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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News Fall 2012

Judges Issue

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

Re g u l a r Fe a t u r e s

S p e c i a l Fe a t u r e s

Club Business 8 Wire~News Contributors & Officers 9 Committees Chairs & Thank You 12 President & Editor Messages 13 Delegate’s Report 16 Club Business 17 Cardiac & New Titles 19 Breed Standard 68 National Rescue Standings 54 Field Top Ten 63 Conformation Top Ten 64 Obed. & Agility Top Ten

On the Cover —

Articles

Special Features 22 GWP Best In Show Feature 30 Welcome to Nationals 58 CHIC 62 AKC Agility & Obedience Invitational 72 Fort Detroit GWP Specialty Results 76 Delaware Valley GWP Specialty Articles 20 Considering Breed Type 24 Coats and Color 28 The Ultimate Versatile Dog 51 My Dog Can Do That 52 Stepping From Field To Show 56 A Work In Progress 60 Judging Conformation For Field

GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH “TRUMAN”

The Cover dog is the exemplary German Wirehaired Pointer, GCh. Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH “Truman”. Truman is owned by Kiki Courtelis, Angie and Mike Johnson and Christine Whitmore, bred by Angie and Mike Johnson at Reece Kennels and Christine Whitmore, and expertly handled by Frank Murphy, assisted by Jay Kim. Truman’s accomplishments started in 2010 when he won the GWPCA National Specialty, Owner/breeder handled by Angie Johnson at the young age of two years. In 2011 Truman caught the sharp eye of Kiki Courtelis and Frank Murphy, who started his specials career.  In a short time Truman earned multiple Best In Shows, multiple Specialty Wins and has achieved 71 Group Wins thus far. Truman will continue his specials career through 2012 then return home to Reece Kennels to train for his Master Hunter Title and NAVHDA UT, as well as producing more stellar get. Mike & Angie Johnson Reece Kennels

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Index to Advertisers Cover

Cupola Farm-Courtelis, Johnson & Whitmore

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WireDogs West - John Nunnes

Inside

Boyd/Shupp/Wilkinson/Witt

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Idawire GWPs-Tom & Jodi Quesnell

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Highfield GWPs-Larry & Pam

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Lacy Magoon

6&7

Ebbtide GWP - Garnett Persinger

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The Haven Kennel - Cindy Heiller, DVM

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Cupola Farm-Courtelis, Johnson & Whitmore

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GWP Alliance

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Focus Kennels-LaMar & Kay Gunnarson

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Forty Lix Kennels - Megan Smith

14 & 15

Wild West Kennels - Jim West & Haukoos

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Purina

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Lee Friess & Jennifer Jacobs

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Weidenhugel GWP - Mildred L. Revell

26 & 27

Claddagh Kennel-William & Courtney Bastian

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Robert Wickes, DVM & Marion Hancock

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Joan & Andy Payton

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Dual Shot Kennels - Karla Hawkins

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Reece Kennels - Mike & Angie Johnson

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Harvest Meadows - Lisa Minnick & A. Resnik

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Hampton Court Kennel-Victor Malzoni, Jr

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Caramel Kennels - Audrey & Don Meinke

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Korskote (Aus) & Germanus (UK) Kennels

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Ironwire - Adam & Amy Cunningham

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WireWorks Kennel - Angela Milowski

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Hawk Haven Wires - Pete & Norma Paduch

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Wirewest GWP - Meg Eden

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Whitetail Kennels- Billy and Deb Darby

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Inverness Kennels - Jack & Laura Myles

Inside

Willamette GWP-Lisa & Octavian Popescu

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Hilltop Farm - Stroh, N & P Paduch

Back C.

Wingfield Farms-Don & Ben Coller

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Hilltop Farm - Betty Stroh

Pr e m i u m s Fo r 2 0 1 2 N a t i o n a l E v e n t s In our ongoing effort to make the GWPCA a more cost-efficient organization, the Board of Directors has agreed to make ALL GWPCA National Premium Lists available electronically. Premium lists and all general information will be emailed directly to each member and made easily accessible on the GWPCA website. Members who would like to request a hard copy be mailed to them should email the Show Secretary, Robert Rein at fouroaksfarms@yahoo.com and provide name and mailing address to receive the hard copy. Links and reminders will be printed in the Wire~News but a “National Packet” will NOT be mass mailed. If you have any questions, feel free to contact any member of the GWPCA Board of Directors, the Show Secretary or National Events Coordinator, Laura Reeves at scotiadawgs@gmail.com.

www.GWPCA.com/Nationals.html Entries Can Also Be Made Online at http://fouroaksfarmseventservices.yolasite.com/

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GW P C A M e m b e r s i p & W i r e ~ N e w s C o n t r i b u t o r s Joining the GWPCA The GWPCA is a non-profit AKC member club who is dedicated to bringing out the natural qualities of German Wirehaired Pointers to perfection. As the AKC parent club for GWP’s we are charged with doing all in its power to protect advance the interests of the breed by encouraging sportsmanlike competition at dog shows, obedience trials, field trials and hunt tests. What does Membership to the GWPCA Entitle Me too? A subscription to the GWPCA Wire~News Discount on advertisement in the Wire~News Monthly E-mail updates in the Wire~Mail Eligible for GWPCA Awards Eligibility to compete in GWPCA Show Futurity & Field Futurity events A vote for officers, directors and other critical issues confronting the GWPCA. A voice in AKC decisions about our breed. Eligible to place a listing on the GWPCA Breeder Listing & Stud Dog Directory The ability to pull resources with other GWP breeders and owners to better the breed in the form of rescue and donations to other causes. How Can I Join? Simply complete an application which is found on the GWPCA website (www.GWPCA.com) under the tab membership. Mail your completed form and dues to Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave., Woodstock, GA 30188

Regular Columns & Articles Pat Laurans - AKC Delegates Report Lori Sargent - New Titles & Top Ten Lynn Sandor - Field Top Ten Diane Turner - Rescue Judy Cheshire - Considering Breed Type Laura Reeves - Coats and Color Courtney Bastian - The Ultimate Versatile Dog Judy Cheshire - My Dog Can Do That! Bernee Brawn - Stepping From Field To Show Laura Myles - A Work In Progess Jodi Quesnell - Judge Conformation for Field Ability Ashlee Trotter - AKC Invitational Qualifiers Robin K. Nelson, DVM – CHIC Photos - Lisa George, Ann Karrick, Bernee Brawn,

Megan Smith, Courtney Bastian, Roger Doyle, Laura Myles, Angie Johnson, Laura Reeves, Christina Freitag, Carol Cagle, Judy Cheshire, Patricia Dempster

2 0 1 2 GW P C A B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd., Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@gmail.com Vice President Elizabeth (Liz) Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Secretary Lori Sargent, 5775 N. Chester Rd., Charlotte, MI 48813 (517) 543-3628 birddog@windsweptwires.net Treasurer Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave., Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 591-4329 geauxerika@yahoo.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 13838@windstream.net Midwest Director Chuck Casanova, 19910 Platte View Rd., Gretna, NE 68028 (402) 691-9498 clc51@hotmail.com Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com 8

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C o m m i t t e e C h a i r s & Po s i t i o n s Committees and Positions Breeder Referral - Bernee Brawn - justagwp@verizon.net Bylaws - Mark Sargent - birddog@windsweptwires.net Canine Health (CHIC) - Robin Nelson - gwpoint@aol.com Delegate to the AKC - Patricia Laurans - plaurans@earthlink.net Field Advisory Committee - Elizabeth Dixon - bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Futurity (Field) - Tom Lococo - tom.lococo@novartis.com Futurity (Show) - Laura Myles - invernesskennels@frontier.com GWPU - Open Judges Education - Judy Cheshire - heywiregwp@gmail.com National Events Coordinator - Laura Reeves - scotiadawgs@gmail.com 2012 Nationals - Diane Marsh - fdmarsh@comcast.net 2013 Nationals - Rhonda Haukoos - brillowkennels@iowatelecom.net Maturity (Show) - Audrey Meinke - fairwindxx@sbcglobal.net Membership & Wire News Mailing-Erika Brown - geauxerika@yahoo.com

Rescue - Diane Turner - dturner596@aol.com ROM - Sean Perry - aspendel@aol.com Top Ten Field - Lynn Sandor - sandorcpa@comcast.net Top Ten Other - Lori Sargent - birddog@windsweptwires.net Trophies - Sue Degraw - schnellberg@comcast.net Versatility - Greg DuBois - grgdubois@comcast.net Wire~News Editor - Angie Johnson - angiehef@aol.com Wire~Mail Editor - Open Web Master - Angie Johnson - angiehef@aol.com

A m e r i c a n K e n n e l C l u b “ T h a n k Yo u ” The American Kennel Club’s “Join With the AKC to Protect Responsible Small Breeders petition” had more than 70,000 signatures when it was forwarded to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) with the AKC’s comments regarding new proposed regulations which would create harsh and unintended consequences for responsible small and hobby breeders in this country.

Thanks to everyone who signed AKC’s petition and sent comments to USDA’s Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service!

As the leader and expert in breeding and maintaining dogs for more than a century, the AKC supports responsible breeders and dog owners through its educational and inspections programs. As the only purebred dog registry with a care and conditions of dogs policy – which we have recently enhanced to create a comprehensive policy for the welfare of all dogs – more than 55,000 inspections have been conducted since 2000. Our expertise demonstrates that regardless of the number of dogs owned or the manner in which breeders interact with potential puppy buyers, strict “one size fits all” breeder/retailer regulation is expensive, unfair, and difficult to enforce. Our comments to the USDA reflect these ideas, and respectfully express our belief that the proposed rule is fundamentally flawed. If you have any questions or comments regarding the AKC’s comments to the USDA, please contact our Government Relations Department at 919-816-3720 or doglaw@akc.org ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Pr e s i d e n t s M e s s a g e The dog days of summer are gone. Fall is a great time for us. The steelhead are in the rivers, bird season is near and so are the GWP Nationals. Preparation for the National Trial and Hunt Test should be well under way. They make a great “tune-up” for the real event—bird season. With a little clean up—the yearly bath and comb the whiskers, your favorite bird dog will be ready for the National Specialty. I look forward to seeing everyone in California this October at the Nationals. Good luck to all and enjoy the fall. PS—Don’t forget to dust off old Betsy and put a drop of oil on all important places— Here’s to tight lines and great birdwork!

Ray

Fr o m T h e E d i t o r I think I say this every issue but once again the Fall Wire~News has been one of my favorite issues to put together as the Wire~News editor. This being our judges issue there are some very interesting articles on judging the German Wirehaired Pointer in the show ring. But unlike other Fall issues of the Wire~News this issue is not only going out to our AKC GWP and Sporting group judges but it is also being distributed electronically to all AKC Field Trial judges. Because of this there are articles and tidbits that the field trial judge will find interesting as well, remember FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION. The Fall issue of the Wire~News is our most distributed issue annually, hitting thousands of email boxes in an electronic format. This issue will not only go out to GWPCA Members but GWP and pointing dog fanciers, field organizations, blogs, facebook and any electronic outlet possible. As the Wire~News editor my hope is to educate people about our wonderful breed and to introduce them to the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America (GWPCA). The GWPCA is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to bringing out the natural qualities in the GWP. With the support of the GWPCA board and its members there are several events that take place each year educating people about GWP’s such as Judges Education, GWP University, National and Regional Events and the AKC meet the breed booth. The GWPCA also has a rescue organization and donates money each year to the AKC Canine Health Foundation. Another reason why I enjoy this issue is because of the advertisements placed by our GWPCA members, owners, and breeders. There are people doing wonderful things with their GWP’s and this gives everyone a chance to shine. I also get to work on some of these ads and it helps generate those creative juices. As you can also tell by this issue our annual National events is fast approaching so our next issue is our National issue. The deadline for the National issue is November 15th. As always I hope you enjoy your Wire~News and go out and kiss a fuzzy face. Warmest Regards,

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D E L E G AT E ’ S R E P O RT

AKC Delegate’s Report By Pat Laurans

In June I attended the Delegates meeting in North Carolina. From that meeting I posted the information on how to sign the petition regarding the USDA proposed small breeders regulations. Thank you to all of you who followed through and signed the “Protect Responsible Small Breeders” petition. The following items that have been approved by the AKC Board of Directors are of interest to our members: New procedures pertaining to the use of blank guns in Pointing Breed Field Trials and Hunting Tests have been approved. In general the new procedure establishes .32 caliber blank pistols as the largest size allowed. It permits the use of 209 primers in blank pistols, establishes the .401 gauge shotgun as the largest shotgun that may be used to discharge blank shells in Field Trials, and cautions handlers with regard to the potentially harmful impact that blank ammunition can have on the hearing of people, dogs and horses. Two other changes were approved regarding Pointing Breed Hunting Tests: The first is to allow females in season to be eligible to enter the last test of the day on a given course where they will be run at the end of the test.  This will be up to the discretion of the host club. The second allows one of the two judges to judge the same testing level at back-to-back events.    Regarding National Specialties: Effective 03/01/12, any experienced dog person will be allowed to judge at your National Specialty or National Regional…any person…with a few requirements; 21 years of age, 15 years of successful breeding, handling or exhibiting and for them to pass a procedure and anatomy test prior to judging the event.”  This may or may not be important to clubs, but it gives an opportunity for some of the wonderful breeders who have chosen not to go down the road to judging the option to judge your National if your club chooses to ask them.  This ruling does include professional handlers but not Field Reps. Meet The Breeds: There will also be a Meet the Breeds Booth October 20 and 21, 2012, at the Javits’ Center in New York City and at the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship and at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL . on December 15 & 16, 2012, I will be attending the September Delegates Meeting in New Jersey.

Support the American Kennel Club www.AKC.org

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Wild West Kennels’ Wonderful World of Wires!!

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e are proud to have the trust and support of so many GWP owners across the country. We look forward to a fabulous fall field trial season. Keep an eye out for all of these dogs and more….yes, there are more puppies that aren’t pictured!! Good Luck to everyone at the GWPCA National Events. Congratulations to the first DC GWP to get a Grand Champion title; NAFC/DC/AFC/GCH Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now; “Louie”. Row 1: Hi Powers Jolt to the System (Belinda DeLaby); Ironwire Acquire the Fire Rocks Cynister (Lacy Magoon); Sure Shot’s Double Dare (Penny Ljungren);Ch HH Vixen’s Arrival (Ed Shupp); Aqua, Fester, Jack and Jenny (Cathie & Don Magoon) Row 2: DC Sure Shot���s Sonora Gone Heywire (Penny Ljungren); FC JayMar’s How Do You Like Me Now JH (N. Litwin/P&C Hieber); FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa (John Sodoro); Brillows Upland Allie (Christian Fisher); Harvey’s Justa Jeff (Ted Harvey); Ironwire Big Country (Henry Bird); Brillows Wild West Justa TN Hustler (Rhonda Haukoos);NAFC/DC/AFC/GCH Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now (Bernee Brawn & MaryPat Ezzo) Row 3: FC Sure Shot’s Pretty Summer Endless Play (Hilde Stapgens); Uodibar’s Freebee (C&K Wisch); Ebbtide’s Justa Gotta Believe (Garnett Persinger/Bernee Brawn); Idawire Hope Floats (Tom & Jodi Quesnell) Row 4: Brillows Wilwest Justa Here We Go (Bernee Brawn); Brillows Sureshot Hardknock Doc (Rhonda Haukoos & Jim West); FC Brillows Big Wild Western (Todd Tuls); Harvey’s Justa Jeff (Ted Harvey)

For Information on Training or available dogs: Jim West 402.679.5316 Rhonda Haukoos 402.679.1565 jim@wildwestkennels.co ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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C Club l u b BBusiness usiness For the 2013 Calendar year the GWPCA positions of President, Treasure, and Midwest Director are open. The nominating committee comprising of Sue Mueller, Betsy Watkins, Laura Myles, and Diane Turner presented the GWPCA Members below for these positions. President - Ray Calkins (ORI) Treasurer- Erika Brown (GA) MidWest Director- Chuck Casanova (NE) Additional nominations may be made by written petition addressed to the Secretary and received at her regular address no later than September 15, 2011, signed by five members and accompanied by the written acceptance of each such additional nominee signifying his willingness to be a candidate.

Need to Contact a GWPCA Member but can’t find your roster? Contact Membership Director Erika Brown at geauxerika@yahoo.com or ph 210.317.9036 and she will email you an updated roster. ______________________

Wanting to get updated on GWPCA Board Activity? GWPCA Board meeting minutes can be found on the GWPCA Website. www.gwpca.com/Minutes.html ______________________

Are you a Facebook Fanatic? Well the GWPCA has a page, search for the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America (GWPCA). ______________________

Send to the GWPCA Secretary. Lori Sargent 5775 N. Chester Rd. Charlotte, MI 48813 birddog@windsweptwires.net Description of Positions The President shall preside at all meetings of the Club and of the Board, and shall have the duties and powers normally appurtenant to the office of President in addition to those particularly specified in this Constitution and By-laws. The Treasurer shall collect and receive all moneys due or belonging to the Club and receipt therefore. He shall deposit the same in a bank satisfactory to the Board, in the name of the Club. His books shall at all times be open to inspection of the Board and he shall report to them at every meeting the condition of the club's finances and every item of receipt of payment not before reported; and at the annual meeting he shall render an account of all moneys received and expended during the previous fiscal year. He shall have charge of membership records and shall notify all new members of their acceptance. The Treasurer shall be bonded in such an amount, as the Board of Directors shall determine. The Midwest Director shall reside in the Central (Central time zone). He should encourage the formation and growth of local clubs within his region and act as an advocate between the Club members within his region and the GWPCA.

We Need You!! Currently there are three positions open, contact Ray Calkins at gwpcascade@gmail.com if you are interested in one of these positions.  GWPU  Wire~Mail Editor  Wire~News Editor

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Treasury Accounts (August 16, 2012)

Balances $19,949.47 - General Fund $3,708.24 - Rescue Emergency Fund $1,207.73 - AllStar Fund $1,770.00 - National FT Trophy Supplement Fund $527.21 - Maturity Fund Submitted by: Erika Brown, Treasurer


Canine Cardiac Clinic

A K C N e w Ti t l e s

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BREED STANDARD

The German Wirehaired Pointer Breed Standard GENERAL APPEARANCE The German Wirehaired Pointer is a well muscled, medium sized dog of distinctive appearance. Balanced in size and sturdily built, the breed’s most distinguishing characteristics are its weather resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings. Typically Pointer in character and style, the German Wirehaired Pointer is an intelligent, energetic and determined hunter. SIZE, PROPORTION, SUBSTANCE The height of males should be from 24 to 26 inches at the withers. Bitches are smaller but not under 22 inches. To insure the working quality of the breed is maintained, dogs that are either over or under the specified height must be severely penalized. The body is a little longer than it is high, as ten is to nine. The German Wirehaired Pointer is a versatile hunter built for agility and endurance in the field. Correct size and balance are essential to high performance. HEAD The head is moderately long. Eyes are brown, medium in size, oval in contour, bright and clear and overhung with medium length eyebrows. Yellow eyes are not desirable. The ears are rounded but not too broad and hang close to the head. The skull broad and the occipital bone not too prominent. The stop is medium. The muzzle is fairly long with nasal bone straight, broad and parallel to the top of the skull. The nose is dark brown with nostrils wide open. A spotted or flesh colored nose is to be penalized. The lips are a trifle pendulous but close to the jaw and bearded. The jaws are strong with a full complement of evenly set and properly intermeshing teeth. The incisors meet in a true scissors bite. NECK, TOPLINE, BODY The neck is of medium length, slightly arched and devoid of dewlap. The entire back line showing a perceptible slope down from withers to croup. The skin throughout is notably tight to the body. The chest is deep and capacious with ribs well sprung. The tuck-up apparent. The back is short, straight and strong. Loins are taut and slender. Hips are broad with the croup nicely rounded. The tail is set high, carried at or above the horizontal when the dog is alert. The tail is docked to approximately two-fifths of its original length. FOREQUARTERS The shoulders are well laid back. The forelegs are straight with elbows close. Leg bones are flat rather than round, and strong, but not so heavy or coarse as to militate against the dog’s natural agility. Dewclaws are generally removed. Round in outline the feet are webbed, high arched with toes close, pads thick and hard, and nails strong and quite heavy. HINDQUARTERS The angles of the hindquarters balances that of the forequarters. A straight line drawn vertically from the buttock (ischium) to the ground should land just in front of the rear foot. The thighs are strong and muscular. The hind legs are parallel when viewed from the rear. The hocks (metatarsus) are short, straight and parallel turning neither in nor out. Dewclaws are generally removed. Feet as in forequarters. COAT The functional wiry coat is the breed’s most distinctive feature. A dog must have a correct coat to be of correct type. The coat is weather resistant and, to some extent, water-repellent. The undercoat is dense enough in winter to insulate against the cold but is so thin in summer as to be almost invisible. The distinctive outer coat is straight, harsh, wiry and flat lying, and is from one to two inches in length. The outer coat is long enough to protect against the punishment of rough cover, but not so long as to hide the outline of the dog. On the lower legs the coat is shorter and between the toes it is of softer texture. On the skull the coat is naturally short and close fitting. Over the shoulders and around the tail it is very dense and heavy. The tail is nicely coated, particularly on the underside, but devoid of feather. Eyebrows are of strong, straight hair. Beard and whiskers are medium length. The hairs in the liver patches of a liver and white dog may be shorter than the white hairs. A short smooth coat, a soft woolly coat, or an excessively long coatis to be severely penalized. While maintaining a harsh, wiry texture, the puppy coat may be shorter than that of an adult coat. Coats may be neatly groomed to present a dog natural in appearance. Extreme and excessive grooming to present a dog artificial in appearance should be severely penalized. COLOR The coat is liver and white, usually either liver and white spotted, liver roan, liver and white spotted with ticking and roaning or solid liver. The head is liver, sometimes with a white blaze. The ears are liver. Any black in the coat is to be severely penalized. GAIT The dog should be evaluated at a moderate gait. Seen from the side, the movement is free and smooth with good reach in the forequarters and good driving power in the hindquarters. The dog carries a firm back and exhibits a long, ground-covering stride. When moving in a straight line the legs swing forward in a free and easy manner and show no tendency to cross or interfere. There should be no signs of elbowing out. The rear legs follow on a line with the forelegs. As speed increases, the legs will converge toward a center line of travel. TEMPERAMENT Of sound, reliable temperament, the German Wirehaired Pointer is at times aloof but not unfriendly toward strangers; a loyal and affectionate companion who is eager to please and enthusiastic to learn. Approved October 10, 2006; Effective January 1, 2007

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TYPE AND STYLE

Considering

Breed Type By Judy Cheshire, Member Judges Education Coordinator

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nowing the verbiage of a standard doesn’t necessarily give one the correct mental picture of a particular breed. Words, particularly adjectives, are often subjective or comparative. For example, a “medium sized dog” could mean a Springer Spaniel to one person and a Vizsla to another. The German Wirehaired Pointer standard defines the breed as a medium sized dog. Words, sort of like statistics, can be presented to imply the analyst’s point of view……..and with multiple analysts, there are a wide variety of mental images! Therefore, understanding breed type requires more than just reading the standard. Type is a combination of characteristics that define a breed and make it unique unto itself. It includes the outline, size, proportions, balance and attitude of the dog as well as specific qualities that enable the dog to do the job it was developed for. The GWP is a rough coated, athletically built, versatile hunting dog that is practical, low maintenance and efficient. Let’s look at some of these characteristics. The German Wirehaired Pointer standard states 20

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“A dog must have a correct coat to be of correct type.” Harsh, wiry and flat lying, 1–2” in length, naturally short and close fitting on the skull with medium length facial furnishings. The coat does not hide the outline of the dog nor should it be excessively groomed to enhance the silhouette.


TYPE AND STYLE spirit they need to be a “team player” with their handler in the field.

A correct, double coat protects the dog from punishing cover, helps to shield it from inclement weather and remains relatively easy to care for. According to the standard, dogs are 24–26” at the withers, bitches slightly less, but not under 22”. This gives quite a bit of latitude in the size of bitches as they can differ as much as 3 ½”. Good substance, without coarseness, should be relative to size. As long as the dog (or bitch) is within the standard, the only fault would be if a bitch appeared “doggy” or a dog appeared “bitchy”. The German Wirehaired Pointer is a little longer than it is high, as ten is to nine. It is slightly “off square” measuring from the point of the shoulder to the back of the buttocks. From the ground to the elbow and from the elbow to the highest point of the withers, the distance should be equal. The shoulders are well laid back with the angulation of the hindquarters balancing that of the forequarters. Correct angulation facilitates a smooth, ground covering stride and balance of those angles enable correct foot timing which promotes both endurance and agility in a dog that is working. Size, balance and proportion all contribute to performance. These dogs have a strong sense of self. They are intelligent and should be confident. These traits show in their overall carriage and contribute to the cooperative

Knowing the characteristics of correct type will come together when you see an outstanding example of the breed. There are also gradients within the right type, so you can have the right type but not necessarily a “good one” of that type. For example, dogs – for multiple reasons - may not use themselves well when they move, or they can have a fault (or several faults) related to function that may decrease their merit. A trait that interferes with the job that the dog was developed to do is a more serious fault than a trait that makes the dog aesthetically pleasing. There are also sometimes styles within type. Styles may be produced or promoted by breeders when they find something that is particularly pleasing to them. Heads, perhaps exaggerations in length of neck or slope of topline and overall substance are characteristics that may be stylized. This should not necessarily change breed type but it is something that is recognizable. Style belongs to fashion, culture and, perhaps, demographics. It’s not necessarily a bad thing and may be thought of as a “variation on a theme”. Learning breed type is a matter of observing as many dogs as possible over time, discussing the global characteristics and more detailed traits of the dogs with long time breeders, watching application of conformation in the field and reflecting on the improvement or decline of depth of quality within a breed. Type is set because a dog has a function or purpose and is something that will endure over generations.

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C OATS & C O LO R

Coats and Color

By Laura Reeves, Member Judges Education Committee

Author’s note: What follows is a re-print of a WireNews article first published in 2006. Since that time, the GWPCA membership has voted on a new standard. The language regarding coat color in the revised standard remains the same, as does the position of the GWPCA Judges Education Committee, reiterated below.

in this country than the solid liver dogs. Though in Germany white dogs are not allowed, the AKC standard says “The coat is liver and white: usualy either liver and white spotted; liver roan; liver and white spotted with ticking and roaning; or solid liver. The head is liver, sometimes with a white blaze. The ears are liver.”

Let’s look at the issues surrounding GWP coats and color, starting with the solid liver dogs, perhaps the least understood and appreciated of several iterations of the GWP. Solid liver dogs are one of the breed’s foundation types of dog. The mother line for most solid liver dogs traces back to Pudelpointers in Germany and Italy. There are excellent solid liver dogs to be found in the country today. They have the correct coat asked for the in the standard. They have correct conformation. But many judges pass them over because they aren’t “typical” or they are considered sort of “plain Jane” -- no flash. Neither of these is a correct decision. Good solid liver dogs should be adjudicated equally with good ticked dogs. Part of the myth of solid liver dogs is that they all have short coats. Let’s recall that a one-inch long coat that is “straight, harsh, wiry and flat-lying” with minimal furnishings -- of whatever color -- is very acceptable and preferable to a soft, open coat with profuse furnishings -- whether on a ticked, white or solid liver dog. We are prioritizing by function. A correct tight coat of any color will be more protective for the dog in a hunting situation than a soft, open coat, also of any color. White dogs have achieved much more acceptance 24

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The coats on white dogs also run the gamut from too short, to correct, to too long, soft and open. The myth that white dogs by definition have softer coats is inaccurate. They can be flashier in the show ring than a ticked or solid liver dog, but again correct coat and functional structure need to lead the judging priorities in this breed, not color or flash. A dog with a naturally very dark liver color will have a better coat than a dog with a lighter liver color. Typically, when I see a dog with a sort of light chocolate color to its head and liver patches, I see a softer, more open coat. The liver color that is so dark as to be mistaken for black, seems to correspond almost inevitably with the coarse, dense, correct coat we are all striving to produce. As regards the line in the standard which states “Any black in the coat is to be severely penalized,” it needs to be read in context with the rest of the standard. Our standard describes a liver dog -- liver head, liver ears, liver nose, liver and white coat. With that in mind, this line would indicate that any black in the coat (of an otherwise


C OATS & C O LO R liver dog) is to be severely penalized. This would be a highly improbable situation. While some judges may mistake a very dark liver dog for black, they can always verify the coat color by checking the nose color. Without exception, a liver dog will have a brown nose and a black dog will have a black nose. Addendum, 2012: The standard calls for four areas of severe penalty. One is explained above, regarding color. It is important to note that all areas of the standard should be respected. We recognize judges can only judge what they are presented, but please keep in mind our club’s desire to maintain an active, functional, dual-purpose dog by heeding ALL elements of our standard. The additional listed severe penalties are: “…dogs that are either over or under the specified height (24-26” for dogs, smaller but not under 22” for bitches) must be severely penalized.” “A short, smooth coat; a soft wooly coat; or an excessively long coat is to be severely penalized.” And, a very direct corollary, “Extreme or excessive grooming to present a dog artificial in appearance should be severely penalized.” This is no different than other breeds with which you might be familiar that restrict or outlaw trimming in order to preserve the breed’s character. “A dog must have correct coat to be of correct type.” That means the dog needs to have correct coat by breeding rather than manufacture in order to reproduce that quality. While we can agree it is a dog SHOW, it also is a judgment of breeding stock, not a grooming competition. The judges, breeders and exhibitors must work together in this area. There is no question Wirehairs are a low-entry, lownumber breed. Type and style vary radically from region to region. In spite of this, or perhaps because of it, quality dogs which meet the standard should be valued and rewarded accordingly. This enables our breeders to continue moving toward the goal of creating “versatile hunter(s) built for agility and endurance in the field.” Photo Caption(s): The photo illustrations show GWPs in the show ring, the field and the home. These are dogs presented in correct, natural coat with minimal grooming. Several also illustrate the dark liver pigment which is generally associated with desired coat texture. ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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U LT I M AT E V E R S AT I L E D O G

The Ultimate Versatile Dog By Courtney Vogel-Bastian, Claddagh GWP’s

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he first thing that comes to mind when you think of a German Wirehaired Pointer, should be the breed’s incredible versatility. GWP’s are one of the most common versatile gun dogs throughout the world. They are the most often utilized hunting dog in Germany, and continue to gain popularity in the US. Originating in Germany, breeders developed a rugged, versatile hunting dog that would work closely with a single hunter or a small party of hunters in varied terrain. From the mountainous regions of the Alps, to dense forests and more open areas with farms and small towns, the versatile pointer was a necessity. German Wirehaired Pointers are classified as a versatile gun dog, and in Britain are grouped with the HPR breeds (for hunt, point and retrieve). While the GWP may lack the edge of specialist breeds like Labradors, English Springer Spaniels and English Pointers in their respective specialist fields, for the all-round sportsman looking for an allround dog, the GWP is the answer. Versatile breeds were not only developed to find and point game as all pointing breeds, but were also bred to perform other hunting tasks as well. This distinction likely arose because 28

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while the British were developing breeds which specialized in tasks such as pointing, flushing and retrieving from land or water, in Continental Europe, the same dog was trained to be able to perform each of these tasks (albeit less effectively). The North American Versatile Hunting Dog Association (NAVHDA) defines versatility as “the dog that is bred and trained to dependably hunt and point game, to retrieve on both land and water, and to track wounded game on both land and water.” GWP’s are often used to retrieve waterfowl while duck hunting, something at which the specialized pointing breeds might be less adept. Unlike the pure pointing and setting breeds, many versatile dogs were bred for working in dense cover as well as cold water, hence the necessary functional wired coat of the GWP. The German Wirehaired Pointer’s most distinctive feature is its coat. Coat should be a main priority when breeding, judging, or


U LT I M AT E V E R S AT I L E D O G Well bred versatile dogs are highly intelligent with a calm demeanor. I like to refer to them as having an “on/off” switch. Our crew lives together in the house, lounging around on dog beds and the couch. But the second I put on my boots or grab my gun, the switch flips! I swear GWP’s aren’t color blind like other dogs, because their switch flips as soon as I grab an article of blaze orange as well!

hunting, as it plays such an important role for the versatile dog. The coat has two layers of which one is an outer coat that is no more than 2 in. long, flat lying and so harsh it feels bristle-like. A correct outer coat is necessary to serve as a protective layer from brush. If the outer coat is long, it will not lay flat, allowing wind to lift the hair, resulting in the dog being cold and wet. In turn, defeats the purpose of this important weather resistant layer. The 2nd layer of coat, is the undercoat. The undercoat serves as an insulating thermal layer during fall and winter, when waterfowl and upland hunting seasons are underway. This layer is extremely thin, if not nearly absent, during the spring and summer months, to keep the dog cool during warm temperatures. A correct coated versatile dog will not have to be stripped down or shaved to hunt, nor will it need to have chalk or hair spray added to the coat before being exhibited in a dog show.

When it comes to training the versatile GWP, their genetic makeup allows for them to have a keen aptitude for hunting skills. Your puppy may drop its nose to the floor and track down a goody… it may have so much point that you could use a plastic bag to work on style… or you could lose your mind worrying about the puppy that hits a pond for the first time in water that’s about to freeze, while it jollies around in complete confidence and desire. Continue to help develop these natural breed abilities with positive reinforcement, and you will forever enjoy “the dog that can do it all”, the Versatile German Wirehaired Pointer!

The versatile German Wirehaired Pointer is an on-foot gun dog, that was developed for work before and after the shot. They are able to hunt different types of terrain in the field, woods, and water. In order to have the qualities of a “do it all”, versatile dogs must be intelligent, with the willpower to persevere along with the ability to concentrate under numerous and variable conditions. Searching, pointing, tracking wounded game, cold water retrieving, blood tracking and blind searching are all necessary capabilities for versatile hunting dogs.

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2 0 1 2 G W P C A N AT I O N A L

We l c o m e t o t h e GW P C A N a t i o n a l s

National Entry Pricing

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2 0 1 2 G W P C A N AT I O N A L

GW P C A N a t i o n a l Te n t a t i v e S c h e d u l e

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2 0 1 2 G W P C A N AT I O N A L

GW P C A N a t i o n a l Re m i n d e r s

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TOP WINNING GERMAN WIREHAIRED POINTER OF ALL TIME

the mighty Oak

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© 2012 AD BY RIBIT DESIGN


photo credit Michelle Steigmeyer

PHIL & AMY BOOTH

Stud service inquiries contact Claire Wisch outlawgwp@aol.com | 443.822.0982

www.BlueRoseKennels.com KATE BATZNER, ASSOCIATE

Š2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Wireswest German Wirehaired Pointers

Bred for the Gun

DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH Supreme ROM

Razz FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl MH JH

Stoli Dibs

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras CGC CHIC# 73923

Three Littermates Made possible by the great dogs of the past that built this pedigree of today

Meg Eden Breeder, Owner, Trainer, Field Handler CH Wireswest First Dibs MH CHIC# 73922 40

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Hard driving all day hunting dogs

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New Champion

Ch Idawire AimN Hi Absolut Mimosa Mimi finished easily winning five 3-point majors! She hunted hard this fall, showing a lot of potential and has starting formal field training. Thanks to Jim & Carolyn Isom for sharing this fun girl with us, and congratulations to Dani Gifford on breeding her first champion GWP.

(Ch Wildacre’s Boxcar Willie SH x Ch Idawire Funny Feeling) Owned & Handled by:

Co-Owned by:

Bred by:

Jodi Quesnell

Jim & Carolyn Isom

Danielle Gifford

IdawireGWPs

AimN Hi GWPs

Absolut Kennels

www.idawire.com

www.aimnhi.net

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Introducing

Ironwire Acquire the Fire Rocks Cynister Sire: Ch Idawire Field of Dreams

Dam: Ch Cynister Idawire Childz Play

Fire finished her short derby dog career by winning the Amateur Walking Derby AND the Open Derby at the GWPCA Midwest Classic hosted by the E. Nebraska GWP club. A big thank-you to Jim West and Rhonda Haukoos for training, conditioning, and handling Fire. We’d also like to thank Fire’s breeder, Adam Cunningham for handing Fire to her Amateur Derby win. And, we’d like to congratulate Fire’s littermates—Ali (Ch Ironwire AC-DC) and Abba (Ch Ironwire Abba Rocks Idawire) on completing their show championships. Ali also placed in the Midwest Classic Derby. Fire is now training with Jim and Rhonda—we’re looking forward to seeing what this girl will do running in gun dog stakes!

Bred by

Owned by

Co-bred by

Adam Cunningham Ironwire GWPs www.ironwiregwp.com

Lacy, Cathie & Magoon Cynister GWPs www.cynisterwires.com

Jodi Quesnell Idawire GWPs www.idawire.com ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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AKC RETRIEVER HUNT TEST

My Dog Can Do That!

(The First AKC GWP to Earn a Retriever Hunt Test Title) By Judy Cheshire

S

ome breeds are specialists, while many are versatile. In the sporting group, there are hunting tests for Pointing Breeds, Retrievers and Spaniels. Those breeds that are historically meant to do multiple tasks are allowed to cross over to other hunt tests, at the parent club’s request with the concurrence of AKC Performance Events Dept. For example, Flat Coated Retrievers have always been included in Retriever Hunt Tests. According to their standard, “He is keen and birdy, flushing within gun range, as well as a determined, resourceful retriever on land and water.” Flat Coats may now also compete in Spaniel Hunt Tests. German Wirehaired Pointers, German Shorthaired Pointers, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons, Spinone Italianos, Vizslas and Weimaraners are all considered to be “continental breeds” that retrieve game both on land and in water. All these breeds may now compete in retriever Hunt Tests. Carol Piette-Cagle and her GWP, Gracie, are the first GWP team to gain a Retriever Junior Hunter title! Pryor Creek’s Gracie Mae is no stranger to the word “versatile”! Her other AKC titles include: Field - Master Hunter (with an average score of 9.75 on her last leg!); Tracking - TD and TDX (and in training for her VST!); Obedience – CD, CDX, UD, UDX (with OTCH points to boot!); Rally – RN, RA, RE and RAE; and Agility – NA, NAJ. Gracie also unofficially competed in an Airedale Fur Test. The requirements include finding a raccoon in a dense forest and barking to indicate its presence – only one Airedale and Gracie qualified, leaving the organizers of the event wondering if they should allow other breeds to enter! Carol rescued Gracie when she was two years old. She was sold over the internet as a hunting dog and when she had a disagreement with the family’s Jack Russell Terrier they decided to sell her, give her away or just dump her! A veterinarian told them about Carol and Tommy Cagle and their love for the GWP breed. Carol picked Gracie up, planning on getting her into GWP rescue. Accepted by the eight other Wires in the household and loved by Carol and Tommy, she never left her new found home. Carol says, “After Tommy died I had lost my training partner and didn’t know if I would continue with dogs, even though it has been a life time hobby. A friend in

Wirehairs said, ‘you will go back when Gracie wants to.’ When Gracie started bringing box turtles to me at home in Oklahoma, it was time to start training again for something - I chose Retriever Hunt Tests as that was something Tommy and I had not done together.” GWPs were accepted into the Retriever Hunt Tests in January, 2012. At the Junior level, the Retriever Hunt Test consists of four marked retrieves, two on land and two in water. The dog may walk to the line on lead but has to be under the handler’s control. Retrieves are not more than 100 yards and the dog must retrieve to hand. The Senior level, which Carol and Gracie are training for now, is more complicated, with both blind retrieves and doubles, plus honoring a working dog. According to Carol, “The difference between the Pointer and Retriever test is that the pointer handlers come, test their dogs, get a ribbon and go home. The retriever tests are run in series, so people stay and you get to talk all day long about dogs. They are very friendly and love their retrievers. Gracie was the only pointing breed in the tests, so lots of people wanted to know what type of ‘new retriever’ she was! When she went to the line, I didn’t know what to expect and they all watched us - Gracie made me proud! I made many new friends and many of the Pro’s that trained in Texas said I should come train with them.” Carol recommends going to a Retriever Hunt Test and observing before entering your GWP. She also suggests training with bumpers before introducing ducks (or pheasants), teaching straight line retrieves, training in all types of water and making sure that your dog holds the bird until asked to release it. She says, “All Wires are noted for their versatility, so with a little different training, they should be able to do a Retriever Hunt Test. The different tests challenge the GWP and keep them mentally alert so they don’t become couch potatoes!” Congratulations to Carol and Gracie! Two of our own who have overcome adversity and met the challenge! ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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FROM FIELD TO SHOW

g n i p p e From Field to Show t

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By Bernee Brawn

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erman Wirehaired Pointer enthusiasts love to complain about “dog shows” and how this sport is ruining the breed. I am a firm believer that it’s not “dog shows” that ruin a breed, but rather it’s the people involved that do so. Let’s be honest, winning is fun. In this country, competition is the highlight of our lives whether it is in sport, business or our personal lives. It’s just not good enough for us to be good; we have to be the best! In order to be the best, the greatest, the winningest, there are often things that get overlooked or ignored. In the world of dog shows today, winning Best of Breed is only a stepping stone to the almighty Group. After all, winning Best In Show is what dog shows have become “about”. Racking up group points, gathering BIS’s has become more important than being the Best GWP. I think that is unfortunate and not good for our breed, or any breed for that matter. Now, don’t get me wrong, a Best In Show is a wonderful achievement and anyone receiving one should be very proud of their dog, trust me, I would be! But should it be the most important thing in our shows today? In the world of flashy show dogs, the GWP has always been the step child. This is not a flashy breed, it does not have a beautiful flowing coat, it doesn’t have silky shiny hair, and it’s not what you would call cute breed. Now of course those of us that love the breed think they are the best thing in the world, but flashy? Cute? Nah! It was never a breed sought out by those who only wanted to own a “show dog”, but that trend appears to be changing. The GWPCA has always put a lot of emphasis on the “Dual Champion” (DC), and since it’s inception the Champion/Master Hunter. This is a dog that can compete in both the show ring and in field trials or hunting tests and do well enough at both to finish it’s FC (Field Champion)/ MH (Master Hunter) and it’s CH (Champion) titles. It’s a difficult goal to achieve and takes a dedicated owner to accomplish. 52

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Unfortunately, many think that bringing a Field Champion to the show ring and expecting to compete is impossible. It certainly should not be. While the vast majority of GWP’s will never set foot in a show ring, there certainly are more of them that could, and should. For some reason, field people think that as soon as a dog has a CH in front of their name, it makes the dog useless for the field. They also believe that unless their dog is flowing with coat, has extreme angles front and back and drools for bait, they don’t have a chance. The other side of that coin, are the “show only” folks who love to make statements like “it’s not bad, … for a field dog”. There is only one standard for the breed and it makes no distinction between “field” dogs and “show” dogs. While the standard describes the ideal GWP we all know that there are quite a few “types” that fit the bill. Too many believe that all field dogs are leggy, rangy and short coated—not so. Too many believe that all show dogs are stocky, thick bodied and long coated—not so. There are good and not so good in both venues, and it’s our job to produce and promote the best. The GWPCA has an ongoing education program that attempts to educate judges to the nuances of our breed. One of the things that this stressed in the seminars is that this is a working dog, a dog expected to hunt fur and feather, to climb chuckar hills, plow through the swamp and negotiate the forest. In order to do these things a GWP must be mentally and physically sound, it must be tough enough to fight furry critters and retrieve them to its owner but tender mouthed enough to also bring a quail to hand in one piece. Its coat was designed to be as no nonsense as the breed itself, protective and utilitarian. No feathers and flowing coat on this breed. It can’t all be up to judges however. Breeders and exhibitors must strive to bring dogs that fit the standard to the ring. The dog with the coat that must be continually stripped to “appear: short and harsh is not correct and we are only hurting ourselves when we promote these dogs. Judges can only judge what is brought to them and if that is all they see… well, whom


FROM FIELD TO SHOW

then can we blame? On the other hand, we certainly rely on our judges to keep the whole dog in their mind when they are judging, and we ask that they judge the breed for the breed, not for what they can go on to achieve in the group ring. We also ask our judges to remember what this breed was put on this earth to do and to judge them with that as the utmost priority. If you are considering bringing your working dog to the show ring, there are few things to do beforehand. First, if you are not familiar with the breed standard, find someone who is and have them evaluate your dog. Be open-minded and listen to their comments. Remember, no dog is perfect and everyone one of them has a flaw here and there. If you think your dog has enough positive things to merit it becoming a Champion, go for it. While our breed should be mostly a natural coated breed, all will benefit with a good grooming before walking into the show ring. This does not mean it needs to be stripped and fluffed up, (this is totally improper for the breed) but a good bath, thorough brushing and overall neatening won’t hurt. All wire coated breeds need to have that dead hair removed at times, so make sure you give your dog a good going over. The dog should be in good physical condition, he should be fit and in shape. All GWP’s that walk into the ring should be in good working condition. A fat sloppy dog does not fit our standard. Remember, this is a breed that should appear athletic, ready to go, and go all day long. A dog that looks like it has been half starved is not in good condition either. Ribs and hip bones should be covered, but not hidden under a layer of fat. Dogs that are being actively campaigned may be heavily muscled in the shoulder and thigh area and these areas may appear or feel lumpy. A good judge will use their hands and eyes to decide if this muscling is appropriate and proper or hiding poor structure underneath. While a dog that self-stacks and moves at the end of the lead is impressive, it really has nothing to with quality of a dog. Teach your dog to stand still; especially wile a judge is examining it. Some dogs may need some exposure to being examined so it feels comfortable with a stranger in such close proximity. Wires are jealous of “their space” and many don’t like people (or dogs) in their faces. A GWP should have a brave and upstanding temperament and while they may not appreciate a judge going over him, he must prove his stability by allowing it. Any GWP that refuses to be examined or that show aggression or fear in the ring should be excused.

Teach your dog to gait calmly and boldly on a lead. Your dog needs to move both away from and back to a judge in a straight line so its movement can be evaluated. A GWP should have free, clean and ground covering movement. A properly built GWP should have a tight body, free of rolling and shuffling. A dog that does not (whether by poor training or by improper structure) or cannot reach with its front, and drive with its rear is not covering the most ground with little effort. Your dog will also be asked to move around the ring so the judge can evaluate his side movement. A dog that is calm and sure of itself will certainly look and move better than one that is straining and fighting the entire way around the ring. Remember, the judge needs to see how the dog is using himself, if they cannot see the legs and feet, they cannot judge it. When the ribbons are handed out, win or lose, remember to be a good sport. You may not agree with the judge’s decision, but once they are made, it’s over. As breeders and exhibitors we have a choice to enter or not enter our dogs. It’s our responsibility to know which judges truly understand our breed, and which judges simply view them as“filler” breed. Just as in the field, there are judges who put more emphasis on certain characteristics; there are judges who are more knowledgeable than others. And then there are judges who really should not be judging dogs. It’s up to us to know which is which. Our breed has a pretty darn good record of producing Dual Champions (considering how few are registered each year) and for that we should be very proud. We have not gone the route of the Setters and Spaniels, show vs. field, and every GWP should be a “field dog”. It’s what the breed is! Our goal as breeders, exhibitors and judges should be to make sure that this trend continues, that the German Wirehaired Pointer continues to be one breed, mentally and physically fit to do whatever task is asked of it.

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FIELD TOP TEN

Field Top Ten January Through July 2012

Field Top Ten Rankings based on dogs defeated. Submitted by Lynn Sandor (sandorcpa@comcast.net)

OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS)

Dogs Defeated

Number Placement

Yamashita/Hawkins

83

6

NAFC DC AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now

M Ezzo VMD/ B Brawn

70

4

3

FC Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa

J Sodoro

67

4

4

DC Jonnee Blue

R Lewis/R Berry

60

3

5

Uodibar's Freebee

Wisch/Haukoos

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3

6

FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl

M Eden

45

4

7

NAFC DC AFC Cascade Tumalo Tess

J & S Williams

44

2

8

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras

M Eden

43

2

9

CH Cascade Double Barrel

Wickwire/Satter/Calkins

35

3

10

Backwoods Drama Queen

Dixon/Barrett-Dixon

23

1

Dogs Defeated

Number Placement

Dog Name

Owner

1

CH Dual Shot's Behind Bars

2

In Open Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 21 GWPs placed 44 times, defeating 659 dogs.

AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) Dog Name

Owner

1

FC AFC Wingfield's High Cotton

D & P Coller

86

6

2

CH Dual Shot's Behind Bars

Yamashita/Hawkins

78

6

3

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras

M Eden

59

3

4

CH Cascade Double Barrel

Wickwire/Satter/Calkins

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4

5

FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl

M Eden

47

2

6

FC AFC Tumalo Timberjack

J & S Williams

44

3

7

CH Rlb's Got Moxie At Drakkar

E Shupp

38

3

8

CH Proulx's Hot Shot Pepper

J & C Proulx

32

2

9

FC Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa

J Sodoro

30

2

10

CH Proulx's Wireswest Big Jake

J & C Proulx

29

2

In Amateur Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 21 GWPs placed 49 times, defeating 623 dogs.

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FIELD TOP TEN

JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED) Dog Name

Owner

Dogs Defeated

Number of Placements

1

Weidenhugel Jetta V Treff

S Jahn

41

7

2

Idawire Apple Pie Ala Mode

B & S Mueller

33

3

3

Ironwires Aquire The Fire Rocks Cynister

B Dean/L Magoon

25

5

4

Blueridge Foxie Sadie Grace

M Headrick

16

3

5

Inverness Whiskey Lullaby

C Casanova/R Nelson

13

3

6

Weidenhugel Kate V Gus

Heiller/Boyd/Sandor/Eden

12

2

7

Cascade Mercury Rising

J Calkins

10

2

8

Brillows Sureshot Hardknock Doc

R Haukoos

8

2

9

Okk Afistfulof Dollars

J & R Schoonover

7

3

9

Schwarzwald's Clad In A Tux

W &G Schmidt

7

2

In Junior Dogs, a total of 17 GWPs placed 41 times, defeating 193 dogs.

CH Dual Shot’s Behind Bars

CH Dual Shot’s Behind Bars

FC AFC Wingfield’s High Cotton

FC AFC Wingfield’s High Cotton

Weidenhugel Jetta V Jetta Treff V Treff Weidenhugel

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C OATS O N P U P PI E S

A Work In Progress By Laura Myles

GWP’s

are a challenging breed to evaluate. The standard states that the breeds most distinguishing characteristics are its “weather resistant, wire-like coat and its facial furnishings”. However, puppy classes might best be described as a “work in progress” since they often have yet to develop an adult coat, facial furnishings, or have a coat that is rough in texture. Eye color also changes as the young GWP matures. Most GWP puppies that are going to have good coats start out with less coat and grow more hair as they age. There are indications of what to look for on these GWP youngsters. They will have a slight beard and eyebrows, but can appear to lack body coat, and there is no undercoat. Body coat will continue to grow and a tighter lying coat is to be preferred to a puppy with two plus inches of hair all over it at six months. While there are several lines that will produce individuals who have a fluffy coat that comes off turning into a correct coat it’s not common. The tighter a coat, which often in the case of the 6-9 mth means “shorter” will also not have the fuzz or fluff on it that a longer heavier coated puppy may carry. Extremes of no coat or facial hair or excessive facial hair and long silky coat are both incorrect. Heads: Hair that is flat lying & non fuzzy is a necessity for the proper adult coat on the skull. We have had youngsters with hair that was flat lying from the beginning and youngsters with longer baby coat that we hand stripped off and it did not grow back in. The lighter liver colored a dog is, the harder it is to have or grow correct coat, especially on the head. The ideal is to have a puppy with flat lying hair on the top of its head, not soft downy fuzz. Ear fringe if present is also generally removed at 4-6 mths. If sparse, ear fringe is gently hand stripped off, or in some cases an extremely sensitive individual may have excess ear fringe trimmed to avoid a spaniel appearance.

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An adult coat on the 6-9 month GWP puppies will often first show up along their topline, appearing first as a stripe of different textured hair along the spine. This hair will feel and look different from the rest of the body coat and can even be a different color. Also check at the base of the tail for what will often be hair that feels different from the rest of the body coat. These are indications of what the adult coat will look/feel like. At around 9 months the texture is changing to more of a coarse/rough feel on more of the body, and it should begin to look as if the coat is going to be weather resistant, and able to protect the dogs from the elements. GWP youngsters can take up to 15 mths to grow in a complete adult coat depending on their coloring/coat type. The darker liver roans, and the solid liver dogs often have a shorter tighter coat with accompanying shorter beards and eyebrows. For the solid livers it is a case of inheritance from their Pudlepointer heritage. Liver hair is shorter than white hair on the GWP. Leg Hair: On many puppies the leg hair will be softer in texture. Hand stripping or light pumice stoning of leg hair removes the yellowish/grey puppy coat allowing the shorter adult leg coat to grow in properly. Toes may also have softer downy hair that should come off or be removed as the adult hair grows in. Coat grows from the spine down, covering the body & sides and in a proper coat also the undersides to protect the belly and chest when working in the field. During summer months undercoat may be sparse, however during the rest of the year undercoat should be present on the 15mth to adult dogs. The undercoat will generally be dark on a liver or liver roan dog, while on a white bodied dog it can be either liver, or white. If one considers the correct coat there should be both an outer flat lying coat and an undercoat during most of the year. Keep in mind during the Fall and early Winter months young GWP’s will have been taken out on their first hunting trips. Trying to keep a youngster with matching eyebrows and a full beard may be difficult. Eye color - The standard states: “Eyes are brown, medium in size, oval in contour, bright and clear” The eyes will change color from blue as a newborn, to greenish brown to eventually a preferred brown. I personally feel that the darker the better. In over thirty years of breeding GWP’s I’ve never heard anyone say that a dogs eyes were too dark! A light yellow or grey/green eye, or yellow bird of prey eye color is undesirable. Having made that statement though, many juvenile GWP’s have lighter eyes. What to look for? Look for a dark rim around the edge of the iris. Without this dark rim the eyes are going to remain yellow. The eye will slowly darken to almost meet the color of the dark rim.


C OATS O N P U P PI E S In summary: Coat: Body coat should not feel like a setter puppy, soft or silky. Do not reward a puppy with 2� plus of soft fluffy hair all over the entire body and head. Look for coarse hair coming in along spine, base of tail. Facial Hair: It is a breed characteristic. Do not reward complete lack of facial hair. At six months a GWP should have some whiskers. They may be a very short

half inch brush along the under jaw, or clumps from the corners of the mouth. Eyebrows can be short and works in progress. Eyes: Shape should be oval and color brown, not yellow. A dark rim should be present around the outer edge of the iris in the younger puppies where a lighter eye may be seen.

Puppy A

Adult A

Puppy B

Adult B

Puppy C

Adult C

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CHIC

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TRAINING

2011 GWPCA Nationals Ionia, Michigan Hosted by Fort Detroit GWP Club

Come see the beautiful fall colors of Michigan and join us for, what we promise, will be a memorable

Sue DeGraw, Nationals Coordinator schnellberg@comcast.net Barb Tucker, Show/Agility Chairman Kay Braddock, Obedience/Rally Trial Chairman John Schoonover, Field Trial Chairman Mark Sargent, Hunt Test Chairman Roger Doyle, Donations Trish Hirneisen, Hospitality Roger Doyle & Rich Hirneisen, Merchandise

Nationals!

Event Calendar: Thurs. Sept. 29, 2011 - All Breed Obedience, Beginner Novice & Welcome Party Fri. Sept. 30, 2011 - Fort Detroit GWP Club Specialty & Sweeps, National GWP Obedience/Rally (GWPs only) & All Star Invitational

COU

There is camping available at the fairgrounds and at the field trial grounds.

Wrangler Available

Host Hotel –

American Inn & Suites, Ionia 616-527-2200 We do NOT recommend any other hotels in the area except the Best American Heritage Inn in Portland, about 15 miles away from Ionia 517-647-2200, gm@greatamericanheritageinn.com

S

Sat. Oct. 1, 2011 - Futurity, National Sweepstakes, Maturity, All Breedare Agility & National Meeting, CGC The birds scarce, but he continues his search working the ditches and fence rows quartering Testing through the field. He slams on point and you say to yourself, "this is what it‘s all about."

His breeding, your training/conditioning combined with high-quality nutrition have made thisoffer possible. We would like clubs to step up and to Saturday dinner – barbeque host a hospitality night. Available nights Give him the high-quality nutrition field when other dogs are $20/person plus cash bar; that helps keep him in the are Monday-Friday. Meals will be offered heading for the truck. Feed what many top field trialers feedevery — Purina® Pro Plan® Performance Formula. day. The more donations we get for Sun. Oct. 2, 2011 - GWPCA National meals from clubs, the less each individual • Real chicken the #1 ingredient, All for a high-qualitywill protein to help muscle have source to pay for theirsupport meal. Contact Specialty Show,isJr. Showmanship, Trish Hirneisen at (248) 258-4884 or mass for strength andBanquet provide energy Breed Agility & Awards rich.hirneisen@gmail.com • VO2 max optimizes oxygen metabolism so dogs burn fat more efficiently Sunday banquet $30/person plus • Natural sources- of glucosamine forcash joint health and mobility We are also asking clubs to put together bar. mlike we have done in the • High levels of antioxidants to help support a healthy immune system baskets for raffle, • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, including EPA and DHApast. Mon. Oct. 3, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 1, • Highly palatable

Field Trial & Water Test

Ads for the catalog are due July 30 to Arden Shaw. For more information of interest to sporting dog enthusiasts, Tues. Oct. 4, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 2, visit www.proplan.com/sportingdog/mag Donations for trophies – information will be Field Trial available soon and on the Nationals Purina is a proud sponsor of: website. October 5 to Conclusion - Field Trial

**All Information is Subject to Change

Merchandise information will be available

Trademarks owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland

©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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THE IDEAL HUNTING DOG

g Conformation for Field Ability n i g d Ju By Jodi Quesnell

When judging GWPs in the show ring, it is unreasonable to ask a judge to determine the field abilities of a dog—that is what field trial and hunt test judges are for. But, we do ask our conformation judges to determine which dog is most suited to field work— based on the breed standard, our blueprint for the ideal hunting dog. With this in mind, judges need to visualize how each dog might perform in the field, and award placements based on which dogs would be the best to take on an allday hunting trip in tough brush. A dog that doesn’t move soundly, who has inefficient movement, who “pitter-pats” would probably not be able to hunt hard all day. That dog will tire out a lot quicker than the dog that has an easy, effortless gait, with plenty of reach and drive. A sound-moving, well-built dog must be a top priority for any serious hunter who plans to hunt all day, possibly a number of days in a row. A dog that isn’t balanced (equal angles—front and rear) will have inefficient movement, and will tire out more quickly than a dog that is balanced, regardless of the amount of angle the dog has. Now, what about the all-important coat that breeders are constantly preaching about? Picture the dog with the beautiful, long furnishing running through the sagebrush, thick brambles or a field of cockelburrs. The hunter that owns that dog will spend the evening pulling, brushing and cussing his dog’s coat. Or maybe there’s snow on the ground and it’s cold—the long furnishing will collect snow-balls, possibly even between the toes, causing the dog to go lame. And, when the dog with the soft coat goes into the freezing lake for a retrieve, the cold water will instantly hit his skin, making him very cold, and very likely to stop working. The dog with the soft coat will also suffer more cuts and scratches because tough brambles will cut right through his coat and to his skin. 60

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What about the dog that’s standing in your ring with the shorter, but wirey coat and minimal furnishings? When he runs through the field of cockelburrs, the burrs won’t stick to his coat, and the one or two persistent burrs that stick to him will most likely get pulled out by the dog himself, while he’s riding in his crate at the end of the day. The hunter with this dog will be able to enjoy the evening relaxing with his dog. What about if the shorter-coated dog has to do a water retrieve? Well, his wirey dense coat will repel the water, similar to a Labrador (or a duck.) He will shakeoff the cold water when he gets to the shore, and will be happy to continue hunting. And, if he’s running through the snow you can be sure he won’t be collecting “snow balls” in his coat! And his dense coat will act as a shield against the tough brush, so he won’t be all cut-up at the end of the day. And, let’s talk temperaments a while. Our ideal hunting dog will have a bold, confident personality so he can work independently, at a distance from the hunter. A needy, insecure dog will stay too close to the hunter to be of any use in the field at all. And, what about that dog that jumps out of his skin when he hears a loud noise outside the ring? He’s most likely sound-sensitive which will render him completely useless when the hunter fires his shotgun. A dog that shows aggression towards other dogs will mean that the hunter will never be able to hunt with his buddies who also have hunting dogs—after all, nobody wants to hunt with a guy whose dog is continually interfering with the other guys’ dogs. What if the dog doesn’t like other people? Imagine that your dog has disappeared over the ridge, where your buddy is hunting. You ask your buddy to get the dog for you, and the dog runs away from him, and in the opposite direction as you. Now you’ve got to spend your time hunting for your dog, instead of hunting with your dog for birds! Not to mention, who wants a hunting buddy that none of your friends can touch? That’s not a


THE IDEAL HUNTING DOG quicker. And a dog that is too “course” with heavy bone will not be very agile in the field. A dog that is too fineboned will not be the “brush buster” that hunters need, either. A strong, solid jaw is needed for a GWP, which is expected to retrieve as part of his job description. The rectangular jaw is the perfect shape to carry a large bird, such as a pheasant or a duck. The jaw is balanced by the rectangular shaped skull. The strong neck and good shoulders are also necessary for a dog who is expected to do multiple retrieves.

dog to be proud of. Also, remember that hunting season is no more than 4 months out of the year—the GWP will be a member of the family when not hunting, so he better have a temperament you can live with! For a hunter those are the “biggies”—Temperament, coat, movement and overall soundness. Another thing a hunter will look at is tailset. GWPs will not be quite as beautiful as a setter or pointer when it’s pointing, but we want certainly don’t want a tail that is set too low, or too high (terrier tail—yuck!) We want our dogs to look good when on point. GWPs should have good feet—after all, when running all day, the feet are shock absorbers, and good thick pads will serve a dog well when he runs through a cactus patch. Splayed feet will eventually lead to a dog that completely breaks down, and cat feet will not be efficient shock-absorbers.

Correct ear-set and dark-brown eyes give the dog a pleasing expression, but aren’t as critical to a hunter. And coat color is a “personal preference” with different people believing that certain colors are more visible in the field, depending on the conditions—I think that I can see my solid livers in the field the best, unless their in the rimrocks looking for chukkar. Others prefer the visibility of white coats, unless they’re hunting in the snow. And, of course there is the infinite combination of liver and white hairs that creates our liver roan, liver spotted and liver ticked dogs. For a serious hunter (and judges), color should be of minimal concern. So, the next time you’re looking at a class of GWPs in the show ring, picture those dogs working in the field, and consider how each virtue and fault will affect the dogs’ performance in the field, and then select the dog that should make the best hunting companion. And, if you’re a hunter, looking for your next hunting buddy—whether you’re looking for a puppy or an adult dog, you should consider the dog’s conformation, and how it will affect performance in the field.

Size is important—too small, and he can’t handle a goose, and too big and he’ll tend to “break down”

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A KC I N V I TAT I O N A L I N V I T E E S

2012 AKC Agility & Obedience Invitational Qualifiers Qualifying Period Starting July 01, 2011 and ending June 30, 2012 By Ashlee Trotter

Congratulations to all of our 2012 AKC Agility and Obedience Invitational Qualifiers! For Agility the Top 5 dogs of each AKC breed are invited to compete against each other. The Formula AKC uses to determine the top dogs is the number of points earned in the qualifying period plus a 10 point bonus for each Double Q earned by the team in the qualifying period. A Double Q is qualifying in both the Excellent B Standard and the Excellent B Jumpers with Weaves course on the same day. If a team in the Top 5 declines the invitation to attend then the #6 dog will be invited and so on. In obedience the top three dogs of each AKC breed are invited by the number of OTCH points. Agility Invitational Qualifiers

Rank Name

MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXS MJG XF owned by Ashlee Trotter CH Scotian Whiskey River MX MXB MXJ MJB owned by C Eberhardt/L Reeves-Locco Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX RE JH MX MXJ MJB NF owned by Kay & Mike Braddock Sgr Dirty Witch SH MX MXB MXJ MJB AXP AJP owned by T Brooks CH Cynister’s Jumpin Jack Splash RN MX MXJ MJB owned by Don Anderson/A Anderson

1 2 3 4 5

Formula Points

760 551 263 176 174

Obedience Invitational Qualifiers Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX RE JH MX MXJ MJB NF owned by Kay & Mike Braddock OTCH Larkspurs Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX2 OM3 JH owned by L Swisher Pryor Creeks Gracie Mae VCD1 UDX VER RAE TDX MH JHR owned by C & T Cagle

I must note that Jed’s SF Blue Belle, aka Belle, has the amazing honor to have also been invited to the AKC’s Obedience Invitational! I believe she’s the first GWP to be invited to both and she’s only 4 years old! Kudos to Kay Braddock for a lot of hard work! I hope everyone will be able to attend this year, I would love to meet Scotian Whiskey River and Sgr Dirty Witch and their people!! And it would be nice to see Don (and Gator) and Kay (and Belle) again too! If you are planning to attend, please let me know at training@creativepaws.com. Best of luck to everyone! Ashlee Jed’s SF Blue Belle 62

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BREED TOP TEN

Conformation Top Ten January 1 Through June 30 2012

Rankings based on competition as reported by AKC. Submitted by Lori Sargent (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

BIS/GROUP ALL BREED COMPETITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) V. Malzoni Jr. GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH (D) K. Courtelis/ M&A Johnson/C. Whitmore GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) B. Stroh, N&P Paduch GCH Drakkar’s RLB Celtic Private Eye (D) J & M Boyd, J. Wilkinson GCH Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) F. Neuwirth/C.Whitmore/A. Johnson GCH Drakkar’s ‘N RLB’s Eyefull (B) K. Courtelis/J. Wilkinson/R. Pate/L. Bultman GCH Afterhours Trickeration JH (B) R. Wickes/M. Hancock/C. Whitmore/C. Chism GCH Heywire ‘N Highfields Hey Look Me Over (B) P&L Kincaid CH Ebbtide Lookout Gambler (D) G. Persinger/H. Huber GCH Harvest Meadow’s Truth Be Told (B) L. Minnick/A. Resnick

Points 44,208

BIS 31

G1 72

G2 16

G3 5

G4 1

9,462

5

20

13

11

5

2,538

0

2

1

6

7

638

0

0

3

3

3

510

0

0

3

0

1

379

0

0

2

1

1

281

0

0

1

1

2

159

0

0

1

0

0

152

0

1

0

0

1

52

0

0

0

1

0

BREED POINT COMPETITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

8 9 10 10

GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) V. Malzoni Jr. GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH (D) K. Courtelis/M&A Johnson/C. Whitmore GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) B. Stroh/N&P Paduch GCH Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) F. Neuwirth/C.Whitmore/A. Johnson GCH Drakkar’s RLB Celtic Private Eye (D) J&M Boyd/J. Wilkinson GCH Heywire ‘N Highfields Hey Look Me Over (B) P&L Kincaid GCH Harvest Meadows Truth Be Told (B) L Minnick/A. Resnick CH Hawk Haven’s Grand Stand (D) N&P Paduch CH Ebbtide Lookout Gambler (D) G. Persinger/H. Huber GCH Weidenhugel Abby V Jessie (B) C. Heiller/K. Boyd CH Dancehall Heart ‘N Soul (D) S. Emerick Reece Wired To Win At Harvest Meadows Afterhours (D) L. Minnick/A. Johnson

Dogs Defeated 178 154 97 41 50 39 35 35 25 13 9 9

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OBEDIENCE & AGILITY TOP TEN

Obedience/Rally & Agility Top Ten January Through June 30, 2012 Obed/Rally/Agility Rankings based on 3 highest scores. Submitted by Lori Sargent (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

UTILITY 1 2 3

Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX OM2 JH – L. Swisher Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock Pryor Creeks Gracie Mae VCD1 UDX VER RAE TDX MH – C&T Cagle

OPEN 1 2 3 4 5

CH Scotian Tougher Than Leather CD JH – C. Casanova/R. Nelson Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX OM2 JH – L. Swisher Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock Pryor Creeks Gracie Mae VCD1 UDX VER RAE TDX MH – C&T Cagle Andra V Argos CD RE – P. Menotti

GRAD NOVICE 1

CH Roy the Upland Hunter CD GN RE – L & O Popescu

BEGINNING NOVICE 1 2

CH Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye BN RN – D&B Leveque I Spy Mischief and No Good – D&S McNamra

RALLY EXCELLENT 1 2 3

CH Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye BN RA – D&B Leveque Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RAE AX MXJ XF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RA NA OAJ OF - S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi

RALLY ADVANCE 1 2 3

CH Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye BN RA – D&B Leveque Tumalo’s Gus – M. Brown Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RAE AX MXJ XF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi

RALLY NOVICE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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Tumalo’s Gus – M. Brown Weidenhugel Jade V Treff BN – E. Gray Jay-Mar’s Walk The Line BN NA NAJ – M Braddock & N. Litwin Willamette’s Zorra – L&O Popescu CH Harvest Meadow’s Singin Gerdie Bird JH – L. Minnick Willamette’s “Mr. Bones” - L&O Popescu FC Sure Shot’s Pretty Summer Endless Play JH – H. Stapgens Willamette’s Sachi - L&O Popescu/A Wilson Reece Afterhours RKM Tempest Tempest Win One For The Gipper – Johnson/ Whitmore/Marks/DeLaby Heywire Looks Like Almond Joy at Reece BN – Cornell/Johnson/Meinke

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586.5 580.0 543.0 592.5 592.0 587.5 574.0 182.5 581.5 594.5 190.0 292 185 82 293 282 193 286 271 190 189 184 169 168 153 98 73


OBEDIENCE & AGILITY TOP TEN AGILITY EXCELLENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH XF – A. Trotter CH Scotian Whiskey River MX MXJ - C. Eberhardt/L Reeves CH Cynister’s Jumpin Jack Splash RN MX MXJ - S&J Rainwater/L. Reeves Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock SGR Dirty Witch MX MXJ AXP AJP SH - T. Brooks CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson Madeline’s Prince Charming AX AXJ Afterhours Frosted Mocha MX MXB MXJ MJB MXF MFB - D Philibert/M Rosenblatt

AGILITY EXCELLENT PREFERRED 1 2

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson T Wolf’s Wired After Grizzly OAP OJP – C. Schneider

331 104

OPEN 1 2 3 4 5

Red’s Emerald Cut CD RN NA NAJ – T Guschl/C Guschl CH Paradox SGR Lady Madonna MH NA NAJ – P. Lunde Jay-Mar’s Walk The Line BN RN NA NAJ – Braddock/Litwin Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RA NA OAJ OF – McKeever/Quattrochi Afterhour Joie DeVivre NA NAJ – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt/C. Chism

OPEN PREFERRED 1 2

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson High Power’s Jesse James RAE SH NAO OJP – N. Ondrus Jay-Mar’s On The Road Again RE NF – J. Rowley

57

OPEN FAST PREFERRED 1

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

223

NOVICE 1 2

Aspendel’s Hearts On Fire – P. Baak Jay-Mar’s On The Road Again RE NF – J. Rowley

219 86

NOVICE FAST 1 2 3 4

Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock Madeline’s Prince Charming MX AXJ – S. Rainwater CH Paradox SGR Lady Madonna MH NA NAJ – P. Lunde Afterhours Joie DeVivre NA NAJ - D. Philibert/M. Rosenblatt/C. Chism

224 137 62 58

NOVICE PREFERRED 1

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

386

NOVICE FAST PREFERRED 1

321 306 203 108 98 315 87

OPEN FAST 1

362 354 350 344 333 310 214 129

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

220

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Announcing the arrival of our puppies! On July 20th we were pleased to welcome four beautiful girls to the world.

GCH Afterhour’s Trickeration JH, NA

“Allie”

Breeders/Owners: Robert A Wickes, DVM Marion Hancock Christine Whitmore Christi Chism Inquiries welcome (330) 283-7361 gontofl@yahoo.com

CH Caramel’N Heywire’s Mocha Chip at Star K

“Chip”

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N AT I O N A L G W P R E S C U E

NGWPR Responds as the Number of Dogs in Need Grows

By Diane Turner

As National GWP Rescue, Inc. moves into its third year of operation, the number of dogs coming into the rescue program is ever-growing. The program’s strong response to the need for shelter support, education and foster care has rocketed NGWPR into the national breed-rescue spotlight. By the time this issue of the WireNews is in your mailbox, nearly 50 rescue dogs will have found forever homes thanks to the efforts of NGWPR volunteers. And as you read this, twenty-some desperate dogs will be safely settled in NGWPR foster homes receiving medical care, training and much needed attention. There is no doubt that the program’s success is due to the dedication of the 49 volunteer coordinators, fosters, transporters, evaluators, mentors and fund-raisers. But as the number of GWPs receiving services increases, so does the need for more funding. NGWPR Treasurer Amy Cunningham estimates that the cost to keep the program operating on this level is between $20,000--$25,000 per year. The majority of the funding comes from the generosity of our GWPCA members. This year NGWPR’s fund-raising activities at the 2012 National Specialty will provide the financial foundation for the rescue program to continue its work. Patti Roberts, NGWPR Fund-Raising Coordinator and her team have plans well in hand.

Topping the list of activities will be the traditional auction of the Ugly Duck Print on Sunday evening at the Awards Banquet. To preserve the old print that has traveled the world, last year it was matted and framed. Though its history and charm are still there, the piece will now be a beautiful addition to any home for a year. Topping the list of NGWPR National activities will be the annual auction of the Ugly Duck Print Last year’s winning bid of $500 went to GWPCA members and long-time rescue supporters Carol and Tommy Cagle. Both Tommy and Carol had a special love for and understanding of GWPs in need. Through terminally ill, Tommy was determined that he would out-bid all others for the Ugly Duck Print. That night nearly $1,000 was earned due to the numerous donations from the folks who were outbid. Once again NGWPR will host a raffle. Ed and Niki Shupp have donated a beautiful Coach purse for the raffle and nationally-acclaimed sculptor Leslie Hutto has offered a numbered bronze of a Wire in the field. And the silent auction is shaping up with donations of many coveted items. Among the items are jeweled show leads, hand-crafted knives, indestructible crate pads, leather leads and collars, dog toys and treats and the item that is causing a buzz across the country--the sterling silver belt buckle with the image of a GWP on point offered by NGWPR transporter/evaluator Steve Minas. If you are not able to go west in October, but wish to place a bid on a silent auction item, contact a friend who will be there or one of the NGWPR coordinators and we will place your bid.

If you can’t attend Nationals, have a friend or one of the NGPWR coordinators place your silent auction bid!

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N AT I O N A L G W P R E S C U E

A design by Gail Richardson and used years ago is being dusted off and featured on this year’s NGWPR t-shirts and Montana artist Joan Paredes is hard at work doing the portraits of the selected rescue dogs for the 2013 NGWPR calendar. The NGWPR annual general meeting will be held at the National Specialty. This meeting is open to any GWPCA member or guest who wishes to attend. So if you are at the specialty please plan to attend and learn more about the NGWPR program. The meeting time and place will be announced. In July, NGWPR welcomed its new North-Central Coordinator, Rachel Moorman. As A GWP owner and a member of the Tri-Cities Club, Rachel brings a wealth of rescue experience, knowledge of area shelters and agencies and an insight to the transportation available in her area. One of Rachel’s first projects was to organize a booth for the Minneapolis Game Fair, at two-weekend exhibition for sporting dog clubs, trainers, vendors and rescue organizations. NGWPR was well represented by our Minnesota volunteers, who brought several of our rescue dogs to the event. It was a great experience for both the dogs and the visitors – dogs were socialized and the folks dropping by the booth learned about our breed and met several nice rescues. Thanks to all of our Minnesota volunteers and especially to Rachel. Though we have a growing volunteer staff, we are desperately in need of foster homes in the south and in the western states. Coordinators Heidi Baumbarger in the south and Amy Cunningham in the Rocky Mtn area take in many of the dogs in need, but often these two coordinators each have four or five foster dogs. They simply should not have to care for so many foster dogs. They need help—so please step up and do your part!

Foster homes desperately needed in the southern and western states -so step-up and do your part! If you live in the south or in the west, please contact one of the coordinators and offer to foster. We understand that when you have puppies or young dogs taking a shelter dog can put your own dogs at risk, but many of our dogs are owner releases. They come in well-cared for, recently vetted and they have manners--these dogs are especially in need of a transitional home and foster parents who can help them adjust. As the 2012-2013 NGWPR year progresses the program goals place more emphasis on education of breeders about the number and type of dogs in rescue situations, development of a more inclusive breed education program for agency and shelter adoption counselors and to institute the NGWPR Reno Project-- an on-line guide to raising a well-adjusted, well mannered GWP puppy. Thanks to all of our NGWPR volunteers and our GWPCA members the future looks brighter for GWPs in need throughout the country.

Support The GWPCA National Rescue www.nationalgwprescue.org

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Fo r t D e t r o i t GW P C l u b S p e c i a l t y Obedience - Judge Ms. Cynthia M. Pischke Highest Combined JED’S SF BLUE BELLE UDX JH RE MX MXJ, SR48693303, 2/26/2008, Breeder: Edward & Barbara Tucker. By CH Jed’s Wild Turkey - Jed’s Lexus LX Von Duffin. Owner: Kay Braddock.

Sweepstakes - Judge Mrs. Debra L. Davis Best In Sweepstakes CH EBBTIDE’S LOOKOUT GAMBLER, SR6993003, 6/28/2011, Breeder: G Persinger & H Huber III & H Witt & J Witt . By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH - CH Ebbtide’s From The Ashes. Owner: H. Huber III & G. Persinger.

Best In Opposite Sweepstakes HH LOOKOUT CELTIC FIELD OF VISION JH, SR69016405 , 7/4/2011, Breeder: Ed Shupp, Joyce Wilkinson and James & Helen Witt. By GCH Ripsnorters Mt. View Lookout JH x CH RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH. Owner: Jim & Michelle Boyd & James Witt & Ed Shupp.

Regular Classes - Judge Ms. Nikki Riggsbee Best of Breed & Group 4 CH EBBTIDE’S LOOKOUT GAMBLER, SR6993003, 6/28/2011, Breeder: G Persinger & H Huber III & H Witt & J Witt. By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH - Ch Ebbtide’s From The Ashes . Owner: H. Huber III & G. Persinger.

Best of Opposite CH HARVEST MEADOW TRUTH BE TOLD, SR65665210, 12/10/2010. Breeder: Lisa Minnick. By GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH - CH Harvest Meadow’s Singin Gerdie Bird JH. Owner: Lisa Minnick & Alice Resnick.

Select Dog CH WINDSWEPTS ANDURIL FLAME O’ THE WEST JH, SR63519104, 07/06/2010. Breeder: Lori & Mark Sargent. By CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH. Owner: Marten Compton & Lori Sargent.

Best Veteran AFTERHOURS DARKSIDES DEMONS FIRE, SR19639502, 07/17/2004. Breeder: Christi Chism. By CH Afterhours Lover Boy x Afterhour Mississippi Mud. Owner: Dennis Germann & Christi Chism.

Winners Dog and Best of Winners REECE WIRED TO WIN AT HARVEST MEADOWS AFTERHOURS, SR69398204, 08/24/2010. Breeder: Michael & Angela Johnson & Christine Whitmore. By CH Lauwyrn Cassio Piece of Cake x CH J an J Afterhours Dana JH Owner: Lisa Minnick & Angela Johnson.

Reserve Winners Dog BAILEY’S FARM WINDSWEPT ZEKE, SR63519106, 7/6/2010, Breeder: Lori & Mark Sargent. By CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH. Owner: Michael Bailey. Agent Lori Sargent.

Winners Bitch HH LOOKOUT CELTIC FIELD OF VISION JH, SR69016405 , 7/4/2011, Breeder: Ed Shupp, Joyce Wilkinson and James & Helen Witt. By GCH Ripsnorters Mt. View Lookout JH x CH RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH. Owner: : Jim & Michelle Boyd & James Witt & Ed Shupp.

Reserve Winners Bitch LOOKOUTS TOVA’S BARONESS, SR68057807, 05/16/2011, Breeder: Eva Wiseman, Helen & James Witt. GCH Ripsnorters Mt. View Lookout JH x CH Tova’s Affair Von Der Winston. Owner: John Ong & M Lee. 72

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Fo r t D e t r o i t GW P C l u b S p e c i a l t y Fort Detroit had their Specialty and Sweepstakes at the Macomb Kennel Club Show. It was well attended with 30 entries in sweepstakes and regular classes with dogs and handlers coming from Illinois, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. A luncheon was provided by Fort Detroit and a good time was had by everyone.

Highest Combined Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX JH RE MX MXJ

Best of Winners & Winners Dog Reece Wired To Win At Harvest Meadows Afterhours

Winners Bitch HH Lookout Celtic Field of Vision JH

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D e l a w a r e Va l l e y GW P C l u b S p e c i a l t y Sweepstakes - Judge Ms. Rachel Romano Kelly Best In Sweepstakes AFTERHOURS REECE FLYING SOLO, SR69770001, 6/13/2011, Breeder: Christine Whitmore, Angela Johnson & Alexis Chism. By GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH - Afterhours Make A Wish . Owner: Christine Whitmore, Angela Johnson & Alexis Chism.

Best In Opposite Sweepstakes EBBTIDE LOOKOUT PAGAN, SR6993001, 6/28/2011, Breeder: G Persinger & H Huber III & H Witt & J Witt . By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH - Ch Ebbtide’s From The Ashes . Owner: Garnett Persinger.

Best In Veteran Sweepstakes CH ARIEL’S JUSTA NEW ATTITUDE CD SH, SR6993001, 6/28/2011, Breeder/Owner: Bernee Brawn & Mary Pat Ezzo By CH Side by Sides Chatanuga Choo MH x CH Ariel’s Justa Too Tuff To Tame SH CD NA .

Regular Classes - Judge Ms. Theresa L. Hundt Best of Breed CH HAWK HAVEN’S GREANDSTAND SH, SR62369106, 5/29/2010, Breeder: Pete Paduch. By GCH Mountain View National Acclaim x CH Larkspurs Dangerous Curves Ahead SH . Owner: Pete & Norma Paduch.

Best of Opposite GCH HEYWIRE ‘N HIGHFIELDS HEY LOOK ME OVER, SR61537108, 3/05/2010. Breeder: J. Cheshire, Doug Ljungren & B. Brawn. By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH. Owner: Pam & Larry Kincaid.

Select Dog NAFC DC AFC ARIELS JUSTA GOTTA GO NOW, SR17778504, 04/29/2004. Breeder: Benee Brawn. By CH Sure Shot’s Rock On JH x CH Justa Ariels Too Tuff To Tame CD SH NA. Owner: Bernee Brawn.

Winners Dog and Best of Winners EBBTIDE’S LOOKOUT GAMBLER, SR6993003, 6/28/2011, Breeder: : G Persinger & H Huber III & H Witt & J Witt . By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH - Ch Ebbtide’s From The Ashes . Owner: H. Huber III & G. Persinger.

Reserve Winners Dog AFTERHOURS REECE FLYING SOLO, SR69770001, 6/13/2011, Breeder: Christine Whitmore, Angela Johnson & Alexis Chism. By GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH - Afterhours Make A Wish . Owner: Christine Whitmore, Angela Johnson & Alexis Chism.

Winners Bitch CEDARBROOK N’ HEYWIRE’S HOW FANCY JH, SR42435108, 5/09/2007, Breeder: : Bruce Ross. By Caramel N Heywire Larkspur Latte JH x CH Heywire N Wismar Justa Fantasy JH . Owner: Donna Burgess.

Reserve Winners Bitch & Puppy Group 1 EBBTIDE LOOKOUT PAGAN, SR6993001, 6/28/2011, Breeder: : G Persinger & H Huber III & H Witt & J Witt . By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH - Ch Ebbtide’s From The Ashes . Owner: Garnett Persinger.

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Summer Splash The Delaware Valley German Wirehaired Pointer Club hosted their second annual “Summer Splash” Specialty in conjunction with the Keystone cluster of dog shows on the weekend of June 1-3, 2012. The entry of 24 GWPs came from all over the east coast, from Florida to New Hampshire and from the Midwest, as well! Other than a few late day showers, the weather Gods were kind to us for another year! We again thank Bernee Brawn, whose beautiful house was our home base. At any time, at least a dozen dogs, making new canine friends, could be found running through the house, playing in the yard or cooling off in the pool! Also, our gratitude to the new occupants of “The Farm”, Patty Busso and her entertaining husband Fabrizio, for offering to host our multiple days of hospitality in 2013. The tradition will continue! The show cluster organizers couldn’t have been more accommodating, giving us our own parking, grooming and hospitality area close to our ring. Each day brought 5-pt. majors for both dogs and bitches and several new champions (and one Grand Champion) were made over the weekend – Ch. Ebbtide Lookout Gambler (Garnett Persinger & Howard Huber III), Ch. Heywire’s Justa Casual Look JH (Lee Freis & Jennifer Jacobs), Ch. Heywire’s I Made You Look (Paul & Kathy Brown) and Grand Champion/NAFC/DC/AFC Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now (Bernee Brawn & Mary Pat Ezzo, DVM). Congratulations to all!

Winners Bitch Cedarbrook N’ Heywire’s How Fancy JH

Best of Winners CH Ebbtide’s Lookout Gambler

Best of Breed CH Hawk Haven’s Grandstand SH

Best In Sweepstakes Afterhours Reece Flying Solo

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GWPCA Wire~News Fall 2012