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Designing for the Web ~ Colour

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BP took this a step further when they merged with Amoco in 1998. They ‘needed to reinvent the energy business, to go beyond petroleum, not by abandoning oil and gas, but by improving the ways in which it is used and produced so our business is aligned with the long—term needs of the world.’ (Lord John Browne, Group Chief Executive, BP). Landor Associates were tasked with the redesign. BP has such a strong brand, the green was retained and built upon with a new positioning, ‘Beyond Petroleum’, and a new logo which took the relationship with nature a step further.

left: Old BP Logo Right: New BP Logo

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Colour expresses personality Colour is used in branding to evoke a reaction and stimulate brand association. The Orange brand was created in 1994 for Hutchison Telecom’s UK mobile phone network. Immediately, the brand was distinctive, fresh and appealing to the target market. The brand used primarily Helvetica as the typeface, but it was the simple, bold and consistent colour usage that made the bold statement in a brand marketplace. The orange colour was often coupled with white, or black, presenting a simple, sophisticated image. The resultant modernist appearance appealed to a certain audience demographic; mostly young, professional men with a high disposable income. Orange were perhaps the first mobile phone network to introduce style in order to sell phones. They were an aspirational brand; they wanted people to aspire to use their products. They built this up through advertising, marketing, sponsorship and careful product placement. Throughout all of this activity, the primary vehicle in brand recognition was a colour: orange.

Colour brand basics Own a colour As discussed earlier in this chapter, owning a colour is the holy grail of brand identity.

Use colour to build meaning In chapter thirteen, I described the various meanings colours have. If you can align your brand, or design, with a colour that makes sense, this will reinforce the meaning of your design.

Develop the best tools to get consistency of colour On the web, we have good standards for colour reproduction — RGB and Hex values. The only down side is the discrepancies between monitors. LCD screens tend to wash colour out — specifically pastel tones. PC’s and Apple Macs have different gamma settings — PCs generally being slighter darker and richer in tone. Ensuring colour is consistent across all of these devices is impossible, but you should still stick to the standards. Any slight deviation can undermine a brand. licensed to Denis (1 user license)

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Five simple steps designing for the web  

Designing for the web

Five simple steps designing for the web  

Designing for the web

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