose some people would call it torture. I would have to agree. I would expect him to come. Since you ask me I'd say the blue one is best.

Would: Wish • I wish you would stay. (I really want you to stay. I hope you will stay.) • They don't like me. I'm sure they wish I'd resign. More Examples From Rosetta: What would you like to see today? I would like to see the temple.


CONVERSATION

Mary: Good morning Jack, what did you do this morning? Jack: I went to the Church Mary: Wow, nice for you, I usually go to church too. Jack: Oh, what religion are you? Mary: I’m Jewish Jack: So you Jewish people go to church how often? Mary: Well we have no church, we have Synagogue Jack: Isn’t it the same? Mary: Not exactly the same but we do the same as you, we pray. Jack: So, what are you going to do this afternoon? Mary: I have no plans, what do you have in mind? Jack: what about going to the college’s theater to watch a movie? Mary: It sounds great! I was also thinking going to the fountain close to the Town square statue, would you like to come along? Jack: Yes, sure why not. We can also go to the restaurant close to the town square? Mary: I’m not sure, they only serve beef and chicken, and we Jewish can’t eat by religion. We only eat Kosher. Jack: Ok, there is no problem, we can ask the waiter to bring some salad with peppers and Beans. Mary: Great, I love pepper and beans. Jack: What about tonight? Would you like to go to the museum? Mary: Yes, sure there is a painting upstairs the museum, which I like the most. Jack: Yes, they have this one of the elephant jumping over the moon. Mary: Yeah, I have seen that painting too. Jack: So, can I ask you something? Mary: Yes, sure what is it? Jack: Can I drive today? Mary: Yes, don’t forget to bring the camera, we are going to laugh our heads off! Jack: Hehehehe, how much do you think today’s plans will cost?


Mary: I have your answers right here! Let me calculate. Jack: Yes sure go ahead. Mary: It will be $280.00 dollars. Jack: WOW, so cheap for the whole day long smiles on our faces! Mary: Indeed! Jack: Tomorrow there will be this old cars show, would you like to come along? Mary: Yes, but I prefer going to the faster cars show. Jack: Wherever you wan to go! Mary: Nice, let’s start today’s plans. Jack: Yes, let’s do it!


Documento Nivel 2 Unidad 4