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Designing for the Web ~ Colour

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Complementary Complementary selections are based on contrasting colours. Sometimes they look horrible and simply do not work. However, sometimes they are just the ticket. I generally use them if I want a vibrancy in a palette, or if I need to draw the readers eye to something. Hues of these colours work great as a highlight colour. They are defined by the colours opposing each other on the colour wheel.

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Other Colour Wheel selections There are other selections which can be used to form palettes: Analogous, Mutual complements, near complements and double complements. ‘Colours, when selected from from the colourwheel in certain combinations, interact together. This is the basis of colour palettes; the interaction of colours.’ Analogous colours, for example, are those which sit immediately adjacent on either side of a selected colour on the wheel. However, I find that I rarely use these four types of colour wheel selections consciously. Designers are more likely to choose these selections unconsciously, as they appear around us naturally.

Complementary colours are defined by the colours opposing each other on the colour wheel.

Triads Triads are really interesting. They provide tension, which can be important in some designs, because their strength is relatively equal. Triad colours are any three colours which are equidistant on the colour wheel. As all three colours contrast with one another they can clash and this is where the tension is created. Triad colours are any three colours which are equidistant on the colour wheel.

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Five simple steps designing for the web  

Designing for the web

Five simple steps designing for the web  

Designing for the web

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