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Guest Editorial Table of Contents

Al Hammond: Southern Region Director, Friends of NRA

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Cover Story

2010 Friends of NRA Merchandise Package

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The Honorable Bill K. Brewster Vice President

Industry Corner Big Sky Carvers

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Tech Talk

Email Blasts

Mr. Frank R. Brownell, III President

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The Honorable Joe M. Allbaugh Trustee Mr. William A. Bachenberg Trustee Mr. Allan D. Cors Trustee Ms. Sandra S. Froman Trustee

National News Fall in Fairfax

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National Police Shooting Championships

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Friends of NRA Most Outstanding Committee

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California Club University

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Friends Update

General P.X. Kelley, USMC (Ret.) Trustee Mr. Wayne R. LaPierre, Jr. Trustee Mr. Owen P. Mills Trustee Mr. James W. Porter II Trustee Mr. Dennis J. Reese Trustee Mr. Ronald L. Schmeits Trustee

Eastern Region

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Central Region

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Southern Region

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Mr. H. Wayne Sheets Executive Director

Western Region

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Mr. Wilson H. Phillips Jr. Treasurer

Mid-West Region

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Mrs. Sandy S. Elkin Secretary

The Super Bowl of Banquets

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Captain John C. Sigler Trustee

Great States

Mission Statement

Program Profile National Rifle Association Museum

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NRA Foundation Donors

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Established in 1990, The NRA Foundation, Inc. (“NRA Foundation�) is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt organization that raises tax-deductible contributions in support of a wide range of firearms-related public interest activities of the National Rifle Association of America and other organizations that defend and foster the Second Amendment rights of all law-abiding Americans. These activities are designed to promote firearms and hunting safety, to enhance marksmanship skills of those participating in the shooting sports, and to educate the general public about firearms in their historic, technological, and artistic context. Funds granted by The NRA Foundation benefit a variety of constituencies throughout the United States, including children, youth, women, individuals with physical disabilities, gun collectors, law enforcement officers, hunters, and competitive shooters.

About the Cover:

2010 Friends of NRA Gun of the Year: Kimber 84M Classic Select Grade .308 WIN

Traditions Staff Traditions is published quarterly by The NRA Foundation, Inc., for the benefit of its donors and other interested parties

11250 Waples Mill Road . Fairfax, VA 22030 . (800) 423-6894 . www.nrafoundation.org

Co-Editor: Amber Niblock-Shorter Co-Editor: Nicole McMahon Editor and Design: Jeremy Greene


Guest Editorial

Have you ever wondered... who selects the Standard Merchandise Package for Friends of NRA events, and what the process is for getting an item considered? I hope to offer some insight in answering these questions and discussing how the 2010 Standard Merchandise Package was chosen.

Al Hammond Southern Region Director Friends of NRA

The selection process for 2010 was an exciting one. The committee came together as early as December of 2008 to start discussing and reviewing new ideas. At the heart of the committee were NRA’s own field representatives, who work year-round with the merchandise at banquets across the nation, receive direct feedback from volunteers and attendees, and through experience, learn what works and what doesn’t. Field representative inclusion and input is invaluable to the process as well as the presence of regional directors, the Friends of NRA Merchandise Manager, and the National Manager of Volunteer Fund-Raising. Each of us work year round gathering information and ideas from volunteers, attendees, business owners, and industry leaders. We were constantly soliciting new ideas and looking for new products, attending vendor shows, auctions, and of course, NRA Annual Meetings. During this exploratory time, we send informational packets to potential companies and request that they submit their products and prototypes with detailed information in time for our annual selection committee meeting in March. Many of the companies we work with are ones in which we have a long-standing history. Our relationship with each is vital in recognizing trends and getting a jump on exclusive or innovative new products. Our goal as a group is to find items which will work for each Friends of NRA event across the country. No Standard Merchandise Package is region specific, instead, they all are a blend of quality artwork, custom firearms, and fraternal items attendees will appreciate and enjoy owning. I have been on the selection committee many times before and I am always proud of how the selection team members can step back and consider an item not only because it would be good for their part of the country, but because it would be good for the overall program. Suggestions from the field, volunteers, and industry leaders are a major part of the selection of any Standard Merchandise Package. Certain items will often inspire committee-conceptualized products where we seek industry representatives to custom manufacture an idea we have for an item we would like to see in the package. And, sometimes, we find or visualize an item but aren’t able to feature it until years down the road. A perfect example of this is the Weatherby pump-action shotgun. This gun in particular was in the works for almost two years before featuring it in this year’s package. It is Weatherby’s first ever pump-action shotgun, and being a part of the conceiving process while also being the first to offer it to the public is an amazing experience. Each year, several hundred items are submitted and reviewed, but only a small number are chosen to be featured in the yearly package. Without input from every angle, the package simply wouldn’t be what it is today. A quality Standard Merchandise Package, along with the thousands of dedicated volunteers who work on committees and host events, is why the Friends of NRA program is so successful. That is why we work so hard every year to put together the very best Standard Merchandise Package we can, and this year was no different. It is a long, but exciting process and we are proud as ever to present the 2010 Standard Merchandise Package. Input from the volunteers is critical to maintain a healthy Friends of NRA program. If you have a suggestion about an item or a company to approach about using their product in future Standard Merchandise Packages, please contact your local NRA field representative. We value your input. Check out the website at www.friendsofnra.org for specific information about the 2010 Friends of NRA Standard Merchandise Package.

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Cover Story

2010 Friends of NRA

Merchandise Package A s Friends of NRA winds down another successful year, it is gearing up for an exciting 2010. The 2010 Friends of NRA Standard Merchandise Package is causing much of the excitement, as it is comprised of items which possess all the characteristics you’ve come to expect at a staple Friends of NRA event– quality, unique, custom, and limited-in-production items you can’t find anywhere else. Each year, a committee is formed, items are sought and submitted, and deliberations over next year’s Standard Merchandise Package begins. As simple as it sounds, a lot of time and effort goes into every package. The planning and preparations start early in the previous year, but once chosen, the items are compiled and sent to be auctioned off at over 1,000 Friends of NRA events across the nation. The importance is monumental, as the Standard Merchandise Package helps draw in old and new attendees alike, and gives every committee a solid platform from which to

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launch their event. Some of the most sought after items are the highly-anticipated Gun of the Year, Knife of the Year, and Print of the Year- and attendees have every reason to be excited to get their hands on these 2010 exclusives. The 2010 Gun of the Year is a Kimber 84M Classic Select Grade .308 WIN with matte blue sporter 22” barrel that combines a presentation rifle with a functioning field gun. “The Kimber name is synonymous with the kind of quality Friends of NRA demands in a Gun of the Year,” said NRA Field Rep Specialist Rex Thomas, who served on this year’s selection committee. “The Select Grade is yet another cut above the already highly popular field gun from Kimber and the extra frills of high grade French walnut stock, NRA serial number, specially cut 20 lines-per-inch checkering on the grip and forend, and gold Friends of NRA logo on the floor plate really kick this rifle up several levels into the realm of collectibles, yet it’s a rifle we wanted buyers or winners to feel comfortable using in the field. I think we captured that concept perfectly in the selection of this rifle.” The 2010 Print of the Year is a beautiful giclee painting “Autumn Gold” from award-winning and world-renowned wildlife artist Pat Pauley. The piece depicts a Whitetail buck with two doe by a tranquil streamside setting in the fall. “It was time to go back to our most common denominator among NRA’s legions of  hunters, the beauty and fascination we have with the Whitetail deer.” said NRA Sr. Field Representative for Upper New York, Jay Rusnock. “We needed to capture the essence of a magnificent buck in the kind of fall scene that we all dream of being a part of. Pat Pauley’s ‘Autumn Gold’ was the winner in our ‘Best

2010 Print of the Year: “Autumn Gold” by Pat Pauley

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


Artist Spotlight: Adam Grimm “Gems of Fall” by Adam Grimm has unique significance to the Friends of NRA program. Finding early success in NRA’s own youth art competitions, artist Adam Grimm comes full circle to bring Friends of NRA this exclusive giclée painting. Grimm is a three-time winner of the NRA sponsored Junior Wildlife Art Competition and since, went on to win the prestigious Federal Duck Stamp Competition at the age of 21 and has been commissioned for several state duck stamps, as well as obtained many other celebrated awards and recognitions. Highlighting an artist who has supported and participated in the NRA since his youth is highly celebrated by the Friends of NRA program. His presence in the package helps illustrate the good that comes from raising money for youth programs. In this giclée painting, Grimm uses a warm autumn backdrop to illuminate four majestic mallards as they fly over marshy waters. Each duck’s individual colors shine in the sun’s early morning glow, creating a visually stunning piece that is sure to win its way into any duck hunter’s heart or home. Each is signed and numbered and offered exclusively to Friends of NRA.

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in Show’ contest among many fine artists that we had the for more,” said Joseph Crismore, NRA Field Representative privilege to carefully evaluate. The Print of the Year is a crit- for Montana. “Quality of merchandise is everything. You ically important part of our banquet traditions and a highly can find items in all price ranges but unique, quality items prestigious honor for artists to aspire to. Our 2010 banquet are what keeps attendees coming to our events.” guests will be thrilled to take a good, close look at and feel Unique items are spread throughout the entire package, the compelling lure and the magic of this image.” including the NRA Grandfather Clock that serves as an at For the 2010 Knife of the Year, Friends of NRA staff tractive gun cabinet, the Cabela’s EZ-Up canopy, which sets conducted extensive research to present attendees with the up within seconds, and the Fred Boyer Ram Skull Bronze Silver Stag Damascus Drop-Point Skinner with a North sculpture that marks the beginning of a real bronze series, American elk antler just to name a few. handle. “The commitThe only problems for tee wanted a useable, attendees this year is yet collectable knife choosing which items for 2010,” said Thomthey want to take as. “We were also all home the most. in agreement that we “I believe, without wanted real, not simuquestion, this year’s lated, elk antler as the package is the stronhandle material.  This gest package Friends of in and of itself makes NRA has ever assemeach knife unique. It bled for our fund-raishad to be the right ing events,” Thomas style blade for field said. “Not only is it use— gutting and visually strong, but it’s skinning.  We also felt incredibly desirable strongly that Damasmerchandise at very, 2010 Knife of the Year: Silver Stag Damascus Drop-Point Skinner cus steel was the only very reasonable pricway to go because all ing.  There is tremensportsmen want to, at least once in their lives, own a Da- dous fund-raising potential with this package. One of the mascus steel knife. Finally the sheath had to be properly upcoming challenges for a committee and field representadesigned and ‘useable.’ NRA logos on both the sheath and tive will be to narrow down the selection of items to what knife were also requested by the selection committee. The they want in their live auction. Over the past 16 years, we committee pretty much designed this year’s knife by tak- rarely had the luxury of too many items to choose from for ing several ideas from multiple submissions and coming up a live auction. What a great problem to face!” with our own very special Knife of the Year.”  “In all categories we seek to get the biggest bang for our Visit www.friendsofnra.org to check out the full 2010 Stanbuck. We want quality that is second to none with an ‘awe’ dard Merchandise Package along with detailed descriptions of factor to keep our attendees surprised, happy, and hungry each item.


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Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


A Standard Package 19

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1: “Keep These Colors Flying”

10: Bob Allen OD Green

19: Weatherby PA-08 Pump

by Brian Hart 2: Savage 93R17 BTV .17 HMR 3: “Iwo Jima” Sculpture 4: NRA Grandfather Clock 5: “Miles to Go” Elk Hunter Sculpture 6: ADG Electronic Top Load Gun Vault w/ NRA logo 7: Small Camel Back NRA Trunk 8: 1911A1 .22LR Conversion Unit 9: Fred Boyer Ram Skull Bronze

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Scoped Rifle Soft Case 11: Boyt Customs Design Concealed Carry Briefcase 12: Leupold Rogue Binoculars 8 x 42mm 13: Origo Sportsman Weather Station 14: Friends of NRA Scope Mounting Kit 15: NRA Belt Buckle 16: Merganser Hooded Decoy 17: Remington 700 SPS .300 Win Mag. 18: Taurus Revolver .357 Mag.

Action 12GA Shotgun 20: NRA Deputy Cat 21: “Gems of Fall” by Adam Grimm 22: Freedom Metal Art 23: NRA Glock .40SW Model 22 24: NRA Polished Copper Eagle Weathervane w/ Floor Stand 25: NRA Padded Sling 26: Three Tin Sign Set 27: “The Lesson III” Shooting Traditions 2010 7


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28: NRA Pilsner and Pitcher Set 29: NRA Serving Set 30: Friends of NRA 2nd

Amendment Wood Sign 31: NRA Custom Fire-Pit/Grill 32: Cabela’s Canopy 33: ADG Double Pistol Range Box 8

34: U.S. Military Cartridge Board 35: NRA Big Game

Ebony/Stag Hunter Knife 36: Rossi Trifecta Youth 20GA/.22LR/.243Win. 37: Safari Earring and Bracelet Set 38: Day-Plus Camo Backpack Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


2010 Sponsor Package • • •

2010 Whitetail Buck Sponsor Sculpture Sponsor Hat Subscription to Traditions Magazine

Liberty Benefits Plus Choice of: • Bear & Son Gold Rush NRA Bowie or • Leupold Rogue Mossy Oak Bino

Liberty Benefits Plus Choice of: • Sturm Ruger KP345 .45ACP or • Leupold Optics Kit

(Includes (1)VX-1 3x9x40 scope, (1)Acadia 10x42 bino & (1)Doskosport double pistol case)

Liberty Benefits Plus: • Weatherby Vanguard Matte Sub-MOA Rifle in .300 WbyMag with NRA logo

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ecoming a Friends of NRA sponsor means sponsoring the future of shooting sports traditions. Individuals and businesses alike, who value and understand the importance of projects like youth education, firearm training and safety, range development, and conservation efforts, participate in the sponsor program each year. With the support of national sponsors, The NRA Foundation is able to help future generations enjoy the same rights and privileges for years to come. Friends of NRA sponsors receive a number of benefits, including a sponsor hat, sponsor sculpture, and The NRA Foundation’s quarterly magazine Traditions, which updates sponsors on NRA Foundation grants and Friends of NRA stories. This year, Friends of NRA is proud to offer sponsors the second sculpture in the exclusive Big Game Sponsor Series, “The Revered Whitetail.” This sponsor sculpture comes from the talented designers at Big Sky Carvers who took inspiration from the 2010 Friends of NRA Print of the Year, “Autumn Gold” by Pat Pauley. A regal, mature whitetail buck enjoys a tranquil streamside setting in the fall. As he makes his way to the stream for a drink, accompanied by his harem of does, something alerts him – perhaps it’s a hunter looking for his next trophy. Taking no chances, this trophy buck is gone in a flash. The highly sought after whitetail is passionately pursued by hunters all over the world and is arguably America’s favorite big game animal. The spirit and passionate pursuit of defending our Second Amendment rights live on through this sculpture. Each sculpture is cast in fine resins with a bronze patina hand applied, sculpted to a scale of 9” x 7”. The finished sculpture rests on a 1 ½” base and is an impressive 10 ½” tall. Completing the sponsor sculpture is a gold-engraved faux black marble base with a National Rifle Association medallion. This sponsor sculpture and other sponsor items shown below are available exclusively to 2010 Friends of NRA sponsors. Becoming a sponsor is your chance to step up and join thousands of individuals and businesses who help safeguard programs that prepare today’s generations to be tomorrow’s guardians of the Second Amendment.

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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Industry Corner

Traditions co-editor Amber Niblock-Shorter sat down with Kern Stevenson, VP of Sales and Marketing at Big Sky Carvers to learn about their relationship with Friends of NRA, their commitment to the Second Amendment, and what’s on the horizon at Big Sky Carvers. Can you give me some background on your company and how Big Sky Carvers’ relationship began with the National Rifle Association? Our company produces wildlife woodcarvings, gifts, sculptures and home décor, and we began our relationship with Friends of NRA as a merchandise vendor back when the program first began. At the beginning of the program we met representatives from Friends at a trade show, S.H.O.T. Show. After learning about the program – we discovered we had a lot in common and the relationship blossomed from there. Since then, we have developed dozens of items for Friends of NRA events, auctions, raffles, and sponsor incentives.    Can you elaborate on some of the more interesting items you have done with Friends of NRA? We choose items that we can do exclusively for the program – that are unique and have a great perceived value. Often we develop product that is specific to the fundraising nuances of each project— a gift of appreciation, a special event, a banquet or a sponsor thank you. Those included are wood carvings, sculptures, and a grandfather clock. We submit items based on feedback from Friends of NRA staff and the trends we see in today’s marketplace that allows Friends of NRA to bring high quality items to its events and raise the funds needed for the programs it underwrites and promotes.   Why is it important to Big Sky Carvers to maintain strong ties with Friends of NRA in particular?   Our family of designers, artists, and sculptors in Montana, has strong emotional ties to the natural world and the work Friends of NRA does. This passion translates into sometimes serious, often whimsical, and at times functional art and home décor products. If we can enrich lives in some small way with the products we create, then everyone wins. What started as just a customer relationship for us has very much evolved into a passion for the Friends program. Having worked so close with the organization all these years we really see the results it produces towards not only preserving our Second Amendment, but granting significant monies for education, programs and more. We understand the importance of the work the Friends program does and our company is uniquely positioned to create high-quality products the members enjoy owning.   Would you encourage other businesses and individuals to get involved with the Friends of NRA program? Friends of NRA is the best kept secret in our industry!  The result it produces for the investment it requires is outstanding.  Friends of NRA is efficiently operated and spends its money where it matters most. This stewardship is all any of us could ask in an organization that supports causes important to us and to future generations. 

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Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


Tech Talk

Don’t Just Click “Delete”

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Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

‘What is Friends of NRA?’ or ‘Where do the proceeds go?’ they think, ‘Well this isn’t bad!’ Who doesn’t want to support the future of the shooting sports by investing in youth programs or range developments by partaking in events like Friends of NRA banquets? It’s an amazing cause and I think NRA members truly want to help.” On the grassroots level, NRA field representatives concur. Lissa Davis, NRA Field Representative for Southern California and Southern Nevada, uses email blasts to achieve that word-of-mouth advertising lacking in her big-city areas. Like Davis, most field reps accomplish this by linking their email blasts back to the Friends of NRA website, where visitors can learn more about the program, download informational material on individual banquets, catch-up on local Friends news, and purchase tickets. “That’s why the emails are so effective,” said Davis. “Because nearly everyone at least has internet access, whereas a gun owner might only go to a range once a month or less.  And since you need not be an NRA member to attend a Friends of NRA banquet, we urge people to forward the emails to their own lists, thus expanding our reach.” To top it off, the Event Services Staff has developed many new, eye-catching email blast templates for 2010. “We are always looking for new ways to expand on the already fantastic Friends of NRA program,” said Jeremy Greene, Event Services Manager. “Creating new and enticing email blasts that are attractive to look at and get the information out to NRA members is only going to better the program. A minimum of two blasts per Friends of NRA event will be sent out from NRA headquarters with the intention of keeping our attendees updated on upcoming events in their area.” Overall, email blasts have played a fundamental role in spreading the word about events around the nation; they’ve been crucial in getting online ticket sales off the ground, driving people to the Friends of NRA website, and best of all, they’re economical and affective. So next time you see a Friends of NRA email pop-up in your inbox, open it up! You never know what you might be missing out on if you just click “delete.”

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hey are a cost-efficient, environmentally-friendly marketing tool and can be a non-profit organization’s best friend. They’re called “Email Blasts,” or email advertisements, and while they may come from others in the form of spam, NRA is using them for a different purpose- getting the word out on upcoming Friends of NRA events. Around headquarters, email blasts aren’t an everyday affair, that is, unless you’re an event services coordinator in the Field Operations Division. That’s because among their other responsibilities, event services coordinators are responsible for sending out email blasts for all upcoming Friends of NRA events under their areas. And considering there are over 1,000 Friends of NRA events each year, that’s a lot of emailing. Not to worry though. NRA members won’t personally receive email updates on every event taking place in the country, just the ones in their zip code (to view them all, visit www.friendsofnra.org). To break it down to its simplest form- the email blasting process requires NRA field representatives to request an email blast for an event in their area with the corresponding zip codes, from there event services coordinators format the email blast in HTML code, create a filter with the zip codes, and schedule it to be sent in an electronic emailing system. The emailing system is designed to pull email addresses only under the zip codes specified by the filter, meaning that if you signed up to receive NRA emails and live under the zip code the field rep provided, then you will receive the email blast. But when the average person’s email inbox contains more spam than vital information, how well are our email blasts really getting the word out? After all, not every NRA member has an email address, so Friends of NRA is only able to reach a fraction of the NRA members in each zip code. Even then, getting people to read them isn’t always a sure thing. “It’s hard to get people to commit to that first step – opening up the email,” said Event Services Coordinator Nicole McMahon. “Once they have, I think people are attracted to the charity behind the Friends of NRA idea. Once they read the banquet information and then read

Subscribe to Friends of NRA email blasts by visiting www. friendsofnra.org and entering your email address and zip code. 11


National News

By Ashley Weaver

Assistant Director of Planned Giving ,

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ctober 8-10, 2009 marked the NRA Heritage Society’s fourth annual fall event, sponsored this year by Universal Coin &

Bullion, Ltd. of Beaumont, Texas. Through a matching gift campaign, we were able to raise a total of $222k including Universal Coin & Bullion’s $50k matching gift. We thank Universal Coin & Bullion, Ltd. for their commitment to helping us protect our Second Amendment rights. “Fall in Williamsburg” is a time for Heritage Society members to come together to celebrate their common interest in the shooting sports and the preservation of freedom, and a time of recognition for all they have done to protect our Second Amendment heritage. The event provides an opportunity for those considering making the NRA a beneficiary of their estate to meet others who have done the same, and to learn what the NRA Heritage Society is all about. This year guests were treated to an unforgettable array of events in the birthplace of our nation – Williamsburg, Virginia. The weekend kicked off with the first ever “Ladies Tea” hosted by Susan LaPierre followed by a welcome reception and dinner with NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre celebrating the 15th Anniversary of the NRA Heritage Society. Guests thoroughly enjoyed his remarks, the opportunity for questions, and the intimate atmosphere of the evening. With the help of Mr. LaPierre, new Ambassador Members were inducted into the Heritage Society. Attendees left energized and ready to kick off the weekend. Friday’s activities were blessed with beautiful weather. Guests toured historic Jamestown Settlement, which is a recreation of colonial life in 1607. Guests also got the opportunity to tour replicas of the English settlers' three ships: Susan Constant, Godspeed, and Discovery. Later in the af-

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ternoon guests toured Jamestown Island, the site of the first permanent English settlement in the New World and were able to witness a real archaeological dig. Following a little down time, it was off to a special reception hosted by NRA President Ron Schmeits and his wife Ann. Guests then boarded buses bound for Norfolk, Virginia for an unforgettable evening on the American Rover. This graceful sailing ship is a three-masted, passenger-carrying topsail schooner modeled after Chesapeake Bay cargo schooners of the past century. Guests enjoyed dinner and beautiful views of the harbor as they sailed into the sunset. On Saturday, guests were given the opportunity to learn about the NRA’s needs and the best way to accomplish their charitable goals. A variety of charitable planning techniques were discussed and what effect the new Administration will have on your tax planning. The evening presented a unique opportunity as guests were escorted by a Fife & Drum Corps to historic Shields Tavern to dine in an 18th century setting. Heritage Society Ambassadors and friends enjoyed remarks by NRA 1st Vice president David Keene in an historic environment much like our forefathers enjoyed. Saturday night ended on a high note as guests embarked on a haunted candlelight tour of Colonial Williamsburg as “historical interpreters” shared the eerie and fun folklore of this old city. Having the opportunity to come together as friends and patriots in this inspiring setting to celebrate freedom is a weekend we won’t soon forget. Heritage Society Ambassador Membership is awarded to those individuals who have made a gift to any NRA entity in their will, trust, or other estate plan and have provided documentation of that gift to the NRA Office of Advancement’s Planned Giving Department. Please join us at our next Heritage Society event during the NRA Annual Meetings & Exhibits in Charlotte, North Carolina, May 13-18, 2010. For More information about our fall event or becoming an Ambassador Member of the NRA Heritage Society please call the Planned Giving Department at (877) NRA-GIVE or visit us on the web at www.nraplannedgiving.com.

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


By Lars Dalseide

Senior Media Specialist

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ast year he called it quits. After nine National [Smith] is fast becoming that way … I appreciate all the Police Shooting Champions (NPSC), Captain Phil- friendships I’ve made here.” ip Hemphill of the Mississippi Highway State Patrol Hemphill won his first National Police Shooting Chamhung up his competitive shooting pistol. But after a year on pionships in 1988. His next eight came in 1990, 1993, the sidelines it was time to end his retirement. 1995, 1996, 2003, 2004, 2006, and 2007. An amazing "I guess Brett Favre kind of led the way for me," Hemp- accomplishment when you consider the 21 years it took hill said with a smile. to build such a resume. But he wasn’t just competing and Called "one of the top 10 shooters in the world across patrolling all those years. There were other tasks he wanted all disciplines," by NRA Executive Director Kayne Robin- to perform. son, Captain Hemphill has had plenty of time to master the During that time, Hemphill has acted as an NRA ammental games that accompabassador to his fellow law ny any competition with his enforcement officers, citcurrent assignment – Range ing the credibility the NRA Director for his contingent lends to the field. "If you of the Mississippi Highway go to John Doe's Shooting State Patrol. Days spent School and then train your guiding new shooters earned people, and one of your ofHemphill the reputation ficers is involved in a shootof being a patient and aping, they'll subpoena the proachable mentor who can shooting records," Hempeasily transfer his knowledge hill said. "They will have to of life-saving firearm skills establish credibility. With to the officers in Mississipthe NRA you don't have to pi. But credit for his return establish credibility. It has should go to his wife Pam. been established." Captain Philip Hemphill receives his award from NRA President “We were sitting there As has the legendary shadRonald Schmeits and NRA Executive Director Kayne Robinson at the table one night, my ow he now casts upon the wife and I, and she says, out of the clear blue, Championships. With 10 titles in hand, he why nine,” recalled Hemphill. “I’m looking has truly established himself as the King of around thinking nine piece of asparagus, nine the Ring. pieces of chicken – nine what? She goes on “No one is surprised,” said NRA’s Directo say why don’t you go for ten. I thought – tor of Law Enforcement Activities Glen Hoyokay!” er. “When we heard he was coming back for a Shooting a cumulative score of 2989-215x, 10th title we figured he wouldn’t rest until he this year’s mark is his highest yet. Still there is got it.” a mark of humility in accomplishments. His speech at the awards ceremony was peppered Register for the 2010 NPSC! For more informawith recognition of fellow competitors and champions past. tion visit www.nrahq.org/law/Competitions/npsc/npsc.asp. The “Robert is just about like my other son," he said, referring 2010 NPSC will be held September 19-23. For a complete to U.S. Border Patrol Senior Agent Robert Vadasz, who listing of results from the 2009 championships, visit www. won the 2008 NPSC. “And [U.S. Border Patrol’s] Enoch NRAblog.com

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A. Niblock-Shorter

he title of Most Outstanding Friends of NRA Committee is an award presented each year to the committee which raises the most funds at a single

Corpus Christi Friends of NRA Chairwoman Laura Berry accepting the award for the 2008 Most Outstanding Committee from Texas Governor Rick Perry and NRA President Ronald Schmeits

Friends of NRA event. To earn this most prestigious recognition is not an easy feat as committees in contention for the title typically raise over $100k at their individual banquets. During the fall Board of Directors Meeting this year, Chairwoman Laura Berry of Corpus Christi Friends of

NRA was presented with the Most Outstanding Friends of NRA Committee award for 2008. It is an astounding success that is a familiar one for Corpus Christi Friends of NRA, who has won the award numerous times in past years. In 2008, Corpus Christi Friends of NRA led the nation in fundraising dollars bringing in over $188,000 in net income. Through 2008, they have raised a remarkable $1,415,671 for The NRA Foundation and have had almost 12,000 attendees. To mark the committee’s success, Berry and other Corpus Christi committee members received special treatment during the fall Board of Directors Meeting with a trip to NRA Headquarters, a tour of the nation’s capital, not to mention the perks earned for being a High Caliber Club. The National Rifle Association uses the fall Board of Directors meeting to honor and recognize outstanding individuals and organizations for their achievements. All have a profound committment to the shooting sports and the gun-owning public in their communities, which is exemplified in their efforts. Friends of NRA is sure to see more of the Corpus Christi committee in the future. “They’re always in the running for a top spot in the Friends of NRA program,” said Nick Tsoucalas, the National Manager of Finance and Operations for NRA’s Field Operations Division. “They are a hard-working committee that is dedicated to the mission of the Friends of NRA program and their numbers consistently reflect that passion and commitment.” To hear more success stories from Friends of NRA committees log-on to www.friendsofnra.org.


By Kim Rappleye

NRA Field Representative, Utah, E. Nevada, S. Idaho

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hortly after becoming the newest NRA field rep- endorsed insurance, which is just one of the many benefits resentative, I was asked by my boss, Western Region of affiliating your club with the NRA. Director J.P. Nelson, to attend the NRA Club Uni- We were then treated to the very best presentation on versity in order to learn about the program. I said I would marketing I have ever seen. For two hours we were inbe happy to go, and I was, until I realized this particular structed by Ron Rosenberg, a real marketing genius, on the event was scheduled on the opening day of Utah elk hunt- “How To” tools of marketing for clubs, businesses, and ining season. dividuals. I have a marketing degree and I can honestly say Now I don’t know about you, but opening day of elk I learned a ton in those two hours. hunting season is just about Following Ron, we enjoyed as sacred as any non-relia fabulous lunch that alone gious event can be— they was worth the $30 Club even let schools out here U registration fee. After, because they know they we listened to a session on wouldn’t have anyone in state associations and their class anyway. When I disproper management. They covered this obvious “misstressed the importance of take” (surely no one would working hand-in-hand with ask me to attend a workthe NRA and focusing on related event on the openindividual state issues. ing day of elk hunting), I While there we also immediately called J.P. to learned about the Friends of reschedule. Without hesitaNRA program and its many tion, his answer was “No.” benefits, NRA’s Institute for After long hours of sulkLegislative Action (ILA), as ing, I readied myself to atwell as watched presentaNRA Club University attendees listen to presentations from program leaders tend NRA Club U in Sactions on developing a shootramento, Calif., already convinced I wouldn’t enjoy the ing range, applying for grants, media relations, women and program since I could be elk hunting. Nothing could have youth programs, and finally competitive shooting. been further from the truth. As if all this wasn’t enough, we were sent home with NRA Club U is an event held three times a year in dif- handouts on each and every topic, contact information for ferent parts of the country. The purpose is to educate local all the speakers, and a cool hat just for filling out a surclub leaders on ways to improve their clubs, from market- vey. What an action-packed day for such a small amount of ing techniques to services offered by the NRA. If you have money— so very well worth the time. never attended, you simply must. From start to finish it Was it better than an opening day of elk hunting season? Not even close. But it was just about the best training I kept my interest. The program was headed by Son Nguyen, Marketing have ever received with a company. I give NRA Club UniManager of Clubs & Associations, and had a variety of versity my highest recommendation, and strongly suggest speakers. It started with an overview of the club system, every club or association attend at some point. You won’t which was enormously informative. It covered all aspects be disappointed. of affiliating with the NRA such as how to form a club, bylaws, mission statement, recruitment, community events, Register your club or association for the next NRA Club U! club awards and much more. This was followed by an ex- Contact Son Nguyen at (703) 267-1345 or visit www.nrahq. tensive and informative session on Lockton Affinity, NRA org/clubs/

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Friends Update

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N. McMahon

Eastern Region

or the first time ever, a state Youth Education Summit (Y.E.S.) awarded college scholarships to its participants. In years past, the winner of the North Carolina Y.E.S. program was awarded a trip to the National Y.E.S. in Washington, D.C. and the other participants would say farewell to their new friends and head home with their fond memories of the experience. However, North Carolina Field Representatives Doug Merrill and David Wells, along with state Y.E.S. organizer Myron Cross, had a better idea for the 2009 summit. To make the dream of college a little more attainable for youths, they awarded a total of $1,750 in college scholarships to three outstanding students, along with an all-expense paid trip to the National Y.E.S. for the top winner. The criteria for a scholarship were based heavily on their essays, involvement with debates, skits, and overall participation. Cross, who has helped organize the summit since it began five years ago, says he has always felt the need to award scholarships. “My reasoning behind scholarships is to get the support of the school system,” Cross said. “It helps eliminate the negative perception of the NRA parents and teachers might have. If we have scholarships, they start to see a different side of the NRA.” Although the program only spans three days, students and chaperones visited an array of sites and participated in many educational activities. On Friday and Saturday, students engaged in a Second Amendment discussion, debates, and essay workshops. The essay, which was required by the end of the weekend, was written on the topic “Why the forefathers included the Bill of Rights in our Constitution.” Students also took a hands-on approach to learning through touring the North Carolina Capitol building, where they talked with NC Rep. Jimmy Love. From there, students visited the NC Wildlife Resource Commission, state Supreme Court, NC Museum of History, and par-

ticipated in a shooting exercise at the Sir Walter Gun Club. The weekend culminated with an awards ceremony where each student was presented with a certificate of completion and three students were awarded scholarships. NC State Y.E.S. winner, Catherine Cox, loved every minute of the summit, but was particularly partial to the legislative visit. “My favorite part was to be able to interact with our state legislators concerning current events and have the privilege of visiting the state courts and learning about their inner workings,” Cox said. “My experience at the State Youth Education Summit has inspired me to perhaps one day become a legislator or an NRA representative.” Unlike National Y.E.S. where students may participate only once, state Y.E.S. students are encouraged to participate for multiple years. Sarah May participated in the NC State Y.E.S. in 2008 where she became the NC State Y.E.S. winner and participated in the 2009 National Y.E.S. She decided to come back to the state summit this year and share her experiences with the rest of the students. “I had a great time last year at the state Y.E.S. and a fabulous time at the National Y.E.S. and I just wanted to return and help out,” said May. “I wanted to help spread the message of the NRA and teach freedom and how important our rights and freedoms are to us as Americans.” All the state Y.E.S. organizers are enthusiastic about expanding the program so it may affect even more youths in the future. “I only see this program growing,” said David Wells, Western North Carolina Field Rep. “Our goal is to try and promote the state Y.E.S. program all year long and encourage each [Friends of NRA] committee to send at least one child.” Calling all current freshmen and sophomores! Apply for the exciting 2010 North Carolina Y.E.S. program by contacting David Wells at (252) 456-2097 or via email at dwells@nrahq. org.

Visit www.friendsofnra.org/NC 16

Traditions . Quarter 4: 1: 2009


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“Our American Hero, Defender of the Second Amendment and Guardian of the Constitution of the United States of America.” On the forestock are inscriptions “Defender of Freedom,” LaPierre’s signature and the quotes, “It’s not about guns, it’s about freedom,” and “Freedom isn’t free.” On the receiver is a picture of LaPierre and a listing of the many books and articles he has authored, as well as a listing of some of the battles he has helped fight and win. On the buttstock, the Friends of NRA patriot logo is featured.

“Sullivan County Friends of NRA does everything big,” said Rusnock. “They have high attendance, numerous partnerships with community clubs and businesses and they just bring an attitude of excellence and passion to celebrating our Second Amendment rights. Their banquet and this project is the epitome of that drive.” The rifle was presented to LaPierre on September 12 at the 2009 Sullivan County Friends of NRA banquet on behalf of the committee, Michael Gagliardi, Leo Cecil, Jay Rusnock, and American Legacy Firearms Company’s Faler and Hanson. The committee plans to honor more of America’s heroes in the future, and continues to strive for excellence every step of the way.

A. Niblock-Shorter

t’s an NRA tradition to honor American heroes, to recognize and give to those who give so much to help secure and defend our American freedoms. In that same tradition, the Sullivan County Friends of NRA committee followed suit at their 2009 Friends of NRA banquet by honoring NRA’s own Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre. “The Sullivan County committee is among the best groups of volunteers you will find anywhere,” said NRA Field Representative for Upper New York Jay Rusnock. “Since day one, they have been focused on making their banquet one which they would not only be proud of, but also one that would put them on a national scale. Working on honoring an American hero was just one way they take their banquet to the next level and they really strive for a level of excellence.” For many years, Michael Gagliardi, chairman of the Sullivan County Friends of NRA, and Leo Cecil, a past chairman of the Mid-Hudson Friends of NRA, have attended the NRA Annual Meetings, where traditionally an American hero is honored with the presentation of a custom, hand-made flintlock rifle. After seeing the tradition year after year at the NRA Annual Meetings, Gagliardi and Cecil decided Friends of NRA should do the same. The Sullivan County Friends of NRA agreed, and with the help of Steve Faler and Warren Hanson of American Legacy Firearms Company, the committee provided an historically-significant Winchester Model 1892 cal. .44 magnum lever action rifle engraved to honor LaPierre. “The inspiration for ‘Our American Hero’ really came from Wayne LaPierre himself,” said Rusnock. “He has dedicated his life to being the face of the NRA and he is always thanking everyone else for volunteering or supporting the organization. Sullivan County Friends of NRA wanted to turn it around and express that same gratitude to him, so they formed this project to recognize him and other people in the future.” On the barrel of the gun, in bold lettering, read the words,

Attend an upcoming Friends of NRA banquet in New York! Contact NRA Field Representative Jay Rusnock at (845) 2987233 or by email at jrusnock@nrahq.org for more information.

Visit www.friendsofnra.org/NY Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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Central Region

ocated in the scenic Black River Valley Parkway firearm sports. in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, only a few miles Even with the club’s most recent upgrades, it still lacked from the Great Lake Superior, sits the new Superior some very important conveniences. The range was intenRange Shooters Club. tionally built in a remote location, which meant it was The remote area, bordering on Wisconsin and Michi- miles from any public water and sewer services, leaving porgan state lines in the cities of Hurley, Wis. and Ironwood, table bathroom units as its only alternative. With the huge Mich., makes it the ideal place for a rapidly growing range. increase in club activities, and a rise in women and children But with an average of 160 inches of snow annually, shoot- attendees, more improvements were needed if the programs ing safety and facility upkeep at the club are a top priority. were to continue to grow in the future. Despite snow fall, the Superior Range Shooters Club In 2009, the club received an additional $25k grant from has grown rapidly in its ten short years thanks to gener- The NRA Foundation to install a well, septic system, and ous grants through The indoor bathroom facilities NRA Foundation, support on the property. Construcby the Big Snow Friends tion began in late August of NRA, and individuals with well drilling and sepsuch as Gary Kusz, retired tic installation performed Police Chief of Ironwood, by local contractors with local business owner Paul volunteers doing all labor Forslund, and many dediand site preparations. cated sportsmen. This project is the first Many club members phase of an indoor eduand officers are active supcational classroom facility porters of the Big Snow and allows the club to furFriends of NRA, so it was ther expand to include prono surprise in 2007, when grams such as the NRA’s the Wisconsin Friends of From left: Scott Taetsch; NRA Field Representative, Gary Kusz; President, Superior Range Women On Target and Shooters Club, Paul Forslund,Treasurer of the Big Snow Country Friends of NRA NRA State Fund Commitother introductory-level tee granted $7,700 to the Superior Range Shooters Club to educational shooting programs. The club’s continual focus build proper safety and impact beams. on expansion and better accommodations is driven by the Through community support and generosity, the club desire to secure the facility and the shooting sports tradiwas able to offer rifle, pistol, and shotgun shooting sports tions for future generations. With every upgrade, every new to the general public – molding it into one of the premier program, and every new shooter it brings in, the club is inshooting facilities in the area. The improvements also en- creasingly seen as a valuable and vital asset to the surroundabled the club to begin 4-H shooting programs and host ing communities and continues to grow with each year. NRA Shooting Sports Camps for the general public. “We would like to thank The NRA Foundation, and The programs immediately expanded to include a family specifically all of the patrons and supporters of the Friends shooting day in July; offering supervised introductory-level of NRA events for the continued support of the Superior rifle, pistol, and trap shooting to anyone interested. Because Range Shooters Club,” said Gary Kusz, President of the Suof demand, the trapshooting league was expanded and they perior Range Shooters Club. included a three-day program called “Camp Superior”, where sixth graders from local schools are introduced to Apply for an NRA Foundation grant today by contacting your fishing, camping, water safety, hunter safety, and different local NRA Field Rep or visiting www.nrafoundation.org! Visit www.friendsofnra.org/WI 18

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


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inding donations for one Friends of NRA event is tough enough, but finding donations for every event in the entire state is something every field representative hopes for. So when Tactical Response, Inc. (www.tacticalresponse.com) and Hero-Gear, LLC (www.hero-gear. com) each made statewide donations for every Friends of NRA event in Tennessee, NRA Field Representative Mike Webb couldn’t have been happier. Tactical Response, a firearms training company, donated a two-day class with lodging included. No matter one’s age, gender, or occupation, their program is designed for attendees to come away from each class with the mindset, tactics, and skill to prevail in a violent confrontation. “We are a firearms training company, owned by myself, James Yeager, and Allen Webb, and we all feel very strongly about our Second Amendment rights,” said Tracy Hightower, who is also chairman of his local Kentucky Lake Friends of NRA banquet. “We felt that donating to every state banquet would generate a lot of income for Tennessee Friends of NRA and it has.” It isn’t the first time Tactical Response has donated to the Friends of NRA program. They also donated a two-day Fighting Pistol Course with lodging as part of the grand door prize at the 2009 Tennessee Friends of NRA State Fund Conference. At the 2009 NRA Club University in Nashville, they donated a two-day Fighting Rifle Course and a two-day Advanced Fighting Rifle Course, both with lodging as part of the grand door prize and Tactical Response has also made significant donations to past NRA Annual Meetings. “Another thing we do is host an annual alumni weekend for anyone who has ever attended one of our classes in the past,” said Hightower. “Alumni can come in on the weekend of our local Friends of NRA banquet and participate in any of the courses we offer that weekend for free, and while they are here we tell them about our local banquet. So if

you win our package at any event around Tennessee you are eligible to attend our alumni weekend.” Hero-Gear, a full-line dealer of tactical and defensive firearms, donated a Fantasy Range Day for two to every Tennessee Friends of NRA banquet. During the day at the range, participants would have the opportunity to shoot an assortment of fully-automatic machine guns. The minimum bid was set at $500. “The one thing we really like about the Friends of NRA program is that nationwide over fifty percent of the money raised goes to youth programs, and in Tennessee 92 percent goes towards youth shooting sports programs,” said Joe Lundberg, Chief Executive Officer of Hero-Gear and committee member of the Highland Rim Friends of NRA. “Because I serve on the State Fund Committee, it’s the only charity that I have ever worked with where I have input on where the money goes. It is very special to me.” Hero-Gear also donated a Remington R15 Rifle .223 Cal. as part of the grand door prize at the 2009 NRA Club University in Nashville and several thousands of dollars in firearms and merchandise to the local Highland Rim Friends of NRA events. “Youth are our future, and as a father and a citizen, educating them on the importance of gun ownership, shooting, and safety is a big deal to me,” said Lundberg. “We wanted to do something where we could raise money for Friends of NRA, but also have it be an educating experience for those who attend our Fantasy Range Day.” Tactical Response’s donation raised over $11k for the Tennessee Friends of NRA program, and Hero-Gear’s donation raised nearly $12k. “They were huge donations for us, not only to local events but for the entire state,” said Webb. “We had no cost in their donations, so it meant that whatever we made from each was 100 percent straight net revenue for the state. Together we made over $23k, and that makes a big difference for our state.”

“We felt that donating to every state banquet would generate a lot of income for Tennessee Friends of NRA and it has.”

A. Niblock-Shorter

Visit www.friendsofnra.org/TN Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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s ile F Rep d l Fie Grandpa, what is an NRA Field Representative? By Al Herman NRA Field Representative, Michigan

As an NRA field representative, my job requires a tremendous amount of traveling, which can be hard on my family, especially on the younger grandchildren. When I missed my grandson Daniel’s eighth birthday party, he had a difficult time understanding why I couldn’t make it to his important celebration and why I have to miss other events like his soccer and basketball games. While at the time I tried to give him the best answer possible, the more I thought about my answer, the more I wanted to put it down on paper so he could have a better picture of his grandfather’s job. I could just write the standard words the NRA uses for my position, but I think my grandson would better comprehend an explanation in my own words; so here it goes: First of all, what is the NRA? The National Rifle Association of America (NRA for short) was formed over 100 years ago in 1871 by Civil War veterans who thought we, as Americans, should be taught how to be more accurate shooters, as well as know how to safely handle our firearms. Today, the NRA works hard to carry out the vision of the founders by training people how to shoot and care for their firearms, and teach kids like you how to be safe around them. Most importantly, we believe in protecting our rights as Americans so you and I can continue to go hunting and target shooting. We are one of the oldest organizations in the country and we are proud of who we are and what we do. What does an NRA Field Representative do? While I work for the NRA, a lot of my work is done for The NRA Foundation. This is a vital part of the NRA, which helps raise money for grown-ups and kids that want to shoot and hunt with their firearms. Remember when I took you to that NRA Shooting Sports Camp? You got to shoot at targets with a BB gun and you won all those neat gifts and a t-shirt. All those prizes, the Daisy Red Ryder BB guns and BBs, the hot dogs and sodas, they all cost money. That is one of the things I do. I help raise money for groups that put on those types of events. How do I raise money? I have people all around the state who volunteer and make up groups called committees that get together once a year to hold a banquet. Remember Grandma taking you


to that big hall where you looked at all that neat stuff on the tables and you sat at the youth table where you got a ticket? When they pulled your ticket and your name was called, you went up in front of everybody and claimed your prize. The smile on your face would have made any grandpa proud! Those banquets are how I help The NRA Foundation raise money for all those groups that want to help people shoot, learn about firearms and have kids grow up to understand and believe in our firearm rights. It is hard work taking care of all those committees. Most of my committees are made up of working people like your mom and dad who can only meet together in the evenings, which is why I am usually gone till past your bedtime. That is also why I can’t make a lot of your soccer and basketball games, but I always get a full report from your mom on how you did. As time goes on, a lot of my committees will not need me to attend their meetings as much and I will be able to attend more of your games. Why do I like being an NRA Field Representative? Because I get to work with some of the best people on earth! The NRA has some of the most dedicated and loyal people that any organization could want. I know you have never seen any of the people I work with, but they are all extraordinary. They are all working together towards a common goal that is our “Second Amendment Rights.” Preserving these rights is essential for kids to grow up in a free country so they may pursue their dreams. All the other field representatives and the NRA Field Operations Division, work very hard at supporting gun owners like me, your dad, and yes, even you, in everything we may need in our quest for the preservation of the Second Amendment and our firearms heritage. It makes me happy to be working with people who are leaders in the fight to keep our most basic right, to own and use our firearms. I know you do not fully understand the meaning of the Second Amendment, but as you get older and as I get to spend more time with you, I will do my very best to help you understand its importance and why I gave you a Life Membership in the NRA for your birthday. I hope this explanation helps my grandson and all other young readers understand what it is I do as a field rep. I can only hope when he grows up he will be lucky enough to find a job that is as fulfilling and meaningful as the one his grandpa has being an NRA field representative.


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efore The NRA Foundation was in the above equation, the Williston High School JROTC Air Rifle Team, was struggling to succeed in their

mission to excel in competitions and make a name for themselves in the shooting sports world. The team, located Southern Region

in Williston, Fla., had a coach committed to the program and students who were willing to shoot, but they lacked the funding needed to buy competitive grade air rifles and equipment to reach the top. Three years and approximately $15k in NRA Foundation grants later, the Williston Air Rifle Team placed 17th out of 100 participating teams at the Junior Olympic National Finals in the Three Position Air Rifle competition held at Camp Perry in July. The team has participated in many competitions, but this was one of their biggest wins. Sgt. Maj. Ray Douyard, coach of the air rifle team, credits much of the success to the grants and the support of the Suwannee River Friends of NRA. “We got involved with Suwannee River Friends of NRA when we were trying to find a new home for the team,” said Douyard. “We found a home at the Williston Shooters Club where we met the treasurer of the group. At the time, we were using antiqued air rifles and minimal equipment and he suggested we apply for a grant.” Since that encounter, Douyard has been filling out grant requests and has received funding for competitive air rifles including Air Arms and Daisys, along with shooting gloves, safety goggles, and everything else they use. “It would’ve taken us years to raise that much money if we didn’t receive these grants,” said Douyard. “You wouldn’t have seen us advance, not in the light speed that we did.” Patty Gaylean, chairwoman of the Suwanee River

N. McMahon

Friends of NRA, is extremely pleased with the team and all the accomplishments it has made thus far. “As chair of the Suwannee River Friends of NRA, I am very excited for this team and their instructor, Sgt. Maj. Ray Douyard,” Gaylean said. “He has motivated these students and has fine-tuned their skills to this current national level of competition. He also teaches them to give back to their community for the support given to them by local groups such as the Williston Shooters Club, their parents, the school administrators, and NRA. It has been our pleasure and honor to assist such a good group of students. They also volunteer time to assist with our Friends of NRA banquet in July each year.” Douyard said the team’s diligence and hard-work motivate him to be a better coach. “They are at each practice and their willingness to be proficient with their equipment and taking care of it is motivational,” said Douyard. “They also inspire one another by helping with each other’s positions and techniques, even when they aren’t at the range.” For some students, shooting on the team means more than just winning in competitions, it means working hard in the classroom too. “Every cadet on the team has to have passing grades to shoot,” said Douyard. “I have one student on the team that if it wasn’t for shooting he would’ve dropped out of school. This young man was a first time shooter and loved it. I told him he had to get his grades up in order to be on our team and he did.” With the continued help of The NRA Foundation and support of the Suwannee River Friends of NRA, the Williston High School JROTC Air Rifle Team will without a doubt advance their program even more and keep success in the equation.

“It would’ve taken us years to raise that much money if we didn’t receive these grants,” said Douyard. “You wouldn’t have seen us advance, not in the light speed that we did.”

Apply for an NRA Foundation Grant in Florida! Contact Trip Lancaster at (352) 463-8379 or by email at hlancaster@ nrahq.org or visit www.nrafoundation.org/grants.

Visit www.friendsofnra.org/FL 22

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


By Steve Wilson

NRA Field Representative, NE California, and Western Nevada

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The committee held a special drawing called “The Dirty Dozen” which consisted of 12 guns. The price of each ticket was a steep $100 a piece, but a great selling point was that every person who bought a ticket went into the drawing for each gun, meaning even the winners from each drawing were placed back into the drawing for another chance to win. Many weekends the committee would sit in front of gun shops and sporting good stores, boosting sales to almost 100 tickets. Come banquet day, the committee had an attendance of 230 people and a net of just over $25k, elevating the banquet to High Caliber Club (HCC) status. HCC is reserved for those events that surpass the $25k mark. This equates to over a 400 percent increase in net revenue over last year. “The committee really deserves a huge round of applause,” said Wilson. “They were really determined and really wanted to prove to themselves that they could do better and they did. Because of their determination and the drive to exceed their current accomplishments, they were able to achieve their goal of hitting High Caliber Status. This year was just phenomenal.”

Western Region

he Gold Country Friends of NRA committee had a rocky start three years ago and since has learned fast how to run a banquet. Their very first dinner was held three years ago in 2007 in the beautiful town of Folsom Calif., nestled in the foothills just east of Sacramento. The attendance was at 102 and the committee was only able to secure five sponsors. By night’s end, the total net was just a hair over $3k. Afterwards, the Gold Country Friends of NRA made a commitment to themselves to do better the next year, and in 2008 they doubled their net to $6k and nearly doubled attendance with 191 attendees. But the sky is the limit, and the Gold Country committee decided it still wasn’t enough. The committee members made a pact to far exceed their 2008 numbers in 2009. They worked diligently on every aspect of the planning process. To attract people, they secured a notable guest speaker, past president of the NRA Sandy Froman. To help promote their dinner, they set up a booth at the local rodeo with a huge banner in the arena to advertise the upcoming dinner,. They handed out flyers, sold tickets for the dinner, and even picked up a large sponsor. “They were really determined to succeed,” said NRA Field Representative Steve Wilson. “They went out every weekend selling tickets, and their dedication really paid off.”

“Because of their determination and the drive to exceed their current accomplishments, they were able to achieve their goal“

Attend an upcoming Friends of NRA banquet in North Eastern California! Contact NRA Field Representative Steve Wilson at (209) 847-4826 or by email at swilson@nrahq.org for more information.

Visit www.friendsofnra.org/CA Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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N. McMahon

Mid West Region

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t was only a year ago Traditions magazine featured the Grand Valley Friends of NRA, a first-year committee that saw overwhelming success. “Having 700 attendees at a Friends of NRA banquet and fundraising about $65,000 is what would be expected from a successful veteran committee. But from a new committee- that is unheard of,” Traditions reported. A year later, this committee is still breaking records. Following the successful inaugural event, the committee set their goals even higher to the $100k milestone. On September 11, an astounding 900 attendees entered the Two Rivers Convention Center where the Grand Valley Friends of NRA banquet was held in Grand Junction, Colo., propelling the committee over $100k, meeting their goal in net income in only their second year. “It’s never happened before in terms of a second year committee,” said Nick Tsoucalas, National Manager Finance and Operations, Volunteer Fundraising in NRA’s Field Operations Division. “They made sure they did not spend away the profits,” said Colorado Field Representative Marc Steinke. “They understand that putting on any event takes effort, so why not make it all that it can be. We owe it to our donors to get as much bang for the buck that we can.” And that is exactly what the committee did. Chairman Richard Hartley worked diligently with committee members to increase net revenue and decrease costs, but ultimately, the area’s passion for the outdoors, strong beliefs in the Second Amendment, and extensive marketing techniques contributed to the stellar performance. “Our plan was to [market] the banquet through good old-fashion word-of-mouth and modern technology of emails and news and radio spots,” said Hartley. “We solicited more sales of dinner tickets into the event, raffle tick-

ets, and items for silent and live auctioning. We knew we needed to increase our inventory of guns and merchandise for participants to purchase through auctioning or raffling and it created a feeling of satisfaction when the people who support our Second Amendment were able to walk away from such a successful event with many winners of many different items.” With the success of the Grand Valley’s 2009 event, Steinke and Hartley are beyond ecstatic to see what this committee is capable of accomplishing in the future. “I am extremely humbled by the fact that they would make this happen,” Steinke said. “I have great respect and would like to tell them how much NRA thanks them. I believe that top committee in the nation is possible.” Hartley added, “[I feel] incredible! Absolutely incredible! Knowing that as a result of this event, we will be able to fund worthy grant applications is rewarding to the entire committee. Maybe even more exciting to this committee is that we have the potential to make our banquet an even bigger success.” For committees who are striving to secure the coveted $100k mark, Hartley has some words of advice for chairmen, “My advice would be to solicit strong committee members, get the word out about your event, and encourage and consider all ideas. Look at the industries in your area and try to find people that work in those different fields to be a part of your committee. Embrace the idea of having a diverse committee. The great thing about diversity is that everyone thinks a little differently and can have useful ideas to increase your chances of success.” Hartley would like to recognize the 2009 Grand Valley committee members for their outstanding banquet effort: Randy Walck, Kelly Claussen, Gary Abbott, David Logan, Blaine Beecher, Dorothea Oldaker, Robert Smith, Mike Decker, Richard Predovich, Andrew Wilke, Nannette & Bill Lintotte, and Chris & Amanda Potter. Attend an upcoming Friends of NRA banquet in Colorado! Contact NRA Field Representative Marc Steinke at (719) 322-4072 or via email at msteinke@nrahq.org for more information.

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


MAR C

ST EINKE

Get to know your NRA Field Representatives! Traditions Magazine brings readers a profile of Colorado Field Rep Marc Steinke. What drew you to the job? It was my love for the outdoors and Second Amendment as well as knowing that going from a Friends of NRA volunteer to a full-time NRA field representative I could have a much, much bigger impact on preserving the two things that are near and dear to me.

sense of competition against those who would take away our Second Amendment rights. They stand up to the challenge and really kick butt. Not one of the Colorado committees is coasting. They all work hard and you will see even bigger results in the near future with both money and programs.

In your area, where does the majority of your grant money go? Colorado spends its grant money wisely. We’ve granted over 50 percent of our funds to youth programs in the past, and I think you will see that continue.

How would you say you manage your volunteers? I do not manage my volunteers; I encourage them and fill their minds with ideas as well as provide them with materials to get the job done. They manage themselves and other committees because they want to see Colorado strong and in turn, make the NRA strong. If you find people who desire to operate on this level while keeping a competition between committees going, you end up with a winning team who is willing to help the “opponent” win. After all, we are all on the same team. It does not get any better than that.

Why does your area grant money to youth programs? At every event we bring the children forward and announce “this is the future of the NRA,” and at every event there is huge applause for this next generation. That tells me the people who donate their money approve of our investment in the future guardians of our Second Amendment rights. Until we decide otherwise, youth programs will remain a big focus for Colorado. Is there anything unique about your committees that make them stand-out from other committees in the country? My committees stand out because they are not just putting on an event because it is the thing to do; they are putting on an event to make it the greatest. They have a

Last, what’s the best part of your job? The best part of my job is working with the best people on the face of the earth! They are freedom-loving Americans who are doing their part to preserve the way of life we love. Everything from shooting, hunting, outdoor activities, and things that make us happy truly set us apart from the rest of the world. Being directly involved and showing leadership to this group of individuals is by far the coolest part of being a NRA field representative.

For more Field Rep profiles visit NRAblog.com Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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Great States

They call it the “Super Bowl” of Friends of NRA banquets, and with the amount of money it raises, it’s obvious why some believe statewide banquets are the way to go.

T

he idea for a statewide Friends of NRA banquet originated in Anchorage, Alaska three years ago when NRA Field Representative for Alaska Brad Kruger found that his largest and most populated city just wasn’t reaching its full potential. Smaller towns in Alaska were generating more funds and he knew Anchorage was a promising place to do the same. He wanted something different to make the big city banquet something special. Thus, the statewide Alaska Friends of NRA banquet was conceived and the planning began. “We don’t buy anything for our Anchorage banquet,” said Kruger. “Every committee donates an item to the banquet, and it is all high-end merchandise. We have the most guns, the best guns, and we have the highest attendance in the state. Everything about the state banquet is just bigger and better and it works.” News of the Alaska Friends of NRA state banquet’s success didn’t go unnoticed. Fellow NRA Field Representative for Colorado Marc Steinke was eager to institute his own statewide Friends of NRA banquet. But like every banquet, he needed to make sure this one stood out from all the rest. While the Alaska event tends to focus on raising money through high-end

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raffles, the Colorado event raises much of their money through high-end sponsorships. “What makes the Colorado state event different is the atmosphere and merchandise,” said Steinke. “We offer $10,000 head tables with lobster tail and filet dinner. The charge for attending without purchasing a table is $80 and the merchandise is accumulated from upper-end donations.” With every year, each statewide banquet makes it a priority to reinvent their events through new games and raffles, distinctive and desirable new items, and anything that gives attendees that awe-factor. The intent is simple: entice new attendees and lure the old ones back again with an experience they don’t want to miss. Alaska accomplished this with their “Wall of Guns” game, provided by the Sportsman’s Warehouse. The wall featured a light display and air horns that announced to the crowd when it was “Gun Time.” The wall was flipped 15 times throughout the night and brought in a remarkable $15k. Also adding to this year’s success in Alaska, were the event’s several Elite Sponsors who were a tremendous support to the overall banquet’s mission. One of the bigger sponsors, the Alaska Urological

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


populated communities. To draw the right crowd it takes something special. It takes something dynamic, something over and above. When all this is put into a package and presented to people who have the means to support our program in a big way, look out, because good things will happen.” Kruger and Steinke could go on forever about the benefits of statewide Friends of NRA banquets, and make convincing arguments as to which of their state banquets is better, but each are in agreement on what really makes their state banquets so successful – their volunteers. “How it comes together simply takes work from the committee, just like the other events in Colorado,” said Steinke. “Dedicated NRA members who do not want to see our rights taken away by anyone is why it works so well.” “We have a fantastic committee,” said Kruger. “If there is any way they can make it bigger and better, they do it. Committee members come from all over to help with the banquet and it really attracts the best and the brightest from the state. A state banquet really does bring the entire state together, it’s just phenomenal.” “The state banquet is like the ‘Super Bowl’ of banquets,” said Kruger. “Every state needs their own! If you don’t have one, I strongly urge you to take a close look at doing one.”

“To draw the right crowd it takes something special. It takes something dynamic, something over and above.”

There’s more to this story...... It is a known fact around the NRA that Field Reps Brad Kruger of Alaska and Marc Steinke of Colorado have a longstanding competitive history when it comes to raising money at their Friends of NRA banquets. Their statewide banquets have since become the ultimate embodiment of their friendly rivalry. In 2008, Kruger and Steinke bet the 2009 Gun of the Year on whose banquet would come out on top in the categories of net per attendee, net-to-gross, and net dollars. It is the second year in a row such a bet has been made between the two state banquets and overall Steinke’s Colorado state banquet has beaten out the competition both times. As part of the bet, Kruger is to hand-deliver the Ruger Vaquero Matched .45 Revolvers to Steinke’s state banquet this year. But win or lose, the field reps say it is all in good fun and it won’t be the last battle they fight against one anotherafter all, “competition is healthy,” said Steinke. “The competition continues between Alaska and Colorado,” Steinke said. “Maybe it is [actually] between Brad and I, but whatever the case, it’s healthy and it is good for our programs and helps generate income. The race to the top will always be there, and the best man will always win, but he can never stop to look over his shoulder. If he does, he will be breathing the other’s dust. What a job we have! It just doesn’t get any better than this.”

A. Niblock-Shorter

Associates, donated $10k and Weld Air Alaska and GBR Equipment both donated $5k. “We also had many other businesses step up at the $2,500 level,” said Kruger. “This really gave us a lot of momentum. We would not be where we are today if we did not have the support of these patriots.” For Colorado, the live auction was the highlight of this year’s event. “Even though we had five donors reach the Kimber Sponsor Level and above before the event, they still came to support our live auction. The first 43 items generated $52,550, but the highlights were the last two,” said Steinke. “We had two sets of Ruger Vaquero Matched .45 revolvers. One set came in our NRA [Standard Merchandise] Package and the other set came from the Alaska state banquet, which our state event won in a challenge last year. Pairing the set of pistols with a Kodiak Brown Bear Hunt commanded a bid of $30,000 each – raising a total of $60,000. What a great way to end a great live auction!” “Every state seems to have a big metro area that just doesn’t pull its share of the revenue, so I think every state should conduct a state banquet,” said Steinke. “The reason a state event is important is because every weekend the people in Denver have the choice of going to some kind of event. Denver is full of entertainment, unlike other less


Program Profile

By Phil Schreier

Senior Curator, National Firearms Museum

O

n a crisp May evening in 1998, Craig D. Sandler, NRA’s Executive Director of General Operations introduced NRA’s President Marion P. Hammer to a gathered crowd in the lobby of the NRA headquarters’ south tower. After a few words, Madam President cut the ribbon opening the new National Firearms Museum to the public. It was a memorable opening to NRA’s prized showpiece, a 15,000 square foot museum with 2,400 firearms and related artifacts displayed in 15 galleries and 85 exhibit cases. It was a long journey to get to that opening night in 1998, one that began with a Remington Rolling Block prize rifle. D. Barclay of the NRA’s rifle team won the rifle handily in the International Rifle competition of 1874 and was later donated becoming the first artifact in a vast collection that is now comprised of over 5,000 firearms and thousands more related artifacts and books. The museum grew slowly, just as the Association did, from 1871 until the move from New York to Washington, D.C. was completed in 1908.  For a number of years the small collection of firearm awards and trophies was sporadically displayed in the Association’s headquarters in the Barr Building at Washington’s Farragut Square.  Contributing to the growth was the Association’s flagship magazine, the American Rifleman, which began publication on a biweekly schedule in 1923. With each issue be-

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gan a series of tests and evaluations of various products and firearms of interest to the shooting community. It wasn’t before long the firearms industry began to send the publisher test guns to be used in the battery of rigorous trials, those of which were maintained by the magazine for future use.  In 1935, the Association formally arrayed the collection of test guns, along with those donated by both former officers and members of the Association.  From 1935 until the move to the Mansion at 1600 Rhode Island Ave N.W.  in 1939, the collection was little more than window dressing in the offices of the headquarters.  There were no true ‘curators’, just publishers, editors and technical editors working with the collection more as an assemblage of props than artifacts.  In the mid-1960s a series of 6’x8’ glass cases were designed and constructed by the magazine staff to publicly display the burgeoning collection. From this design and display method the museum served NRA members and the public for some 30 years.  In 1981, the Association hired a professional museum director, James Quinn and formally named the collection the National Firearms Museum beginning a long process to create a world class museum environment for the 2,000+ firearms collection.  A design plan was developed for a complete renovation of the first two floors of the Association’s headquarters with state of the art exhibits and displays out-

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


lining the history and development of firearms and their role in American society. Today, exhibits highlight the bravery of the early settlers to the New World, the fight for independence, the expansion westward and the gold rush, the dawn of the industrial revolution and the numerous wars and conflicts Americans have fought to maintain their hard won independence and freedom. Full sized dioramas highlight the Jamestown Colony, Samuel Hawken’s rifle shop, the arms making factories of the Union and genteel surroundings of the agrarian south. Additional dioramas include a trench scene from World War One as well as a heavily shelled Norman courtyard from the Second World War. A functioning Coney Island shooting gallery from 1903 and a full scale replication of Theodore Roosevelt’s library from Sagamore Hill enable the visitor to step back in time to gain a sense of how important America’s firearms heritage is to our development as a free country. A gallery named in honor of William B. Ruger houses a changing collection of exhibit highlights that are of spe-

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

cial note. Every 9 -12 months, the Ruger gallery hosts a feature exhibit, selected by museum staff years in advance. To date the gallery has included exclusive exhibitions of William B. Ruger’s and Dr. Beretta’s private and corporate arms collections. In 2002, a collection of firearms used in well-known films and TV shows opened, featuring the original ‘Dirty Harry’ S&W .44 Magnum, John Wayne’s Winchester 92 from Stagecoach and even a GE mini gun from the Matrix. The National Firearms Museum has grown from a small collection of test guns maintained by the American Rifleman magazine staff to a world class learning and education institution that has become the visible presence of the National Rifle Association and the many projects and programs they offer to the public and their membership. For more information about the NRA Museum, including an in-depth video experience and look at museum galleries, visit online at home.nra.org/#/museum.

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Foundation Donors

The NRA Foundation Thanks the Following Do

August 1, 2009 - O INDIVIDUAL DONORS Gifts of $25,000+ Mr. August A. Busch, III Missouri Universal Coin & Bullion, Ltd. Texas Gifts of $5,000 - 24,999 Anonymous Iowa Mr. and Mrs. Michael D. Brown Missouri Cabela’s Nebraska Camp Fire Conservation Fund New York Cheaper Than Dirt Texas Crimson Trace Corporation Oregon DBS International Pennsylvania Doug Turnbull Restoration, Inc. New York Mr. Martin E. Fasack New York Independence Tube Corp. Illinois Natchez Shooters Supply Tennessee Mr. Raymond Plank Texas George S. Rich Family Foundation, Inc. Maryland Mr. Ralph E. Roubal Minnesota Mr. Tyler T. Schropp Virginia Gifts of $1,000 - $4,999 Ms. Susan Andreson California Anonymous Virginia Auctionarms.com, Inc. California The Michael & Beverly Carrick Foundation Ohio

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin R. Case Virginia Mr. Anthony J. Chimblo, III Connecticut Jason and Melissa Devine New Hampshire Mr. Dan Dewey Arizona Dillon Precision Products Corp., Inc. Arizona Ms. Beverly A. Dinelli New Mexico Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Fox North Carolina Keith and Connie Hamilton California Mr. and Mrs. Ted Hogan Texas J & G Sales, Ltd. Arizona Ms. Heide K. Kaser Virginia Network For Good Maryland Numrich Gun Parts Corporation New York Mr. Robert L. Pezzati Michigan Mr. Wilson H. Phillips, Jr. Virginia Mrs. E. Roy New Hampshire Ms. Alicia Shaeffer Texas Ms. Jill Sosin Arizona Mr. and Mrs. Frederic O. Vicik Washington Mr. James P. Weidener Florida Widener’s Reloading & Shooting Supply, Inc. Tennessee Gifts of $250 - $999 Anonymous Arizona

Mr. Joseph G. Breton Texas Mr. and Mrs. Frank L. Cerutti Virginia Mr. Donald G. Chilcote Michigan Mr. and Mrs. Brian W. Clements Pennsylvania Mr. Neil Damron Connecticut Financial Advisors Trap Shoot California Galco International Arizona Mr. George B. Garber, Jr. Missouri Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Ghilarducci Colorado Mr. Robert B. Goode Arizona Ms. Debra J. Goodwin Maine Mr. Kenneth W. Heidkamp Connecticut Mr. Thomas J. Keim California Mr. Drew Koval Virginia Mr. and Mrs. Bill Lyon New Hampshire Mr. Daniel O. Maldonado Texas Mr. Michel E. Marcellin Virginia Mr. Edward S. Martin Pennsylvania Mr. and Mrs. Lathan D. Murphy Florida Mr. George William Nugent Ohio Paso Del Norte Gun Collectors, Inc. Texas Mr. Marko Radielovic Virginia Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Ringdahl Virginia Ms. B. Victoria Shipp New York

Listed contributions do not necessarily reflect total giving for the year. We If you notice any errors or omissions, please contact us at (8

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Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009


onors for Their Generosity and Continued Support

October 31, 2009 Southern Devices Sportsman Club North Carolina Mr. John C. Stier Oregon Mr. and Mrs. William C. Stivers Pennsylvania The von Gontard Family Foundation Missouri Walnut Creek Rifle Club Pennsylvania Mr. James F. Watt California Mr. Justin Willette Massachusetts Mr. and Mrs. Benjamen E. Zerface Ohio ESTATES Estate of Betty M. Duebner Wisconsin Estate of J. Andrew Foster New York Estate of Donald W. Gerdes Ohio Estate of Lloyd Hubbard Alaska Estate of John P. Mohns Washington Estate of Arthur Lee Quinn Kentucky Estate of Harry Andrew Tod California Estate of Fritz Carl Weidig (Trust) Idaho Estate of Burton V. Zoul California IN KIND GIFTS Mr. Pete deCoux Arizona Mr. William G. Dembeck Maryland Mr. Robert H. Dorian Missouri Mr. Steven Elber New Jersey Mr. Marc Finklestein Alaska

Mr. William Thomas Gennetti, Jr. Virginia Ms. Sarah Hart Kentucky Mr. Robert W. Hoelscher Florida Lehigh Valley Sporting Clays Pennsylvania Ms. Jean Moyer Odenthal Virginia Mr. Terry J. Popkin Maryland Mr. Gordon B. Rogers Georgia IN HONOR OF GIFTS Bryon E. Haney Mr Dennis B. Haney IN MEMORY OF GIFTS Randall C. Banks Ms. Debra J. Goodwin Robert P. Beaman Beaman’s Wellness Center P.C. Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Darger Mr. and Mrs. Dale Hauck Mr. John C. Stier Walter Birdsong Mr. Michael Mines Edwin Bonczek Mr. and Mrs. Donald E. Buck Vincent C. DeCesaris Mr. and Mrs. Ronald DeCesaris Ms. Cheryle Mesolella Gregg Dieterle Mr. Kenneth E. Corbin Gary J. Giering Manheim Sportsmens Assoc. John E. Hale Mr. and Mrs. Patrick W. Popwell Eric Alan Hamilton Keith and Connie Hamilton Warren M. Hook Mr. Van D. Waugh Jerry E. Huhtala Mrs. Sonja Huhtala Stephen E. Jones Mr. and Mrs. John S. Lester

Michael L. “Jack” King Mr. and Mrs. David Taylor Shufflebarger Ruth A. Kulick Mr. Steve Kaplan Orville J. Lobb Mr. Kurt Koch Thomas Mayr Ms. R. Lynne Mellin Capt. Buck McElhone, Ret. Mr. and Mrs. Dan Milski Henry Nardi Ms. Dolores G. Hermon Michael A. O’Neil Ms. Marsha S. Green Milton S. Poulos Mr. and Mrs. Tom Minaidis George W. Robinson Mr. and Mrs. Daniel N. Iseminger William A. Rudacille Mr. John Updike Terry Spink Mr. William Gooding John J. Suttman Grismer Tire Co. Dalton L. Tobin Mr. Charles Arnold Nathan Voight Ms. Theresa Degenstein Steve West Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Tranel Red Whitmire Ms. Jennifer Garner

e make every effort to ensure accuracy and completeness of donor names. 800) 423-6894 or by e-mail at nraf@nrahq.org. Thank you.

Traditions . Quarter 4: 2009

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NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID THE NRA FOUNDATION

The NRA Foundation 11250 Waples Mill Road Fairfax, VA 22030

The NRA FouNdATioN 2010 ANNuAl MeeTiNg AucTioNs Ensuring our shooting and hunting heritage

Race in now to get your tickets to the NRA Foundation’s 2010 Annual Meeting Auctions. You won’t want to let this opportunity zoom past you! The National Rifle Association will be among the first to experience the brand new NASCAR Hall of Fame in Charlotte, NC. Tickets for these events sell out quickly so purchase your tickets today by calling 703-267-1417. www.nraam.org

May 13-14, 2010

NASCAR Hall of Fame

Charlotte, NC

Traditions 2009: Qtr.4  

A Publication of The NRA Foundation

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