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ANGUS bulletin Winter 2018


STEP UP TO TE MANIA ANGUS CONSISTENT PERFORMANCE FOR THE PREMIUM BEEF MARKET

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TE MANIA ANGUS NORTHERN BULL SALE WALGETT, NSW TUESDAY AUGUST 14TH @ 11.30AM Enquiries welcome Hamish McFarlane 0427 641 606 or Tom Gubbins 0429 952 197

www.temania.com.au


At the NSW State Committee Meeting on March 24th, Clem Whale received a 25 Year Membership Award on behalf of CA & M Whale, while Suzanne Haslingden received a 50 Year Membership on behalf of Inglewood Estate. Clem and Suzanne are pictured with outgoing NSW State Committee Chairman, James Laurie.

Dalby Feeder Challenge 421 to 500kg class champion heifers was awarded to Burenda Angus manager John Schmidt with Ashley Loveday, Elders and Intervet Australia's Luke Goldthorpe, at Dalby QLD 13/04/18. Image Credit: Fairfax Media

George Harborne, Crookwell NSW, won Champion F002 Parader and Grand Champion Parader at the Sydney Royal Easter Show

out & about

Nick Butcher (ASBP Project Officer) assisted by Jack Laurie to collect beef samples for Cohort 6 of the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program

Thomas Duddy, Killain Angus Tamworth NSW, had a successful Beef Australia 2018, winning the 12 years & under Commercial Cattle Junior Judging and 12 years & under Beef Cattle Paraders Class. Image Credit: Fairfax Media

A Pen of 4 Benalong Grazing Angus heifers exhibited by Lewis Roe (left) were judged by Richard Metcalfe as the winners of the 2018 Gingin commercial Anguspictured Bulletin — winter PAgeGeorge 1 heifer competition in WA. They are also with2018 organiser Gifford. Image Credit: Farm Weekly


12 Contents winter 2018 | volume 32

14

10 1 Out and About 2 Contents 4 From the President 5 From the CEO 7 Around the Weaner Sales

8 Brad Gilmour becomes Angus Australia’s 45th President Publisher: Angus Australia Locked Bag 11 Armidale NSW 2350

10 Introducing the 2018 Angus Australia Board of Directors

P: 02 6773 4600 | F: 02 6772 3095

12 Angus feeder premiums grow

E: office@angusaustralia.com.au W: www.angusaustralia.com.au

14 Promoting the Angus Benefit at Beef Australia 2018 16 Beef Australia showcases culinary delights of Angus Beef

Editor: Diana Wood Layout: Ebonie Sadler-Small Printer: APN Print, Warwick QLD Disclaimer: Opinions expressed in this publication are not necessarily those of the Editor or of the Board of Angus Australia. Neither the Editor nor Angus Australia takes any responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained within this publication, nor for the outcome (including consequential loss) of any action taken by readers or others based on information contained therein. The publishers reserve the right to refuse or cancel without notice any advertisement in a publication issued by them.

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19 The Angus benefit delivers across the supply chain 21 Aussie Angus fuels Costco’s China expansion 22 Verified Black Angus Beef provides assurances 23 Trust in what we do 24 Beef Australia 2018 Inspires our Scholarship Winners 26 Around Beef Australia

36 29 Beef Australia bonus for one lucky winner 30 Angus & Angus Influenced Cattle perform at the Beef 2018 National Carcase Competition awards 33 Around the Shows 34 Angus blitz Australia's largest grassfed beef carcase competition 34 Angus provide consistency 35 Around the female sales 36 Angus carcase success across the country 39 Members Feedback Improves Angus Database Search 41 Viewing Animal Information in Angus.Tech 42 Signing in to Angus.Tech 44 Selecting Your Next Angus Bull 46 Performance recording in dry times 48 Realising the Value of the Integration of Fixed Time AI into Commercial Beef Cattle Enterprises


50 advertising index Angus Studs

78

46 50 Support for Verified Angus brands at SE Asia’s largest food tradeshow

70 The GenAngus Future Leaders Program

53 Commercial Supply Chain team broadens knowledge base

73 Supporting the future of the beef industry

54 Angus Australia welcomes new supply chain officer

74 Enhancing the Angus product

54 Appointment of Breed Development Officer 55 New faces join the Member Services Team 55 Introducing Maxine Draycott 56 Pedigree certification for Angus heifer exports made simple 57 How does Angus Australia’s Inventory system work?

71 GenAngus Speaker Highlights

76 Female focus for Injune beef producers 78 Angus for marketability 80 Better cattle comes from breeding ambition 81 Angus breed used for more than 60 years at Gowangardie

Commercial Advertising

83 A brief guide to design and image file types

52 Angus Brand Verification 65 Angus Merchandise 43 AngusSELECT 42 ANIPRO 60 ANIPRO 64 Beef Central 58 Davey Group 75 Eastern Spreaders PTY LTD 32 Genetics Australia 62 Graphic Design Services 38 Neogen Australia 18 Nowlan Stock & Station Agent 13 Prolix 20 Transport Welding Engineering 72 Transport Welding Engineering 6 Uruguay World Angus Secretariat 78 Vetoquinol Angus Bulletin — winter 2018 PAge 3 40 Zoetis

59 Member Services stats

84 Importance of branding consistency

61 ASBP Cohort 7 Weaning Completed and Analysed

86 Brand Refresh

62 ASBP – Cohort 6 Structural Soundness Data Analysed 65 Sire Nominations OPEN for ASBP Cohort 9 66 InstaAngus 68 Ready for Roundup 69 Roundup Sponsorship Opportunities

IBC Ascot 9 Bannaby Angus 60 Ben Nevis Angus 50 Booroomooka Angus 82 Brooklana Angus 70 Clunie Range Angus 17 Curracabark Angus 19 DSK Angus 68 Fig Tree Park Angus 18 Glengowan Angus 6 Hardhat Angus 45 Kansas Angus 85 Knowla Livestock 41 K5X Angus 8 Lawsons Angus BC Millah Murrah 72 Myanga Angus 79 Noone Angus 53 Pentire Angus 56 Sara Park Angus 51 Seaforth Angus 22 Sugarloaf Angus 82 Texas Angus IFC Te Mania Angus 28 The Glen Angus 20 Wattletop Angus

86 Angus Australia Staff Directory

67 Achmea Australia


from the president Brad Gilmour, Angus Australia President

Well, where have the first six months of 2018 gone? It seemed like we’d just finished baling hay when I received the notice for our Annual General Meeting in Armidale. By then it was May and we’d fed most of it out. As always, there was plenty to catch up on and a few big changes too. The sun was shining in Armidale and fittingly, our new board members received a very warm welcome. Joining the board was: • Hamish McFarlane, Nationally elected Director • Erica Halliday, State elected Director for NSW • Jock Hughes, State elected Director for Tasmania • Andrew Kuss, State elected Director for Western Australia We look forward to your fresh outlook and ideas to improve and expand the great benefits that Angus cattle bring to the beef industry, right across Australia. Familiar faces remaining on the board are: • Dr Laurence Denholm, Appointed Director • Jim Wedge and Sam White, Nationally elected Directors • Brett Piraner, State elected Director from QLD • Libby Creek, State elected Director from SA • Brad Gilmour, State elected Director from VIC, As you all know Libby Creek has stepped down as President, leaving big shoes for me to fill. Just quietly, I’m delighted to see her continuing on the board. Libby, your knowledge and guidance will be invaluable. And finally, we say thank you to those leaving the board. You’re hard work and clear thinking over the years has put us in good stead for the future. • Tony Seymour (TAS) 10 years • Lindsay Wolridge (WA) 8 years • Samantha Dobson (TAS) 2 years • Dean Fredricksen (NSW) 2 years

It’s been a trying year

integration of the NH Foods supply chain of their Angus suppliers, Whyalla Feedlot and the Oakey Beef Exports processing plant. One of Pat’s major concerns going forward was enough regular supply of Angus steers to an expanding market sector and their brands Angus Reserve, 1788 Platinum and Omug. Marcel, Assistant General Merchandise Manager, said Costco Wholesale shared the benefits of the black Angus Reserve program with consistent quality and supply being the driving factors supporting the program. A trend that shows signs of growth, with Australian Angus set to be supplied in new stores opening in China and New Zealand. The Celebrity Chef Program saw Chef Afit (Holycow!), Jess Pryles (Hardcore Carnivore), and Adrian Richardson (Good Chef Bad Chef) cook up some mouth-watering meals with Angus beef. I took it upon myself to represent Angus Australia as the official taste tester. A tough job, but one I felt qualified for.

Learning what the ‘Angus Family’ really means

It was a term I heard a lot last year during the World Angus Forum in Edinburgh. And it was brought home on a personal level when we were hit by the St Patrick’s Day fires. The immediate support from Angus breeders was overwhelming. Friends and strangers turned up from far and wide to help with mustering and fencing. Fodder and fence posts showed up by the truckload, and casseroles arrived at our front door. Offers of agistment in a very tough season were incredibly generous as well. All of it allowed us time to re-establish the fences and pasture we lost. The support is ongoing. It’s hard to find the right words in the face of such kindness. All I can say is thank you and add that I’ve learned a thing or two about the unbelievable generosity in people. I’ve also learned a few things about fires, which I’ll leave you with. 1. Sow your burnt ground as soon as possible 2. Accept help when it’s offered (all of it) 3. Look after your mental health 4. Fire has no effect on black field crickets – or docks

We’ve seen the cattle market retreat 20–25%, which is concerning enough, but nothing compared to the kilograms of dry matter that has disappeared from our paddocks and haysheds over most of Eastern Australia. For those in drought affected areas, we hope the next substantial rain is not too far away.

Beef Australia in Rockhampton

Angus Australia had a strong presence in the Durack Pavilion, which turned out to be a great meeting place for Angus enthusiasts, both young and old. The Angus Benefit Seminar was a real highlight and featured guest speakers Pat Gleeson and Marcel Moodley. Pat is the General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports and Thomas Borthwicks, Mackay at NH Foods Australia Group. In what was a fascinating talk, Pat discussed the PAge 4

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

Brad Gilmour, president

peter parnell, Ceo


From the CEO

Dr Peter Parnell, Chief Executive Officer

The first half of 2018 has been very challenging for many members with widespread dry conditions across the majority of eastern Australia. However, despite the resulting general down-turn in cattle prices the Angus premium has remained strong in all major markets. The growing prominence of Angus brands in both the domestic and export market has generated unprecedented demand for Angus beef. In addition, due to lower prices the demand for Angus breeding heifers from southern Australia for the China export market has again been very strong in recent months. Angus Australia has had a busy start to 2018, with large increases in registrations, export certification, performance data and genomics testing relative to the same period in 2017. We had a significant presence at Beef Australia in Rockhampton during May, with strong enquiry at our trade display for information on Angus, especially from northern producers. Also, during the first half of 2018, Angus Australia has been successful in negotiating access to government funding through the MLA Donor Company to assist in our future education and extension programs, contributing to our goal of providing members with the best possible technology and information to accelerate the ongoing enhancement of the profitability of Angus. This funding support will enable the recruitment of some additional staff positions involved in developing and implementing innovative education and extension programs for our members and their customers.

Report from 99th Angus Australia AGM and Board meeting conducted on 24-25th May 2018

The 99th Angus Australia Annual General Meeting was conducted in Armidale on the 24th May 2018, followed by a Board meeting on the 25th May 2018. At the Annual General Meeting, President Libby Creek tabled the Society’s 2017 Financial Reports and the Director’s and Auditor’s Reports; and, declared the declaration of the results of the recent Directors ballot. The President advised that considering the newly elected Directors, and those Directors with continuing terms, the 2018 Angus Australia Board would consist of the following elected-Directors: Mrs Erica Halliday and Mr Sam White from NSW; Mr Brett Piraner and Mr Jim Wedge from Queensland; Mr Andrew Kuss from Western Australia; Mr Brad Gilmour and Mr Hamish McFarlane from Victoria; Mr Jock Hughes from Tasmania; and, Mrs Libby Creek from South Australia. The President acknowledged the contributions of retiring Directors, Mrs Samantha Dobson, Dr Laurie Denholm, Mr Dean Fredericksen, Mr Tony Seymour and Mr Lindsay Wolridge. Mrs Samantha Dobson served as a State-elected Director from Tasmania for the last 2 years, including performing the role of Chair of the Commercial Supply Chain Committee.

Dr Laurie Denholm served as a State-elected Director from NSW for 2 years and particularly made significant contributions as Chairman of the Board’s Strategy and Risk Committee. Mr Dean Fredericksen served as a National-elected Director for 2 years and particularly made significant contributions as Chairman of the Board’s Marketing, Communications and Youth Committee. Mr Tony Seymour served as a State-elected Director from Tasmania for 8 years and an Appointed Director for 2 years. During this time Tony made an enormous contribution to the Board, participating in various Committees and in particular taking a leading role in the oversight of the financial management of Angus Australia as Chairman of the Board’s Audit and Finance Committee. Mr Lindsay Wolridge, served as a state-elected Director from Western Australia for the past 8 years. Lindsay contributed significantly to all aspects of the Board and particularly in the development of breed development policy and oversight of technical issues in the role of Chairman of the Board’s Breed Development and Extension Committee. At its subsequent meeting, conducted on the 25th May, 2018 the Board elected Mr Brad Gilmour as President (Chaiman), and Mr Sam White as Vice-President. On taking the Chair, Brad Gilmour acknowledged the contributions made by Libby Creek during her 2-year term as President. The Board resolved to invite Dr Laurie Denholm to serve as an Optional Appointed Director, as per Clause 13.1 (d) of the Angus Australia Constitution, with specific expertise in risk assessment, risk management and governance not available among the elected Directors. The CEO and Managers provided the Board with an overview of progress with various initiatives in breed development and extension, strategic projects, marketing, youth development, commercial supply chain, and organisational support. The Board approved several amendments to the Angus Australia Regulations designed to maintain the integrity of the pedigree information in the Angus Australia database, including an overhaul of the DNA and parentage verification requirements for animal registration and changes to the requirements for registration of animals recorded with other breed associations (overseas and domestic). In addition, changes to the Regulations around the use of Angus BREEDPLAN were simplified, and new Regulations introduced relating to export pedigree certification. Further details of the Regulation changes will be provided separately to the membership once they have been integrated into existing Regulations and necessary changes made to the associated breed registry software. Pending the completion of the necessary changes to the breed registry software, the amended Regulations are planned to take effect from 1st July 2018. The next Board meeting will be conducted on the 2627th July in Sydney.

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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David and Mark Carolan, Nalorac Pastoral Company, "Lyndhurst", offered 300 Angus steers & 80 Angus heifers. The steers averaged 233kg, and made a top of 378c/kg at Armidale 23/03/18

The Quinn family, "Dambaroo" Cudgera Creek via Murwillumbah with their pen of champion Angus steers which made 343c/kg at 320kg or $1,099 at Casino NSW, 16/03/18. Pictured are Margaret, Luella Kennedy, Gordon, Lyndal Quinn, Charlie Somerville, Stuart Kennedy, Georgie and Chanel Kennedy

Tom & Meg Archer were awarded the market's best presented steers (21 Angus steers 351kg) which sold for $1,225, at Powranna TAS, 8/03/18. They also sold Angus heifers, 324kg for $1,150

around the weaner sales Images: Fairfax Media

Champion Pen of Crossbred Steers winner Don Russell, at the Stanthorpe Blue Ribbon Weaner Sale QLD, 5/04/18. His Angus cross steers 368kg, sold to 331c/kg or $1,218/head

Allan Sweeney, Rocky River, with milk tooth Angus, 424kg which sold for 311c/kg or $1,318 at Tenterfield NSW, 15/03/18

Richard Gardiner and Vaughan Boyd, Alcoa Farmlands 13 Angus steers, Bulletinsteers, — winter358kg 2018 7 365kg, for 320c/kg or $1,167 and Angus 14 Angus forPAge 328c/kg or $1,174, at Boyanup WA, 16/03/18. Image Credit: Farm Weekly


Introducing the 2018 Angus Australia Board of Directors Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

At the 99th Annual General Meeting of the Angus Society of Australia on the 24th of May 2018, the results of the 2018 Directors ballot were formally declared. The first meeting of this Board took place the following day, with Brad Gilmour from Victoria elected to the President’s chair, following the completion of Libby Creek’s two year tenure and Sam White from New South Wales elected as the Vice President.

Pictured left to right: Andrew Kuss, Hamish McFarlane, Jim Wedge, Sam White, Erica Halliday, Brad Gilmour, Libby Creek, Jock Hughes, Brett Piraner at the recent board meeting in Armidale

At its meeting on the 25th May 2018, the elected Directors for 2018 resolved to invite Dr Laurie Denholm to serve as an Optional Appointed Director, as per Clause 13.1 (d) of the Angus Australia Constitution, with specific expertise in risk assessment, risk management and governance not available among the elected Directors.  Laurie has accepted this invitation and has subsequently joined the 2018 Board.

Brad Gilmour

State Elected Director, Victoria Brad owns and runs a family based Angus breeder operation, Gilmour Pastoral near the South West Victorian town of Terang and has been a member of Angus Australia for 22 years. Brad provided one of the co-operator herds for the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program across five cohorts from 2011 and has played a large role in Youth development and the VIC State Committee. Qualifications: Angus breeder

Sam White

Nationally Elected Director Sam is the principal of Bald Blair Pastoral Co, which he runs alongside wife Kirsty and sons Abbott and PAge 10

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Arthur, where they run both a seedstock and commercial Angus herd. Qualifications: Bachelor of Finance Administration, Grad Dip in Ag Eco, Member of Australian Institute of Company Directors, Angus stud & commercial breeder

Libby Creek

State Elected Director, South Australia Libby and her husband Bruce, managed the well-known Angus stud, The Basin for eighteen years. Following the Basins’ dispersal, Libby has worked for the Hillcrest Pastoral Company, a commercial cattle operation running 2,500 Angus and Angus cross females in the south east of South Australia. Libby has just finished her term as President of Angus Australia. Libby has been a member of the South Australian Angus State Committee for over twenty years. Qualifications: Adv. Dip Agribusiness and Angus Breeder

Dr Laurence Denholm

Optional Appointed Director Laurie has been running cattle on his family farm since 1986 and has been a registered Angus breeder since 2001, as the principal of Denholm Glen Angus, run alongside his wife


Juliet and children, Alasdair and Catriona. Laurie has over 35 years experience in corporate and government policy development, strategic planning and risk management. Qualifications: BVSc(Hons), LLB(Hons), DipAgSc, GradDipLegPrac, PhD(Cornell), GAICD, Angus breeder

Erica Halliday

State Elected Director, New South Wales Erica is the co-owner at Ben Nevis Angus, a family run operation established in 1947. She has had a long association with Angus Australia and in particular the Youth program, as a previous winner of the University of Illinois Scholarship and has worked as the Project Officer and Youth Facilitator at Angus Australia. Qualifications: BA. of Agricultural Economics, Angus breeder

Jock Hughes

State Elected Director, Tasmania Jock is the principal of Cluden Newry Angus, a family run seedstock herd established in 1956, by Jock's grandfather, calving over 300 registered Angus females. Jock has been a member of the Tasmanian State Committee since 2010. Qualifications: Angus breeder

Andrew Kuss

State Elected Director, Western Australia Andrew, along with his wife Fiona has been the co principal of Allegria Park Angus stud since 1994. Andrew has served on the WA State Committee since 2007. Andrew spent time working for the Department of Agriculture and for a rural merchandise company, specialising in agronomy, sale and machinery. Qualifications: Bachelor of Applied Science, Angus breeder

Hamish McFarlane

Nationally Elected Director Hamish has been a co-principal at Te Mania Angus for the past 20 plus years, where he has been responsible for strategic direction, business planning and analysis, recording with Breedplan, progeny testing and benchmarking, classing cattle, visiting client herds and managing wholesale semen business. Qualifications: Angus Breeder

Brett Piraner

State Elected Director, Queensland Brett is the co-principal of Arthursleigh Q Angus and has been a member of Angus Australia since 2010. Brett has broad experience around supply chain and procurement and contracts. Brett was made an Associate Fellow of the Australian Association of Procurement and Contracts Managers in 2011 and a full Fellow in 2016. Qualifications: Angus breeder

Jim Wedge

Nationally Elected Director Jim is the co-principal of Ascot Angus. Prior to this Jim was the owner of the National Pump & Irrigation retail business running 18 outlets with 150 staff. Following the sale of the business to AMP Capital, Jim was appointed CEO and managing 54 stores and 500 staff before advancing to Executive Chairman. In 2007 Jim retired from the business and became a full time cattle breeder. Qualifications: DipBus in Management, Dip Irrigation, Company Director & Angus Stud Breeders

Brad Gilmour

Sam White

Libby Creek

Laurence Denholm

Erica Halliday

Jock Hughes

Andrew Kuss

Hamish McFarlane

Brett Piraner

Jim Wedge

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Brad Gilmour becomes Angus Australia’s 45th President Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Victorian Brad Gilmour has been declared the 45th President of Angus Australia at a meeting of the Board Directors held in Armidale NSW on the 25th of May 2018. Brad owns and runs a family based Angus breeder operation, Gilmour Pastoral near the South West Victorian town of Terang and has been a member of Angus Australia for 22 years and a Board member since April 2015. Brad and his wife Marg provided one of the co-operator herds for the Angus Sire Benchmarking Program across five cohorts from 2011. He is also actively involved in the Angus Victorian State Committee, where he has been Chairman on three occasions, the Western Victorian Regional Group where he has also been Chairman on three occasions and the Angus Youth program. As a family, the Gilmours’ identified the Angus breed close to 30 years ago, as the perfect opportunity to grow their beef business. ‘I have always believed in the Angus premium and when we moved to a purebred Angus operation I knew we were making the right move’ said Brad. ‘Breeding Angus has been the right decision for us and has allowed us to build both a profitable and sustainable beef operation’. You would be hard pressed to find someone more passionate about the Angus breed and the future it holds in the beef industry, and as a large scale commercial operator Brad has highlighted some key areas of growth within Angus Australia that he believes are crucial to the growth of the Angus breed. ‘Being a commercial Angus breeder I am excited about Angus Brand Verification and protecting the integrity of the breed’, he said ‘I believe that this program will have a flow on effect through the industry as a whole from the seedstock to the commercial breeder’.

“BREEDING BULLS IS NOTORIOUSLY DRIVEN BY FADS, NOT FACTS. AT LAWSONS ANGUS WE BELIEVE IN PROVEN SCIENCE. OUR DISCIPLINED BREEDING PROGRAM IS BASED ON SOUND SCIENCE AND EXPERIENCE.”

Angus Australia’s new Vice President, Sam White, outgoing President Libby Creek and incoming President, Brad Gilmour

Brad also has a great enthusiasm for the development of the beef industry leaders of the future and can’t wait to be involved in the fantastic programs such as the GenAngus Future Leaders Program in conjunction with Achmea Australia. ‘It will be exciting to see this program rolled out in the next couple of months by Angus Australia, targeting all young beef industry enthusiasts’, said Brad. And with the 100 year anniversary of Angus Australia coming up in 2019, Brad anticipates a huge year of celebration for Angus breeders across the country. ‘Angus Australia will not only be looking to the future but will be reflecting on the huge advances we have made in the last 100 years as a breed and an organisation’, he said. Brad will be taking over the role of President from Libby Creek from South Australia and will be supported by a team of 9 other Director’s, including Vice President Sam White from Bald Blair Angus, Guyra New South Wales. ‘In taking over as President of Angus Australia, I am very grateful to recent past Presidents Hugh Munro and Libby Creek for the work they have done and I look forward to working with the new board into the future’, he said.

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Angus feeder premiums grow Jon Condon, Beef Central

There’s been a noticeable widening in premiums paid for Angus feeder cattle in some regions recently, which market observers suggest may be primarily due to growing competition for black cattle to slot into Angus-aligned grainfed brand programs. A growing perception in industry circles this year has been that 100-day grainfed beef is now becoming a ‘commodity’ item in international beefmarket circles, that’s increasingly being reflected in pricing. That’s stimulating brand managers to seek to add additional attributes, such as breed identity, in order to defend margins, in an increasingly hostile global grainfed beef market. Large volumes of good quality grainfed beef now flowing into export markets in North Asia and elsewhere out of the US is only heightening that ‘commodity’ view about generic 100-day grainfed beef in Australia. Keen observers of the cattle market for backgrounder and feeder types have highlighted an expanding premium for Angus cattle in recent times. One heavily committed supply chain stakeholder said he could not recollect a larger margin for Angus cattle over everyday flatback (50pc indicus or less) feeders than that being seen at present in the southern Queensland/northern NSW region. “There appears to be a shortage of Angus cattle in the market, in the context of demand,” he told Beef Central. “That’s being driven by the fact that a substantial number of very significant grainfed supply chains (he used NH Foods’ enormous Whyalla feedlot as an example) have moved from buying a lot of crossbred feeders, to virtually none. PAge 12

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

“Everyone is now doing an Angus program, to try to differentiate themselves in the grainfed market, and consequently a good Angus feeder steer today is selling for 320-330c/kg liveweight, in the northern NSW/ southern Queensland region,” he said. That contrasts with a typical ‘flatback’ heavy feeder steer, quoted in Beef Central’s regular 100-day grainfed trading budget published yesterday at 280c/kg ex Downs. “That Angus premium at present – at least 40c – is as big, if not bigger than it has ever been”. Historically, Angus premiums in Australia have rarely topped 20c/kg liveweight. Further south in Victoria, premiums tend to be less, purely because of the preponderance of local black cattle relative to other breeds. Worth pointing out, though, is the fact that some feeder grids (JBS and Bindaree are examples) currently offer Angus premiums worth just 10c/kg liveweight. “But such offers are made by operators that routinely buy crossbred cattle as well – often in the same consignment,” one contact said. “Those smaller premiums are really directed at mixed runs of cattle, with some blacks and some crossbreds on the same truck, with the 10c/kg premium applying to the straight Angus in the mob,” he said. “But a lot of supply chains have now moved into the market with Angus-type brand programs, and now the


market is short, and competition for feeders is currently very strong in that Angus space.” Adding to the effect, the fact that straight Angus breeding by and large only happens in the bottom half of the continent only concentrates the current supply challenge. Perhaps another influence on the current market dynamic, contacts suggest, is the number of Angus breeding cows that have been diverted into F1 Wagyu breeding programs in the past two years – arguably reducing the normal flow of straight Angus feeder cattle coming forward. “That might be a small factor, but it’s more the fact that the market has wanted to ‘decommoditise’ itself, by hitching beef brands to breed identity, non-HGP, or some other special brand attribute to get away from the commodity end of the trade,” a supply chain stakeholder said. Still other impacts on Angus feeder supply this year may be the small but growing numbers of boat cattle to China, taking both slaughter and feeder weights, and the impact of dry conditions on southern Australia. With a lot of supplementary feeding going on in the south, using cottonseed and other energy-dense feedstuffs, it has perhaps also pushed more of those 350kg southern animals that used to get sold at 400-450kg as a feeder, onto a grain-self feeder until slaughter weight. “We suspect the dry weather has made that opportunityfeeding or grain assistance happen a fair bit this year, diverting some animal away from the feeder market into a Woolworths, Coles or Scone domestic slaughter program,” one large feeder customer told Beef Central.

beef in his presentation to the Queensland Rural Press Club recently. NH Foods identified a move to longer-fed Angus brand programs as part of the company’s strategy, going forward, outlining its strategy in moving further away from ‘commodity’ 100-day beef, by extending to 150 day and 200-day programs, using Verified Black Angus/ Angus cattle. Other large players like Stanbroke and Kilcoy are moving in a similar direction, with heavier emphasis on Angus brand programs, while Rangers Valley and Stockyard have had deeply-entrenched Angus programs for decades.

Longer days on feed avoids ‘commodity’ beef

NH Foods’ Andrew McDonald made several references to the inherent growing risks in ‘commodity’ grainfed

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beef australia

Angus were on display across the Beef Australia 2018 event Emily H cattle Photography

Promoting the Angus Benefit at Beef Australia 2018 Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

With a record crowd of 100,368 people passing through the gates at Beef Australia 2018, Angus Australia and many of its’ members took full advantage of the promotional opportunities on offer at an event that is considered the pinnacle of beef expositions in Australia. While the Angus Australia trade display was the main focal point for the society, there was ample opportunity for attendees to view Angus genetics, with Angus studs hosting trade displays and fifteen studs exhibiting in the show ring and to taste Angus beef at the Beef Symposium and during the Celebrity Chef Restaurant. 1,200 registered international delegates from more than forty three countries were in attendance during Beef Australia 2018, with the trade display providing the perfect backdrop to discuss export opportunities for both live cattle and beef exports. 280 domestic and international delegates also had the pleasure to sample Angus beef during the Beef Australia Symposium. Partnering with Cape Byron Angus, a Verified Angus Beef Brand from the Bindaree Beef Group, to sponsor the event, symposium guests were treated a Cape Byron eye fillet or slow cooked beef shin. Angus Beef also featured as part of the PWC Celebrity Chef Restaurant with Oakey Angus Reserve, a Verified Black Angus Beef brand from NH Foods featuring during a lunch time session. As a sponsor of Beef Australia, Angus Australia hosted a seminar on the ‘The Angus Benefit’. 160 delegates were given a backstage pass to one of our industry’s most successful integrated Angus supply chains. What they do, how they do it, why they do it and the Angus premium generated throughout their enterprises. PAge 14

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

In her introduction to the seminar, Angus Australia’s President, Libby Creek highlighted the key messages of consistency of product which is a big focus for Angus Australia with the Angus Brand Verification program giving customers the assurance they need and to support Angus members to protect the brand. The main take home messages from Pat Gleeson, General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports and Thomas Borthwicks, Mackay at NH Foods Australia Group and Marcel Moodley, Assistant General Merchandise Manager, Costco Wholesale Australia Pty Ltd, was that Angus producers are in the box seat. Angus cattle are known are known world wide for taste, colour and consistency and can always produce the quality product to take to the market. It was also highlighted that across the whole supply chain, that we should be looking at the value that can be provided to customers and ensure continuation of the consistent supply of the quality they demand. During the stud cattle judging, just over seventy head of Angus cattle were presented, with exhibitors from both Queensland and New South Wales putting their cattle forward for judging. Under the appraisal of judge Steve Crowley, the Grand Championships were split between Queensland and New South Wales


beef australia

"

Beef Australia is one of the worlds greatest beef expositions and a great way to promote the influence of Angus around the globe Bowenfels Special Edition L7, a rising three year old cow with a seven month old heifer calf at foot was named the Senior and Grand Champion female. Described by judge Steve Crowley, ‘As a really productive cow with good teat placement and doing a good job on her heifer calf’. Junior and Grand Champion Bull was awarded to PC H130 Kodiak M117. Exhibited by Pine Creek Angus, judge Steve Crowley chose the bull because, ‘He has a good spine and frame size. He is good on the move and walks beautifully with a well laid in shoulder and has good muscle throughout’. Overall Beef Australia 2018 was the perfect promotion stage for Angus Australia and ensured that the message continued to be communicated to the beef industry about the advantages that Angus can offer any production system and how the incorporation of Angus genetics into these systems can not only improve meat quality, but provide a premium. ‘Angus Australia had a significant presence at Beef Australia 2018 and it is pleasing to see that the interest in Angus cattle continues to grow at each event cattle’, said Angus Australia CEO Peter Parnell. ‘There was particularly strong enquiry from northern producers, with increased demand from beef brands driving northern demand for Angus cattle’, Peter added.

"

Angus Australia's Commercial Supply Chain Manager Liz Pearson and Marketing & Communications Manager Diana Wood, at the Beef Symposium with the Angus verified Cape Byron Angus product. Image courtesy of The Land

Angus Australia's trade stand at Beef Australia 2018

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Beef Australia showcases culinary delights of Angus Beef Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Visitors to Beef Australia 2018 were treated to the culinary delights that Angus beef has to offer, as verified Angus brands featured across the event.

Beef Industry Symposium

Angus Australia joined forces with Bindaree Beef Australia to showcase Cape Byron a Verified Angus Beef brand, during the Beef Symposium. Attendees to the Beef Symposium were served up a Cape Byron eye fillet with buttered fondant potato, sautéed baby spinach and Diane sauce or slow cooked shin of beef with Katsuobushi butter, eggplant puree and Chinese broccoli.

Cape Byron eye fillet with buttered fondant potato, sautéed baby spinach and Diane sauce, was one of the options served up at the Beef Symposium lunch

PWC Celebrity Chef Restaurant

Adrian Richardson's, Nona’s braised blade beef ragu, Nicola potato gnocchi

Jess Pryles's Smoked tri tip, ancho citrus sauce and Texas caviar

Adrian Richardson's Korean braised beef short rib, kimchi, shitake and white miso

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

Since 2015 Beef Australia have brought prominent international and Australia chefs to Rockhampton to showcase Australia Beef and all the ways it can be eaten and enjoyed by people globally, with the chefs featuring each day in the PWC Celebrity Chef Restaurant. Oakey Angus Reserve, a Verified Black Angus Beef brand from NH Foods was featured during one of the lunch time sessions. Diners had their tastebuds wowed by Chef Afit, the founder of Holycow!, who went from one street stall to 21 steak houses in seven cities in Indonesia; Jess Pryles, cook, author, TV host and a professional Harcore Carnivore and Adrian Richardson, co host of Good Chef Bad Chef. During service, Adrian Richardson delighted with Nona’s braised blade beef ragu, Nicola potato gnocchi and Korean braised beef short rib, kimchi, shitake and white miso; Chef Afit with Top round beef, Indonesian Rendang and Jess Pryles with Smoked tri tip, ancho citrus sauce and Texas caviar.

Adrian Richardson (Left) and Chef Afit (4th from the left) assisting in service


beef australia

All hands on deck for service of Adrian Richardson's gnocchi dish

Angus brand verification

Angus Australia is the only independent third-party verifier of Angus breed claims on beef products, with Angus Australia’s brand verification program developed as a service to the beef supply chain in response to the demand from consumers wanting to have greater confidence in the integrity of Angus beef brands. Both Beef Australia events gave Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson the opportunity to give a brief presentation on the Angus Brand Verification services Angus Australia offers the industry and how these services protect the Angus brand.

Angus Australia's Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson presenting to the crowd at the Beef Symposium lunch

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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A sold out crowd of over 160 people were on hand to hear how one of Australia’s most integrated supply chains incorporates Angus into their business and how the Angus brand works to their benefit. In his opening comments, Pat Gleeson, General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports and Thomas Borthwicks, Mackay at NH Foods Australia Group, told the room that ‘Angus is at the top of the tree when it comes to marketing, but has the consistent product to back the claims’. At Oakey, other programs have been reduced to make more way for the production of Angus brands, with 60% of production now part of the Verified Angus program. But one of the biggest challenges they now face is sourcing the cattle. ‘It’s imperative we have the quality Angus cattle coming through the program, to maintain consistency’, said Pat. ‘Oversupply is not an issue, there is an urgency around continuing to supply Angus beef to the programs such as Costco’. Marcel Moodley, Assistant General Merchandise Manager, Costco Wholesale Australia Pty Ltd, highlighted the importance in developing relationships with a supplier that is trustworthy and they are very happy very to work with NH Foods and stock their Angus Reserve brand, a Verified Black Angus Beef brand.

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Marcel Moodley, Assistant General Merchandise Manager, Costco Wholesale Australia Pty Ltd and Pat Gleeson, General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


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Aussie Angus fuels Costco’s China expansion Fiona Meyers, Beef Central

Australian Angus beef will supply the first Costco Warehouse retail outlet in China when it opens next year. Mr Moodley said Costco was happy to embrace brands, and as such had embraced the Angus brand with logos appearing on all the meat sold.

Popularity stakes

Marcel Moodley highlighted the importance of Verified Black Angus Beef to the Costco program

Costco’s commitment to stocking only Angus beef will see its supplier – Australia’s NH Foods – switch more and more of its feeder cattle passing through its 52,000 Whyalla feedlot to Angus, a Beef 2018 seminar hosted by Angus Australia heard. The new China warehouse in Shanghai which will open in March or April next year, is expected to rank among the biggest Costco stores in the world. There are expectations the first Chinese store will have a similar turnover to those in South Korea and Hawaii, which each generate $400 million a year. Costco Wholesale assistant general merchandise manager Marcel Moodley said Australian Angus beef was the highest quality the company could obtain for its customers. Costco, which is the second largest global retailer in the world, sources all its beef for its Australian stores from NH Foods, with the beef grainfed for 150 days at Whyalla feedlot, near Texas on the Queensland/NSW border. Since 2013, the company has sold $111 million worth of Angus beef through its nine Australian stores, and will now only stock grainfed Angus beef. Mr Moodley said the mission of Costco was to provide members with quality and service at the lowest possible price. Customer loyalty was integral to the business, and that did not come without supplying consistently highquality products. “We like to say we offer quality product in a Bunnings warehouse environment,” he told the Beef 2018 seminar. “We know how important it is to have consistently high quality, and we are very happy with our partnership with NH Foods. “The benefits of Angus beef are that it offers consistent quality, and it’s exactly the same, fed for 150 days and with a minimum marbling score of 2. “People talk about Angus and its quality, and that’s because it is quality beef. As long as I am here (in the role at Costco), Angus will be here.”

The Costco customers, who range from mums and dads to butchers and restaurant owners, have voted with their wallets, with some of the food service businesses buying pallet-loads of the Angus beef from Costco. Mr Moodley said he had forewarned their supplier, NH Foods, that the Chinese store was to open next year, so that provisions could be made to source more livestock and place on feed in preparation. “We have given them enough notice and an idea of what we might sell in China so they can be ready,” he said. As well as China, Australian Angus beef will also be sold in a new Costco store in New Zealand, which is expected to open in 2020.

Whyalla has been sourcing and lot feeding Angus cattle since 1995 and is continually sourcing consistent quality lines of Angus cattle across the country

Feeding the demand

Meanwhile NH Foods is swinging more and more of its production over to Angus or Angus-cross cattle in order to supply the seemingly insatiable demand from Costco and other customers. The company’s Whyalla Beef feedlot is currently at full operating capacity of 60,000 cattle, and of those, 70 percent are either pure Angus or second-cross. NH Foods general manager Pat Gleeson, who is also general manager of Thomas Borthwick and Sons and Oakey Beef Exports, said the yard had reduced other feeding programs to concentrate more heavily on Angus. The company processes 5000 cattle a week from the feedlot, and every part of the process is audited. It is this, plus the longer shelf-life of 140 days compared to the best from the US of just 70 days – which had helped Australian Angus product demand swell in international markets. While Mr Gleeson would not commit to a time frame of when the entire feedlot would hold Angus or Anguscross cattle, he said it was “the vision of the feedlot to do this.”

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Verified Black Angus Beef provides assurances Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Angus cattle are fast becoming the cornerstone of the NH Foods program because Angus beef consistently provides a quality product and consistent products will yield a premium price.

Peter Parnell, Angus Australia's CEO and Pat Gleeson, General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports

Pat Gleeson, General Manager at Oakey Beef Exports and Thomas Borthwicks, Mackay at NH Foods Australia Group, presented to a sold at out crowd during Beef Australia, on the benefits Angus cattle bring to the NH Foods business model. 'Angus is known worldwide for taste, colour and consistencies, so continuous growth forecast is positive for global and domestic Angus programs,' said Pat. At their Oakey Beef exports plant on the Darling Downs of Queensland, about 60% of production is now part of the Verified Angus Beef program, where they currently process 5,000 head of cattle each week. Oakey Angus Reserve, a Verified Black Angus Beef brand, is a 150 day grain fed product, with a marble score of 2+, sold throughout the world and is domestically available through Costco. Their Whyalla Beef Feedlot, located at Texas Queensland has a capacity of 60,000 and has been lot feeding Angus cattle since 1995 and now feedlot programs

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

are being reduced to make way to increase the Angus Reserve Program. NH Foods utilises Angus Australia's 'Highest level of verification and assurance, Verified Black Angus Beef, for the Oakey Angus Reserve product because our customers want to know that they are purchasing 100% genuine Angus beef,' Pat said. But producing a successful Angus brand is not without its challenges, with supply being key. 'Sourcing cattle is now the biggest challenge, it’s imperative that we have the the quality Angus cattle coming through the program to maintain consistency,’ said Pat. Pat noted that high demand for the Angus product will put pressure on the supply chain, but, 'With six cattle buyers for Whyalla Beef, we are able to source consistent quality lines of Angus cattle from the eastern states of Australia from central Queensland down to King Island off Victoria.'


beef australia

Image Courtesy of The Land

Trust in what we do

Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager As a beef producer do you know your customer and can you give them the information they want? The questions most asked across Beef Australia 2018. And questions that should be focused on across the supply chain, from the seedstock producer through to the retail outlet. Today’s consumers are walking encyclopaedias, with smart phones in their pockets they are armed with information and they want that information to be readily available. Consumers want to know, what breed of beef they are eating, where it came from, how it was produced and a guarantee that they are consuming the exact product they have paid to experience. And if they can’t find the information they want or don’t receive the experience they were expecting, they are not afraid to tell the world about it. More value can be extracted from our beef businesses it we can better appreciate what the consumer wants and ensure we are meeting if not exceeding their expectations. Australian beef producers operate in a highly competitive international marketplace and we must understand their needs and continue pursuing the advantage for Australia beef. The way forward for beef producers is to build consumer trust, breed something the consumer wants and arm them with information on the product. Former National Farmers Federation and Meat and Livestock Australia Chairman, David Crombie highlighted exactly this at the Rabobank Beef Industry Awards dinner. ‘There can be no better insurance for our beef industry than community trust,’ David said. ‘We need to position ourselves at the high value, quality end of emerging markets. To do this we need, short, transparent supply chain with through chain accountability to our customers backed by creditable verification and trace back.’ Trust like this can built through programs such as Angus Australia’s brand verification services program, developed as a service to the beef supply chain in response to the demand from consumers wanting to have greater

confidence in the integrity of Angus beef brands. In opening the Angus Benefit seminar, Angus Australia director Libby Creek highlighted that this has, ‘Been a big focus for Angus Australia with the Verified AngusB eef program giving customers the assurance they need, as well as supporting Angus members to protect the brand’. Tools such as BREEDPLAN further enhance this trust through the supply chain, as breeders can make more accurate breeding decisions that will impact the beef on the plate at the end of the supply chain. And combined with genomic measurement the genetic merit of a herd can be increased in comparison with breed averages and boost the profitability of a herd at a more rapid rate. The beef industry is certainly benefiting from genetic gain, as producers are further armed with the tools to make more informed and accurate selection decisions, thus providing end users with the quality products they desire. At the end of the day, it is all about eating great Australian beef and as Angus producers, we want it to be all about eating great Australia Angus Beef and need to ensure we are breeding the cattle that will provide this product in a way that consumers will accept. As summed up by Meat and Livestock Australia’s, Andrew Cox, ‘Australia’s greatest advantage as a beef producing nation is consumers overwhelming trust of high quality Australia beef’.

Image Courtesy of Farm Weekly

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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beef australia

Laura Wishart with the Beef Australia 2018 Sign

Beef Australia 2018 Inspires our Scholarship Winners Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer

Beef Australia 2018 welcomed more than 100,368 Visitors, 1,200 registered international delegates from 42 countries, more than 5000 head of cattle, 530 trade fair exhibitors and 3 very talented and inspirational Angus Youth members Jack Laurie, Laura Wishart and Emily Webb Ware through its gates at this years event. Angus Australia and the Queensland State Committee were proud to offer the opportunity for these three young beef enthusiasts to attend the prestigious event.

Jack Laurie

Jack grew up on his family farm at Knowla Angus, Moppy New South Wales and was keen to take the opportunity to attend the event all about beef. Whilst in Rockhampton Jack was able to talk and connect with people from various parts of the beef industry that had the same interests as he did. A highlight of Jacks experience was talking to Robert Whitacre from ST Genetics, America, about how they run operations in vast numbers producing semen for bulls that are used all around the globe in both dairy and beef cattle ‘We had discussions on a variety of Angus bulls that they have available and what genetics are working well in the American environment,’ Jack said. ‘As a young member talking to other more established breeders gave an insight into larger programs not only in stud Angus but in regard to a commercial focus as well,’. he said. Throughout the week Jack also attended various industry seminars and functions, with MLA and MSA hosting numerous sessions on new technology the benefits of the MSA index value. ‘I was fortunate to be able attend the Beef Connection dinner, allowing me to connect with like-minded people within the agricultural industry, both cattle breeders and industry experts, Jack added. But one of Jack’s greatest achivements was being asked to judge the 12 Years and under age group for Beef Cattle Paraders. ‘It was an honour and privilege to stand in the middle ring and be exposed to such a great opportunity,’ Jack Said. PAge 24

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

When summing up his experience Jack noted that the opportunity to be able to broaden his horizons within the Australian beef industry was of the most value and the support of Angus Australia and the Queensland State committee to gain this experience was very much appreciated.

Laura Wishart

Laura Wishart grew up on a mixed farming enterprise on the south coast of Western Australia. The focus of her family farming business is their commercial Angus herd and beef feedlot. With this in mind the opportunity was seized by Laura to attend Beef Australia with Angus Australia not only to advance her knowledge on personal level but also to value add to her professional career in the meat industry. As first timer to the industry bonanza, Laura was quick to learn that the difficulty does not lie in making the most of it, it lies in knowing which of the many seminars, trade stands, shows and networking events to prioritise. ‘The sheer size of Beef Australia 2018 and the variety of industry sub-sectors represented a fantastic opportunity to develop my knowledge and understanding of a number of topics relating to Australia’s beef industry and grow my network of contacts,’ Laura said. ‘I was exposed to the much-discussed Smokin’ Yak slowcooked Brahman hump and was really excited about this concept and what it represented. That is, the increased returns each stakeholder in the beef supply chain could collect if we are able to value-add more of these traditional secondary cuts’, she said. ‘I think this is especially true in a market in which sustainability is becoming more of a discussion point and cultural diversity and culinary experimentation have become the norm,’ she added.


beef australia Laura also attended a number of seminars covering topics such as improving animal performance and efficiencies on-farm, the future of the live export industry, consumer trends, global markets and carcase measurement technology. ‘I came away from each of these with a better appreciation of the complexity of the beef industry and the amount of effort, passion and commitment that makes it what it is,’ she said. A big highlight for Laura was being a steward for the Angus Judging alongside Emily and Jack. ‘Prior to this, I had never been involved in a cattle showing event,’ said Laura. ‘I have been involved at the other end of the spectrum in carcase/meat judging, just never the showing side of the industry,’ she added. ‘I am amazed by the enormous investment of time, money and effort that the studs made to get their cattle to Rockhampton’. Wrapping up Laura’s experience at Beef Australia, she noted how fantastic the experience was to be involved in such a high caliber event and been able to network with like minded individuals. ‘It is my belief that harnessing this breadth of knowledge and perspectives through collaboration will be key in pushing the industry forward,’ she said. ‘It looks like our industry has an exciting future ahead and I cannot wait to be part of it’, Laura concluded.

Emily Webb Ware

Emily has grown up on a 4th generation farm, near Yea, Victoria. Her family have a self replacing Angus herd which they have been breeding since before Emily was born. ‘As a born and bred Victorian, with very little experience in northern beef systems, I was excited to explore a different perspective on the beef industries within Australia,’ said Emily. Emily was keen to get straight into the Beef Australia experience and started her week with attending the ‘Stockmanship and why it matters’ workshop, held in Nerimbera.

Jack Laurie at Beef Australia with Robert Whitace, ST Genetics

Dr Ron Gill from Texas A&M Agrilife Extension shared his expertise in livestock handling and animal welfare and gave a practical demonstration of the principles of lowstress stock handling in action. As part of the Stockmanship tour Emily also heard from Chloe Gould about the new DEXA technology being trailed by Tey’s Australia, which will provide producers with better feedback on their carcasses. ‘Objective measurement and value-based marketing was a topic frequently mentioned through the week,’ Emily said. A highlight of Emily’s experience was the full day property tour to Belmont research station not far from Rockhampton. ‘This property works closely with CQ University’s Precision Livestock Management team to facilitate research and development of technologies for livestock production in Northern Australia,’ Emily said. ‘We were able to see new technologies, including the walk-over-weighing system and new models of livestock smart sensors, in action,’ Emily added. ‘Many of the projects that we learned about taking place at Belmont were incredibly innovative and have the potential to change the way we farm’ she said. As part of the tour Emily also visited the nearby Beef Breeding Services laboratory to see their artificial reproduction capabilities. A significant part of the Beef Australia program that Emily attended was the NH Foods Next Generation program, which involved a number of events aimed at young beef leaders 18-35 years. Part of this program was the Young Beef Meet and Mix including the young farmers challenge, and the Next Generation Forum, which brought together a number of inspiring and innovative people who spoke about how they established their own businesses and worked towards success. ‘The NH Foods Next Generation program also introduced the Graeme Acton Beef Connections program, which I hope to be more involved with in the future,’ she said. Emily left Rockhampton feeling inspired and optimistic about the future of the beef industry in Australia. ‘The experience has been valuable beyond measure for my career in the beef industry,’ she concluded.

Scholarship winner Emily Webb-Ware with Events & Angus Youth Development Officer Candice Liddle

Angus Foundation Beef Australia Scholarship winners, Emily Webb-Ware, Laura Wishart and Jack Laurie

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Angus Australia Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson and Supply Chain Officer, Olivia Twaddle, Angus Australia Directors Brad Gilmour, Hardcore Carnivore, Jess Pryles, Angus Australia Director, Libby Creek, Angus Australia Marketing & Communications Manager, Diana Wood and General Manager Wingham Beef Exports, NH Foods Australia, Grant Coleman

NH Foods Australia General Livestock Manager, Stephen Moy, Costco Wholesale Assistant General Merchandise Manager, Marcel Moodley, Oakey Beef Exports, NH Foods Australia General Manager, Pat Gleeson, Liz Pearson, Olivia Twaddle, Michael Beattie, General Manager Wingham Beef Exports, NH Foods Australia, Grant Coleman and NH Foods Australia General Manager Domestic Sales, Michael Davidson

Christie Kennedy and Angus Australia Director Libby Creek. Image, Emily H Photography

around beef

Angus Australia's Breed Development & Extension Manager, Andrew Byrne with Don Nichol & Michael Beattie & Strategic Projects Manager, Christian Duff

PAge Australia 26 AngusCEO Bulletin — winter 2018 Achmea Emma Thomas, with Angus Australia's CEO Peter Parnell

Grant Coleman, Pat Gleeson, Jess Pryles, Liz Pearson, Celebrity Chef, Adrian Richardson, Olivia Twaddle, Diana Wood, NH Foods Australia Managing Director Seiji Inatomi and Peter Parnell


Ben Hill, Bulliac Angus,Miles QLD; Nigel Semmens, Genetics Australia; Tom Peters, Cogent UK & Robert Whitacre, ST Genetics

Angus Foundation Scholarship winner, Jack Laurie & Angus Australia Life Member, Bob Dent

Glynnis & Brian Turner, Swanbrook Angus, Inverell NSW

australia

Angus Youth enjoying Beef Australia - Hannah Powe, Events & Angus Youth Development Officer, Candice Liddle, Mardi O'Brien, Emily Hurst and Jack Laurie

Angus Australia's Breed Development & Extension Manager, Andrew Byrne with Lucinda Corrigan

— winter 2018 Commercial PAge 27 Hardcore Carnivore, Jess Pryles Angus withBulletin Angus Australia's Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson


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beef australia

Beef Australia bonus for one lucky winner Rural insurer Achmea Australia teamed up with Angus Australia during Beef Australia 2018 in Rockhampton QLD, to offer visitors to the Angus Australia trade stand the chance to win a Honda EU30is 3kva Portable Silent Generator, valued at $3,000. Graham Irish, owner of the 11,000-hectare Angus/ Brahman crossbreed beef cattle property ‘Balnagowan’ in Tungamull, QLD was been declared the lucky recipient of the prize at the conclusion of Beef Australia. Mr Irish, who lives permanently in Bowral, New South Wales, was delighted to be selected as the winner. “This was my first visit to Beef Australia, and so I was very pleased to win this prize. The generator has already been put to use on my Queensland farm, and has been a huge benefit to us,” says Mr Irish. Achmea Australia featured as part of the Angus Australia stand, where they promoted the competition – and their presence was also a great opportunity to create more awareness of what’s already proving to be a popular insurance choice for beef producers. With Achmea’s commitment to forging genuine relationships without broker fees, their inherently cooperative business model is based on maximising longterm client satisfaction over profit. And their partnership with Angus Australia heralds a growing commitment to supporting the future leaders of Australia’s Beef and agricultural industries. Together, the two companies recently launched the GenAngus Future Leaders Program, which mentors young entrepreneurs seeking to advance their knowledge and skills, via a first-class initiative that will help shape the industry for years to come. Angus Australia’s Marketing & Communications Manager Diana Wood described the competition initiative as a positive addition to the new partnership. “As a member-

based organisation, Angus Australia is continually looking at opportunities to add value to the businesses of its members. This prize was an exciting way to give back to the beef community,” she reported. Achmea Australia CEO Emma Thomas also described her reaction to the competition: “I was really thrilled the competition was so well received, and to hear that the generator has already been put to good use on Mr Irish’s farm.” Mrs Thomas also described the Beef expo itself as a huge success for Achmea Australia. “It really underlines our focus on collaboration, and our sense of community spirit. Our approach is all about offering a partnership alongside an insurance solution, and this competition was just one example of our continued efforts to protect and enhance our agricultural communities for many years to come,” she said.

Angus Australia CEO Peter Parnell and Achmea Australia Risk Specialist Richard Reynolds draw out the winning entry at the conclusion of Beef Australia at the Angus Australia Trade Stand

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018 Gerard Bennett Risk Specialist with Achmea Australia congratulates Graham Irish on winning the Honda Generator

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Angus & Angus Influenced Cattle perform at the Beef 2018 National Carcase Competition awards Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Australia’s biggest carcase competition, the ANZ National Beef Carcase Competition at Beef Australia 2018 has proven the merits that using Angus genetics can have in either a crossbred or purebred operation to improve carcase performance.

Bruce Campbell and daughter Bryden Campbell, Cooara, Keysbrook receive their Grand Champion Award from sponsor ANZ’s representative, Mark Bennett at the ANZ National Carcase Awards night during Beef Australia 2018. Image courtesy of Beef Central

The competition, saw 1077 animals, make up 359 teams of three animals from six states processed and assessed at 21 plants across Australia, giving entrants the opportunity to benchmark their bloodlines, genetics and breeding goals against others across the country. And in a first the competition allowed beef producers to enter their cattle in local carcase competition, plus nominate the same cattle into the Beef 2018 competition, allowing producers to benchmark themselves on a national level. Meat Standards Australia (MSA) Research Development and Integrity manager, Janine Lau travelled to all 21 plants to grade the carcase entries across the country. Bruce Campbell and family, Keysbrook WA, won both champion and reserve champion pen and champion and reserve champion carcase. The 9-10 month old steers entered by the Campbell family were all bred on the family farm and based on the family’s Cooara Angus and Charolais bloodlines. The Campbells’ Champion pen, were Charolais Angus cross steers scoring 251.3 points (out of 300), which included the animal that was champion carcase with 81.95 points. While their reserve champion pen with 249.47 were purebred Angus and included the animal that won reserve champion carcase, with 81.76 points. All up the Campbells’ entered five teams of fifteen calves, to come out with first and second in the pasture fed

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

pen of three medium trade chiller steers or heifers 180260kg and third in the pasture fed pen of three heavy steers or heifers 260.1-340kg class. The results were great feedback for the Campbell family who generally turn their steers off their mothers or pasture feed with a pellet based supplement, seasons pending, for the domestic market at around 220kg. In 2015, the Campbells won Reserve Champion carcase and reserve champion pen with similar type calves and regularly have success at the Perth Royal Show. Geoff Pearson, from TW Pearson, a feedlotter and grazier from Bunbury WA took out the highest scoring MSA index carcase on 63.32 points and the highest scoring MSA index pen on 201.82 points, with Wagyu Angus cross steers. The same team also won the grainfed pen of three heavy trade chiller steers o heifers 260-340kg. G & B Bendotti, Pemberton WA, also tasted success with their 9-10 month old Angus steers straight off mum, placing first and second in the pasture fed pen of three heavy trade chiller steers or heifers 260-340kg. They also received a third in the pasture fed pen of three medium trade chiller steers or heifers 180-260kg. Continuing the success of WA entries, was Blue River Grazing, Northcliffe, with a team of 15-16 month old Angus steers, finishing first in the pen of three pasture fed export chiller bullocks. A team of Angus cross Murray Grey steers from John Drinkwater, Dardanup WA, placed 2nd in the class for


beef australia

Mike MacCue, Wilga feedlot, Ben Mayne, Texas Angus and Ben Hiscox from BJA, Inverell selecting the winning the Angus steers at the Wilga Feedlot.

The Campbell Family’s reserve champion pen of three prior to processing

Blue River Grazings’ Angus steers, finished in first and sixth in the pen of three export chiller bullocks pasture fed 300-420kg class

Mark Inglis, JBS with Ben Mayne, NSW who won class 6 – pen of three export chiller bullocks grain fed 300 to 420kg. Image: Beef Central

pen of three heavy chiller steers or heifers 260-340kg, unrestricted feeding A pen of three Angus steers entered by the Mayne family from Texas Angus, Warialda NSW were victorious in the pen of three 100-day grainfed export chiller bullocks 300-420kg carcase weight. Their 18 Beef 2018 steers were sent to the MacCue family’s Wilga Feedlot, Bellata, where Mike MacCue and Ben Hiscox from BJA, Inverell, helped select the steers into pens of three. They were entered in Class 6 for 100-day grainfed export chiller bullocks, the biggest class in the competition with 492 head, 330 more than any other class. All their pens finished in the top 50. Their winning steers scored 241.18 points out of a possible 300. They have enjoyed great success in the Sydney Royal Beef Challenge, winning the last two grand champion 70-day domestic pen awards plus a swag of other prizes.  Texas Angus also won the prestigious RAS Perpetual Consumer Trophy for Champion Export Taste Test Carcase in 2017. Beef 2018 carcase competition chairman David Hill was the driving force behind the expansion of the competition and was pleased that entries came close to doubling. 'Australian beef is among the best in the world, so performing well in the National Carcase competition puts a beef producers product among some of the best in the world', he said.

John Bendotti, Pemberton, WA, Noel Grant, GDL and Lisa Bendotti won class 2 - pen of three heavy trade steers or heifers pasture fed 260 to 340kg. Image: Fairfax Media

Michael Crowley, MLA with MSA Index highest points winner Geoff Pearson. Image: Fairfax Media

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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GET THE MOST OUT OF YOUR BEST BULLS Insurance Ensure you will have semen from your best bulls for years to come. Quality Certified Once arriving at Genetics Australia, your bull will begin a program to ensure he has the highest quality of semen giving you the best quality return on your investment. Export Opportunities Genetics Australia is accredited to produce semen eligible for export around the world. First Class Service Our experienced staff will help you throughout the process. From your bulls arrival on farm, collection, storage and despatch. Know that your bull will be in good hands during their experience at Genetics Australia.

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


around the Shows

Beef Australia Show

Junior & Grand Champion Bull - PC H130 Kodiak M117. Image: Emily H Photography

Senior & Grand Champion Female - Bowenfels Special Edition L7. Image: Emily H Photography

Sydney Show

Junior & Grand Champion Angus Bull & Hordern Trophy Team Member winner - PC Kodiak M117, exhibited by Pine Creek Angus, Cowra NSW. Image courtesy of Struan Pearce

Senior & Grand Champion Female & Urquhart Trophy Interbreed Champion female - Myanga Lady Louise L226, Beresford Family & Scott Myers. Image: Emily H Photography

The Hordern Perpetual Trophy for the best interbreed beef pair at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, was won by the Angus team PC Kodiak M117, exhibited by Pine Creek Angus and Myanga Lady Louise L226, Beresford Family & Scott Myers. Image: Fairfax Media

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Angus blitz Australia's largest grassfed beef carcase competition Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

David and Jenny Smith, Howard Nominees, Kalangadoo, South Australia blitzed the field, by becoming the first competitors to win both grand champion and reserve grand champion carcase in the event’s 10-year history. The 2017-18 Southern Grassfed Carcase Classic was the biggest and best yet with nearly 550 head more cattle than the previous year. In a five-month delivery period, Teys Australia’s Naracoorte abattoir processed 1269 cattle from 45 producers from SA and western Vic, affirming its status as the nation’s largest grassfed beef carcase competition. The Grand Champion carcase went to an Angus steer, the Class 2 winner for Single steer or heifer, 0-4 teeth 240-320kg. The 292.4 kg carcase, had an eye muscle area of 87 square centimetres and 6mm of rib fat to score 87.77 points out of a possible 100, including full points for saleable meat yield. Mr Smith, who runs a herd of 120 autumn-calving Angus females, entered 38 head and also took out the best team of three and best team of ten animals. The Alan Kranz Memorial Trophy for highest eating quality animal went to an Angus cross steer, 380kg, exhibited by Ian Louise Johnson.

Angus provide consistency Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Hailing from Wepar in the lower south east of South Australia, David and Jenny Smith, Howard Nominees, use Angus bulls over their self replacing 120 Angus based, cow autumn calving herd.

David Smith, Howard Nominees, Kalangadoo, is congratulated on winning Grand Champion. Image: Fairfax Media

The Smith’s switched to a pure Angus herd a decade ago to focus on breeding quality, consistent bullocks. Steers are grown out to turn off bullocks at 600kg at around 18-20 months direct to the processor. In 2017, the Smiths were finalists in the Excellence in Eating Quality Progress award, recognising producers who have made the greatest improvement in their MSA index and compliance, at the 2017 Meat Standards Australia Excellence in Eating Quality Awards in South Australia.

David Smith, Kalangadoo. Image: The Weekly Times

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


Merrilong Pastoral Company, Spring Ridge NSW sold 96 PTIC Angus heifers for $1,700 heifers on AuctionsPlus 20/04/18. Image: AuctionsPlus

Bruce Lyle sold Angus heifers for 406c/kg or $1,099, Casino NSW, 16/03/18

Steven Scott, sold 49 Angus heifers, to a top of $1,280, three pens equaling 278-304c/kg. Wodonga VIC, 5/04/18

around the female sales Images: Fairfax Media

Hillgrove Pastoral, Booroowa NSW sold 34 Angus Heifers and Calves for $2,030 on AuctionsPlus 23/03/18. Image: AuctionsPlus

Kevin Chorley sold Angus heifers 340kg for $1,268 or 372c/kg, at Stanthorpe QLD, 5/04/18. Picture are Colin Keevers, with Champion Pen of Angus Heifers winner Kevin Chorley.

Angus Bulletin winter121 2018 Angus PAgeheifers 35 Charles and Cass Kimpton, with grandson Piers,—sold to $1,429, averaged $1,372. Mortlake VIC, 10/05/18


ANGUS CARCASE SUCCESS ACROSS THE COUNTRY Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Angus are known throughout the world for their ability to consistently produce the finest high quality beef. Results in hoof and hook competitions across the country continue to reiterate these claims, as Angus and Angus influenced cattle perform well across the country, proving the ability of of Angus cattle to provide the carcase traits that bring profitability to any cattle breeding enterprise

Wagga Wagga Christian College exhibited the Reserve champion school steer at the Royal Canberra Show. Image Fairfax Media

2018 ACTEWAGL Royal Canberra Show

Wagga Wagga Christian College exhibited a 482kg Angus steer that was awarded reserve champion school steer after it won the heavy domestic section. The steer also placed first in the hook section in the heavy domestic section, scoring a total of 88 pints out of 100, with rib and P8 fats of 7 and 9mm an a rib eye area of 87cmsq.

The Champion Mediumweight was a Limousin cross Angus heifer, exhibited by L Chorley and J Barber, weighing 460kg, who also exhibited the Reserve Champion heavyweight with a Limousin cross Angus steer.

2018 Sydney Royal Easter Show

Proving the breeds’ ability to meet market specifications has seen Angus steers put on a dominant performance in the Sydney Royal Easter Show Purebred Steer and carcase competition, winning a myriad of awards across the whole spectrum of the competition. All up Angus steers won, Champion Virtual Taste Test, can 2nd in the Stanhill Trophy, won Reserve Champion Heavyweight Steer and a Gold Medal in the carcase award and were awarded 6 Silver Medals and 8 Bronze medals. A 534kg Angus steer, bred and exhibited by BW & MM Brooker led the way when crowned both the Reserve Champion Heavyweight steer on the hoof. Dressing at 61.1%, scoring a maximum of 15 points with a rib eye of 119cm2 and had P8 fat of 12mm and rib fat of 8mm, the carcase was awarded a Sydney Royal Gold Medal. The Scots School, Bathurst, exhibited a 469kg Angus steer, that was bred by Sunny Point Pastoral Company,

Grand Champion prime yearling and champion heavyweight at Wagin Woolarama, was an Angus steer exhibited by WACA Narrogin. Picturedf are Ray (left) & Colin Batt, judge judge Cameron Petricevich, Mark Penrose& students Nyah Mills & Kaileasha Reynolds, Luke Armstrong, Connor Dawson & Alika Gould. Image: Farm Weekly

2018 Wagin Woolarama, Wagin WA

An Angus steer exhibited by students from the WA College of Agriculture (WACA), Narrogin, took out the prizes of Champion Heavyweight unled yearling and Grand Champion. The Angus steer weighed in at 554kg and was awarded a total of 92.5 out of 100 points and was chosen by judge Cameron Petricevich for his, 'Beautiful depth and length'. The students also exhibited the 2nd place steer in the lightweight section, with a 392kg Angus steer. PAge 36

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

Stanhill Trophy Team. Image: Emily H Photography


to take out the Virtual Taste Test Champion award. The steers dressed at 53.8% and had a P8 fat of 16mm and a rib fat of 11mm. A team of 3 purebred Angus steers, all bred and exhibited by BW & MM Brooker, placed 2nd in the prestigious Stanhill Trophy team, with 264 points.

Silver Medals:

Heavyweight School Steer – The King's Schoo,l, 574kg Angus steer, bred by Milong Angus Lightweight Open Steer – Justin Richards & North Bullagreen P/S, 391kg Angus steer bred by North Bullagreen P/S Middleweight Open Steer – The Scots School Bathurst, 436kg Angus steer, bred by D & D Searle Middleweight Open Steer – The Scots School Bathurst, 455kg Angus steer, bred by Gilmandyke Angus Middleweight Open Steer – BW & MM Brooker , 457kg Angus steer, bred by BW & MM Brooker Heavyweight Open Steer – Pymble Ladies College, 506kg Angus steers, bred by Knowla Livestock

Bronze Medals:

Reserve Champion Heavyweight steer and Gold Medal winner at the Sydney Royal Easter Show, exhibited by BW & MM Brooker. Image: Emily H Photography

Virtual taste test 1st places: Lightweight Open Steer – Justin Richards & North Bullagreen P/S, 391kg Angus steers bred by North Bullagreen P/S Middleweight Open Steer – The Scots School Bathurst, 488kg Angus steer, bred by D & D Searle Heavyweight Open Steer – Braidwood Central School, 532kg Angus steers, bred by Billaglen Pastoral Co

Middleweight School Steer - Scone High School, 439kg Angus steer, bred by BW & MM Brooker Middleweight School Steer - Pymble Ladies College, 499kg Angus steer, bred by Knowla Livestock Middleweight Open Steer – Saint Ignatius College, 411kg Angus steers, bred by Allynbrook Park Middleweight Open Steer –Scone High School, 416kg Angus steers, bred by BW & MM Brooker Middleweight Open Steer – Cody Evans, 428kg Angus steer, bred by Ryan Knee Middleweight Open Steer – Wellington High School, 448kg Angus steer, bred by Minnamurra Pastoral Co Middleweight Open Steer – The Scots School Bathurst, 486kg Angus steer, bred by Gilmandyke Angus Heavyweight Open Steer – Justin Richards, 574kg Angus steers, bred by Justin Richards

2018 Harvey Beef Gate 2 Plate Challenge, Western Australia

This unique competition sees cattle performance assesses from the farm gate to the consumers’ plate. Competitors enter a team of three owner bred cattle (two steers and a heifer). The cattle go into a feedlot on the same day and are fed on the same ration. Heifers are fed for 76 days and steers for 89 days. The data collected is based on factors effecting profitability for the feedlot and processor, as well as MSA grading. From 61 entries and 183 animals, a team of Sussex Angus cross from Sandy and Narelle Lyon, Willyung Farms, Willyung, were crowned the winners of the Gate 2 Plate competition The team with the best processor performance was a tram of Charolais Angus cross cattle from Bruce and Gaye Campbell, Keysbrook. Second in the same category was a team of Angus cross Droughtmaster cattle, entered by Mountain Valley Livestock, Albany. Second place in the best MSA Performance went to a team of two Angus and an Angus Shorthorn cross bred by Peter and Merryl Johnston, Boyup Brook, while third in this category was awarded to a team of Angus cattle entered by Hugh and Andrew Smith, Torbay. Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Angus. only Angus.

There’s only one DNA profile created specifically for Angus cattle.

Angus GS™ is the new standard in genetic testing for Angus cattle. Created by Angus Genetics, the profile is purely Angus DNA. So it will have better predictability and deliver more power and accuracy than any previous generation genomic enhanced EBV, and at greater value. Learn more about Angus GS at the Angus Genetics website: angus.org/agi. Visit angusaustralia.com.au/ to see how to order the test in Australia.

For Angus. by angus.

ANGUS Genetics To learn more contact: Angus Australia 02 6773 4600 office@angusaustralia.com.au

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


Angus Software

Members Feedback Improves Angus Database Search Matthew Reynolds, Breed Development Officer

The Angus Australia database provides a wealth of information and with recent updates to the search function is now more user-friendly than ever before. These improvements ensure users can easily and effectively navigate their way through the database and draw on the valuable information when making breeding decisions.

View of the new, interactive pedigree display

Angus Australia is continually improving the services for members and gaining feedback from those that use the Angus.Tech software is of critical value. The recent improvements have been driven by member feedback which will ensure the system is not only easy to use but provides the relevant information upfront. The enhancements include: • Improved ease when signing in as a registered user Users will no longer have to sign in each time they access the Angus Database Search. The improvement means a user’s login details will be remember, unless they do not access Angus.Tech for a period of 30 days, once they tick the ‘remember my details’ check box on signing in. • Introduction of a “Summary” tab and removal of the “Custom” tab When viewing information for an individual animal, a summary tab is now displayed. The tab displays a summary of the information available in a similar format to the old animal enquiry facility. With the introduction of the default summary tab, the “custom” tab that previously enabled users to build their own customised summary tab has been disabled. • Modifications to the “Pedigree” tab The pedigree tab now contains a new, interactive pedigree display for each animal. The new display enables users to more easily navigate up and down an animal’s pedigree, while also displaying both the ident and name of each animal in the pedigree tree. • Display of “Advanced Search” options as default The advanced search options are now visible as default for registered users, making them more accessible and user friendly. • Improved visibility of “Help” links The link from the Angus Database Search to the comprehensive help information available in the Angus Education Centre is now displayed in bright yellow, making it more visible to users. • Improved ease of moving between Angus Database Search, Angus SELECT, Catalogues and the Angus Australia website Additional menu items have been added, making it easier to navigate between the Angus Database Search,

AngusSELECT webpage, online catalogue facilities and the Angus Australia website. • Improvements to default search results layouts Modifications have been made to reduce the number of columns displayed in the default layout of the animal search results table. Additionally, a new drop-down box above the search results table, enables users to seamlessly switch between a number of different search result table layouts. The new layouts, being “expanded layout”, “animal details only” or “EBVs only”, make it easier for users to display the information that is of most interest to them when conducting animal searches. • Improvements to the display of EBV information The options to show or hide EBV accuracy values, EBV percentile values, or progeny trait counts, are now displayed as buttons, rather than tick boxes, making it easier for registered users to customise the display of EBV information. • More accessible display of search options The options to “show search criteria”, “customise the results layout” and “save favourite searches” are now displayed as buttons above the search results table, making it easier for registered users to access and utilise these features. • Modifications to “Customise Results Layout” screen Modifications have been made to the screen that enables registered users to set up and save a customised animal search results layout. The new screen is more intuitive, making it easier for registered users to edit or create new layouts that are customised to their specific needs. A number of additional enhancements are scheduled for implementation over coming months, including the availability of new graphical reporting tools that enable registered users to analyse the results of their searches. Any members with suggested improvements, or that require assistance with the use of the Angus Database Search facilities are encouraged to contact staff at Angus Australia on (02) 6773 4600 or office@angusaustralia. com.au Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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THE SCIENCE OF SELECTION The advanced genomic selection tool available for Australian Angus breeders

i50K for Angus is a DNA test that predicts genetic potential for a range of economically important traits. i50K is the market leading genomic test for registered Angus cattle. An i50K for Angus test enables: • Genomic integration into Angus BREEDPLAN providing increased accuracy of selection on young animals. • Identification of elite, unproven bulls and young bulls with a unique combination of traits; • Selection of superior heifers to become herd replacements and elite females for submission to AI or ET programs; • Highly accurate pedigree records through DNA trace-back technology that matches calves with sires in a multiple-sire system. To take your breeding decisions to the next level call:

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


Angus Software

Viewing Animal Information in Angus.Tech Matthew Reynolds, Breed Development Officer

With recent updates to the Angus Database Search, viewing information on individual animals is now easier than ever before. When using the database, you can search for the Animal name or Animal ID. Alternatively, if you are log in as a registered user you can perform searches with additional selection criteria to identify individuals or groups of animals which meet your needs. Once you have identified the animal you would like to view in more detail, you will need to click on the row for that animal. This will open a summary page, as well as a number of tabs which display further information, such

as the animal’s registration status, pedigree, ownership history, EBVs and status for genetic conditions. Support in using and interpreting the information in Angus.Tech is available, by clicking the Help button in the top right corner of the page or by visiting the Angus Education Centre. For further information or support contact staff at Angus Australia on (02) 6773 4600 or office@angusaustralia. com.au

Step 1:

Step 2:

Enter Search details here

Click on the record to view further information

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Angus Software

Signing in to Angus.Tech Matthew Reynolds, Breed Development Officer

A range of great tools, information and technologies are available through Angus.Tech, which can assist in making breeding or selection decisions. When accessing the Angus Database Search, you can enter as either a “Guest” or “Registered User”. The database is available to all members and non-members once they have registered and obtained a log in. Entering as a registered user enables full access to the database and the ability to produce reports, perform advanced searches and customise the outputs of the database. In addition, registered users have access to information not available to users entering as a guest, such as pedigree, ownership and progeny information. This change has been necessitated by the need to protect the integrity of the Angus Australia database. To sign in, visit the Angus Australia website (www. angusaustralia.com.au) and click on the link at the top of the page “ANGUS.TECH”. From the Angus.Tech home page click on the “ENTER AS REGISTERED USER” button and enter your sign in details or click “register here” to get your login details. The User ID can be your Herd ID, email or mobile phone number. For further information or support to access Angus.Tech contact staff at Angus Australia on (02) 6773 4600 or office@angusaustralia.com.au

Step 1:

Click Here

Step 2:

Click Here

did you know... Anipro Natural is listed on the Australian Grasslands Premium Beef supplier of eligible feeds and supplements list

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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breed development

Selecting Your Next Angus Bull Matthew Reynolds, Breed Development Officer

The Angus breed is constantly improving with Angus bulls for sale this year delivering genetics that are, on average, $3.54 per cow mated more profitable than last year. Capitalising on this and making sure your herd continues to benefit from the great work seedstock breeders are doing is not always simple.

It is important that the selection of any bull not only meets the needs of the business, but complements the current herd and bull team. The impact of getting this wrong can take decades to resolve and mean the performance and profitability of the herd may be compromised. Bull selection draws in a huge number of factors and ensuring you are prepared when selecting a bull, not only requires proper planning and research beforehand, but also relies on a keen eye at the point of sale. The “Selecting Bulls” module in the Angus Education Centre breaks down bull selection into eight areas of consideration, which can be used as a checklist when selecting a bull. This checklist includes: 1. Establish a clearly defined breeding objective It is important to recognise what you want out of your breeding program and defining a breeding objective ensures a clear understanding of what is required for success in your operation. 2. If bull selection involves the purchase of bulls, identify the seedstock breeder or breeders from which bulls will be sourced Across Australia each year, hundreds of on-property sales will take place and thousands of bulls will be sold. Identifying a seedstock breeder or breeders means valuable time is not spent considering bulls, which will not add value to your herd. It is important to consider how the breeding objective of the seedstock breeder aligns to your objective and also what information will be available on the bull to support your decision (e.g. full set of BREEDPLAN EBVs, genetic condition status, etc.). 3. Consider the Angus BREEDPLAN information of the bulls that are available The Angus BREEDPLAN EBVs should form the foundation of any bull selection decision. Ranking bulls PAge 44

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

on the selection index that aligns closest to your breeding objective will ensure you can prioritise bulls. Bulls with EBVs in undesirable ranges should be disregarded from the prioritised list. To check the available EBVs of registered Angus animals visit the AngusSELECT area on the Angus Australia website. 4. Consider the genetic condition status of the bulls that are available Genetic conditions can cause long-term damage to your breeding program, which is why it is important to disregard any bull with an undesirable genetic condition status. To check the genetic condition status of registered Angus animals, visit the AngusSELECT area on the Angus Australia website. 5. Consider the breeding soundness of the bulls that are available It is important that all Angus bulls selected for use within a breeding program are sound and capable of getting their allocation of cows in calf in a timely manner. Bulls which have not been subject to and passed a Bull Breeding Soundness Evaluation (BBSE) for as many of the components in a BBSE examination as possible should be disregarded. If you are unable to get a BBSE performed on a bull prior to purchasing, it is important to consider the following: - Testicle size and consistency - Sheath - Hind leg structure - Front leg structure - Feet conformation 6. Consider the health status of the bulls that are available The importance of buying bulls which have been appropriately vaccinated and treated cannot be understated and it’s important that these reflect the


breed development

Wednesday st August 1 2018

“Northam Homestead Yards” Boggabri requirements of cattle on your property. Bulls which do not have the appropriate vaccination and health treatments should be disregarded. 7. Consider other selection criteria of particular importance to the breeding program When selecting a bull, it is important to consider other characteristics which may affect his performance within your operation. Bulls with poor temperaments and bulls with a pedigree closely related to the females to be joined are just two examples of criteria bulls should be disregarded on. 8. Do not be distracted by aesthetic features or the influence of non-genetic factors on the appearance and performance of bulls The value of a bull comes from the progeny he produces and it is important not to get distracted by non-genetic factors. A large proportion of what we see when examining a bull is the result of the bull’s genetics responding to the environmental conditions he was raise and kept in. The focus of any bull selection should be on a bull that has better genetics, than the currently used bulls, and that can get the allocated cows in calf in a timely manner. Bulls have a significant impact on the performance of a breeding program, as most will sire over a hundred offspring in their lifetime and contribute genetics to the future generation of cows. The process for ensure any bull selection adds value to your herd doesn’t have to onerous, but does need appropriate time and planning put in. For further information on any of the areas covered visit the Angus Education Centre and complete the “Selecting bulls” module.

Quality Bulls Paddock Reared for Longer Working Lives Come to a sale where the bulls are affordable and is a low stress helmsman sale

Contact: Rob Crosby - 0427 434 348 Bart Crosby - 0429 470 080 or Elders Tamworth & Gunnedah Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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breed development

PERFORMANCE RECORDING IN DRY TIMES Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager

With much of southern Australia anxiously awaiting an autumn break, it is timely to reflect on some considerations that members need to make when recording performance information for Angus BREEDPLAN during dry times. One of the challenges facing beef producers across Australia is the ever increasing occurrence of drought. Drought presents many obstacles to the management of a beef enterprise with countless operational, nancial and emotional hurdles testing the resolve of beef producers. While often not on the top of the priority list, one of the considerations that managers of a stud cattle operation need to make is the impact that the drought (and consequent management practices) has on both the genetics and performance recording requirements of their herd. Why is it important to consider genetics? Genetic improvement is a medium to long term strategy for improving herd pro tability. Importantly, the effects of genetic improvement are both cumulative and permanent. The breeding decisions made in a herd today will have a direct impact on the genetics and subsequent pro tability of the herd for the next ten years. Consequently, stud breeders are encouraged to persist with their long term genetic improvement strategy during short term challenges such as drought. One component of this is the maintenance of an effective performance recording program. Won’t the poor performance of animals in a drought lower their EBVs? No. The performance of an animal will only be directly compared by Angus BREEDPLAN to the performance of other “similarly treated” animals. That is, calves that have been bred in the same herd, are of the same sex, are of similar age and have been run together. It is how the animal performs relative to other “similarly treated” animals that is important, not the actual measurement of the animal.

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What impact can a drought have on performance recording? While the poor performance of animals is not a problem to genetic evaluation, there are countless factors that can potentially compromise the effectiveness of a herd’s performance recording during a drought. Generally speaking, these factors revolve around the forced implementation of management practices that cause considerable disruption to routine stud operations and/ or the poor condition of stock. For example, Animals being placed on agistment, often on a number of properties, especially where the management of animals is largely uncontrolled/unknown. Early weaning of calves or a number of different early weanings Increased and varied incidence of disease/sickness Dispersal of a large number of stud animals What management practices can be taken to reduce the disruption of drought? Importantly, there are a number of strategies that can be taken which will minimise the disruption that drought has on the effectiveness of a herd’s performance recording: • Breeders should carefully consider the traits that are important to their breeding program (or the breeding program of their clients) and potentially rationalise the traits that they record. With time often a constraint, limiting your performance recording to a core of important traits can be an adequate interim measure. Alternatively, maintaining the traits that you record but limiting your performance recording to just your bull calves may be a suitable short term option. If utilising this option, it is important to resume whole herd and full trait recording as soon as possible. • Where possible, the number of animals within each contemporary group should be maximised and/or maintained. Angus BREEDPLAN will use the performance information of an animal more effectively if there are a large number of other “similarly treated” animals to compare it with. • If a contemporary group has to be split for management reasons, create the new groups based on “automatic” criteria (eg. sex, age, prior management groups, prior weigh dates). In addition, try to weigh all calves in the contemporary group before the group is split. • Care should be given to submitting accurate management group information. A different manage ment group code should be entered for any calf or group of calves that have either been treated differently or exposed to different non-genetic influences. For example, calves given different levels of supplement or calves placed on agistment. Consideration should


breed development

also be given to variations in pasture quality, stocking rates, water quality, etc. In addition, a birth management group should be specified with the birth performance (eg. birth weights) of any calves whose dams have been treated differently prior to calving.

What other specific considerations should be made? In addition to the above management strategies, there are several specific considerations that need to be made when recording particular trait information. • Only record scanning information on animals that are in adequate condition, especially when scanning for fat depth & IMF. To obtain effective results, animals should have a minimum average rump fat depth of 4 – 5 mm. This ensures that there will be sufficient variation between animals to allow genetic differences to show up. • If early weaning, it is important to remember that Angus BREEDPLAN can only analyse the 200 day weights of calves that are older then 80 days of age when the weight is recorded. Consequently, if some calves will be younger than 80 days of age when you plan to wean, please contact staff at Angus Australia to discuss the performance recording options for these calves. • Angus BREEDPLAN can analyse two 200 day weights on each animal. Therefore, if early weaning, it may be beneficial to weigh the calves at weaning and then take a later weight. • In situations where the recording of the 200 day weights for your calves is delayed, it is important to remember that the recording of the associated mature cow weights should also be delayed so that they are taken within two weeks of the 200 day weights for the calves. • The fertility performance of cows running under drought conditions can provide very valuable information to the Angus BREEDLAN analysis. In drought situations, there will generally be more pressure placed on female fertility than normal and this can have benefits for genetic evaluation. However, the usefulness of the fertility information can decrease if there are significant non-genetic influences that can’t be accounted for (eg. disease). If you have any concerns over the quality of your fertility information in a drought, please contact staff at Angus Australia to discuss your concerns prior to submitting this information.

Should performance be recorded for calves that have lost weight? Yes. Calves should be recorded even if they have lost weight. Remember that animals are only directly compared to other calves that have all been treated alike. It is how the animal performs relative to the other “similarly treated” animals that is important, not the actual performance of the animal. Should performance be recorded for sick/extremely poor animals? In extreme situations, if the drought has resulted in a high and varied incidence of disease/sickness, careful consideration needs to be given as to whether to record the performance for that particular group of animals. If there have been signi cant differences in nongenetic in uences that can’t be accounted for, recording performance may bias the EBVs of these calves. It is important to note that this relates not only to their performance during the drought, but all performance information for these calves. While the drought may have broken by the time their later performance is recorded, there may still be differences between the performance of the calves that can be attributed to the non-genetic in uences that couldn’t be accounted for previously. Does genomics offer an alternative to collecting performance information? As a general rule, performance information should be collected and an effective performance recording program maintained wherever possible. However in situations where the collection of effective performance information is either challenging or not possible, genomically testing animals provides a useful alternative for obtaining information about the genetics of the animals. Who do I contact for advice? The best approach to maintaining an effective performance recording program during a drought will vary from operation to operation and from drought to drought. If you are in any doubt as to the best strategy for your particular situation, please do not hesitate to contact staff at Angus Australia to discuss your options.

To further discuss performance recording during a drought, please contact Angus Australia: Phone: 02 6773 4600 | Email: office@angusaustralia.com.au Website: www.angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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A word from Vetoquinol

Realising the Value of the Integration of Fixed Time AI into Commercial Beef Cattle Enterprises Dr Enoch Bergman DVM, Swans Veterinary Services

Artificial Insemination is a fantastic tool to rapidly improve the genetics of Australian beef producers. Further, busy cattle veterinarians, such as myself, without significant companion animal responsibilities are often doing very little during the mating season. Prior to integrating AI into my practice, I used to tell my clients, “When the bulls are working, I’m not!” Traditional heat detection based programs do not suit most busy beef producers. They also fail to suit most busy veterinarians! The advent of Fixed Time AI (FTAI) programs, yielding reasonable results has created fantastic opportunities for producers and their veterinarians as well!

The Primary Motivation

After delivering their first calf, heifers are under significant nutritional strain. Heifers are growing, lactating, gaining new dentition, and simultaneously trying to look after their first calf. Whilst adult cows take around 55 days to reconceive, heifers can take up to a month longer. After 280 days of pregnancy, there are only 85 days left in the year! In essence, this means that heifers that calve at the same time as the adult cow herd often fail to cycle before the bulls are put in and some might not before the bulls get pulled out! It is no wonder that the conception rates of rising three year old first calf heifers is often disappointing. After arriving in Esperance, WA I began introducing my clients to the concept of the benefit of mating their heifers in advance of the rest of the cow herd and to shortening the mating window of their heifers as well. My rationale was to buy their heifers additional time after they calve, allowing more of them sufficient time to repair and prepare their uterus after delivering their first calf, improving the likelihood of their conceiving early in their second joining. Specifically, I advocated a six week joining, budgeting on an 80% conception rate for their heifers. I then encouraged them to preg test their heifers six weeks after the bulls finished up and to sell the empties either directly to a feedlotter or to grass finish them. Regardless, my motto was “There is no tragedy in an empty heifer.” Empty heifers are worth significantly more per kilo than empty three year old animals. Further, by short and early joining them, the overall calf crop was more consistent, as the calves from heifers receive less nutritional assistance from their poorer milking mothers than their cow reared siblings. Many producers embraced the new scheme, however, some of my clients were still a bit nervous. In order to allay their fears I set some of them up with a premating synchrony program comprised of two doses of prostaglandins two weeks apart, followed by seven weeks of bulls starting at the second dose of prostaglandin. This allowed most of the heifers to cycle three times over a short period. We were able to condense the heifer calving to a seven week mating yet still achieve a more palatable 90% conception rate with this program. The PAge 48

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caveat was that we needed a higher proportion of bulls to cover the first oestrus. We budgeted on 5% bulls for the first week of the mating program, with normal bull stocking rates thereafter. The double prostaglandin program was good, but some producers didn’t have enough appropriate bulls to cover the first round of synchrony adequately, so, I began to think about FTAI. I thought, if I could perform one round of FTAI three weeks ahead of the cow mob over the heifers, I could then plug the bulls into the heifers ten days later, leave them in for six weeks, and generally end up with approximately a six week joining. As an added bonus, I could put really safe, high genetic merit bulls over the heifers and keep the progeny!

The Secondary Motivation

When I proposed my idea, most of my clients responded that they never kept any of the progeny from their heifers. A producer’s heifers should represent their best genetics! If they aren’t their best genetics, by definition, that producer’s herd is going backwards! I realised that they were focusing on the appearance of the heifer’s calves rather than on their genetic makeup, as heifers tend to produce less milk. Further, many had traditionally been terminally crossing their heifers to inferior bulls! Many bulls purchased for use over heifers has EBV’s for low birthweight BUT ALSO for low weaning weight. Some producers even terminally crossed to miniature breeds in order to manage dystocia, over their BEST GENETICS! Having a good understanding of EBV’s and the value of accuracy in their determination, I sought to seek out proven calving ease bulls with great growth and maternal characteristics and to change the way my producers thought.


Image Credit: Farm Weekly

Putting Runs on the Board

I started fairly slowly. I ran my dream past a semen salesman acquaintance, he pulled some strings and helped me to access a $22 dollar exceptionally accurate, extremely low birth weight, calving ease bull, with incredibly short gestational length and well above average weaning weight. I started by targeting smaller producers that had suffered through a tough calving. Early on, I set my producers up with the following program: Bomerol + Cue-Mate on day 0 Ovuprost, Pregnecol and pull Cue-Mate on day 8 Bomerol and apply heat detection devices on day 9 FTAI 28 hours later on day 10 (52 hours after Cue-Mate removal). Producers found the program straight forward and much less labour intensive than they expected. For myself, I simply arrived at the appointed time and inseminated their heifers. And guess what… their heifers calved without assistance, and their calves usually outgrew the calves out of their mature cows! The AI sires I had been set up with were fantastic. All of the heifers that conceive to AI calved well before their due date with no calving troubles on any of the enrolled properties. Most of the producers fell in love with their calves, enrolled in a program for the upcoming joining, and talked to their friends. Essentially in this way, my AI book has grown to over 5,000 head per year and continues to grow.

What does AI Cost?

At the time of writing this article an average bull may cost $6,000, be used for 3 years on average, and salvaged for $1,500 when sold. Whilst he is residing on the property, he will consume as much as a cow and a half, essentially displacing 1.5 cows and hence 1.35 calves, assuming a 90% conception rate overall. Calves average around $900 dollars. So a bull’s rough annual costs are ($6000$1500)/3 + 1.35 x $900 = $2715. If we divide a bulls annual running cost of $2715 by a booking of 40 heifers with a conception rate of 84% over six weeks ($2715/ (40*0.84)) we come up with an annual cost of $81 per calf born over a roughly six week calving. Roughly speaking, two rounds of AI using a new intra vaginal progesterone device, reused for the second

round costs about $30 in drug costs, $30 in semen costs, and $15 in professional fees, not including travel. This amounts to $75 with a presumed conception rate of 75%. This amounts to approximately $100 per calf born over roughly a three week calving. $81 vs $100 However, the AI calves will on average be 10.5 days older due to synchrony, which works out to an additional 10 kgs of calf @ $3 per kilo… $81 vs $70 ($100 - $30) Further, the naturally covered heifers may be covered by bulls of lower genetic merit compared to the available AI sires… So let’s conservatively assume 15 kgs @ $3 per kilo of additional weaned calf difference due to genetics… $81 vs $25 ($70 - $45) We aren’t just saving money, we are making money, and we haven’t even started talking about genetic gain!

What Else is in it for producers?

Producers also benefit from capitalising on their best genetics, speeding their genetic turnaround from a three year interval when the calves from heifers weren’t retained to a two year turn around, a huge 50% improvement in genetic gain! Calving becomes much more predictable, both by using proven bulls with predictable calving ease but also by condensing the joining into two rounds of Fixed Time AI separated by 23 days. The heifer progeny will hit the ground early and power away, often outweighing the progeny from the mature cows at weaning. Fixed Time Artificial Insemination isn’t just affordable, its profitable!

Conclusion

Working closely with many of my producers to help them to improve their herd structure has ultimately led to the implementation of Fixed Time AI programs over their heifers. I try to get them to keep more heifers and mate them over a short window, allowing the mating process to pick the winners. After all, reproduction is the key driver behind profitability. Ultimately, my goal is to help them to set their heifer up to succeed. By calving them down in a tight pattern with little or no need for assistance, setting them up for the next joining, we aren’t just picking the best replacements, we are building better cows! Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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supply chain

Support for Verified Angus brands at SE Asia’s largest food tradeshow Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

Angus Australia’s Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson recently travelled to Singapore in support of Angus brands who are independently verified by Angus Australia. Liz attended FHA 2018 (Food and Hotel Asia), Asia's most comprehensive international food and hospitality trade event in support of: NH Foods Australia’s Angus Reserve, 1788 Platinum and Omugi; Thomas Foods International’s Angus Pure; Bindaree Beef’s Cape Byron Angus Beef; Rangers Valley’s Black Market and Black Onyx and Jack’s Creek Black Angus. FHA 2018 Singapore provided the largest and central hub tradeshow for the promotion and distribution of Australian beef throughout south east Asia, with 30 acres of exhibition area, 4,000 exhibitors from over 70 countries, 80,000 trade attendees from over 100 countries and Tens of thousands of products on display. Along with the promotion and distribution of beef, this tradeshow included all things food and beverage, from Thai seafood to Tunisian dates, USA dairy products, Spanish bread and French cheese and chocolate. For Angus Australia’s Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson, having a presence at this event gave her the opportunity to further promote Angus Australia’s brands verification services. ‘While the emphasis of Angus Australia’s attendance at this event was to support our verified brands, it was also a great opportunity to meet with other Angus brands on display and discuss the value of independent verification for these’, said Liz. Another aspect of value was the opportunity to communicate directly with major customers of Angus brands, the wholesale and distribution businesses based in Singapore. ‘These businesses distribute products into hotel chains, high-end restaurants, food service, supermarkets and butchery’s,’ Liz said.

In discussion with four key wholesalers, Liz was given an insight into the good, the bad and the ugly when it came to Australian Angus beef. ‘There was dedicated support for the consistent eating quality of our Australian Angus beef and the knowledge that it would deliver a superior eating experience every time on any menu in the high-end food service industry,’ she said. However, it was not all roses with some clear challenges being faced in the market today. ‘The first is the competition Australian Angus beef brands are currently facing from Brazilian and Argentinian Angus brands,’ said Liz.

Bindaree Beef & Sanger Australia Meat Cabinet at FHA 2018

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


supply chain ‘And although the consistency of eating quality is not as good as Australian Angus beef, their product is still pretty good according to these distributors and is approximately $4/kg cheaper,’ Liz added. ‘This lowers the margin the distributor can make on Australian product relative to South American product. Highlighting the importance of delivering consistent eating quality and any other point of differentiation that Australian Angus brands can offer,’ she said. It was also noted that over recent times there has been a significant influx of Angus products available in the international market. Terms such as commoditisation were raised with concerns about the validity of Angus breed claims on products. ‘This drive for differentiation and validity of Angus breed claims in the market is pleasing to hear, as Angus brand verification can deliver this,’ said Liz. Many opportunities were afforded to discuss Angus brand verification with international visitors, particularly from SE Asia, attending the tradeshow looking to secure quality, verified Australian Angus beef.

Patrick Marryat Export Sales & Marketing & Nathan King Export Sales Thomas Foods International with Liz Pearson Commercial Supply Chain Manager Angus Australia at FHA 2018

‘Angus Australia’s independent verification received praise from these distributors as another bow in the offering to the food service industry of SE Asia by Australian Angus producers,’ Liz said. The final challenge highlighted, was one that all beef encounters, competition with other proteins for a place on the menu. ‘With a lot of Angus products going to high end restaurants and hotel chains, once you’re on the menu, there is no guarantee of staying there as high-end chefs like to continually update and change their menus,’ Liz said. ‘In this case brand owners and distributors work closely with chefs to create trust and brand loyalty’. Whilst in Singapore, there was also the opportunity to visit one of the largest distributors, Huber’s Butchery, who retail large quantities of high-end Australia product, including beef, lamb and fruit and vegetables. ‘Huber’s butchery is quite a site with 2 levels of fresh and packaged products to browse before entering their on-site bistro to taste the beautiful and sometime exotic produce on offer,’ said Liz. All Huber’s products are sold by 100g quantities with some very pricy items available. ‘Certainly, when you consider the processing cost of getting your Angus cattle from the property right through the value chain and into a high-end butchery in Singapore, it’s no surprise that the price paid by a customer in Singapore compared to Australia is extreme,’ Liz finished.

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supply chain

Commercial Supply Chain team broadens knowledge base Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

Angus Australia’s Commercial Supply Chain Officer, Olivia Twaddle was recently given the opportunity to participate in Meat and Livestock Australia’s Meat Science course held in Brisbane. This course was run over an intensive five days covering the scientific elements affecting eating quality of red meat, from production through to consumption. Topics included: • Eating quality attributes • Biochemistry and muscle structure • Growth and development of body tissue • Fat partitioning and fatty acid composition • Pre-slaughter nutrition • Production influences on eating quality • Processing impacts on eating quality • Marbling and eating quality • Grading systems • Chilling, ageing and packaging methods • Cook methods At the helm of the course were Dr John Thompson, formerly of the University of New England and Beef CRC and Dr Graham Gardner from Murdoch University. Both of whom have trained participants from over 30 processing plants in the past 15 years. Dr Thompson and Dr Gardner were highly engaging and clearly demonstrated the value and need for efficiency throughout the beef supply chain in delivering a high eating quality piece of beef. Participants in this course came from throughout the beef supply chain, including producer, processors, meat sales representatives, service providers, research scientists and lot feeders. This course provided excellent networking opportunities and generated multiple points of view and questions for an engaging and educational environment.

The meat science course highlighted new techniques

The program offered a stimulating approach to experience and understanding of new technologies within the processing sector. It also provided a sound knowledge of MSA and its anticipated future in the beef supply chain. While there are many exciting new opportunities in the beef industry, this course also covered some of the challenges faced by our industry, our standards as producers and where the future of our domestic and exports markets exists. Olivia greatly valued the opportunity to attend this course and came away with new found knowledge. ‘As a member of the Commercial Supply Chain team, this program was highly valuable in broadening my knowledge of recent research, new technologies, consumer trends and how Australian beef is valued in the international marketplace,’ said Olivia. ’Participation also afforded me the opportunity to engage with, build and strengthen relationships with other participants from the beef supply chain, which is a key aspect of the function of the Commercial Supply Chain program,’ she added.

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Angus Australia welcomes new supply chain officer Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

Angus Australia is pleased to welcome Olivia Twaddle to the Commercial Supply Chain team as Supply Chain Officer. Olivia grew up in Newcastle close to the beach. Olivia is passionate about working with the beef industry to develop sustainable and profitable initiatives that lead to better outcomes for the beef supply chain with a strong focus on food production and the consumer. She attained a Certificate 3 and 4 in Agriculture at Tocal Agricultural College in the Hunter Valley, NSW. Olivia’s experience extends to station work in the QLD channel country paired with extensive experience in the feedlot industry. Over a 5 year span Olivia worked for JBS Australia’s Caroona Feedlot, managing the livestock crew and induction team and with Ceres Agriculture at Warialda as the Livestock Manager. Over the last 2 years Olivia has re-launched Guyra Milling as the Mill Manager, taking on the hefty task of setup and development of this business from scratch. Olivia is currently studying a Bachelor of Rural Sciences majoring in Livestock Production and Nutrition at UNE in Armidale. “I am excited to be putting my best foot forward and becoming an valued member of the Angus Australia team” says Ms Twaddle. Olivia will work closely with Angus Australia Commercial Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson to develop and strengthen relationships throughout the beef supply chain and build and implement initiatives and education programs for producers that will bring value to Angus Australia members and the beef industry.

Angus Australia staff; Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager (Left), Olivia Twaddle, Supply Chain Officer (Middle) And Liz Pearson, Commercial Supply Chain Manager

Olivia will be the lead auditor for Angus Australia’s Angus Brand Verification program that is the beef industries only independent verification program for Angus branded beef products. “Olivia comes from a strong beef production background with an emphasis on feedlot production and feed milling and these qualities will be a valued addition to the Commercial Supply Chain team and Angus Australia” Ms Pearson. “I look forward to welcoming Olivia and her qualities to the team” says Ms Pearson.

Appointment of Breed Development Officer Angus Australia is pleased to announce the appointment of Matt Reynolds in the role of Breed Development Officer. Matt brings a passion for cattle breeding and a diverse background in agriculture to the role. Working closely with seedstock and commercial Angus breeders will be a key focus of Matt’s role, as he supports the application of genetic improvement technologies and the suite of products Angus Australia has on offer to its members. Matt joins Angus Australia from the sugarcane industry in Mackay, where he was involved in a major piece of work around the process for the release of sugarcane varieties and the commencement of work to eradicate a major disease from the industry. The opportunity to return to the cattle industry is one Matt is relishing, after previous experience with the dairy industry with the then Victorian Department of Primary Industries. During his time with the dairy industry, Matt supported dairy farmers with the use of genomic technologies and was involved in the start up of the GINFO project. PAge 54

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Angus Australia looks forward to Matt joining the Breed Development and Extension team. Matt can be contacted at matthew.reynolds@angusaustralia.com.au or by phone on 02 6773 4626.

Andrew Byrne, Breed Development & Extension Manager (Left), with Angus Australia's new Breed Development Officer, Matthew Reynolds


Scott Wright and Victoria Lee, Angus Australia's newest Member services officers

New faces join the Member Services Team Victoria Lee

Victoria grew up on the Mid North Coast in Cundletown New South Wales and became involved in the cattle industry from an early age growing up around dairy and beef cattle. During most of her school years, Victoria participated in cattle and carcase competitions and has experience with all facets of the beef industry process. Victoria is currently studying a Bachelor of Agriculture /Bachelor of Business majoring in Accounting and Marketing at the University of New England. Victoria is joining Angus Australia after having spent a year working for ABRI with a variety of society’s and prior to that was working in the racing industry with the sale of yearling bloodstock. As well as her interests in cattle, Victoria has invested many hours into community programs and youth committees throughout the agricultural industry, serving as Vice President for a Next Gen branch Footprints in Ag as well as being Vice-Secretary for Wingham Beef Week.

Scott Wright

Scott comes to Angus Australia after working in Rural Merchandise for Wilshire & Co based at the Deepwater branch.  He is currently studying a Graduate Certificate in Ag (Animal Science) part-time at the University of New England. Scott originally studied Rural Management at the University of QLD, Gatton College.  From 1999 until 2016 he owned and operated the “Wright Robertson of Glencoe” winery at Glencoe New South Wales, which was a pioneer of New England produced boutique wines.  A fire destroyed the business in 2016 and since that time Scott has returned to the beef industry. “It is a privilege to come and work at Angus Australia.  Angus have been at the forefront of genetic gain in the beef industry for a generation and it will be a fascinating organisation to work in and learn from,” said Scott.

introducing Maxine Draycott Angus Australia is pleased to welcome Maxine Draycott to the Accounting and Administration team as an Accounts Officer. Maxine migrated with family from England as a 10 pound pom and grew up in the Western Suburbs of Sydney. She has extensive experience in work with not for profit organisations having worked in New South Wales, Adelaide and Alice Springs in administration or the finance areas before returning to NSW to study part-time at the University of New England. Maxine is excited to be joining the Angus Australia team, because she enjoys working with member based organisations.

Maxine Draycott

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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member services

PEDIGREE CERTIFICATION FOR ANGUS HEIFER EXPORTS MADE SIMPLE Lou Wood, Member Services Officer

With heifer exports being an appealing market option for Angus breeders, the Member Services team thought it would be beneficial to provide a quick overview to streamline the processes necessary for Angus Australia Members to be involved in Export shipments, where export pedigree certificates are required.

Important Steps:

1. Be a member of Angus Australia. This can be done by completing an application form and using Pay Way online or by printing off a form from the Angus Australia website. Please note that membership application is NOT instant and CANNOT be comleted over the phone. It may take up to 24-48 working hrs to process membership applications. 2. Make sure the bulls used are in your ownership, by checking them online or contacting the Member Services Team to do a check. 3. Ensure that bulls used to breed the export heifers have 3 generations of pedigree on both the sire and dam side. 4. Fully complete the Angus Export Sire Recording and Validation form, which may be provided by your stock agent. This form will be forwarded to Angus Australia by the Exporter. If the form has not been completed correctly it may be returned to you for amendments.

purebred Angus bulls, with a minimum of 3 generations of pedigree, from a single or multiple sire mating group.

What’s the difference between Category 1 and Category 2 animals?

Export Certification Checklist https://www.angusaustralia.com.au/export/exportresources/export-certification-checklist/

Category 1 – High quality, registered, purebred pedigree Angus cattle sourced from Australian seedstock breeding herds. Includes both heifers and bulls for breeding purposes bred from registered purebred Angus bulls and cows with a minimum of 3 generations of pedigree. Category 2 – High quality, purebred Angus cattle sourced from Australian purebred breeding operations. Includes heifers for breeding purposes sired by registered

Things to remember: • • •

Export animals can only be processed and certified if all requirements are met Not every bull in your ownership needs to be listed on the Angus Export Sire Recording and Validation form, just the ones used to breed the heifers going to export. Bulls with ‘AI’ written at the end of their name means that they were produced by AI (Artificial Insemination) eg. MSO PRINCE RON L15 (AI), it does not mean they are an AI sire.

Export Information Links:

How to Export https://www.angusaustralia.com.au/export/exportresources/how-to-export/

Export Certification Standards https://www.angusaustralia.com.au/export/exportresources/export-certification-standards/

If you have any questions or queries regarding the process of export pedigree certification please contact the Angus Australia office: 02 6773 4600 | regos@angusaustralia.com.au

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Herb Duddy 0429 002 809 Ben Sharpe 0428 364 487 Jeff Duddy 0409 811 950 Ben Johnston 0455 964 487 Robert Duddy 0415 036 905

Brad Newsome 0419 483 958 John Settree 0408 297 368

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member services

How does Angus Australia’s Inventory system work? Sam Hamilton & Nicky Carey, Senior Member Services Officers

The word ‘Inventory’ doesn’t need to be as daunting as it sounds or as it looks. Although it can be quite a tedious and time-consuming task when operating a business, it is important to set aside time and really consider your inventory options when Fating off calving females.

Autumn and Spring Inventory

All breeding females 2 years and over within the Inventory year (1st January to 31st December) are split up into two categories based on when those females are expected to calve as indicated by the member, either in Autumn (1st January to 30th June) or Spring (1st July to 31st December). When a female turns 2 years of age it is subsequently nominated as either an Autumn or Spring calver depending on whether they are born, Autumn (1st January to 30th June) or Spring (1st July to 31st December).

Taking care when Fating off females

It is very important for the Autumn and Spring Inventory that you correctly Fate off females using the correct Disposal Codes supplied on the bottom of your Female Inventory List and the correct Disposal dates. Using the correct Disposal Codes ensures that females are being fated off based on an abnormality, old age etc. and supplying the correct Disposal dates can affect calf registrations, Breedplan and so on. Many people assume that Fating off females because they are not expecting them to calve or because they won’t be calving for that particular year is going to save them money. In the short term this is actually incorrect. By fating a female off because she will not be calving (or is not in calf) for that year, and then making her active again the following year as she will be calving, members are charged a Reinstatement fee as well as the Inventory fee on top for that year. This equates to paying the same amount that you normally would if you were to keep her active and not fate her off. So, in hindsight, in situations such as this, it is far more beneficial to leave non-calving females as they are on the Inventory if they are to be joined again the following year. However, this is entirely at the members discretion

Getting your Inventory submitted before the due dates

Submitting your Inventory before the due dates outlined is a necessity for several reasons. This tells us which females you are keeping active so you are billed accordingly, and when we produce the annual Calving Record Books, as they will appear in this. Failure to submit your Inventory list within the dates outlined means late Inventory Fates will not be credited and you will be invoiced for the entire list (either Autumn or Spring).

To aid members with these due dates we have created a magnetic Inventory Schedule List for each year as a reminder. If you would like a magnetic Inventory Schedule please let us know, otherwise they will be included in your next Spring Calving Book pack.

Do’s and Don’ts on the Inventory List

Do • Use the correct Disposal Codes listed • Use the correct Disposal Date • Take care when fating off females • Sign and Date the bottom of each Inventory page • Submit your Inventory before the nominated due dates • Contact us if you have any enquiries Don’t • Transfer animals using the lnventory list • Use an incorrect Disposal date • Leave the Disposal Date column blank when fating an animal • Use prior year Inventory Lists to fate animals off, as these lists may not be accurate. As you can see Inventory doesn’t need to be as daunting as you may think. Keep to the Do’s and well away from the Don’ts and it will not only keep your paperwork in order and correct, but will help when the time comes to register your calves.

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Member Services stats 2018 to date Sale CatalogueS

36,406 animals

120 sale catalogues 5,210 total lots

registrations

14,697

19,242

Male

2,467

Female

Steers

HBR Registrations:

APR Registrations:

RAR Registrations:

MBR Registrations:

31

1,155

19,824

ACR Registrations:

9,268

2,775

BREedplan performance 4,987

Birth

27,821

SS

200 Day

11,055

400 Day

34,586

Ultrasound Scan 14,694 (**, RIB, P8, IMF%)

600 Day

16,340

Docility

transfers

15,138

4,149

Total transfers

26,512 Total DNA requests submitted

5,671

Dwarfism (DW)

161

Angus Heifer Select

2,326

1,065

Angus GS

2,544

Neuropathic Hydrocephalus (NH)

Base PV & SNP (280)

4,037

Oculocutaneous Hypopigmentation (OH)

20

Microsatellites

91

Osteopetrosis (OS)

166

Parent Verifications

1,196

Alpha Mannosidosis (MA) 182

Pestivirus

1,969

Coat Colour

330

Myostatin (NT821)

118

Transfer DNA Between Labs

14

Zoetis i50K

Arthrogryposis Multiplex 1,010 (AM) Contractural Arachnodactyly (CA)

1,230

Total Members: 3,943 Full

Junior

Commercial

Life

1,116 2,411

391 24

Development Duplications 3,855 (DD)

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

I E S TA B L

947 SHED 1


sire benchmarking

ASBP Cohort 7 Weaning Completed and Analysed Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

All Cohort 7 calves from the Angus Sire Benchmarking program (ASBP) were weaned across January to April 2018. This involved 6 co-operator herds and 1,005 weaners from 34 sires. The data recorded at weaning included weaning weights and docility scores. A vial of blood (10ml) was also collected from each weaner for high volume DNA extraction and genomic profiling. This is used for sire verification, general genomics research and the expansion of the Angus Australia reference population. Importantly, genomic profiles, based on the Neogen Angus GS product, are produced and incorporated into the BREEDPLAN analysis. The weaning weights, docility scores and genomic profiles for all Cohort 6 calves were included in the June 2018 BREEDPLAN analysis. The latest BREEDPLAN EBVs and progeny average value for all sires in the ASBP are available from the Angus Australia website at https://angus.tech/enquiry/ animal/asbp Listed in Figure 1, 2 and 3 are the top 10 Cohort 7 ASBP sires for 200 Day Weight EBV, Docility EBV and the Angus Breeding Index. Note – There may be more than 10 sires listed if sires have the same EBV or Index value.

Figure 2 – Top 10 ASBP Cohort 2 Sires for Docility EBV (June 2018 BREEPLAN Analysis)

HAZELDEAN JAIPUR J140

+28

95%

MILLAH MURRAH LOCH UP L133

+21

94%

KANSAS JUDD L76

+19

76%

BANNABY REALITY K63

+17

79%

BOONAROO KERNAL K72

+15

76%

AYRVALE LEGACY L21

+14

81%

COONAMBLE KEVIN K314

+13

78%

MURRAY DOWNLOAD L20

+11

83%

BANNABY RESERVE K173

+10

83%

PATHFINDER KOMPLETE K22

+8

84%

Breed Average

+4

Figure 3 – Top 10 ASBP Cohort 6 Sires for Angus Breeding Index (June 2018 BREEPLAN Analysis)

Figure 1 – Top 10 ASBP Cohort 7 Sires for 200 Day Weigh EBV (June 2018 BREEPLAN Analysis)

Sire

200 DAY WT EBV (kg) Acc

CHELTENHAM PARK BERKLEY J7

+71

84%

G A R PROPHET

+64

98%

AJC K41

+62

88%

MILLAH MURRAH LOCH UP L133

+62

94%

KILLAIN ALASKA K18

+62

79%

CLUNIE RANGE LEGEND L348

+58

83%

AYRVALE LEGACY L21

+58

84%

ESSLEMONT LOTTO L3

+57

96%

A A R TEN X 7008 S A

+57

98%

WATTLETOP LOCK L4

+57

87%

KANSAS JUDD L76

+57

82%

Breed Average

+43

DOCILITY EBV (kg) Acc

Sire

Sire

ABI ($)

CHELTENHAM PARK BERKLEY J7

+167

ESSLEMONT LOTTO L3

+156

GATES KIPLING K7

+154

G A R SURE FIRE

+154

BOOROOMOOKA KULGERA K270

+150

RENNYLEA KODAK K522

+149

RENNYLEA K835

+148

STORTH OAKS JACK J7

+148

AJC K41

+146

G A R PROPHET

+145

Breed Average

+109

For further information please contact:

Christian Duff, Angus Australia Strategic Projects Manager M: 0457 457 141 or email: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

ASBP Cohort 7 Weaners

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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sire benchmarking

ASBP – Cohort 6 Structural Soundness Data Analysed Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

In the June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis structural soundness scores from Angus Sire Benchmarking Program (ASBP) Cohort 6 progeny have been analysed, producing Structural Soundness EBVs for the ASBP Cohort 6 sires. This included feet and leg structural soundness scores, evaluated using the Beef Class system (figure 1), on 1,112 progeny. The steer progeny were assessed following approximately 100 days on feed around 16 months of age, while the heifers were assessed on farm at approximately 18 months of age. A list of the “top 10” Cohort 6 sires for each Structural Soundness EBV is shown in tables 1 to 5. You can also access, search and sort the structural EBVs for the full list of sires via https://angus.tech/enquiry/animal/asbp Structural Soundness EBVS are interpreted as estimates of genetic differences between animals in desirable feet and leg structure. A higher EBV indicates that an animal will produce a higher percentage of progeny with desirable structure. There are five Structural Soundness EBVs produced being: • Front Feet Angle (FA) • Front Feet Claw Set (FC) • Rear Feet Angle(RA) • Rear Leg Hind View (RH) • Rear Leg Side View (RS) Additionally, across Cohorts 1 to 6 of the ASBP 5,142 progeny have been assessed for the structural traits and analysed through Angus BREEDPLAN. The score distributions for each trait is shown in figure 2 to 6. For further resources on interpreting the Structural Soundness EBVs visit the Angus Australia website (www. angusaustralia.com.au) Table 1 – Cohort 6 Sires – Top 10 - Front Feet Claw Set EBV (June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis)

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

Sire

ID

EBV

Acc.

ARDROSSAN HONOUR H255

NAQH255

+24

84%

PARINGA RED PILBARA K146

HKFK146

+21

69%

GRANITE RIDGE JUPITER J42

SJKJ42

+20

65%

MILLAH MURRAH KINGDOM K35

NMMK35

+17

88%

CLEA H028

NRZH028

+17

73%

MURRAY GRANDO J136

NURJ136

+16

80%

BOWMAN AUSTRALIA K2

BOWK2

+16

70%

WEERAN JOEL J13

VHWJ13

+14

69%

COOLANA CONVERSION - K026

VCCK026

+12

72%

DUNOON HIGHPOINT H744

BHRH744

+12

74%

Breed Average

-2


sire benchmarking Table 2 – Cohort 6 Sires – Top 10 - Front Feet Angle EBV (June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis)

Sire

ID

EBV

Acc.

HARDHAT GM GRASS RANGE Y21 J518

DKKJ518

+24

72%

RENNYLEA K163

NORK163

+22

79%

MURRAY JUDGE J14

NURJ14

+22

80%

COFFIN CREEK JOKER J202

NIWJ202

+20

73%

COOLANA CONVERSION - K026

VCCK026

+19

71%

RENNYLEA H556

NORH556

+18

75%

BANNABY ABERDEEN J137

ECMJ137

+17

76%

BOWMAN AUSTRALIA K2

BOWK2

+16

72%

TWYNAM J122

NXTJ122

+15

67%

DENHOLM GLEN G10 BARTEL J41

EDUJ41

+14

77%

Breed Average

Figure 2 – Distribution of Front Feet Claw Set Scores in ASBP Progeny Cohorts 1 to 6 (n=5142)

0

Table 3 – Cohort 6 Sires – Top 10 - Rear Feet Angle EBV (June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis)

Sire

ID

EBV

Acc.

RENNYLEA H556

NORH556

+21

65%

GRANITE RIDGE JUPITER J42

SJKJ42

+13

58%

RENNYLEA K163

NORK163

+12

75%

GK 26 FEDERER F23

QFCF23

+12

66%

BOOROOMOOKA KINGY K9

NGMK9

+12

70%

BOWMAN AUSTRALIA K2

BOWK2

+10

66%

COFFIN CREEK JOKER J202

NIWJ202

+9

69%

TWYNAM J122

NXTJ122

+9

63%

COONAMBLE JUNIOR J266

WDCJ266

+9

64%

BANNABY DAIQUIRI J56

ECMJ56

+8

70%

Breed Average

Figure 3 – Distribution of Front Feet Angle Scores in ASBP Progeny Cohorts 1 to 6 (n=5142)

-2

Table 4 – Cohort 6 Sires – Top 10 - Rear Leg Hind View EBV (June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis)

Sire

ID

EBV

Acc.

ARDROSSAN HONOUR H255

NAQH255

+5.5

55%

TWYNAM J122

NXTJ122

+5.0

46%

RENNYLEA H556

NORH556

+3.8

43%

MURDEDUKE JAMBOREE J26

CSWJ26

+3.4

61%

RENNYLEA K178

NORK178

+3.0

51%

BROOKLANA TM EMPEROR J64

AMQJ64

+2.9

52%

STONEY POINT HEINEKEN H22

SGMH22

+2.8

51%

MILLAH MURRAH KLOONEY K42

NMMK42

+2.6

57%

DUNOON HIGHPOINT H744

BHRH744

+2.4

52%

MURRAY JUDGE J14

NURJ14

+2.4

62%

Breed Average

0

Table 5 – Cohort 6 Sires – Top 10 - Rear Leg Side View EBV (June 2018 Angus BREEDPLAN analysis)

Sire

ID

EBV

Acc.

MURDEDUKE JAMBOREE J26

CSWJ26

+0.5

66%

MILLAH MURRAH KLOONEY K42

NMMK42

+0.5

66%

AJC E91

NXOE91

+0.5

45%

RAFF HINGAIA J347

QRFJ347

+0.5

51%

COONAMBLE JUNIOR J266

WDCJ266

+0.5

52%

BOWMAN AUSTRALIA K2

BOWK2

+0.5

51%

DAVID'S HARVEY ALLBANGER H42

CWDH42

+0.5

52%

NEWLYN PARK EMPEROR J6

SKOJ6

+0.4

49%

GRANITE RIDGE JUPITER J42

SJKJ42

+0.4

45%

BROOKLANA DREAM H29

AMQH29

+0.4

52%

BOOROOMOOKA KINGY K9

NGMK9

+0.4

61%

Breed Average

Figure 4 – Distribution of Rear Feet Angle Scores in ASBP Progeny Cohorts 1 to 6 (n=5142)

0

Figure 5 – Distribution of Rear Leg Hind View Scores in ASBP Progeny Cohorts 1 to 6 (n=5142)

Figure 6 – Distribution of Rear Leg Side View Scores in ASBP Progeny Cohorts 1 to 6 (n=5142)

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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sire benchmarking ASBP – Cohort 6 Structural Soundness Data Analysed - Continued

FRONT FEET CLAW SET

1

2

3

4

Open Divergent (OD)

Reference: Shape (primarily curl) and evenness of the claw set

5

6

7

8

Desirable

9

Scissor Claws (SC)

FRONT & REAR FEET ANGLE

1

2

3

4

Steep Feet Angle (SA)

5

6

7

Desirable

8

9

Shallow Feet Angle (SA)

Reference: Strength of pastern, depth of heel and length of foot

REAR LEG SIDE VIEW

1

2

3

4

Straight Rear Leg (ST)

Reference: Angle measured at the front of the hock

5

6

7

Desirable

8

9

Sickle Hocked Rear Leg (SI)

REAR LEG HIND VIEW

1

2

3

4

Bow Legged Rear Leg (BL)

Reference: Direction of the feet when viewed from the rear

5

6

Desirable

7

8

9

Cow Hocked Rear Leg (CH)

Figure 1 - Beef Class Structural Assessment Scoring System

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


sire benchmarking

Sire Nominations OPEN for ASBP Cohort 9 Christian Duff, Strategic Projects Manager

Sires nominations are OPEN for the next joining round of the Angus Sire Benchmarking program (ASBP) to produce the Cohort 9 progeny. A strong show of support from the Angus Australia membership has already seen 32 bulls nominated to the end of May 2018. Members are able to nominate up to Monday August 6th 2018, however preference is given to early nominations. This joining program will commence in mid-September 2018, and is expected to involve approximately 2,000 cows across several co-operator herds.

The benefits of bulls entering the ASBP include:

NEW BLACK MERCHANDISE Available now through the Angus Australia website

www.angusaustralia.com.au

• Be involved in cutting edge Angus research in areas such as genomics, retail beef yield and immune competence. • Close genetic linkage to the ASBP reference population ensures research outcomes, particularly in the genomics area, will have high relevance to your herd. • High density DNA profiles will be stored for current use (e.g. sire verifications, single-step BREEDPLAN analysis) and future research. • Receive high accuracy EBVs, particularly for hard to measure traits such as net feed intake, abattoir carcase data and female reproduction. • Receive progeny average values and sire ranking from within the ASBP, including traits such as MSA Index and MSA Marble Score. • Involvement in Australia’s largest beef cattle progeny test program including large contemporary groups. Approximately 40 bulls will be selected for the 2018 joining program with the aim to join each bull to at least 50 cows by fixed time AI. The bull selection criteria will be based on genetic diversity, breeding values, selection indexes and their relationship to sires already used in the ASBP. For further details on the ASBP and to nominate bulls for Cohort 9 visit the Angus Australia website www. angusaustralia.com.au

For all questions in relation to the nomination process or the ASBP in general please contact:

Christian Duff, Angus Australia Strategic Projects Manager M: 0457 457 141 or email: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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#

InstaAngus

We’ve noticed some stunning Instagram accounts from Angus breeders and others across the beef supply chain that are capturing the essence of Angus life, so we would like to share them a little further to celebrate the diversity of the Angus breed across Australia. Don't forget to follow us on Instagram!

@rigaangus

@booragul_angus

Credit Ben Simpson

@topx_roma

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

#AngusPremium #GrowAngus #IUseAngusBulls

@landfallangus

@inglebraefarmsangus

@heart_angus

@baldblairangus

@greenwood_livestock

@mcgrath_rodwells_livestock


angus youth

Beef insurance that started with a glass jar

200 years ago, 39 farmers put money into a glass jar, to be compensated in the event one of them had a haystack fire. Today, this mutual approach to farm insurance remains alive and well in Achmea Australia. Part of one of the world’s largest mutual insurers, we’re committed to reducing your farm production risk. Our glass jar represents our dedication to a mutual partnership built on trust and transparency.

Did you know... We also offer stock insurance cover for stud bulls purchased at sale events? Choose from mortality only, mortality plus loss of use resulting from accident, or mortality plus loss of use resulting from disease.

To find out more call Achmea on

1800 724 214 or visit achmea.com.au

Above all, we exist to keep you farming. Proud supporters of the GenAngus Future Leaders program

The information in this advertisement is general advice only and does not take into account your individual objectives, financial situation or needs (your personal circumstances). Before using this information to decide whether to purchase the insurance policy, you should consider your personal circumstances and the relevant Product Disclosure Statement available from the ‘Downloads’ section of our website www.achmea.com.au. Achmea Schadeverzekeringen N.V. ABN 86 158 237 702 AFSL 433984.

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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angus youth

Ready for Roundup

Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer 2019 will see Armidale, NSW host the 38th Angus Youth National Roundup from the 10th to the 13th of January. This great event will also kick start the Centenary Celebrations of Angus Australia and mark the involvement that Angus Youth has had in the growth of the organisation across the years. The Roundup will be coordinated by Zac McInerney from Brisbane. Zac has a long association with Angus Youth and the Angus Youth Roundup having been a competitor and previous committee member. Zac has also held a position on the Angus Youth Management Committee for 4 years. ‘The 2019 Angus Youth National Roundup is set to be a large event. The last time the event was hosted in Armidale we had over 220 participants from all over Australia’, said Zac. ‘A large educational program is currently being put together by a driven and experienced committee that will draw on industry leaders to help educate our youth', he added. ‘In addition to our educational program we will have the heifer show competitions, Special Dinner Dance, Barn yard Olympics, parents bus trip and a special event to mark the start of the Angus Australia Centenary Celebrations’ Zac highlighted the importance of Roundup and the Angus Youth program in the development of young people in the beef industry ‘As a person who has been part of the Angus Youth program I am passionate about giving back and helping

young people interested in the beef industry, the tools they need to develop their interest and forge a career,’ Zac said.

For more information on the 2019 Angus Youth National Roundup, please contact: Zac McInerney, Roundup Co-ordinator Mobile: 0402 512 262 | Email: zac@scarbahangus.com.au Or Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer Phone: 02 6773 4622 | Mobile: 0437 873 220 Email: youth@angusaustralia.com.au

2019 Sponsorship Opportunities

A quality event such as this is dependent on the generous support of numerous partners. Sponsorship for the 2019 Angus Youth National Roundup will be managed again by Agri Alliance a small firm based in Wagga Wagga, New South Wales that specialises in sponsorship, events and project Management specific to the agricultural Industry

For more information on sponsorship opportunities, please contact: Joanna Palmer 0481 160 915 or Email: admin@agrialliance.com.au

2ND FIG TREE PARK ANGUS BULL SALE SUNDAY, 12TH AUGUST 2018 AT 1PM; WANDSWORTH NSW

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WWW.DCCO.COM.AU PAge 68

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


3

$5,000

Presentation during event

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Major Awards eg. Champions

Lectures

Awards & Presentations

Signage & Promotion Material

Trade Stand

3

Front Cover

5

Front Cover Large and Bold

One Full Page

Dinner Tickets

Logo on Catalogue

Catalogue Advertisement

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Social Media Coverage

One ½ Page

4 Items

5 Items

Promotional material in Bags

All prominent Dining area and locations Including Cattle shed, Ringside, prominent locations, judging ring Dining Hall

Major Awards eg. Champions

Logo on back of Shirt

Logo on front of Shirts & Logo on Hats, Logo on Water Bottle

Acknowledged in all Acknowledged in all Roundup coverage Roundup coverage with Logo & Name with Logo and name Prominent smaller

1

$10,000

NAMING PARTNER DIAMOND PARTNER

Merchandise Shirts Hats & Water Bottle

Roundup Advertising

Partnership Positions Available

All GST Exclusive

One ½ Page

Inside Cover

3

3 Items

Judging Ring

Major Awards eg. Reserve Champions

Logo Large and Prominent on back of Shirts

Acknowledged in the Roundup Sponsors advert

1

$5,000

SHIRT SPONSOR

One ½ Page

Inside Cover

2

2 Items

Judging Ring

Major Awards eg. Reserve Champions

Short presentation within program

Name on back of Shirt

Acknowledged in Roundup Sponsors advert

5

$2,000

GOLD PARTNER

One 1/3 Page

Inside Cover

1 Item

Judging Ring

Class naming and presentation

Name on back of Shirt

Acknowledged in Roundup Sponsors advert

1

In Kind

MEDIA PARTNER

Inside Cover

1 Item

Judging Ring

Class naming and presentation

Name on back of Shirt

Acknowledged in Roundup Sponsors advert

1

In Kind

WATER SPONSOR

One 1/3 Page

Inside Cover

1 Item

Judging Ring

Class naming and presentation

Logo on side of Hat and name on back of shirts

Acknowledged in Roundup Sponsors advert

1

$1,500

HAT PARTNER

All Sponsors - Facebook and Twitter and Instagram Posts on Angus Youth Account

One ½ Page

Dinner Menus and Inside Cover

3

3 Items

At Dinner, Judging ring and dining areas

Presentation at dinner

Dinner Presentation

Name on back of Shirt

Acknowledged in the Roundup Sponsors advert

3

$3,000

DINNER PARTNER

PARTNERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

2019 Angus Youth National Roundup

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

One 1/3 Page

Inside Cover

1 Item

Judging Ring

Class naming and presentation

Logo on Water Bottle and name on back of Shirts

Acknowledged in Roundup Sponsors advert

1

$1,500

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One Business Card Size

Inside Cover

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Assigned to team names

Name on back of Shirt

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15

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angus youth

The GenAngus Future Leaders Program Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer

Angus Youth will launch the first GenAngus Future Leaders Program in Sydney from the 5th to the 7th of September 2018. 12 Angus Australia members will be given the opportunity to attend a three day workshop, kick starting a twelve month leadership journey. The program has been designed to support the younger members of Angus Australia, aged 18 to 40 get into their own beef business, grow their business and further develop their skills to become future industry leaders. The initial workshop will cover such topics as business financials, beef business benchmarking, mindset, beef supply chain, risk and liability and succession planning. With the topics presented by current industry leaders. The three day workshop will also include a special dinner function with an inspirational guest speaker talking about how they have grown in their business area. Following on from the initial workshop, information and guidance will be given over a twelve month period to ensure that growth and development is continued by the participants. Registrations for this exciting and new program will open on the 2nd of July via the Angus Australia website. The program is proudly sponsored by Achmea Australia and the Angus Foundation. Participants will be fully

supported with accommodation, meals and education sessions, all they will need to do is just get themselves to Sydney for 3 days.

Gen A n gus

Future Leaders Program

For more information on the 2019 Angus Youth National Roundup, please contact: Candice Liddle, Events & Youth Development Officer Phone: 02 6773 4622 | Mobile: 0437 873 220 Email: youth@angusaustralia.com.au

2018

ANNUAL ON PROPERTY

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Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

Friday 3rd August 2018 www.clunie.com.au FIND US ON FACEBOOK


angus youth

GenAngus Speaker Highlights Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer

The program will boast an impressive line up of high level presenters from a diverse range of backgrounds, designed to challenge participants.

Alan Deacon

Tom Maguire

We are excited about the line up of presenters that we have planned for our participants and we will list just a few here to give you a taste of what to expect

Alan Deacon

ACHMEA AUSTRALIA – ‘Risk and Liability’ Allan Deacon is the Business Development Manager for Achmea Australia. Across a deep and rich history spanning over twenty years, Allan has worked in agricultural insurance with major insurers, brokers and clients. Allan’s has also worked on properties in Quirindi NSW and was also the manager of a country branch for a major broker in Tamworth, NSW. Allan spends his spare time playing golf, mowing his 5 acre block and shuttling his three boys between their numerous rugby commitments. Allan is committed to keeping farmers farming through Achmea's insurance solutions

Tom Maguire

TEYS AUSTRALIA – ‘Supply Chain, Finding your market’ Tom Maguire is the Chief Value Chain Officer with Teys Australia, a 50/50 joint venture between the Teys family and Cargill. Teys Australia is a substantial part of Australia’s beef industry, operating six beef processing plants, three cattle feedlots as well as other businesses in the value chain located across Australia’s eastern seaboard. Tom has been involved in the Australian meat industry since 1997. Tom holds post graduate qualifications in Economics, Industrial Relations and Human Resource Management. He has also completed a Master in Business. Tom believes Australian agriculture has a bright future if it is able to adapt in response to global megatrends and resulting changes in customer and consumer requirements.

Isobel Knight & Steven Mirtschin

PROAGTIVE – ‘Succession’ Isobel Knight is a succession planning specialist and has been the owner and a director of Australia’s leading family farm succession planning business Proagtive for the last decade. Isobel is a mother of three has degrees in business law and psychology, is a trained counselor and mediator.

Isobel Knight

Steven Mirtschin

Isobel was awarded the 2013 NSW-ACT Rural Industries Research & Development Corporation (RIRDC) Rural Women’s Award and National Runner up. Isobel’s association with family farm businesses stems backs to her family’s farm near Junee and now Loomberah NSW where she and her husband Rod run a cattletrading enterprise. Being part of two family farms and experiencing firsthand the challenges of planning for the future has been the catalyst for Isobel’s interest in farm succession planning. Isobel’s passion is to ensure that the next generation has an opportunity to participate in agriculture and believes a lack of succession planning is costing farming families, rural communities and agriculture dearly. Isobel has worked closely with hundreds of individual farming families. This remarkable level of training and experience sets Isobel apart from anyone else in the field of succession planning. Steven Mirtschin has extensive business and professional experience including over 10 years as a former Agribusiness Bank Manager for a major Bank. Steven has a degree in Agricultural Science and now operates businesses on behalf of his family. Steven grew up on his family farm on the Darling Downs, Queensland, which is still owned and operated by other members of his family. Steven now lives near Canberra with his wife Joanne and their two children. Steven's aim is to deliver strategic thinking, tailored advice and integrated solutions for family businesses and agricultural enterprises. Other speakers include:

David Brown and Hilary Beech

Holmes and Sackett – ‘Finance and Beef Benchmarking’

Pete Clarke

21 Whispers – Mindset More information on the GenAngus Future Leaders Program will be available from www.angusaustralia.com. au as it becomes available.

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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PHONE: (07) 4633 3822 483 Greenwattle St, Toowoomba, QLD, 4350 http://www.mansell.com.au/companies/transport-welding-engineering.html PAge 72

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angus youth

Supporting the future of the beef industry Candice Liddle Events and Youth Development Officer

The Angus Australia Foundation offers a number study scholarships to Angus Australia members to support them in completing their tertiary studies in courses that will benefit the Australian beef industry. In 2018 four very worthy recipients that will make an impact on the beef industry in the years to come have been selected as the worthy recipients.

Emily Webb Ware

Emily has grown up on a 4th generation farm, near Yea, Victoria. Her family have a self-replacing Angus herd of 400 cows and have been in the Angus breed from before Emily was born. Emily is in her third and final year of a Bachelor of Agriculture at the University of Melbourne and completing the Production Animal major. ‘After I graduate, I hope to work in the industry for a few years to gain experience and perspective, before returning home to take over from my dad running the farm,’ said Emily. ‘My goal is to become a top producer in my region, and someone who is active in contributing back to the industry,’ she added. Emily is extremely grateful to the Angus Australia Foundation for supporting her through my tertiary studies. ‘This year I will be able to attend a number of industry events and conferences that I was not otherwise able to afford,’ she concluded.

Jasmin Ramage

Jasmin has grown up in Guyra, New South Wales and from a young age she has been passionate about animals and being involved in the agricultural industry. Jasmin is in her second year studying Bachelor of Veterinary Technology at Charles Sturt University Wagga Wagga and aims to become a mixed practice veterinarian in rural Australia, with a focus on production animals. ‘I would like to be involved with improving the economics of intensive farms and better management strategies of maintaining the health and production of animals,’ said Jasmin. ‘There is an increased demand on intensive farms and production animals, and I see the opportunity to be involved closely with the production animal industry as a rural veterinarian,’ she added. ‘I would like to thank the Angus Foundation for their support in granting me a Study Scholarship and would encourage other upcoming youth members to continue their involvement and apply in the future,’ she said.

Brad is currently in his third and final year studying a Bachelor of Agriculture at University of New England. ‘In 2014 I purchased my first stud Angus females and have thoroughly enjoyed building my Angus herd over the last few years,’ Brad said. ‘Once I graduate I aim to gain a career within the beef industry where I have particular interest in breeding, individual animal management, feed efficiency, meat quality and marketing,’ he said. ‘I would like to thank the Angus Foundation for their support through granting me a Study Scholarship,’ Brad added.

Ruby Canning

Ruby grew up on her family farm at Mortlake, Victoria. Ruby began her tertiary studies in New Zealand at the Lincoln University but her love for the Australian beef industry brought her back to Australia. Ruby is currently studying Bachelor of Agriculture and Bachelor of Business majoring in marketing at University of New England. ‘My background in the beef industry has allowed me to pursue my passion for the industry,’ said Ruby. ‘I have a strong desire to be involved in supply chain management and furthermore I am interested in effective business networking and industry insights,’ she said. At the completion of her degree, Ruby plans on completing a livestock marketing internship in Canada. ‘My own experiences in the beef industry have inspired me to encourage and help the younger generation to be involved in the beef industry, and I will forever be grateful for the opportunities which Angus Australia and the Foundation have given me,’ she added.

Emily Webb Ware

Jasmin Ramage

Bradley Doak

Ruby Canning

Bradley Doak

Brad grew up on sheep and cattle property near Bundarra, New South Wales. From a young age Brad’s passion for beef cattle has influenced him to be actively involved in the beef industry attending and competing in various breed society youth events and shows and remaining actively involved in the family farm.

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Enhancing the Angus product Since 1996 John Leigh, Topbos Angus has been at his 600ha property, Nandewah located 12km south of Cowra in central NSW. When starting out in cattle John began with a small mixed breed commercial herd, but was dismayed to be docked 20c/kg live weight for those animals which weren’t pure Angus and so he moved over to a pure Angus herd. At present, 80 straight- bred Angus commercial cows are run alongside 200 stud Angus breeding cows. Formally a research scientist (ecologist/ agronomist) with the CSIRO for 39 years, John has a keen interest in science and integrity and sees the benefits behind Angus Australia’s investment in research and development and the enhancement of the Angus Brand Verification services. ‘At this stage of my life, I am of an age when it is almost foolish to buy green bananas! As an ex-scientist I understand the importance of measurements and the subsequent provision of externally produced Estimated Breeding Value (EBVs),’ said John. 'BREEDPLAN is a wonderful facility that enables everyone to externally verify claims we may make in relating to calving ease, growth, fertility, carcase quality and most importantly Selection Indexes for animals,' John said. In 2011 John began utilising genomic testing and since then all progeny have been analysed. 'This has proven to be a significant benefit in enabling rapid breeding progress, especially when selecting elite sires and ET donor cows,' said John. 'The cost of genomic testing now also includes parent verification of sire and dam and this is so important for two reasons, as the EBVs are based on accurate PAge 74

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pedigrees and enables the detection and subsequent culling of animals carrying recessive gene disorders'. ‘Competition with other breeds is a future challenge for Angus breeders, and therefore it is important to continue to improve the Angus breed by the reliance and use of all the available EBVs, particularly the Angus Selection Indexes.’ Most recently the significant progress by Angus Australia with the introduction of the single step analyses which introduced the implementation of a new and improved approach for incorporating genomic, or DNA information into the calculation of Estimated Breeding Values (EBVs), was a great step forward. ‘Further reliability has been achieved by aiding us in the optimal selection of elite bulls and embryo transfer (ET) cows that meet our key breeding objectives,’ said John.


John believes that the utilisation of BREEDPLAN information in selection decisions will enable Angus breeders to compete successfully and honestly on behalf of consumer clients. Further to this he cites the recent re-introduction of Angus Brand Verification services by Angus Australia in conjunction with a number of major meat processors to verify Angus beef products, as another avenue for ensuring reliability of the product being offered. Being able to guarantee the percentage content of Angus on the label of the product on the supermarket and butchers shelves, is an important step for processors to take according to John. 'This program is a significant step in building consumer confidence, which are of importance to all of us in the Angus supply chain as consumer demand is a major influence in our industry,' said John.

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Female focus for Injune beef producers

First Published on 5 May 2018 Queensland Country Life By Kelly Butterworth and Lucy Kinbacher Jeremy and Julie Shaw and their sons Henry and Leo, from the 9307 hectare (23,000 acre) aggregation, JS Grazing, Injune, operate a commercial Angus herd in partnership with Jeremy’s parents, Jeff and Jenny. Heifers are the firm focus of their operation. “They’re the engine room, I guess, of what we want to do,” Jeremy said. “It takes a good cow to make a good calf.” While they cannot compete with the budget of seedstock buyers at bull sales, top genetics are just as highly regarded in their herd. They buy the best bulls they can, focusing on their female pedigree, and supplement them with an AI program using semen purchased in top priced bulls. “We’ve been doing up to 100 cows and 120-to-50 heifers but we’d like to ramp that up to 300 to 500 cows this year if we could,” Jeremy said. “We’d like to get to that 500 cows and we think that’ll really fast track things hopefully.”

Time for change

Of the family’s 1300 Angus breeders, Jeremy’s parents retain 200, which they run at their home block. The family turned to a pure Angus herd 10 years ago, but historically were a pure Hereford operation. It was the success of the black cattle in their 999 head on-farm feedlot that swayed them to alter their herd. “They ate well, they didn’t get sick, they forage well in the paddock,” Jeremy said. While the feedlot was decommissioned due to high grain and freight costs, the infrastructure is not left to waste. Jeremy and Julie began yard weaning in 2015 after the PAge 76

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premium prices rewarded to those using the technique in southern states. While they previously sold weaners straight off the cow, they now yard wean and bunk train them before turning them off into paddocks for six weeks before their sale. Jeremy said while yard weaning was yet to take over in their local area, he wanted to be ahead of the game.


Images: Kelly Butterworth “I’m sure it’ll pay dividends for us in the future, and I think it already has,” he said. “You’re getting anywhere from $1000 to $1200 for your calf pretty well straight off mum, and then (if you’re using the feedlot) you’re keeping them for another six, eight months and you might get another $400. “We’ll take the money and run.”

Record weaners

Weaners are the family’s bread and butter and while many producers expected higher prices for their steers, the Shaws’ set themselves apart. “Your steer has got an end-game so you can’t get a massive premium on a steer because the bloke at the other end has got to make some money,” Jeremy said.

“But if we can get as much money as we can for heifers... that’s where we can fine-tune things I guess.” Last year their annual weaner turnoff to the Roma store sale saw their steers top at 390c/kg but it was their heifers that stole the show reaching a staggering 426c/kg. Overall the line of 476 steers averaged 381c/kg at 316kg to return $1208/hd while the 325 heifers averaged 401c/ kg at 283kg to return $1135/hd. They also offered 10 Angus cows due to calve later that month which sold for $2400/hd. “When people are coming and buying them they’re not going to the feedlot industry, they’re going...for people’s breeders, that’s a big tick for us really,” Julie said.

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Gordon and Sally Wollen with Angus Australia's Supply Chain Manager, Liz Pearson

Angus for marketability Diana Wood, Marketing & Communications Manager

Located at Red Range, 27km east of Glen Innes in the Northern Tablelands of NSW, Sally and Gordon Wollen run a self replacing 300 cow herd on their 900 hectare property, 'Buckendor', in high rainfall eastern fall country averaging 900mm. Taking into consideration, the females and their followers, the Wollens run close to 700 head of cattle at any one time, with their female herd, predominantly Angus. Registered Angus bulls are purchased regularly, with a focus on eye appeal. 'Length and basic confirmation are assessed and then we use performance information, concentrating on 200 and 400 day weight and calving ease,' said Gordon. 'We think it is very important to find the balance between visual and performance information when making selection decisions for our bull purchases,' Gordon added. Angus cattle have become the Wollen's breed of choice due to their marketability 'There is a great market for Angus cattle and they are certainly the preferred breed here in the New England,' said Sally.

The Wollens also noted that Angus cattle are very easy doing and the temperament of their Angus cattle is second to none. Gordon and Sally are also very complimentary of the work that Angus Australia is doing to support its members across the supply chain. 'It is great to see Angus Australia engaging with commercial producers,' said Sally. 'We have seen the seedstock producers enjoy the support of Angus Australia and it is exciting to see them further develop relationships with commercial producers,' Sally believes that the support Angus Australia is giving to commercial producers can only be of benefit to the whole supply chain and she looks forward to what the future holds.

www.repro360.com.au Experience reproductive gains beyond just profits Try the new Repro360 resource - the Calving Calculator app. Available in the Apple App store and Google Play, or from the resources section in repro360.com.au For more information visit www.repro360.com.au or call 1800 302 355

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"

The Wollens were awarded the Best Presented Pen of Angus steers at the Colin Say & Co Premier Weaner Sale at Glen Innes during April. Their 62 Angus steers made 317c/kg and were sold into Qld. While prices were back on their 2017 result,which saw them receive a 428c/kg high, Gordon and Sally were very pleased with the results, considering the season everyone has been facing.

28TH ANNUAL SALE

WEDNESDAY 12TH SEPTEMBER

"

nooneeangus.com.au

PAUL JAMESON 0428 667 998 ANDY McGEOCH 0418 737 470

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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Better cattle comes from breeding ambition Nicola Bell, The Weekly Times

Striving to continually breed better cattle is the simple philosophy Danny Kuch runs his business by. Danny, a fifth-generation farmer on his family’s property at Darriman on Victoria’s Gippsland coast, believes he probably got the passion to breed better stock from his father when they bred Merino sheep.

Danny and Brendan Kuch farm up to 1100 Angus breeding cows

Now, Danny, his wife, Kim, and son Brenton run 10001100 Angus breeding cows and 1600-1800 Cashmore Park composite ewes across two properties totalling 2000ha at Darriman and further north at Combienbar. Danny said Darriman was “dry and marginal” country, so they set up their business to suit. “We are purely breeders of grass-fed cattle but we don’t try to fatten and finish them as it’s too dry,” he said. Having run Angus cattle for about 30 years, Danny said the breed offered an advantage because they were “marketable”. The aim is to breed early-maturing, “easy doing” cattle suitable for a range of markets. The breeding program is split with about two-thirds of the cows calving in spring and the remainder in autumn. This allows better utilisation of the bulls, better cash flow and helps spreads the risk of marketing. While Danny said two calving periods meant higher workload, they aimed for tight calving intervals — cows are joined for eight weeks and heifers six weeks. Females are joined to bulls naturally, running in mobs of 60 to 80 with two bulls. “There are no second chances,” Danny said. They farm on “dry and marginal” country.

Born to perform

All females are pregnancy scanned six weeks after joining and any not in calf are sold. PAge 80

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Danny said they selected replacement females of quiet temperament, growth for age and style. The top 60-70 per cent of the heifer calves are kept as replacements, while the remaining 30-40 per cent are usually sold to the live-export breeder market. “It’s a good market for surplus heifers, which is the beauty of the Angus breed and we can put up a big line,” Danny said. “We’ve just had 220kg heifers make $1100.” Autumn-drop steer calves are sold as weaners at about 350kg in December, usually via AuctionsPlus. “We used to sell them at 12 months but about four years ago we decided instead of carrying them over summer, when they hardly put on any weight, we were better off selling as weaners,” Danny said. Meanwhile, the spring-drop calves are weaned in early autumn and sold as yearlings, in about September at 350-400kg.

Logged on

DANNY likes selling on AuctionsPlus because they can put good numbers together, it’s a “brilliant marketing tool” and the cattle can stay on the property until they are sold. They do sell smaller lines of cattle through the local Leongatha saleyards. Calves are weaned in a small paddock with hay and handled regularly.


“We don’t supplementary feed the spring-drop calves at all and they’ve never seen hay until weaning, so it gets them acclimatised,” Danny said. The Kuchs’ cattle are European Union accredited — individually traceable and free from hormone growth promotants — which adds another option for marketing. “Being EU opens up a few more options as a lot of grassfed programs are marketed as grass-fed and HGP free,” Danny said. As well as the National Livestock Identification System tag all of the heifers are freeze branded. “What we find as once breeders are six to seven years old the NLIS tag retention isn’t great, so this means we can permanently identify the cows,” Danny said. “It gives us double lifetime traceability.”

Another of the Kuchs’ management and marketing tool, which isn’t yet common industry practice, is using pain relief for castrating male calves. “Customers of grass-fed meat programs are asking for it and it gives us another marketing option,” Danny said. “It’s also probably the right thing to do.” The pain relief, which is like a “long acting Panadol” is administered via needle under the skin and costs about $2 per head. “I’m not sure if there will be a productivity gain yet, but it’s got to help the calves and it may give us an edge with marketing.” As 100 per cent grass-fed producers, the Kuchs chase bulls with good 400-day weight, moderate birthweight, and good structure. “We want moderate cattle, so we don’t want a big 600day weight,” Danny said.

Angus breed used for more than 60 years at Gowangardie First published on 1 Feb 2018 www.theland.com.au by Ruth Schwager

Producing top-quality Angus weaners is the focus for Jeff Walls and his son Simon on the 2000-hectare property "Lynfield", Gowangardie, Victoria. The 260-breeder pure Angus herd is run alongside 810ha of cropping and 1200 Merino ewes and their replacements. The family’s involvement with the Angus breed began in 1955, when Jeff's grandfather bought the first 16 Angus heifers and a bull for 70 guineas. Structure and meat is the focus when selecting bulls, Mr Walls said. “We want as much meat on an animal as we can get, and a good frame that can walk and stand up to the weight in feedlots,” he said. “They need to have the structure to put on weight quickly in a feedlot.” The Walls keep about 75 per cent of their heifers, culling on type for the young stock and production for older cows. “We pregnancy-test everything, and anything that’s not in calf is gone,” Mr Walls said. “Over the past couple of years we’ve had a good market for females and sent a few to the Chinese export job, there was a good premium. We’ve been mothering up and recording parentage for the past 15 years so we've got the records required for that market.” The cattle are on a mix of native and improved pastures, and are fed silage in dry seasons. “We try to keep the feed up to them at joining, and we feed silage and hay depending on the year, but we haven't opened up the silage pit for the past year,” Simon Walls said. A tough season at joining had little impact on fertility, with 22 sets of twins from 215 older breeders last year.

Jeff Walls with his sons Simon and Richard at the Euroa, Victoria, weaner sale in December. Photo by Peter Kostos, supplied by Fairfax Media

Angus weaner producers rewarded with recent markets

The oldest weaners from the Walls family are usually in the first run of heavier cattle at the first Euroa, Vic, sale for the weaner selling season, held in December. “The top end of the weaners can weigh about 450 kilograms and sometimes they’re not yet nine months,” Simon Walls said. All steers are sold in the December sale, with 100 head sold at the end of last year. The 2015 steers ranged from $1130 to $1250, jumping up to $1250 to $1480 in 2016. In the December 2017 sale, they sold from $1120 to $1280. “It’s finally a market that's rewarding producers,” he said. “A few years ago we'd never get $1000 for our top price, but over the past few years the bottom price was equal to or greater than any price we've had before.” The steers, usually bought by backgrounders, are yardweaned at nine to 10 months of age. “Some of the top buyers want yard-weaned – they won't bid unless they're yard-weaned. We have repeat buyers so we try to work with them.” Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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TEXAS ANGUS

140

Super Thick Quiet Bulls sell Thurs 26th July

50th Bull Sale

Open Day 12th July

Lots 133, 134 & 139

www.texasangus.com.au Selling brothers to the Grand Champion & Reserve Champion 2017 RAS Beef Caracse Challenge Pens NSW & Winners of 2018 Grainfed Export Chiller Class of Australia’s Largest Carcase Competition - Against 492 Head Ben Mayne 0427 295 039 PAge 82

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marketing

A brief guide to design and image file types Ebonie Sadler-Small, Graphics & Multimedia Officer

So you have a new logo or design piece and you have been given a set of files by the designer, what do you do with them and who gets sent what? Well lets break down what the most common design and image file types are and what they are used for: ai. (Illustrator file) Usually you won’t be sent this file but just in case you do, this is the bones of the design, it holds all your editable elements. This file should not be given out unless the recipient is changing it with your permission for a few reasons. 1. The fonts are ‘live’ which means they are editable, and if the person who opens it doesn’t have a particular font that’s been used, Adobe Illustrator (the program it opens in) will change it to a generic substitute font. 2. People can accidently move, change and generally cause havoc if they aren’t used to Adobe Illustrator and can overwrite the file meaning it replaces the original design. 3. The file will contain linked images and if you don’t have the images to relink them with then your file will either display a blank space where your image will be or retain the image but it will be fuzzy when you get the item printed. eps. (Illustrator file) This is the ‘set’ version of the original file, it is the same design as the ai. but the (previously live) elements are no longer editable, meaning you can’t edit the text and any line work has been made so it doesn’t get distorted when you scale the piece. This file is scalable to very large sizes, as opposed to pixel based images (jpgs for example) which are limited to their saved resolution. Send to: This version is the best version to send to other designers, printers, sign writers and depending on the embroidery company or digital/film agency, this may be the preferable file type. Pdf This is the portable version of your InDesign, Eps or Ai file. You can easily send it due to a compressed file size and most people can open it without installing new software. PDFs can be made to different file sizes and for different needs, so you can have one that’s made at Press quality for printing or you can have one set with web optimizing qualities to put on your website. Send to: Anyone, including printers, sign writers and people you want advice from indd. (InDesign file) Again, usually you won’t be sent this file but just in case you do, this is the bones of the design, it holds all your editable elements. This file type should only be given out if you have the packaged folder of the document (meaning the creator has packaged it through the program to ensure that all fonts, images and assets have been gathered into a cohesive folder you can share or keep for records).

psd. (Photoshop file) Again, this file type is a working file, so it holds editable elements such as text, shapes and effects. This file is much more share-friendly than ai. and indd. files as you save the elements into the file itself meaning the next person can usually use it with no issues. This file format provides flexibility. Send to: Preferably send a jpg copy of these files out, unless someone specifically asks for it. jpg. (Image file) This is a portable and smaller file of your psd. file, or a normal picture file if you are getting the images off your camera, colleague etc. Jpgs are fine for use on social media, websites and depending on the resolution, can be fine for small scale layouts (think A3 and below). Send to: Anyone. png. (Image file) A web optimised version of a jpg or psd. file. The file size is compressed so they are great for websites to keep the file size of images down, and if you have an element such as a logo, it will be able to save it with a transparent background. Send to: Anyone. Web designers and digital / film agencies will find this file particularly useful, but in Microsoft programs where you need to put an element with a transparent background in, these can be used. giff. (Image file) A pixel based file that is mostly used for animating a graphics file, for example revolving web advertisements. Send to: Anyone. You are most likely to send these to companies you are advertising online with, or web developers who are building or updating your website. tif. (Image file) These are images that are saved to maintain their image quality and clarity so they can be used in large scale projects and are a common file type for professional photographers to handle. Send to: Designers, film / digital agencies, printers, sign writers or anyone that requests a high resolution image for a project they are working on for you. If you need to send Angus Australia any design or image files and are unsure of which to send, please do not hesitate to contact us at design@angusaustralia.com. au, especially if the files are for design work, website advertising or the Angus Bulletin.

quick fact: raster vs vector images In very simple terms - A Raster file is a pixel based image while vector images are infinately scalable and not resoloution dependent Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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marketing

Importance of branding consistency Ebonie Sadler-Small, Graphics & Multimedia Officer

Consistency is not just great for creating good habits, it’s a tool that can be used to invest in yours and your businesses future. There is a lot of information available suggesting that in the world of branding, consistency is key but have you ever wondered why it is so highly regarded? Let’s have a look at some of the many reasons consistency can be one of your biggest branding assets.

Being Recognisable

Being recognisable has is benefits. Customer loyalty, increased and sustained following, brand value and enhanced creditability are just some of the reasons. By developing a recognisable and sturdy brand, it makes business easier down the track as well, from simple things as generation of organic and genuine interest to the easier introduction of new products and services. You can let your brand be your biggest backer for investments as you have a reputable and recognisable product or business to do the talking for you. You want to be one of the recognised brands that comes to mind when people are shopping for a new product or thinking of enlisting new services. Customers are more drawn to familiarity rather than the unfamiliar, even if the unfamiliar has a better deal or service. It also gives you a competitive edge over competition, and with further recognition your brand presence will elevate itself which enhances your edge.

Why should you invest in your brand

Being consistent leads to you being more recognisable, which has many benefits as discussed above. Never underestimate the power of a cohesive brand. Not only does it convey to potential customers that you are organised and have thorough thought processes and developed ideas, it also demonstrates you invest the time, money and effort into your own business, which to someone who wants to invest in their own business, speaks a lot. By being able to create a sense of consistency it also gives the customer a sense of reassurance that what they see or purchase today will be of the same nature, quality and consistency in the future. That’s not to say you brand shouldn’t evolve or have a brand refresh over time, that’s important as your brand should evolve with your business, its saying that it should always be recognisable in some respect as you.

Why should you have one person or business do it for you

It’s very simple, the more people – especially when unrelated to each other’s work – that are designing, writing and developing content for you, the less you can control the consistency. For example: you might have the majority of your work in set fonts but you need an advert done for a newspaper and they offer free graphic design services, you think wow that will save me $30, but then you find out they don’t have the correct fonts and want you to purchase them for use, so you ask for them to be substituted. This may PAge 84

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seem fine for one advert, but once you substitute once I guarantee that you will become more relaxed about it and continue to do it when the opportunity presents itself to save, but in the big picture, you no longer have brand consistency. The more you stray from your brand (in a negative way) the less recognisable you become and the less cohesive your business looks, even on a sub-conscious level to your customers. This is also an example of being inconsistent in the development of your brand, instead of developing your branding further in a consistent and recognisable way.

Three tips for creating a consistent brand 1. As discussed, have one person or business managing your branding. For example, if you find yourself outsourcing graphic design to one person, and the creation of your sale video to another, it’s not necessarily a case of merging those together, but if you need an introduction slide or assets developed for your videographer, then get your graphic designer to design them and supply them. What may take a bit of extra time on consider ation and planning can help lead to a much more consistent brand. 2. Spend the time developing your brand image, if you are happy with it you are more likely to work towards maintaining your identity. 3. Branding isn’t only about looks, your branding is a mixture of elements from the design of the look and feel, the content development and phrasing to the style of imagery you use. You need to consider all these things, and make sure you are consistent with all of them. For example, if your business has developed a quirky, upbeat style of writing for social media then you need to continue that through your website, advertising and beyond. Its these key considerations that will help customers develop familiarity and a sense of loyalty towards you and your brand.

The ultimate benefit of Consistent branding is the trust gained from the customer


marketing

Sponsorship Exhibition Opportunities 1

Arinex

waf2021@arinex.com.au

Example of consistent branding - WAF 2021 A great example of how consistent branding both enables your brand to grow, as well as remain recognisable is the WAF 2021 branding. The use of colour, typography, angles and repetitive elements creates a dynamic look with pieces individually and as a set. By carrying these elements through the various designs it allows it to be adapted to many different shapes and formats. You can note that some of the design assets such as the 2021 graphic have changed slightly as the branding continues to be developed.

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Open day at Knowla Friday July 27th Ted Laurie: 02 6558 5503 • James Laurie: 02 6558 5519

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

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marketing

Brand Refresh

for when you need new brand identity but want to keep the familiarity and recognition of your business

A brand refresh is essentially a renovation, you keep the bones – be it your name, colours or logo – but you reimagine the look and feel of it. One way is to update but keep a visual connection. In this case you could rework your logo instead of remake from scratch, like updating your logotype to a more modern font or simplifying a complex logomark to fit in with a more modern audience. You can then base your new or updated design elements from that. For all branding projects done through Angus Australia we utilise 4 pillars which we are vital for brand integrity.

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4

Quality n’t

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3

Research

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2

Identify wh

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The Process:

- We will dicuss your needs & expectations for the project - Concept Design - We will create several options for you to review, including mock ups tailored to your needs such as adverts, social media posts and sale catalogue covers - Review - Your opportunity to review and share feedback for the designs - Refinement - Here we will refine the work with your feedback and repeat the review and refinement process until we have an outcome you love - Outcome - You love your new look so we deliever the final outcomes (if applicable) and templates so you can show the world your improved but still recognisable look.

For more information contact Ebonie Sadler-Small, Graphics & Multimedia Officer on 0428 518 880 or email design@angusaustralia.com.au

Software Development PAge 86

Peter Parnell

Ron Bower - Part time

Chief Executive Officer M: 0428 918 632 P: 02 6773 4605 E: peter@angusaustralia.com.au

Human Resource Manager P: 6773 4607 E: ron@angusaustralia.com.au

Human Resources

Chief Executive Officer

angus australia staff directory

Christopher de Crespigny

Michael Ainsworth

Information Systems Manager P: 02 6773 4619 E: christopher@angusaustralia.com.au

Computer Programmer P: 02 6773 4610 E: michael@angusaustralia.com.au

Mark Evered

Chris Nimmo

Computer Programmer P: 02 6773 4610 E: mark.evered@angusaustralia.com.au

Computer Programmer E: chris.nimmo@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018


Strategic Projects

Marketing, Communications & Youth

Finance & Administration

angus australia staff directory David Cameron

Joy Howe

Administration Manager - Accountant P: 02 6773 4624 E: david.cameron@angusaustralia.com.au

Accounts Officer P: 02 6773 4612 E: joy.howe@angusaustralia.com.au

Sue Webeck

Amanda Wolfe

Accounts Officer - Part time P: 02 6773 4606 E: sue@angusaustralia.com.au

Administration Officer P: 02 6773 4600 E: amanda@angusaustralia.com.au

Maxine Draycott Accounts Officer - Part time P: 02 6773 4628 E: maxine.draycott@angusaustralia.com.au

Diana Wood

Robyn Brazier

Marketing & Communications Manager P: 02 6773 4601 M: 0411 242 001

Marketing Assistant - Part time P: 02 6773 4609 E: marketing@angusaustralia.com.au

E: marketingmanager@angusaustralia.com.au

Candice Liddle

Ebonie Sadler-Small

Events & Youth Development Officer P: 02 6773 4622 M: 0437 873 220 E: youth@angusaustralia.com.au

Graphics & Multimedia Officer M: 0428 518 880 E: design@angusaustralia.com.au

Christian Duff

Nick Butcher

Strategic Projects Manager P: 02 6773 4620 M: 0457 457 141 E: christian@angusaustralia.com.au

Project Officer, ASBP M: 0427 701 236 E: nick@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Bulletin — winter 2018

PAge 87


Member Services

Commercial Supply Chain

Breed Development & Extension

angus australia staff directory Andrew Byrne

Matthew Reynolds

Breed Development & Extension Manager P: 02 6773 4618 M: 0418 412 042 E: andrew@angusaustralia.com.au

Breed Development Officer P: 02 6773 4626 E: matthew.reynolds@angusaustralia. com.au

Liz Pearson

Olivia Twaddle

Commercial Supply Chain Manager P: 02 6773 4608 M: 0488 758 360 E: liz.pearson@angusaustralia.com.au

Supply Chain Officer P: 02 6773 4627 M: 0400 236 386 E: olivia.twaddle@angusaustralia.com.au

Nicky Carey

Samantha Hamilton

Senior Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4616 E: nicky.carey@angusaustralia.com.au

Senior Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4613 E: sam@angusuaustralia.com.au

Robyn Kelly

Victoria Lee

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4615 E: robyn@angusaustralia.com.au

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4611 E: victoria.lee@angusaustralia.com.au

Lou Wood

Scott Wright

Member Services Officer - Part time P: 02 6773 4617 E: office@angusuaustralia.com.au

Member Services Officer P: 02 6773 4614 E: scott.wright@angusaustralia.com.au

Angus Australia Locked Bag 11, Armidale NSW 2350 P: 02 6773 4600—| F: 02 2018 6772 3095 | E: office@angusaustralia.com.au PAge 88 Angus Bulletin winter Website: www.angusaustralia.com.au


Balance

Genetics

Commercial Performance

Performance Recorded

MSA Focused

Independently Assessed

THE ASCOT ADVANTAGE SPRING SALE INCLUDES SONS OF Ascot Hallmark H147 • Ascot Lion Heart L 305 • Millah Murrah Loch Up L133 • Millah Murrah Kingdom K35 • Millah Murrah Klooney K42 • Texas Global G563 • Millah Murrah Highlander G7 • Clunie Range Juno J173 • Te Mania Emperor (Inc. 2 outstanding full brothers to Ascot hallmark)

SPRING BULL SALE 130 BULLS FRIDAY 21 SEPTEMBER, 2018 Free delivery to many centres in NSW & QLD

Jim Wedge M 0419 714 652 ascotcattle.com.au 1123 Warwick-Allora Rd, Warwick QLD 4370


120 BULLS SELL 6th September 2018, Bathurst FEATURING SONS OF:

Millah Murrah Klooney K42

Millah Murrah Kingdom K35

Coonamble CoonambleHector HectorH249 H249

Ross & Dimity Thompson Email: info@millahmurrah.com Phone: 0439 179 269

Millah Murrah Kruse Time K400

Ascot Hallmark H147

www.millahmurrah.com

Millah Murrah Loch Up L133

Musgrave MusgraveAviator Aviator

“Goonamurrah” 1202 Turondale Road BATHURST NSW 2795

Angus Australia 2018 Winter Bulletin  
Angus Australia 2018 Winter Bulletin