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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News Summer 2012

Field Issue

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

Re g u l a r Fe a t u r e s Club Business 7 President’s & Editor Message 8 Treasurer’s Report & Officers 9 Committee Chairs & Announcement 10 Delegate’s Report 51 National Rescue Standings & Special Features 43 New Titles 46 Field Top Ten 48 Conformation Top Ten 49 Obed. & Agility Top Ten 50 Purina Parent Club Partnership 52 CHIC

S p e c i a l Fe a t u r e s Articles 14 Turn Em Loose 19 The Versatile Hunting Dog Federation 23 Making of a Master Hunter 24 NAVHDA Utility 27 My Hunting Buddy 28 Hunting Partners - Early Development 32 It’s All About Tradition 35 My First Field Trial Experience 36 GWPCA Classic 38 My First Experience Training A Dog 42 Set The Bar High

On the Cover — NAFC/DC?AC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now

“Louis James”

Our thanks to all who have helped Louie become the dog he has become. Without all the great dogs in his pedigree, without all the foresight and dedication of the breeders and owners of those dogs, this dog would not exist.

Justa GWP’s Dual Champion GWP’s since 1980 w w w. g w p c a . c o m 4

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Index to Advertisers

Cover Inside 3 6 11 18

Justa GWP - Bernee Brawn Hawk Haven Wires - P. & N. Paduch Wild West - J West & R Haukoos Cascade - Ray & Lynn Calkins Justa GWP - Bernee Brawn GWP Allicance

30 & 31 41 51 Inside Back Cover

Reece Kennels - Mike & Angie Johnson SureShot & Heywire - Ljungren & Cheshire Purina Willamette GWP’s - Popescu Leslie Swisher

S u r v e y o n GW P C A N a t i o n a l s The GWPCA National events are a huge undertaking. Whether a local club or a national committee, a small number of people put in a large amount of work to make these events enjoyable for the benefit of our entire membership. Because of this and other challenges the GWPCA board is considering some changes but first we want to hear from you. Recently a National survey was distributed to the GWPCA membership via email. The deadline to complete this survey is August 1, 2012. If you did not receive this survey by email or if you do not wish to take it on-line contact Deb Finstad by phone 651.405.9308 or email finst004@umn.edu and a survey will be mailed to you. This is YOUR club, let your voice be heard.

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Pr e s i d e n t s M e s s a g e

The Theme of this message: Discussion of Change.

Many of the topics come from the membership or committees and some from the Board

of Directors. Some are new and some are old.

The SEAC submitted their minor changes involving the Sweepstakes, Show Futurity and Maturity. There has been ongoing work on the By-laws to bring them into the modern age. Some of the changes are gender related but the most significant discussion is wording to utilize the electronic advances that reduce our dependence on snail mail. We already provide an electronic roster. Last years National Packet was available via the internet. Our Judges edition of the Wire~News was sent to all AKC sporting breed judges also via the internet. There has been discussion on changing to an electronic newsletter rather than the printed version. The printing and mailing of the Wire~News is our clubs biggest expenditure. There have been requests to change the ROM program. Once again the idea of holding our Nationals at a single location rather than the historic rotation between the three regions has been discussed. Some of the ideas have been accepted and other have not. Some are still under consideration. Any changes that are made need to be beneficial to the membership. Put your thinking caps on because we will be asking for your input.

Ray Reminder: All Board Meeting minutes can be found on-line. Go to www.GWPCA.com and browse down the buttons on the left hand side and select “Meeting Minutes”

Fr o m T h e E d i t o r Three issues of the Wire~News down two more to go before my tenure as the Wire~News editor is over. If you have had even the slightest inclination to be involved in the Wire~News please contact me. I would love to discuss what it takes to be the editor of this publication. My contact information is email: angiehef@aol.com or phone 863-576-3064 This issue is our annual field issue and I will have to say has been one my favorite to put together, what is more rewarding than reading about and viewing pictures of what our dog’s do best...HUNT! The membership has been fantastic in writing articles, sending pictures and making contributions to this issue. I would like to have seen a couple more ads but am very grateful for the ones I received. Putting together a publication at this level takes a lot of work so I am asking please don’t commit to an ad unless you are positive one will be placed. Speaking of ads I had the pleasuring of putting together a few ads in this issue and I am always here to help with ideas and formatting. But there was one ad in particular I was especially honored to put together and that was for our breeds third OTCH dog. OTCH Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX2 OM3 JH. It has been about 15 years since the last GWP earned an OTCH, so I salute Gus and Leslie Swisher on accomplishing this honor. Our next issue of the Wire~News is our annual Judges Issue. Again this issue will be sent electronically to all AKC Conformation GWP and Sporting Judges but I am excited to announce that this issue will also be sent to all AKC Field Trial judges electronically as well. Because of this change I am booking up fast for advertisements. Some of the top GWP’s in both show & field have already reserved their pages. Don’t Miss Out. The deadline for the judges issue is AUGUST 15th. And this deadline is going to be set in stone so we can get this issue out before Nationals. If you need assistance with an ad or would like to reserve a page contact me as soon as possible. Warmest Regards,

Angie Johnson

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Tr e a s u r y Re p o r t & W i r e ~ N e w s C o n t r i b u t o r s Treasury Accounts (June 5, 2012)

Regular Columns & Articles

Balances $21,242.58 - General Fund $3,688.24 - Rescue Emergency Fund $1,207.73 - AllStar Fund $1,770.00 - National FT Trophy Supplement Fund $527.21 - Maturity Fund

Pat Laurans - AKC Delegates Report

Submitted by: Erika Brown

Jeff Funke - The Versatile Hunting Dog Federation

Lori Sargent - New Titles & Top Ten Lynn Sandor - Field Top Ten Diane Turner - Rescue Bernee Brawn - Turn Em Loose Charlie Kissinger - Making of a Master Hunter

New Members Sharon Began - West Chester, PA Stan Clark - Bradley, CA Mary Ann Cummings - Nassau, NY Camille Kuri - Hudson, OH Gavin & Dawn OConnor - Springfield, MO Lori Patterson - Lake Worth, FL Alice Resnick - Ottawa, FL John Sodoro - Omaha, NE

William Bastian - NAVHDA Utility Matt Solt - My Hunting Buddy Ray Calkins - Hunting Partners: Early Development Bernee Brawn - Its All About Tradition Henry Bird - My First Field Trial Experience Adam Cunningham - GWPCA Classic Belinda DeLaby - My First Experience Tom Jarnich - Set The Bar High Robin K. Nelson, DVM – CHIC Photos - Liz Dixon, Matt Solt, Bernee Brawn, Meagan Smith, Ed Shupp, Belinda DeLaby, Courtney Bastian, Tom Jarnich, Linda Krepak, Angie Johnson, Deb Darby

2 0 1 2 GW P C A B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd., Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@gmail.com Vice President Elizabeth (Liz) Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Secretary Lori Sargent, 5775 N. Chester Rd., Charlotte, MI 48813 (517) 543-3628 birddog@windsweptwires.net Treasurer Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave., Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 591-4329 geauxerika@yahoo.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 13838@windstream.net Midwest Director Chuck Casanova, 19910 Platte View Rd., Gretna, NE 68028 (402) 691-9498 clc51@hotmail.com Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com 8

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Committee Chairs & National Announcement Committees Breeder Referral - Bernee Brawn - justagwp@verizon.net Bylaws - Mark Sargent - birddog@windsweptwires.net Canine Health (CHIC) - Robin Nelson - gwpoint@aol.com Delegate to the AKC - Patricia Laurans - plaurans@earthlink.net Field Advisory Committee - Elizabeth Dixon - bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Futurity (Field) - Tom Lococo - tom.lococo@novartis.com Futurity (Show) - Laura Myles - invernesskennels@frontier.com Judges Education - Judy Cheshire - heywiregwp@gmail.com National Events Coordinator - Laura Reeves - scotiadawgs@gmail.com 2012 Nationals - Diane Marsh - fdmarsh@comcast.net 2013 Nationals - Rhonda Haukoos - brillowkennels@iowatelecom.net Maturity (Show) - Audrey Meinke - fairwindxx@sbcglobal.net Membership & Wire News Mailing-Erika Brown - geauxerika@yahoo.com

Rescue - Diane Turner - dturner596@aol.com ROM - Sean Perry - aspendel@aol.com Show Advisory - Judy Cheshire - heywiregwp@gmail.com Top Ten Field - Lynn Sandor - sandorcpa@comcast.net Top Ten Other - Lori Sargent - birddog@windsweptwires.net Trophies - Sue Degraw - schnellberg@comcast.net Versatility - Greg DuBois - grgdubois@comcast.net Wire~News Editor - Angie Johnson - angiehef@aol.com Wire~Mail Editor - Angie Johnson - angiehef@aol.com Web Master - Angie Johnson - angiehef@aol.com

Pr e m i u m s Fo r 2 0 1 2 N a t i o n a l E v e n t s In our ongoing effort to make the GWPCA a more cost-efficient organization, the Board of Directors has agreed to make ALL GWPCA National Premium Lists available electronically. Premium lists and all general information will be emailed directly to each member and made easily accessible on the GWPCA website. Members who would like to request a hard copy be mailed to them should email the Show Secretary, Robert Rein at fouroaksfarms@yahoo.com and provide name and mailing address to receive the hard copy. Links and reminders will be printed in the Wire~News but a “National Packet” will NOT be mass mailed. If you have any questions, feel free to contact any member of the GWPCA Board of Directors, the Show Secretary or National Events Coordinator, Laura Reeves at Scotiadawgs@gmail.com. www.GWPCA.com/Nationals.html ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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D E L E G AT E ’ S R E P O RT

AKC Delegate’s Report By Pat Laurans

I recently received the following letter from the AKC Chairman of the Board pertaining to an AKC petition in response to the USDA proposed regulations towards the small breeeder. I hope that will join me in signing this petition. Dear Pat As many of you have just heard during my remarks to the Delegate body, we have an opportunity to act quickly, together, to have our voice heard in Washington to support responsible breeders. As an important part of the AKC — in your role as Delegate — I ask you to please sign the petition today and help us spread the word about this important issue facing us all. Join us in supporting responsible breeders and giving the American public access to acquiring happy, healthy puppies. The American Kennel Club has created the “Join With the AKC to Protect Responsible Small Breeders” petition in response to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) new proposed regulations which would create harsh and unintended consequences for responsible small and hobby breeders in this country. Under the proposed regulations, breeders or others who sell a puppy sight unseen, by any means including online, by mail or by telephone, would now be regulated in accordance with USDA standards, if you own more than four “breeding females” of any of the listed species, including dogs and cats. The effect of these proposed regulations would be to take away the public’s opportunity to obtain puppies from those breeders, who in many cases have dedicated their lives to breeding for health, breed type and temperament. Please join us by signing the “Join With the AKC to Protect Responsible Small Breeders” petition before July 16 when the public comment period to the Animal Care Division of the USDA’s Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service ends. The petition, along with AKC’s comments on the proposed rule change, will be sent to the USDA. How to Sign: 1. Visit www.akc.org/petition and click “Sign Here Now!” 2. Read through Join With the AKC to Protect Responsible Small Breeders and click the blue box titled “Sign the Petition.” 3. Complete the required fields — name, email, city and state. You can also leave a comment if you wish. We recommend you check the “Signature Display” box so that your name is displayed rather than an anonymous signature. 4. After filling out those fields, click the blue “Sign” button. 5. Once you are finished you’ll have the option to share the petition via email, Facebook, Twitter and your blog. Please take a moment to share it with your fellow fanciers, club members, and friends who support responsible breeders.

Thank you for your support. Please forward this email to your fellow fanciers, club members and friends who support responsible breeders. If you have any questions or comments regarding the petition or the proposed rule change, please contact our Government Relations Department at 919-816-3720 or doglaw@akc.org. Sincerely, Alan Kalter Chairman of the Board American Kennel Club 10

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POINTING BREED FIELD TRIALS

Turn Em Loose! By Bernee Brawn

Pointing breed field trials are a competitive event used to find the top notch bird dogs in the country. There are several venues for competitive trials, from AKC to NSTRA (National Shoot to Retrieve), ABH (American Bird Hunters) and AF (American Field). Each has its own set of rules and traditions, each has its followers, but they all have the same goal- find out whose dog has what it takes to beat all the others! Just like most of the rest of our dog games, for the most part no money changes hands at a field trial, no one gets rich, but everyone has a chance for bragging rights!  

GWP’s and Field Trials From the first days of GWP involvement with the AKC, they have successfully competed in field trials. The Haar Baron line of Wires were very successful on the mid-west trial circuit. Can you imagine the pointer boys watching the first Wire walk to the line back in the late 1950’s? I imagine they were all scratching their heads wondering what the heck is that scruffy, short tailed dog? And what was he doing here? The Faestel HaarBaron dogs showed them in short order that while they may indeed be scruffy…. They were not to be laughed at! Over my 30 yrs. of running GWP’s in AKC and AF pointing breed trials I’ve about heard every description possible…. “Looks like a GSP on steroids”, “Hey, a hippie shorthair”, “That dog get hooked up with an electric socket?”…… turn em loose gentlemen, just turn em loose! Our breed has nothing to be embarrassed about – just cause they aren’t all slick, shiny and pretty….. 14

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they have a great knack for finding their fair share of birds, keeping in touch with their handlers, and are super retrievers! We take home our fair share of blue ribbons from coast to coast. Some GWP fanciers don’t believe our breed should be horseback trial dogs. I could never figure this out, mainly because I know how smart this breed is! They know the difference between you on foot toting a shotgun, and you on a horse asking them to lay down a fast and far run. Most every field trial Champion I know is hunted by their owners from the western chuckar hills to the tight woods of the northeast for grouse. Smart dogs can and will do that! If you like to watch dogs of all breeds doing what they were bred to do, if you like being outside talking dogs, if you ever wanted a brag dog, then AKC pointing breed field trials may be just the right thing for you. So what is a field trial, what is a Gun Dog stake and how in the heck do they pick the winners? There are stakes for all ages, training stages and breeds- in AKC there are the following stakes available. Puppy- 6 mos. - 15 mos. - looking for potential Derby- 6 mos. - 2 yrs. old- must find & point game Gun Dog- 6 mos. and up- must be totally steady to wing, shot, and fall. All Age- 6 mos. and up – where the big boys run From the AKC Field Trial rule book: A Gun Dog must give a finished performance and must be under its handler’s control at all times. It must handle kindly, with a minimum of noise and hacking by the handler. A Gun Dog must show a keen desire to hunt, must have a bold and attractive style of running, and must demonstrate


POINTING BREED FIELD TRIALS not only intelligence in quartering and in seeking objectives. It must also have the ability to find game. The dog must hunt for its handler at all times at a range that is dependent on whether the handler is on horseback or on foot and should show or check in front of its handler frequently. It must cover adequate ground but never range out of sight for a length of time that would detract from its usefulness as a practical hunting dog. The dog must locate game, must point staunchly, and must be steady to wing and shot. Intelligent use of the wind and terrain in locating game, accurate nose, and style and intensity on point are essential. A dog that does not point cannot be placed. A dog should not be called back to point after the running of its brace except under the most extreme and unusual circumstances.

The Judges Dilemma Close your eyes and picture the perfect 30 minute gun dog performance. Can you see it, the dog that runs swift, happy and uses the wind and terrain all in his quest to find birds? He barely put a foot down wrong! He points his birds with style and commands your attention; there is no question about what he is doing. Now rerun that perfect performance twenty times and separate the performances with plusses and minuses. (He did this when he might have done that sort of thing.) Of those 20 dogs, 15 of them may go out and never make a mistake. Each dog may have multiple finds, all handled with good manners. Each might use the wind correctly, work the cover well, handle like a dream and complete their time still going strong. The other 5 dogs will not be under consideration because of some breach of manners. OK judge, pick your top 4 dogs! How do you separate this performance from that one? What makes this more important than that? Will you be a positive judge and look for the things the dogs did right, or a negative judge and hope they crash and burn to make your decision easier? There are judges who are just looking for the dog to make a mistake, one small step, a too slow stop to flush, a exuberant turn to mark. “Thank You handler”… words no trialer wants to hear before his time is up. But sometimes, that could be the difference between the blue ribbon and red.

I asked these questions to some knowledgeable GWP field trailers from across the country. Even though each have very different types of dogs, each lives in very different area of the country and their time in the sport is varied, I was very surprised how similar their answers were.

Our Panel Ray Calkins- Ray competed in his first trial in 1975, he walked and came home with a red ribbon. Tony McGrane- Started trialing in the late’90s, but didn’t get serious until 2002. Tony’s dog trainer always told him that his “meat dogs” were good enough to place in wirehair trials, so I started looking for a wirehair that could WIN shorthair trials. Penny Ljungren- Started in 1976 when she got her first GWP.  She went to a trial and won the puppy and it was all over.   Rhonda Haukoos- After wrangling for the 1989 GWPCA Nationals MN, she obtained her first GWP in 1990. After attending her first GWPCA Nationals and placing twice, she was hooked. Jim West -A professional trainer of all pointing breeds. Question - Is there one most important thing you look for when judging a gun dog stake?  Is there anything you really dislike?

Tony- The most important thing I look for in any bird dog is the intense desire to find and point birds. I hate to see a dog root around in a birdy piece of cover before it points, flushes, or decides that there is no bird.  Ray- One thing I really like in a Gun Dog is a dog that instinctively knows where to go to find birds and uses the wind appropriately. Things I hate-loud

Would you be able to judge the whole dog, or the hole in the dog?

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POINTING BREED FIELD TRIALS and constant hacking by a handler and out-riding by the scout to move the dog forward. Jim- Application is the first thing I look for. (i.e. proper use of the wind) I despise a dog that comes in from behind. Penny- The obvious and easiest to see is nice style on point and a fast and pleasing way of going.  I like to see a dog that knows his job and is happy and enthusiastic to do it. I don’t think there is any one thing I look for.  It is the best balance of all elements in any given stake. For me personally I find barking very annoying. A little off the line I can forgive but more than that is very distracting. Rhonda- Application is the most important, a dog may look pretty going down a particular line; but if it is on the wrong side of the wind it isn’t pretty anymore! A dog coming in from behind, multiple times, annoys me, too. Sometimes there is a legitimate reason, and some common sense has to be exercised in determining how far “from behind” the dog actually came. If it happens multiple times…ouch. Question - In a Gun Dog stake what importance do you give bird work over run? And does one have more weight over the other when it comes to placements? Tony- The first thing I look for is how a dog applies itself to the course.  A savvy bird dog is going to use the wind, cover, and terrain to its advantage in finding birds while hunting in front of the handler.  I choose the dog with the best overall performance when considering placements.

Tony- A “classy” bird dog is one that excites constant admiration for its cheerful, yet polished manner in hunting, finding, and handling birds. Ray- Some think that class is a Pointer or Setter with head high and tail at twelve o-clock- if they look bored or are doing a Stevie Wonder--it LACKS class.  To me, class has a broader definition.  A class dog is a determined hunter moving in an intelligent animated forward pattern requiring minimal handling.  The point is intense, nostrils flaring to the scent and the eyes like lasers that direct the handler to the birds.  Tail may depend on how he hit the scent and the terrain--10 is just as good as 12. Jim- Classy is how they get across the ground animation, snap, crack, pop Rhonda- I like an animated gait that gets my attention. In addition, I like to see a dog that is intense on point. Of course, a high head and tail looks good, but some dogs have physical traits that don’t allow. Penny- I guess the obvious is nice style on point and a fast and pleasing way of going.   Question - What is the simplest way to explain the difference between an all age performance, and a gun dog performance?  Tony- An All Age dog hunts the country, a Gun Dog hunts the cover. Jim - You hunt with an All Age dog, a Gun Dog hunts with you.

Penny- Here again it is a balance and the overall picture the performance gives us.

Penny - All age range further in search of game and may check in less often but still needs to handle.

Jim- Application first, then bird work. Not too worried about range. The dogs need to handle and have all of their manners intact. These are the criteria and the order in which I rank their importance when looking at the “big picture”.

Ray- A gun dog has a more thorough search of the grounds but still in a fast and attractive manner. An all age dog searches the major objectives, his range is a bit more extreme but he is never “lost”.

Ray- Bird work and run--50/50.  The “run” has to be an intelligent application to the grounds.  Run for runs sake is not what I am looking for. Question - We always talk about “class” in bird dogs, what makes a dog “classy”? 

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Question - Many of our GWP owners are involved in the non competitive events (HT’s/ NAVHDA), do you believe competition (FT’s) made/makes our breed better, no different, or worse? Tony- Any venue that puts a dog in front of a judge is good for a breed. In field trial competition, the best bird dogs rise to the top and are brought to the


POINTING BREED FIELD TRIALS attention of dog breeders, competitors, and puppy buyers. Jim- Competition makes the world better, so of course it has helped. America was built on competition and our breed can benefit from competition. Rhonda- Let me preface by stating that I think any venue that anyone participates in helps that dog, these dogs need a job and the bond created with your dog when you play any of these games is hard to beat. I do believe that the competitive venues help make the breed better. The top reason, for me, is that competing in all breed field trials lets me see what I am up against in the Sporting Group as a whole. I am not limiting myself to just the wirehairs. I can’t, really, because so few of them compete in field trials. But it gives me an opportunity to be sure that I have enough bird dog, stamina, and class. Ray - I believe it has minimal impact on the breed as a whole. All events that increase training and working with GWPs are beneficial.  The negative to competition is genetically changing the breed just to win a trial.  The positive is showcasing the best of the breed for all to see and use in breeding programs. Penny- Although I like to run in the AKC field trials myself I truly believe that anything you do with your dog is a plus.  It builds the bond between you and your dog and hopefully makes him a better hunting companion. Question - How would you suggest anyone interested in the sport of field trialing with their GWP get started? Jim- Enter a dog and run it.....there are always folks willing to help (and criticize). It is simple, get involved. Ask questions. Watch as much as you can. Rhonda- I think most field trialers I know would be more than willing to answer any questions that a new person had. I try to take folks “under my wing” and help them thru the process. If an interested party found a trial near them, they could call the trial secretary or a committee member to express their interest, and those folks could probably lead them to a person that can help them.  OR just show up at the event and start talking to people. Most participants know that the sport needs new

blood and will welcome new people with open arms. (With that said, it maybe easier to get a “sit down visit” towards the end of the day, when the event is winding down for the day.) Tony- The best way for new people to learn about trialing is by finding a successful field trialer that is willing to mentor them. Penny- Go to a trial.  It is helpful if you have a mentor to show you the ropes and introduce you around. Ray - Start with walking trials unless you are already “horsey”.  Watch and follow braces--not in a lawn chair beside a bird field.  Find a mentor. Question - Why do you judge? Ray- Knowledgeable trialers who have been in the sport need to give back.  Judging gives you a broader understanding of the sport and this is when you really learn. Tony- I started judging field trials because I wanted to become a better field trialer.  By watching the best dogs and handlers, I was able to see how they reacted to the variety of situations that can occur while competing.  I was also able to learn by the mistakes of other handlers. Rhonda- I judge as a way to give back to the sport that I take so much from. If you would like to learn more about pointing breed field trials go to www.AKC.org & Rules and Regulations  We hope to see you and your GWP at a trial one day! Come join us.

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VHDF

The Versatile Hunting Dog Federation By Jeff Funke

The Versatile Hunting Dog Federation (VHDF) was established December of 2007 with the help of long time versatile hunting dog enthusiasts including Sigbot Winterhelt, Josef Schmutz, Ed Bailey, and myself. VHDF held their first hunting dog evaluations in the spring of 2008 and currently has active affiliates in Washington, Idaho, Montana, Minnesota, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Saskatoon. VHDF’s mission is to promote ethical hunting practices and conservation of game animals by enhancing the quality and ability of versatile hunting dogs through breeder and handler education, performance based testing, and by facilitating continuing education and information exchange regarding health and genetics. The primary path taken to accomplish our mission is by conducting field tests designed to evaluate versatile hunting qualities of breeds registered by any recognized registry or studbook. VHDF is an all-breed testing organization that exists to serve breed clubs, breeders, individual owners and the dogs themselves by providing a fair, comprehensive testing system. Breed standards, registration, registry and other such matters are the sole responsibility of individuals or breed clubs and not the responsibility of VHDF. Summary of VHDF Testing VHDF tests are noncompetitive. Dogs are evaluated against a set standard specifically designed around the collective values of North American hunters and their dogs. These evaluations are designed as a tool for the hunter and breeder to evaluate natural ability and trainability in a public forum. The test results are public record and are useful to breeders for future breeding decisions. The results also tell owners what areas they should emphasize in future training for an all-around and capable hunting dog. VHDF field judges are now trained internally through our rigorous apprentice program. The initial VHDF field judges came from a combination of North American and European hunt test programs as well as field trial judges.

The VHDF testing and evaluation program is divided into three distinct categories: (1) aptitude evaluation, (2) performance evaluation and (3) conformation evaluation. Aptitude testing or evaluating the dog’s natural hunting aptitudes refers to an evaluation of the natural ability or capacity of the dog in any one of a number of hunting related subjects that are considered to be inherited. Aptitude testing is particularly important for versatile dogs given the nature of such dogs and the large number of different and sometimes conflicting hunting related aptitudes they are expected to possess. VHDF offers two levels of aptitude testing. The first level, the Hunting Aptitude Evaluation (HAE), is designed to record the level of hunting aptitude in the young dog up to approximately 1.5 years old; however, there are no age requirements. At this age, the dog should have been exposed to game but not seriously trained and thus still exhibit semi-natural aptitude. During the HAE, each dog is evaluated in the aptitudes of Nose, Search, Pointing, Tracking, Water, as well as having Desire and Cooperation evaluated during each of the specific test subjects. The second level of aptitude testing is the

Advanced Hunting Aptitude Evaluation (AHAE)

and it is designed for the young dog beyond puppy stage that is fully developed mentally and physically. The abilities of the dog at this level should have been further enhanced through training, therefore giving one a very reliable and detailed evaluation. This level of detailed evaluation is very useful as the primary tool for the hunter and breeder to evaluate natural ability and trainability of individual dogs as well as entire litters. During the AHAE, each dog is evaluated for the aptitudes of Nose, Search, Pointing, and Search behind a duck (which combines tracking and water) as well as having Desire and Cooperation evaluated during each of the specific test subjects. Further, each dog is tested in the trained subjects of Steadiness on Game, Retrieving on Land and in Water, Blind Water Entry, and Retrieve by Drag, as well having Obedience evaluated during each of the specific trained test subjects. The AHAE test has been long awaited by many top breeders because it is one of the few events that evaluates the dogs’ natural talents and trainability at a more ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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VHDF rigorous and useful level than just a puppy test; yet allows for a dog that has not been completely finished and thus able to possibly mask inherited faults. This makes the AHAE test useful as both a progeny test and an individual dog test. VHDF believes that Breeders and Breed Clubs are responsible for selecting the future path of their breeds as opposed to the natural selection that occurs in nature. Selection for a dog breeder is the task of choosing the individual animals that will best carry the future of the breed. This task is both art and science. By using some science based on VHDF estimates of hunting aptitudes, breed clubs and breeders may improve their odds of choosing the best individuals that not only produce the most talented offspring, but those with the least number of defects. VHDF aptitude testing is particularly useful in selective breeding programs that utilize progeny testing to determine the genetic value of a parent or a set of parents. Progeny testing involves inspecting groups of offspring from specific parents. Whereas individual breeders rely mostly on individual selection, breed clubs and groups of breeders are able to pool their resources and utilize progeny testing. In this case, if entire litters of offspring from related parents or groups of offspring from particular sires show above average aptitude in the natural ability subjects, one can reasonably conclude that these parents are genetically valuable because of the quality of their offspring. Performance testing seeks to identify dogs that are fully capable at all levels of work before and after the shot, on land and water, by themselves or in a brace. Performance testing identifies dogs that not only have the necessary hunting aptitudes, but gives further insight into temperament and tractability. Therefore, dogs must complete significant training in order to accomplish the required tasks. The VHDF Performance Evaluation (PE) is designed to evaluate the fully finished versatile dog. The PE is the highest level of competency for dogs within the VHDF system. The Performance test should serve as the definitive evaluation for hunters and breeders who seek to test their dog’s ability as well as their own training skills at the highest level. During the PE, each dog is evaluated in the aptitudes of Nose, Search, Pointing, Search Behind a Duck, Water Search Without a Duck, and Backing or honoring a bracemate’s point. Further, each dog is tested in the trained subjects of Blind 20

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Water Retrieve, Steadiness on Game, Retrieving by Land, Water, and Drag, as well as having Desire, Cooperation, and Obedience evaluated throughout the entire test. While the inherited aptitudes are still evaluated in the PE, the main focus is on the overall performance of the dog handler team to accomplish the task at hand; such as remaining steady through the fall or recovering a duck on the blind retrieve. VHDF considers the PE to be the most valuable test for individual breeders to utilize for individual selection since it incorporates all the aptitudes, as well as gives insight into temperament and trainability. In addition, hunters and trainers seeking to measure their training methods and suitability of their dog as a reliable and competent hunter before the shot, after the shot and in the company of a companion’s dog will find the PE to be a useful evaluation. The final component of the VHDF testing program is the Confirmation and Structure Evaluation (CSE). The CSE is a detailed evaluation of every part of the dog from head to toe with a major


VHDF emphasis on proper structure and movement in the field. Coat quality is also evaluated in detail. The CSE is not designed to compete with or supersede breed shows offered by breed clubs, as we cannot offer the level of detail that the specific breed specialist judges can. What we do offer is information for the individual breeder that otherwise has no access to such knowledge. VHDF believes in the “Total Dog” concept and encourages their members to pay equal attention to performance, structure, temperament and health. This program was developed by combining the attributes of the AKC conformation programs with the more detailed evaluations conducted by European breed clubs. As such, many VHDF CSE judges are conformation judges certified by AKC or their European counterparts. VHDF Scoring System The VHDF scoring system is referred to as a 10 point plus system. Under relatively normal conditions, dogs are scored from 0 to 10 in each subject, with a 10 being roughly equal to a 100 percent performance. A 100 percent performance means that nothing else is expected at that level in that subject and there is little to no room for improvement. Likewise, a 5 is roughly equal to a 50 percent performance, meaning the dog did half of the work expected or showed half of the ability that experience tells us is possible. The scores of 11 and 12 are reserved for performances that exceed the expectations of the judges, and in the case of the 12 overcame difficult conditions as well. The VHDF scoring system is designed to leave plenty of room at the top end to recognize truly exceptional dogs and performances when they occur. In many venues, an average dog can earn the highest possible score. In this respect, the goal of VHDF is to do the best job possible of identify the truly above average dogs as opposed to merely offering a passing score or the opportunity to earn a title if the dog meets the minimums.

In the Hunting Aptitude Evaluation (HAE), all subjects are scored with a numerical weighting factor of one. This is for simplicity so that individuals and breed clubs may easily interpret the numbers for their own purposes. While we as individuals may value certain characteristics more than others, i.e. some say desire is more important than cooperation, we have refrained from placing arbitrary numerical weighting factors on the individual subjects. After all, if a dog is deficient in any one of the inherited aptitudes considered to be useful for versatile hunting dogs, he is not a good prospect as a truly versatile hunting companion. In the Advanced Hunting Aptitude Evaluation (AHAE) and in the Performance Evaluation (PE) where more training is required the scoring is divided into trained subjects and natural ability subjects. The trained subjects have a numerical weighting factor of one while the natural ability subjects have a numerical weighting factor of two. Training tends to have more variables than aptitude and therefore less genetic importance, but it should not be overlooked entirely. Ultimately, the purpose of the VHDF 10 point plus system is to provide detailed, meaningful and consistent information. The Versatile Hunting Dog Federation does not award first, second and third place; nor prizes; nor trophies and ribbons. The level of detail provided by the 10 point plus system allows breeders to increase the selection pressure for particular traits that they seek, as well as for the overall quality of their breed. A Few VHDF FAQ’s Since VHDF is a new organization with some new ideas we tend to get a few questions on a regular basis. Here are my answers to some of those questions.

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VHDF Q: Why is VHDF needed when there are already a number of other similar organizations? A: While it is true that there are similarities between VHDF and existing clubs we feel that none are as inclusive, detailed, and flexible. VHDF allows all breeds and all registries, whereas some testing groups exclude purebred dogs based on their registry. VHDF also includes conformation and water and tracking work for the truly versatile hunter. Finally, the VHDF scoring system provides a high level of detail which is useful for breeders and breed clubs to select parents with the highest genetic value. VHDF feels their scoring system does the best job of identifying the above average progeny and individuals as opposed to systems that mostly identify the below average performers. This is somewhat similar to the way the competitive field trial system identifies the above average performers in the breed overtime vs. a hunt test that clearly identifies competency, but may or may not identify above average performers. The VHDF scoring system cannot only certify competency at given tasks and as a whole, but by having a 10 point plus system with the 11 and 12 given for exceptional performances they can identify the very uppermost performers. Q: Why are there no titles or at least a passing score? I am not sure how well my dog performed? A: VHDF is a highly competitive organization consisting of very dedicated breeders, hunters, and versatile dog fanciers. Except for the PE field evaluation, all the tasks are run with the dog as an individual in a non-competitive environment. VHDF celebrates all dog organizations that are committed to improving their breed, competitive or not. VHDF chooses to eliminate titles and pass fail cutoffs for several reasons. First, not all breeds are at the same level of ability. Some gene pools are currently very small and have little breeding stock to choose from. Given that fact, we feel we do not

have the knowledge to dictate to breed clubs how old a dog needs to be, what total score is needed to pass, or which of the hunting aptitudes are most important for their breed and therefore carries the highest weight and has the greatest impact on the final score. Second, VHDF seeks to merely provide data and avoid the politics of earning titles. The awarding of a title would be an arbitrary cutoff that may be useful as a benchmark, but again tends to take the focus off of the very best performers and put it back on the title benchmark itself. The scoring system is very simple to interpret. In the HAE for example, the dog is tested in 7 hunting aptitudes and the scoring is from 1 to 10 with 10 being a 100 percent performance. A score of 70 means that the dog obtained full performance in all categories. Likewise, it is important to look at the score in individual categories so that such information may be used to improve a breeding program’s weakest areas by seeking lines of dogs that consistently perform near full performance in those areas. Participants are provided a detailed certificate of evaluation for their dog and the results are posted online. Q: I don’t see a VHDF affiliate in my area and I would like to participate in a VHDF event. What should I do? A: VHDF currently has 9 affiliates mostly in the West and Midwestern US. VHDF would like to offer more opportunities for our members throughout the US and Canada. To start a new affiliate group is easy to do and has minimal requirements in terms of cost or infrastructure. Existing dog clubs, groups, or individuals for that matter need not form a separate sub-chapter of VHDF. All one needs to do is pay an annual affiliation fee of $150 and pay a set fee of $450 per 3 person judging team for each weekend of testing. The first test is offered at no cost so clubs can try out the VHDF format with minimal investment.

For more information on the Versatile Hunting Dog Federation, please visit our website at www.vhdf.org

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THE MAKING OF A MASTER HUNTER

The Making of a Master Hunter By Charlie Kissinger

Where does one start, I guess you would say at the very beginning. The best time would be as a puppy when their minds are absorbing everything they can, and this is not just for master hunter. It is for all venues of field training. If you are going to do the hunt tests, there is nothing wrong with doing Junior’s it can be a great experience for the dog and you as a handler. When training for the JH always keep in mind your next step will be the SH and then MH.. You should work on the backing (honoring) with your dog when you are training for the JH at that young age, this will be your big step to the SH & MH titles. The Training for the Master Hunter Title will be a time consuming project and you will have to give it the dedication it deserves. Using the senior hunter test as a training tool for the master hunter title is a smart way to go, unless you have a lot of different people and dogs to train with on different kinds of grounds. You should train under different weather conditions also, rain, sunny & hot etc. Some tests will have with a back coarse and a bird field and some will be on a continuous coarse, this means all birds pointed will be shot and retrieved and your brace mate’s dog will be required to honor if acknowledged . The MH dog must be completely steady to wing, shot and fall with minimal light commands, this means the dog cannot move for the retrieve until sent. This is where doing the SH test becomes a training and learning session, you can give commands to your dog in SH.

Hunting: This is an area that can make handlers unhappy and judges enemy’s. In this portion of the test a judge must determine if a dog

is hunting or just running a path, or keying off the handler (handler leading dog). Judges must also understand the different running styles of different breeds. At this level a MH dog must be hunting looking for objectives and searching the cover at a reasonable range. What is a reasonable range: I would have to say for a pointing dog in medium cover no closer than 30 to 40 yards and searching (not just out in front of handler). Again this is why it is important to run dogs in different cover. Some dogs will tighten their range when put on strange grounds.

Bird Finding: This is another one,

finding a bird depends a lot on how they are planted, how good the dogs nose is and scenting conditions are (hot weather and dogs panting hard, are the birds in heavy green cover, no wind blowing) these all make a difference. But your dog must find at least one bird to pass

Pointing: a MH must be steady to

wing shot and fall with only a very light whoa command. A dog with more prey drive might be a little more difficult to steady, but will give you more drive when it comes to the retrieve and search. This also pertains to the stop to a wild flush, and a MH dog must stop on their own, without a command. This can be started by simply throwing a dummy, a ball or even a hat into the air when the dog is moving and then whoaing the dog. Then progress to birds.

Trainability: This is an area that

should let you know where you are (or the dog is) in his training. For example if your dog goes on point, looks great then breaks when you flush the bird his pointing score could be good but he would be marked down in trainability. If the

dog is hunting well but dose not listen he would be hit it trainability. This works throughout the test. Also throughout the test your dog must be healed away from any circumstance that occurs, an honor, birds wet and running around not flying, an honor to retrieve etc.

Retrieving: on the MH the retrieve must be to hand. The dog can put the bird down to reposition it but should not take it’s mouth off of it, and this should be only to a minimal, depending on weather like real hot and humid, and bird condition. You can only give the dog one command to retrieve you may give him a good boy on his way back, all commands and praise should be low keyed. Honoring: (backing) can also be a

bit of work, some dogs if you’re lucky will back anything. And then you have the dogs that just want to run and find their own birds, they are the harder ones to train for backing. Again you need to train with all breeds in all kinds of cover. Some dogs will not want to back a Brittany or a dark dog. The Vizala in the fall in certain cover can be very difficult to see just as a dark dog it the woods or under some cover can be. Again you will need different dogs to work with or some different backing dog silhouettes, with either you will need something to fly out from in front of the pointing dog when in training. A MH must also honor to retrieve at least once, and you cannot touch your dog throughout the retrieve. Yes it takes a lot but at the end you will have a finished gun dog that you can be proud of and hunt with and say I did this. If you are going to pursue the MH then my advice would be to go to some hunt tests and walk the braces and watch what they are doing and looking for. Taking notes is not a bad idea.

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N AV H D A - U T

NAVHDA Utility - “Versatile Test for the Versatile Dog!” By William Bastian, Claddagh GWP’s

In 1969, NAVHDA established a system of comprehensive tests that truly measure all aspects of work for the versatile hunting dog breeds. The trialing systems in use in North America before this time were established for specialists. The NAVHDA system provides for testing at various stages of maturity. Tests are conducted in an environment which reflects actual hunting conditions and situations. It tests the most important qualities of a good versatile dog. The Utility Test is designed to test the finished hunting dog, and its usefulness to the on-foot hunter in all phases of hunting both before and after the shot, in field and marsh, and on different species of game. During the entire Utility Test, the dog is scored on use of nose, desire, stamina, cooperation and obedience. There are 5 portions of the test: Field Work The dog is hunted for a minimum of 30 min. and is required to search for, find and point game and to retrieve shot birds to hand. It is expected to be steady to wing, shot and fall. Duck Drag It is required to track and retrieve a 100-200 yard drag that has one bend in the course. The dog should be able to complete the track and retrieve duck to hand on its own, without any influence from the handler. Duck Search This portion involves a blind search for a live duck in a pond or marsh with at least 1 acre of heavy vegetation cover for a minimum of 10 minutes. The dog is released after a single gun shot with no visual mark. This test displays a dog’s ability to work independently with confidence. They are judged on their use of nose, desire, perseverance, intelligence and sense of cooperation. This is my personal favorite portion of the entire test, there’s nothing like watching a dog put on an awesome search!

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Walk at Heel A practical obedience test where the dog has to remain at heel, either on loose lead or no lead, through a 35 - 40 yard zigzag course. No commands or corrections are allowed. This is done next to a blind on the shore, where the dog has to display calmness, cooperation, and obedience with the distraction of water and duck decoys beside them. Remain and Steadiness by Blind This is a test of obedience, control, and calmness in the presence of gunfire when the handler is out of sight. Dog must remain quietly in a blind with 6-10 decoys out front, while handler fires two shotgun rounds. After the handler returns to the blind, the dog must remain steady through a sequence of shots and then retrieve a thrown duck from the water. The UT Test is challenging and demanding. It’s designated for more experienced dogs in an advanced state of training. It evaluates their ability to perform as reliable versatile gun dogs, and demonstrates their physical and mental capability to take training. The test itself, makes for a long day for both dog and handler, but the experience and bond you build with your dog through this training and testing regimen is extremely rewarding. The NAVHDA registry was originally dominated by GWP’s, “the ultimate versatile breed”. Unfortunately, now they have become a minority in the system. To date, our breed has only one CH/ VC, and merely ten CH/UT Prize I’s. Have we bred away from versatile abilities for the close working gun dog, for which this breed was originated? Or are breeders/owners just not interested in training and testing for those abilities? If you are up to the challenge, I urge you to give it a try! For more information, and to locate your nearest NAVHDA Chapter go to: www.navhda.org


NAVHDA Utility In Pictures

N AV H D A - U T

Blind Duck Search in Heavy Vegetation

Field Portion- 30 minutes in terrain known to contain game, dog must be steady to flush, wing, shot and fall.

Duck search - minimum of 10 minutes displaying ability to locate wounded waterfowl.

Duck Drag – 100 to 200 yd drag to display cooperation and obedience without any direct influence of handler.

Walking at Heel – Practical obedience test heeling between 10 pairs of zigzag staked course with loose or no lead.

Remain & Steadiness by Blind - Shows calmness and control around gunfire without handler present, then 75 yard retrieve of marked duck directly to hand. ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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N AV H D A V E R S AT I L E C H A M P I O N S

NAVHDA GWP Versatile Champions 1988 to 2011 1988 (23 dogs tested, 5 passed, 4 were GWP’s) 80%* VC RIKO V D WISSOWER KLINKEN VC HARROLD VOM DUNNHOF VC JAEGERMEISTER NICHOLAS VC WINDY RIDGE NIKA

DAVID WOLLIN D. KLINKHAMMER GREGORY J WENTZ JAMES L MORRISON

1990 (16 dogs tested, 8 passed, 5 were GWP’s) 63%* VC BIRKO VON WEIDEBACH VC CLINT VOM FASANENTAL VC WINDY RIDGE NIKA VC FAX VOM HEDGE ROW

JOSEPH & KAYE DOLEJSI HERMANN HEYDLAUF JAMES L MORRISON JOSEPH K DOLEJSI

VC RIDGE HUNTER'S MISS GINGER

MICHAEL L GARRIOTT

1994 (23 dogs tested, 6 passed, 3 were GWP’s) 50%* VC KAISER DER JAGD VC SAGEPOINTS SILVER STREAK VC THREE DEVILS CHUKAR

DAVID S CARLSON JEFF FUNKE GREG GROSSKLAUS

1996 (31 dogs tested, 10 passed, 3 were GWP’s) 30%* VC MORGAN'S BARBIE GREGORY J WENTZ VC SOUTH PAW'S BENTLEY TROY D BERRYMAN VC VOM GRAFENAUER LUDWIG GEIST SCOTT KRUEGER

1998 (60 dogs tested, 21 passed, 6 were GWP’s) 29% VC KETTLE CREEK'S OLLA VC NITRO PROOF TYLER VC SHARPE'S CREEK'S ASPEN VC ASPEN RUN'S BELLE VC THREE DEVILS HARLEY VC KETTLE CREEK'S MOE

JEFF SOWERBY ROBERT R WARNER III JEFF SOWERBY JAMES L MORRISON JIM FENNER JOHN & C. CROZIER

2000 (100 dogs tested, 31 passed, 5 were GWP’s) 16% VC THUNDERHILL'S ECHO VC SHARPE'S CREEK'S ARLEY VC THUNDERHILLS MR ZIG ZAG VC ANNA VOM STUTH VC BIANCA VOM GOTTESACKER

JEFFREY R PAULUS JOHN E CROZIER JR JEFFREY R PAULUS SCOTT P THOME PAT ALLOWAY

2002 (116 dogs tested, 44 passed, 9 were GWP’s) VC KEN VOSPET LAMANTIA & ATHENS VC THREE DEVILS MAGNUM B DORUMSGAARD VC BACHMAN BAY ANJA MICHAEL BOWMAN VC SHARPE'S CREEK'S ANGUS RICHARD J SKEUSE VC ADEL VOM HORAN'S BAUERNHOF J. CROZIER JR VC BARBWIRE'S BRISCO RICHARD B SCHULTZ VC ROOSTER RIDGE'S BLAZE RON K OAKLEAF VC ALICE VOM RAINMAKER PAUL L TROUT VC HUNTERS' RIDGE DAKOTA ROSE K. MISKAVIGE

2004 (99 dogs tested, 32 passed, 6 were GWP’s) VC FLAUGHERTY CREEK CODY DAVID WALKER VC CURIO VON KRIEGER SEAN & C. TIMMENS VC WINGMASTER'S BRISK AUTUMN JOHN E CROZIER JR VC ERIKA VON KRIEGER CONNIE & S. TIMMENS VC AUTUMN FIRE'S MAX BALLENBERG MARK A GEBHART VC TOP SHELF'S BLAZING BELLE JEFF L JALBERT

2005 (63 dogs tested, 30 passed, 4 were GWP’s) VC ROOSTER RIDGE'S DAISY MAY VC THUNDERHILLS REBA VC THUNDERHILL’S MONTANA VC BLACK CANYON GIN

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R CASTOR-EKWALL MARK J REINERT JASON KARASEK ARTHUR TRUJILLO

2006 (89 dogs tested, 39 passed, 11 were GWP’s) 28%* VC SMOKE CREEK'S MAX II VC THUNDERHILL'S AXEL VC THUNDERHILL'S CRYSTAL'S ICE VC AFTERHOURS AUGIE VAN GOGH VC HEIDLWOLF BENELLI VC HUSKAR VOM WIREDHAUS VC SHARPE'S CREEK'S EIRA VC SOUTHPAW QUASIE VC THUNDERHILL'S DAKOTA BELLE VC LJC'S GEM VC TOP SHELF'S TESS

LINDA BENNETT WAYNE ALDEN GILBERT TREMBLAY TIMOTHY A OTTO CHRIS J SCHWERSENSKA JOE E AUMANN JEFF SOWERBY SCOTT L BEYNON KEN L MISKAVIGE DUANE L STAHL KEITH H KEMMER

2007 (92 dogs tested, 39 passed, 5 were GWP’s) 13%* VC MCNALLY'S CALAHOO J SCOTT BARNER VC MIA CHUKAR CHICK ANDY SOLT VC THUNDERHILL'S DIAMOND LIL KEVIN & TRUDY RAUTIO VC ROOSTER RIDGE'S GUSTO TOON R. SCHWEIKHARDT VC WARREN II V D WISSOWER KLINKEN DUANE L STAHL

2008 (98 dogs tested, 56 passed, 5 were GWP’s) 8%* VC SOUTHPAW QUEENIE VC GRIFFS XPLOSIVE GUNNER VC BLUE COLLAR ASIA VC SCHWARZWALD APPLE JACK VC TOP SHELF'S CLARY SAGE

ROBERT H FERRIS DAVID A NAGELHOUT A. & M. TRUJILLO LUCILLE M HOUGH TORY ZIMMERMAN

2009 (86 dogs tested, 48 passed, 4 were GWP’s) 8% VC CLEARWATER SAM EDWIN O NUZUM VC SCHWARZWALD'S BEGIN WITH MADISON K NIEPOKOY VC THREE SPOKE'S AVA STEVE BECKER VC WIRED WEST SURESHOT OAKLEY MATTHEW SOLT

2010 (105 dogs tested, 55 passed, 10 were GWP’s ) 18% VC BONE POINT'S ELMO BRETT WOOD VC GRIFFS XPLOSIVE GRIZZLIE JOHN N NUNNES VC SCHWARZWALD'S BROCK T GREGORY HALL VC SUPER V BROWNING DON VANDERLIP VC TOP SHELF'S HOLY SMOKIN MARLEY STEVEN L BUCK VC GRIFFS QUASIE LADY DAN J GRIFFITH VC THUNDERHILL'S BELLE JEFFREY R PAULUS VC AMY VD WESTMARK BRET RODERICK VC BARLEY VOM OKANOGAN-FLUSSTAL NICK P MELLBY VC SCHWARZWALD'S BRAEDEN K. HOUGH & LAMANTIA

2011 (114 dogs tested, 61 passed, 5 were GWP’s) 8% VC ARRAK V DEN MEADOW LAKES JENNY HORSTMAN VC WEAVERS PT KRIEGHOFF EXPRESS TERRY J WILSON VC GRIFFS VIKING CHEWBACCA JOHN N NUNNES VC KIEFER SEE'S DANGER RANGER NATHAN STEEBER VC THUNDERHILL'S MAGNUM MAGZ JOEL D MCVINNIE *Percentage of dogs that passed were GWP’s

www.NAVHDA.org

www.NAVHDA.org


MY HUNTING BUDDY

How My Hunting Buddy Turned Into A MH, FC and NAVHDA VC By Matt & Nichole Solt ~ Wired West Kennels

With that litter of pups we received a NAVHDA Natural Ability breeder’s award and FC Wired West Sureshot Oakley MH NAVHDA VC. Some people ask me what traits did I look for when I picked Annie? The truth is she was white. I already had Maggie who was liver and roan. It was easier to track who was who in the field while I was hunting. Then again, you could have closed your eyes and pick a pup out of that litter.

The road to obtaining a dog with not only a AKC MH and FC, but a NAVHDA VC has been a rewarding one. When I got involved with wirehairs my intentions never involved testing or trialing them. My main desire was to hunt. Unfortunately, hunting only lasts from late August to early February depending on how far you are willing to travel. But what do you do with your dog the rest of the year? That is when I started to participate in field trials. My first wire was my girl Maggie (Solt’s Maggilla Gorilla). I didn’t realize how lucky I was to get an amazing girl like Maggie, until I was able to compare her to other dogs while out in the field. We started running in NSTRA (National Short to Retrieve Association). Since then, Maggie has become a NSTRA Champ. While we were at a NSTRA trial eight years ago I met a pretty blond hair blue eyed girl. Seven months later Nichole and I were married. One of our first dates involved a dog training session, where her father Steven Ames introduced me to NAVHDA. NAVHDA drew my attention, because it’s the closest test for a proven hunting dog. I first started training Maggie and a pup from her first litter Mia Chukar Chick. Mia was the first dog I trained and handled that became a NAVHDA VC.

From day one Annie has always tried to please me. At an extremely young age she knew how to go from tracking a pheasant to pointing a covey of chukars. At a year old she tested and earned a perfect score of 112 Prize I in NAVHDA NA. Annie was the most natural dog to train. After a year of hunting she really started to show me something, so we decided to prepare Annie for the NAVHDA UT. While training her for the UT, we started testing Annie for her Master Hunter. Annie went 6 of 8 at two years old. Her MH was pending the water test. The following August we tested for the UT, where Annie earned a 201 Prize I. After the UT, I started to run Annie in a few AKC field trials. Having some success, I decided to continue on that path. During the fall of 2009, I ran Annie in the NAVHDA Invitational. At the age of 3 years 5 months, Annie obtained her VC with a score of 197. During the spring of 2010 she finished her FC. Annie is currently one major away from obtaining her AFC. My adventure with Annie has been a fun ride. As she gets older, I fear I will never have the privilege of owning another wire like her. Then again, when I bred her mother I feared that there was never going to be another girl like Maggie. Annie is everything we ever hoped for.

In 2006 we decided to have a litter of puppies, because our girl Maggie was getting older and we feared that we would not find another like her. Little did we know we had nothing to fear. We bred Maggie to NAVHDA VC McNalley’s Calahoo MH. ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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HUNTING PARTNERS

Hunting Partners: Early Development, Evaluation and Selection By Ray Calkins

Like GWPs—diversity abounds!! Our first Cascade litter arrived on April Fools day in 1979 and over the years, we have had lots of reasons why one puppy is chosen over the littermates. I can offer comments here on how we select and develop the litter in Oregon and as we advise those who purchase pups— read a lot and use what works for you and your GWP. As the breeder, we will select the sire and dam for the litter based on many criteria, from known heritable physical traits to personal hunting experiences with them or their puppies from previous litters. All dogs bred here are two years of age or older, they have had all genetic tests done and will have had at least one hunting season under their belts. Pedigrees are considered, both for the litter and for the future breeding possibilities. There is no way one breeder can keep all the puppies and give them the opportunities and individual attention that a GWP demands. It is important to develop a rapport with the new ownerhunters so the pups’ development can be monitored and the breeding can be evaluated. I have always said that breeding GWPs is masochistic. It would be so much easier to breed Labradors or pointers or Dobermans where coat is not an issue and color and marking is either set or doesn’t matter. The wire coat is usually the most challenging because of the wide variation and litters bred for the avid hunter are generally a little shorter in coat simply because the average hunter is not interested in spending an hour de-burring the dog before he sleeps with him.

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The first eight weeks of their lives are a very important time for pups and they are incredibly impressionable. The litter is handled daily and the positions and stimulations advocated first for the German military dogs are incorporated between the first and second week. Kids are wonderful for puppies but ours are now adults so borrowing is occasionally necessary. Exposure to sounds, textures and movements is very good for the young litter. Our whelping area is adjacent to a large puppy yard so they can begin to go outside, usually 3-4 weeks. This serves to keep their sleeping area cleaner and the world outside is a constant source of stimulation. New toys to carry around—that’s retrieving in its earliest stages. Logs to crawl over or hide behind and a platform to climb simulate little chukar hills. Training to come when I whistle begins with weaning. It is nothing more than response to a stimulus with food as the reward. I whistle and food is the reward. This easily transfers to the field by kneeling, whistling and offering a treat. Free feeding is NOT done or encouraged anytime in our dogs’ lives. Call this a vet thing. You will identify your dog’s pattern and be able to identify any change in it. When hunting it is very convenient to put the bowl down and have it eaten immediately. The bond between dog and man is strengthened when he knows the food comes from you and not the dispenser in the corner. Feeding time can later be expanded to whoa training with the individual pup. We do not live and die by the 49 day new home rule that Wolters popularized in his book. We do believe that exposure to birds and “country” is very important beginning at about 6 weeks. A wing and a pole are not used--they teach puppies to site point. Development of the nose is much more


HUNTING PARTNERS That’s development—pups have been handled, exposed to birds, country and water and are ready to go their new homes at 8-9 weeks after I’ve picked mine—forget the 49 days—no wing and pole (feathers and poles are another topic).

important at this time. Pups need to know that birds are smelly and fun. So, initially, the “pack” is introduced to a wing clipped pigeon in their puppy yard (home, is safe and secure). The bolder ones lead the charge and the more cautious ones watch, point or stalk before joining in. This is repeated with smaller groups, then individuals. The goal is to have each pup eagerly going after and pick up the bird even if it’s only by the wing. Some will retrieve, some will show their catch proudly--the pigeon will need back up and rescue!!

Selection: Pick the litter, rule out the ones you don’t want and then bring the family. Everyone has a different criteria or need—Male or female? To be bred or neutered? What type of hunting will the dog be used for—chukar, grouse, waterfowl or all of these? What is your temperament—tough or more casual? Are you 15 or 75? Have you lived with a GWP before? Discuss these needs with the breeder, pick a pup that will be right for both of you. If possible visit often. Or let the breeder choose for you. Or let the puppy crawl into your lap and choose you. Continue socialization and exposure—get involved in a local GWP, hunting or training club. Then enjoy hunting with your partner— the years will go by too fast!! If all is right, you will have memories and stories for a lifetime!

The litter’s horizons are expanding and walks in a larger area will also happen in a pack. Evaluation continues throughout this process. Which ones are bolder? Which are closer or interested in returning to the safety of their yard? Which are more curious or distracted by butterflies or gopher holes? They will change daily. Weather permitting, longer walks to the creek expose the litter to water and again we watch the reactions of the pups as they first get their feet wet! By this time many other evaluations are in progress—coat, pigment, testicles, teeth. Bird exposure will continue with the pack being divided, first into smaller groups, then individuals. Pigeons will be planted and puppies will be watched. Did they point; did they use their noses to find or to track; were they cautious or bold; did they catch, carry or retrieve? The game will change to incorporate quail as the bird of choice—quail are quicker and will return to the Johnnie house. Catching does not reinforce the pointing instinct. We believe that early exposure to birds is CRITICAL in the development of a bird dog but NO GUNFIRE is involved. Exposure to the gun comes much later after the pups are bird crazy!

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AKC CHAMPIONSHIP

Its All About Tradition By Bernee Brawn

1904

Picture dogs coming by buggy, by train, and sometime by those new fangled automobiles. Owners, handlers, trainers, grooms all headed to Grand Junction Tennessee for one reason, to test their dogs against the best in the country. There were no interstates, no airplanes, most of the roads were dirt or gravel.  Just getting there must have taken months of planning.

rebuild and several of those buildings still exist today. Today, Grand Junction consists of a couple of streets, 3 small restaurants, a gas station, the Bird Dog Museum and nicely kept small, quaint homes..... and, of course, the Ames Plantation.  

Ames Plantation

The entire town of Grand Junction would turn out to welcome these dogs and their people. Welcome banners, picnic lunches, homes opened for lodging, food for people, dog kenneling and horse  stabling  arranged- this was indeed a huge undertaking for a very small town whose inhabitants had their own list of troubles. Historically, the sport of field trialing has its roots in southern quail hunting. The first pointing breed field trials in America were held near Memphis, TN in 1874. The area is rich in bird dog history and a large part of the local way of life. This year the AKC was very fortunate to have been granted permission to hold our Gun Dog Championship on the hallowed grounds of the Ames Plantation near Grand Junction, TN. These grounds have been the premier testing grounds for the nation’s best All Age dogs beginning in 1904.

Grand Junction Tennessee

Grand Junction was founded in 1854 and got its name from the “Grand Junction” of the Memphis and the Charleston Mississippi Railroad Lines. These are the major North/South and East/West lines running through Grand Junction. Grand Junction and its railroads were a much sought after prize during the Civil War, for whomever controlled the railroads controlled the rest of Western Tennessee. During the Civil War,  the Union Army held the city from the Confederate Army for approximately 3 years. Much of the town suffered destruction during this time. In 1878 the Yellow Fever epidemic came to Grand Junction and wiped out more than half of the 150 residents left in the town. Most are buried in the local Cemetery. The town started to

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Ames plantation was the creation of Hobart Ames, who acquired the property and developed the area for field trials. His wife, Julia Colony Ames, became the sole owner of the plantation when Mr. Ames passed away. It was Julia’s love of the sport and her foresight, that on her death in 1950, she created the Hobart Ames Foundation to assure that the area was maintained in such a fashion so as to remain the place where one could show the abilities of the nation’s great bird dogs. The University of Tennessee has been the caretaker of the plantation and has done a remarkable job of maintaining a world class set of field trial grounds, while also in being able to generate income from wise use of the land to sustain itself and serve as a location where much valuable research has been done in the fields of wildlife management, forestry, and in cattle genetics. It was a great honor to be able to attend the AKC Gun Dog Championship on these grounds.

The Championship- a true test

This Championship brought together 124 top dogs from all the major pointing breeds. With the historic


AKC CHAMPIONSHIP Ames Plantation being the setting for showcasing these fine dogs, the obligation was felt even greater. I can tell you that many handlers freely expressed their profound experience of testing their dogs at this challenging location. I have not witnessed this kind of emotional experience, by so many, before. The event was a National Championship in every sense, yet I believe it will have an even greater impact over time. This event had been in the planning stages for over a year. Doug Ljungren, VP of Performance and Companion Events was the first to conceive of the possibility of running at Ames. Doug approached Rick Carlisle, Superintendent of the Plantation, with the idea. A key step in getting Rick comfortable with hosting the event was Doug’s request of Ken Blackman to be the Chairman for the trial. Ken is a neighbor in the area and well known by the Plantation. With Ken’s enthusiastic acceptance, the deal was finalized. There is no doubt that this event would not have occurred if it were not for Doug and Ken. Six one hour courses were utilized, with no course being used twice in the same day. This is southern quail country, with smallish fields ringed with thick hedgerows, tilled plots, hills, twists and turns. The dogs had to handle to get around  and  they had to hunt very thick cover to find the elusive, mostly wild quail. This was not a planted bird trial, all birds were native or pre-released months in advance.  

But only dogs who found and handled their birds would be used in the final placements. This decision will be debated for years to come, but this was a special one time event, and in the end was probably the correct decision to make.  It’s the little things you remember The wide spread support from the local community was noted and welcomed by all. The Ames staff was there to marshal us around the course, which was much appreciated since even after two weeks I am not sure I could find my way home. The Ladies of Hickory Valley were there every morning to keep the coffee fresh and serve us Big Al’s biscuits. They provided helpful information to the field trialers that needed local services. We received many comments from the local folks regarding the friendliness and good sportsmanship exhibited by the participants.  Many of the local Pointer pro’s came out for lunches and dinners and made us all very welcome.   Upon arrival in the small, and very quaint town of Grand Junction, you come to realize that “bird dogs” is a very large part of  the culture of the town today. On the corner of National Championship Drive, there is a bank with a life size Pointer statue out front. The Bird Dog Museum is located just down the street. There were posters and welcome signs up for us. It was evident that we were welcome there.

The galleries were large, sometimes with 50 horses following the dogs. The noise from the spectators, horses, road crew all played into the dogs finding (and not finding) and handling birds. Bird work became a challenge with some courses being productive every day, and others seemingly barren. Luck of the draw and the ability of the dogs to dig in played a big part in their success.

One afternoon we went to town for lunch. At another table were three elderly ladies all having lunch. When they finished lunch, they stopped at our table and asked if we were enjoying our trip to Ames, wondered how our dogs did , and asked each of us where we were from. Then they thanked us for coming to their town! We were rather flabbergasted, but very touched by their kindness. One of the gals told us she didn’t own dogs, never had, but loved to come out to watch all the excitement.

While controversial, the judges decided that they would take the entire performance of the dogs into play when deciding the Top Dog of the Day…some birdless dogs were chosen to compete in the finals.

A very important part of the overall committee and one I will always remember was Moses, a sheriff from Grand Junction, who was the honorary road guard! He stopped all traffic until horses and dogs

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AKC CHAMPIONSHIP passed, and he took his job very seriously! When we brought Louie to the line he looked at him, looked away, then very quietly asked Rhonda… “Maaam, just what kinda dog is that there? I’ve never seen one of them before!”  We got quite a chuckle from that. Another highlight of our trip was meeting and riding with Nick Thompson. Nick has scouted many of the winners of the National Championship over the years. He was so nice, so helpful, and so very generous with his knowledge of the grounds and how to handle a dog to show them to their best advantage! A true southern gentleman. All in all it was a great trip and I am so glad AKC pulled all the necessary strings to hold the event there. The history, the backdrop, the ghosts in the hills…..we were following in the footsteps of great dog men and women from generations ago. Thanks to the Ames Plantation for allowing us the opportunity to be a part of the tradition.

The 2013 AKC Gun Dog Championship will be held at the Branched Oak WMA grounds just outside of Lincoln Nebraska. This will also be the location of the GWPCA National Champions in 2013! Hope to see some of you there.

The GWP’s There were 4 German Wirehaired Pointers entered in the event, all handled by Jim West. Jay-Mar’s How Do You Like Me Now JH (“Grevious”) , NAFC/ DC/ AFC/GR Ch Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now (“Louie”) , DC Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire (“Sonora”)   and FC Brillows Big Wild Western (“Wiley”). Louie” was honored by being one of the 12 dogs called back for the final braces. The overall winner was trained and handled by our very own Greg Dixon!  We all congratulate Greg and Bitty on their great performance. 1st) FC Old School Attitude, Pointer, h Greg Dixon 2nd) FC/AFC Eshod’s Arkansas Lady, GSP, h Ray Dohse 3rd) FC Stoney Hill Mr. Dixon, GSP, h Jamie Fountain 4th) FC Cedar Valley Bandit, Brittany, h Tom Tracy Here are the placements and the dogs named Best of Breed for the event.

Bests of Breed Weimaraner – NAFC Graugeist Texas City Slicker Irish Setter – NAFC FC Brophy’s Shenanigans Vizsla – FC Tommy’s Dixie Chick Pointer – FC Old School Attitude German Wirehaired Pointer – NAFC FC/AFC Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now German Shorthaired Pointer – FC/AFC Eshod’s Arkansas Lady Brittany – FC Cedar Valley Bandit

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FIELD TRIALS

My First Field Trial Experience By Henry Bird

After a lot of research and investigation, first about what breed and then what lines, I found myself the proud owner of a GWP puppy. The breeder I got him from enjoys field trialing which got me researching these events. I was invited to join the breeder at the GWPC of Eastern Nebraska Field Trial and the GWPCA Midwest Classic. Even though I got my pup to be a hunting partner and family member I thought it would be fun to go check it out. I was a little nervous as I’m not what you’d call a horse person as well as not being familiar with how the game is played. What I found was a community that reached out to embrace and make me feel welcome. Professionals and Amateurs alike took the time to explain what was occurring, how the rules applied and the different strategies for success.

another communal celebration as everyone enjoyed a great dinner in the club house and results were announced. Sunday started the GWPCA Midwest Classic and goodbyes were said to the folks, without the luck of having a GWP in their string, departed. Sunday the cold had returned with periods of drizzle, but that did not diminish spirits or the fun of each brace. Sunday night found all the GWP people gathered around the fire pit barbecuing hot dogs and toasting marshmallows while telling tall tales interspersed with jokes. Laughter and smiles were out in force.

Friday started out cold and wet for the Eastern Nebraska Club Field Trial and then was interrupted by lightning as the braces were stopped for the safety of dogs and people alike. Dinner at a local pizza place was a celebration of camaraderie and competition where old friendships were renewed and new ones were made.

Monday the weather was hot and sunny making for dry work for both dogs and riders alike. The course though was shown in all its beauty. I was loaned an incredible horse and really got to appreciate everything as I rode multiple braces and the coaching and mentoring on what was occurring finally came together. Branched Oaks is truly a wondrous place! As the day wound down, final results were announced and pictures taken. Stake outs were pulled up, horses trailered and good byes said with everyone looking forward to attending next year’s event.

Saturday the weather broke and a beautiful sunny day emerged. Multiple courses were used and the day was full of bustle and energy as horses, riders and dogs all moved to and from braces. Vibrant dialogue emerged as friends congratulated each other on the emergence of young dogs the work of experienced gun dogs and then consoled when opportunities were missed. Saturday evening was

Field Trialers are a unique and dedicated bunch. Their dogs and horses are trained to a fine level of skill and there are so many subtle nuances to running a brace it will make your head spin. However, the most impressive part is how open, kind and welcoming they are and the sense of community that permeates the event. Thanks to all of you for a great weekend!

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GWPCA CLASSIC

GWPCA Mid-West Classic & GWPC of Eastern Nebraska’s Spring Field Trial By Adam Cunningham

I had the pleasure of attending the second annual GWPCA Midwest Classic and the trial that the local club puts on right before it. These trials were the highlight of my spring in 2011 and I was looking forward to getting back out to Branched Oak to run my dogs on such nice grounds with a great group of people. There weren’t as many entries this year but that didn’t affect the quality of dog work presented. The Eastern Nebraska GWP Club’s Field Trial started the weekend off on Friday. The sky was dark with rain clouds that spit intermittently on us but made for good scenting conditions until the afternoon when those same clouds broke open with thunder and lightning forcing everyone to take a break until the weather cleared up. Saturday was a sunny spring day and it was a perfect day to run dogs. We had a lot of braces to get in so everyone was hustling to get to the line when it was time to go. Some of the highlights were GWP’s placing in: OLGD AGD OD AWD

2. FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa; Owner John Sodoro 3. Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa; Owner John Sodoro 4. FC/AFC Wingfields High Cotton; Owner Ben Coller JAOM CH Idawire Field of Dreams; Owner Adam Cunningham 2. Ironwire Aquire the Fire Rocks Cynister; Owner Lacy Magoon 1. Ironwire Aquire the Fire Rocks Cynister ; Owner Lacy Magoon 2. Brillows Sure Shot Hardknock Doc; Owner Rhonda Haukoos 3. Ironwire AC-DC; Owner Adam Cunningham 4. Black Star’s Waka Flocka Flame; Owner Leo Boman

Sunday the GWP Midwest Classic started and the clouds and drizzle were back, luckily the lightning and thunder didn’t return allowing us to stay on schedule. There was some magnificent dog work and there were plenty of birds on course. A water test was held and all of the dogs passed. With his pass, Jay-Mar’s How Do You Like Me Now became a new field champion. The trial concluded on Monday with bright sunny skies and warm temperatures. The placements were: Open Gun Dog; 1. FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa; Owner John Sodoro 2. NAFC/FC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now; Owner Bernee Brawn 3. Scotian Andromeda Galaxy; Owner Thomas Lococo 4. High Powers Jolt to the System; Owner Belinda DeLaby Amateur Gun Dog 1. FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa; Owner John Sodoro 2. FC/AFC Wingfield’s High Cotton JH; Owner Ben Coller 3. Snowy River’s TNT Timber Tick; Owners Brian Silcott & Mark Verdoorn 4. CH Idawire Field of Dreams; Owner Adam Cunningham Open Derby 1. Ironwire Aquire the Fire Rocks Cynister; Owner Lacy Magoon 2. Brillows Sure Shot Hardknock Doc; Owner Rhonda Haukoos 3. Inverness Whiskey Lullaby; Owners Chuck Casanova & Robin Nelson DVM 4. CH Ironwire AC-DC; Owner Adam Cunningham Water Test 1. Jay-Mar’s How Do You Like Me Now; Owners N. Litwin, Pattie & Chris Hieber 2. High Powers Jolt to the System; Owner Belinda DeLaby 3. CH Idawire Field of Dreams; Owner Adam Cunningham 36

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GWPCA CLASSIC This is a fairly new event and I hope to see more people support it next year especially with Nationals running on these grounds in 2013. There is something special about watching GWPs in a field trial and it is fun to see some of the top GWP’s in the country compete. There were a lot of young dogs showing promise this year and that should lead to more Gun Dogs next year and some stiff competition! Thanks to all of the judges, participants, and to the GWP club of Eastern Nebraska for putting on a great event in 2012.

Open Gun Dog

1st -FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa 2nd - NAFC/FC/AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now 3rd - Scotian Andromeda Galaxy 4th - High Powers Jolt to the System

Amateur Gun Dog

1st -FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa 2nd - FC/AFC Wingfield’s High Cotton JH 3rd - Snowy River’s TNT Timber Tick 4th - CH Idawire Field of Dreams

Open Derby

1st - Ironwire Aquire the Fire Rocks Cynister 2nd - Brillows Sure Shot Hardknock Doc 3rd - Inverness Whiskey Lullaby 4th - CH Ironwire AC-DC

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TRAINING

My First Experience Training a Pointing Dog to be Steady By Belinda DeLaby Subjective - based on somebody’s opinions or feelings rather than on facts or evidence Objective - based on facts rather than thoughts or opinions When Angie asked me to write an article for the Wire News Field addition, I was honored of course. But when she explained that she wanted an article detailing my experiences of training my first pointing dog to be Steady to Fall, I was stumped. That to me is a large undertaking, especially considering it took many months to get Ivan to that level of training. So how was I supposed to tackle this project without boring the pants off the reader? As I sat and thought of my experiences, I was overwhelmed with a series of conflicting emotions. Many colorful adjectives could be used to describe my training experiences, so I decided to approach this from a subjective view, rather than an objective one. So we begin… Optimistic - tending to take a hopeful and positive view of future outcomes As I looked at the litter of GWP’s, I was excited at the prospect of a future champion in the field. Every week I would visit and watch the puppies play and interact. Especially observant of their independence, boldness, and general unruliness. At about 6 weeks, I had narrowed it down to a few hopefuls and decided to do the quail intro at that time. Nothing beats a group of GWP pups playing tug-o-war with their first quail…lol. By 8 weeks, all the pups had a healthy desire for quail. When puppy pickin’ day rolled around, I was talked into an all liver headed boy pup. Up until then, I was a diehard classic blaze lover. But this pup had “something “ that drew my attention, so I quickly gave in to the suggestion that I take him home. 38

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The first months were a blissful puppy development experience. Potty training, obedience, taking the puppy for “walks” in the field, and loosely planting quail for pup to find, point, and chase to his heart’s content. All the pieces were falling into place. It was so easy. Idealistic - the tendency to represent things in their ideal forms, rather than as they are Early development had gone so smoothly, I was convinced that this smoothness would persist all the way through ‘Steady to Fall”. I tend to be a glass is half full individual so this is how I often view any task that life has to throw at me. Steadiness training began in earnest once I felt Ivan was ready and mature enough. We started with teaching WHOA and overlaying the e-collar. Easy Peasy. We then moved on to Stop to Flush (STF) training. First stopping gently with check cord and then with e-collar once Ivan understood what I wanted. Things could not have gone better. I often train with Angie, so we would take turns working our dogs behind each other when doing STF or pointing drills in order to build a foundation for backing. Ivan absorbed his lessons easily and I was now ready to take the chase out


TRAINING with pointing drills and the e-collar. Up until this point, the e-collar was only used on STF drills, and I just gently stopped him with the check cord on pointing drills. Ionia, Michigan

Things went relatively smoothly with the use of pigeon. Ivan learned to point well off the bird and not creep or crowd. Soon he was standing staunchly and shot. Sue through DeGraw,wing Nationals Coordinator schnellberg@comcast.net Next, I had a few birds shot for him to reinforce Barb Tucker, Show/Agility Chairman steady to fall and then I moved to quail. At first, Kay Braddock, Obedience/Rally Trial Chairman I put the quail in launchers to help manage the John Schoonover, Field Trial Chairman training scenario and reinforce the rules. Ivan had Mark Sargent, Hunt Test Chairman no trouble transferring what he learned on pigeon Roger Doyle, Donations to quail in the launchers. With everything in Trish Hirneisen, Hospitality order, we moved to loose quail. At first, Ivan was Roger Doyle & Rich Hirneisen, Merchandise again a model student and then he started trying options. There is camping available at the fairgroundsAs and at the I troubleshooted for field trial grounds. each trump card that Ivan played, he would Wrangler Available come up with a new and Host Hotel – more annoying “option”. My once model student American Inn & Suites, Ionia was now becoming 616-527-2200 mutinous as well…lol.

2011 GWPCA Nationals Hosted by

Mutinous - willful or disobedient Fort Detroit GWP Club Speaking of training most people tend to Come see the partners, beautiful fall colors have 1 or 2, so I’m sure you can appreciate a whole section on the challenges that it creates…LOL. of Michigan and join us for, what Neither Angie nor I had trained a dog all the way through Steady to Fall. Depending on what we we promise, will be a memorable were working on or troubleshooting, I would spend a few days with my mentor honing my skills, then returnNationals! to the field with Angie to apply what I had learned.

Event Calendar:

As a companion dog Thurs. Sept. 29, 2011 - All Breed trainer, communication Obedience, Beginner Novice & Welcome when teaching is a Party skill that I feel that I am good I would Fri.at. Sept. 30, 2011 - Fort Detroit GWP start off by explaining Club Specialty & Sweeps, National GWP to Angie exactly, step (GWPs only) & All Star Obedience/Rally by step, what we were Invitational going to do. Usually more Sat. thanOct. once1,for effect 2011 - Futurity, and absorption issues. National Sweepstakes, Maturity, All Breed Agility & National Meeting, CGC However, I’m sure Testing you have all seen the Japanese tourist with the American tour guide. All– the little round heads Saturday dinner barbeque smiling and bobbing in affirmation $20/person plus cash bar; as the guide issues important instructions to the group. Then said tourists move off to -do exactlyNational the opposite Sun. Oct. 2, 2011 GWPCA of what the tour guide instructed them toAll do or Specialty Show, Jr. Showmanship, not toBreed do. Obviously, in this situation, there is a Agility & Awards Banquet language barrier. This is often the analogy that flashed through my head- $30/person after a session with Sunday banquet plus cash Angie.bar. I reflected on what I had said and then wondered to myself what she had heard. However, language NOT an issue, I was Mon.barrier Oct. 3,was 2011 - Hunt Testso Day 1, only led toField one conclusion…see definition above. Trial & Water Test

Humbled having a feeling ofTest insignificance, Tues.- Oct. 4, 2011 - Hunt Day 2, inferiority, and subservience Field Trial As I moved through the training process, pigeon October 5 toofConclusion was used in favor quail. Pigeon- Field fly offTrial and cannot be caught by an insubordinate dog. Quail is Subject Change can be**All run Information down and caught creatingtobad habits and sets your training back.

We do NOT recommend any other Disheartened hotels in the area except the Best - to American Heritagemake Inn insomebody Portland, lose hope and enthusiasm about 15 miles away from Ionia 517-647-2200, As I worked through gm@greatamericanheritageinn.com this phase of training, I was repeatedly told that this was normal for a lot of dogs that have not Weinto would to step up and bought thelike ideaclubs of being steady justoffer yet.to I was host a hospitality night. Available nights assured after a few sessions he would be back on are Monday-Friday. Meals will be offered track. every day. The more donations we get for meals from clubs, the less each individual Weeks turned into of meal. a training plateau. will have to paymonths for their Contact We were not making any progress and what I was Trish Hirneisen at (248) 258-4884 or doingrich.hirneisen@gmail.com seemed to make no difference to the dog. I

was getting frustrated and threatened to send him are Hill also Puppy asking clubs off toWe Daisy Farm.to put together baskets for raffle, the I decided to take some like timewe offhave fromdone our in training past. for a bit. Frustration and training do not go together. We both needed the break. Ads for the catalog are due July 30 to Arden Shaw.

Ruminant - inclined to be thoughtful and reflective Donations for trophies – information will be available thereally Nationals At that point, soon I sat and backon and viewed what website. was going on from all possible points. I really tried Merchandise to get in Ivan’s head to understand what information will be available he was thinking. I hoped I did anyway. I spoke to my mentor and we both agreed on what we needed to do. However, to fix his issues required ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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TRAINING

entering into that gray area of training that could potentially create additional problems if not handled right. Things had become a game for Ivan. The consequences simply did not have enough emphasis on him. We needed Ivan to buy in to the fact that he needed to stop at first scent and hold that bird. It needed to be his choice. We needed him to respect and almost fear the bird. It was a delicate balance of pressure and reward. Pragmatic - advocating behavior that is dictated more by practical consequences than by theory The process by which I was to correct Ivan’s issues was easy for me to conceptualize in my mind, yet I did not feel comfortable executing the level of pressure required to get the job done. Luckily, Jim West and Rhonda Haukoos were camped down at Masaryktown FT grounds in Brooksville for summer training at that time. I was discussing the issues with Jim and he essentially agreed with my assessment and what needed to be done. Jim has had his hands on many a dog and I knew he would be able to get Ivan over the hump. Ivan spent two weeks with Jim and Rhonda. I know Ivan frustrated Jim as much as he frustrated me. I didn’t feel like such a loser after that..LOL.

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Euphoric - extremely happy or excited The day I picked Ivan up from Jim, we went out to the field so Jim could let me see that Ivan indeed had absorbed his lessons and was all but through with the games. To watch the dog that had for months given me training fits go on to point, stand through wing, shot, and fall, retrieve, and deliver to hand without a problem was a real treat. As I write this, Ivan has not tried any more “options” and seems to have bought into the idea of being steady. In a few days I will welcome a new fuzz face into my home so I can continue to hone my training skills. I have a much different view of training a dog to be steady than I did when I started with Ivan. I would say I am definitely more realistic about the whole process. However, I am looking forward to that roller coaster of emotion that goes with taking a bird dog all the way through the steadying process. What is it that makes me a glutton for punishment?


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SET THE BAR HIGH

Set The Bar High…Train for Master Hunter By Tom Jarnich

A friend of mine asked me if I would like to help his club at their hunt test. This was approximately a year or so before the arrival of my first German Wirehaired Pointer. The test was my first exposure to AKC’s hunt test program and an opportunity to experience it firsthand. It was also the first time to observe a few wires run at the master hunter level. The experience of seeing the master dogs run that day left a lasting impression on me. The bar had been set. From that point on I was determined to train to that level. Eventually, I entered the test program and was approved to judge these hunt tests. The Master Hunter dog is the finished, polished gun dog. This is the dog any hunter would be “proud to own”. The dog, as most know, is evaluated in six categories relative to hunting ability. They are hunting, bird finding, pointing, and trainability, honoring and retrieving. Let’s briefly take a look at these categories. The Master dog must show boldness, independence and intelligence with respect to how he/she hunts the course. The dog must have the keen desire to hunt. They must handle for their handler and must do so with a minimum of commands or hacking. I have found a positive correlation relating to this issue. Usually, if I can remember the dog’s name after it has run, it means that I heard it too often on the course. The dog and handler must work as a team. Even though the dog is being evaluated, the handler’s actions or errors can influence the outcome. The category of bird finding is generally a simple one. The dog must find game. With respect to “finds” there are no set numbers. However, just like in most field trials, it’s not how many but the quality of the finds. As a handler, I always wanted the “boys” to establish some bird work in the back course before entering the bird field. (Most of the tests in the East run their course with a bird field. It’s usually a matter of logistics. I have been to tests that run a continuous course, which is more realistic when compared to actual hunting.) As a judge evaluating a dog, only a find in the bird field doesn’t give you much to work with in developing a score in this area. No finds adversely affects the pointing score and precludes you from any possible call back situation. 42

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Now that the dog has found game it must point it. When it comes to pointing, it must do so with intensity. The dog must point staunchly. There can’t be any type of movement or creeping. The dog must remain on point throughout the entire sequence of steady to flush, wing and shot on “blanked” birds, and fall relative to the retrieve. Trainability is a general type of category. This category typically relates to the overall performance with respect to “willingness to handle, obedience to commands and gun response”. It also covers specific areas such stop to a wild flush, delayed chases and back course honoring. The next category is honoring. Simply put, the dog must honor or back it’s brace mate whenever it encounters it on point. However, the dog must also honor through the retrieve (it’s brace mate retrieve of shot game) in order to satisfy this requirement. Some dogs just don’t like to honor. This where they will usually “blink” the pointing dog or even worse, steal point. Both are unacceptable behaviors. The last category is retrieving. The dog must deliver shot game “promptly, tenderly and absolutely to hand”. At this level, there should be no commands given or movement by the handler towards the dog. There are times where dogs place game down after picking game up initially or drop game or “mouth” game. These are all unacceptable examples. When it comes to retrieving, dogs should be taught the “trained retrieve” also referred to as the “forced fetch”. Even the dog that is a natural retriever should be taught this. It’s the only way to develop a truly consistent retrieve. This was something I learned at a clinic taught by a highly regarded professional trainer. Well, these are basically the elements of the Master Hunter test. This is a test that has very little margin for error and rightfully so. When I judge these dogs I generally keep an open mind and try to judge positively. It is the judge’s responsibility to give a fair and honest evaluation of the dog’s performance that day. A question sometimes used in the evaluation is: Would I hunt over this dog and/or was the overall performance one of a Master Hunter? Generally, if a dog has a miscue or does something questionable it will resurface and manifest itself somewhere else on the course. Let’s face it they are dogs and not machines. They will have good days and hopefully not many bad days. The better you can prepare for test (like the infinite variables and situations you can encounter) the better the probability of success. Dogs must be “proofed” during their training. If they succeed in this process they should be ready. I wish you continued success in your training and in achieving this coveted title.


AKC New Titles

NEW TITLES

(January - April 2012) Compiled by Lori Sargent

CHAMPION

CH Aimn Hi Jet Stream (B) SR61717307 (1/7/12) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x CH Devata Rip It Up At Scotia; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom; Owner: Kay Gunnarson & LaMar Gunnarson CH Geaux All In Schnellberg (D) SR64635106 (1/20/12) by DC Schnellbergs Freedom Reigns x GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Charismatic; Breeder: Erika Brown & Helen Witt & Susan De Graw & Josh Brown; Owner: Susan De Graw CH Reece Afterhours In The Eye Of The Storm (D) SR59437103 (1/7/12) by GCH CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christi Chism & Angie Johnson; Owner: Linda C Eidemiller & John H Eidemiller CH Ripsnorterncladdagh Backfld N Motion JH (B) SR62716303 (1/7/12) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian; Owner: Marguerite Howard & Lisa George CH Rlb’s Pin-Up Girl (B) SR53204508 (1/8/12) by CH Rlb’s Mac The Knight MH x CH Scotian Xtra Time RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman; Owner: Roger Bultman & Stacy Risler CH Windmill Aspendel Texas Traveler (D) SR65036703 (1/16/12) by CH Ripsnorter’s Thunderhart x GCH CH Aspendel’s Pale Rider JH; Breeder: Betsy Watkins & Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro; Owner: Betsy Watkins & Robert Perry CH Afterhour’s Annie Oakley Of Reece (B) SR50178401 (2/5/12) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christi Chism & Angie Johnson; Owner: Linda Medlock & Christi Chism & Beth Carter CH Ironwire AC-DC (B) SR63942501 (2/17/12) by CH Idawire Field Of Dreams x CH Cynister Idawire Childs Play; Breeder: Adam Cunningham & Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Adam Cunningham CH Wireworks Talking Up A Storm (B) SR61500206 (2/6/12) by CH Larkspurs Windmill Winston JH x CH Mt View’s Ripsnorter Pink Star; Breeder: Angela Milowski & Shon Michael; Owner: Angela Milowski & Shon Michael CH Hawk Havens Grand Stand JH (D) SR62369106 (3/17/12) by GCH CH Mountain View National Acclaim x CH Larkspurs Dangerous Curves Ahead SH; Breeder: Pete Paduch; Owner: Peter L Paduch & Norma L Paduch

CH Idawire Aimn Hi Absolut Mimosa (B) SR67406902 (3/30/12) by CH Wildacres Boxcar Willie SH x CH Idawire Funny Feeling; Breeder: Danielle Gifford & Joyce Gifford; Owner: Jodi Quesnell & Carolyn V Isom & Jim Isom CH Ripsnorterncladdagh Bringn Sexy Back (D) SR62716301 (3/16/12) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian; Owner: Lisa George CH ADPG Afterhours The Seventh Sign (B) SR63182105 (4/7/12) by CH Adpg The Patriot MH x Afterhours Make A Wish; Breeder: Danielle Gerbert & Christine Whitmore; Owner: Cathy Vvigotty & Danielle Gerbert CH ADPG Celebration V. Gefharte (B) SR49504707 (4/13/12) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Adpg Independence Day; Breeder: Linda Medlock & Beth Carter & Danielle Gerbert; Owner: Danielle Gerbert CH Inverness Solo Xtravagance (B) SR69803601 (2/25/12) by CH Inverness Odin x CH Inverness Kiss Me Kate; Breeder: Laura Myles; Owner: Laura Myles CH Purepoint Stellar Pursuit JH (B) SR63731307 (4/29/12) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x Weaver’s Autumn Harvest; Breeder: Melissa Iverson & Michelle Weaver; Owner: Michelle Weaver & Lori Ackerman CH Windswept’s Anduril Flame O’ The West JH (D) SR63519104 (4/28/12) by CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH; Breeder: Mark & Lori Sargent; Owner: Marten Compton & Lori Sargent

GRAND CHAMPION

GCH CH Drakkar ‘N Rlb’s Eyefull (B) SR51817504 (3/3/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Kiki Courtelis & Joyce Wilkinson & Lois Bultman & Ralonda Pote

FIELD CHAMPION

FC Brillow’s Wild West Ponder Rosa (B) SR54471404 (4/7/12) by Whitetail Eli’s Brother JH x Brillows Flyin Frizz B; Breeder: Rhonda Haukoos; Owner: John Sodoro FC Jay-Mar’s How Do You Like Me Now JH (D) SR53880209 (4/27/12) by DC St Croix’s Diamond Jim x CH Jay-Mar’s Liver And Onions SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber

©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

43


NEW TITLES AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras (B) SR44876603 (3/31/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder/Owner: Meg Eden AFC Wireswest Radical Girl MH (B) SR44876605 (4/6/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder/Owner: Meg Eden

BEGINNER NOVICE

Weidenhugel Jade V Treff BN (B) SR65865808 (1/15/12) by FC AFC Weidenhugel Impulse V Xero RN MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee; Breeder: Mildred Revell; Owner: Elaine C Gray CH Drakkar’s Rlb He Caught My Eye BN RA (D) SR51817503 (3/30/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Donna Leveque & Bob Leveque I Spy Mischief And No Good BN (D) SR52537814 (3/31/12) by Shasta Otto Man x Heart River Naughty But Nice; Breeder: Michelle Pool; Owner: Dennis McNamara & Selma Mc Namara

GRADUATE NOVICE

CH Roy The Upland Hunter CD GN RE (D) SR42625603 (1/16/12) by CH I’Am A Triple Dual Shot CD x Annie Mae Hunter; Breeder: Fred Daggett & Amber Daggett; Owner: Lisa Popescu & Octavian Popescu

UTILITY DOG EXCELLENT

Larkspurs Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX2 OM3 JH (D) SR06311601 (4/13/12) by DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey MH x Larkspurs Molly McGee; Breeder: Linda Forrestel & Gina McCain; Owner: Leslie Swisher

OBEDIENCE MASTER 3

Larkspurs Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX2 OM3 JH (D) SR06311601 (4/13/12) by DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey MH x Larkspurs Molly McGee; Breeder: Linda Forrestel & Gina McCain; Owner: Leslie Swisher

RALLY NOVICE

Jay-Mar’s Walk The Line BN RN NA NAJ (D) SR53880203 (3/16/12) by DC St Croix’s Diamond Jim x CH Jay-Mar’s Liver And Onions SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Mike Braddock & Nickol Litwin Weidenhugel Jade V Treff BN RN (B) SR65865808 (3/25/12) by FC AFC Weidenhugel Impulse V Xero RN MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee; Breeder: Mildred Revell; Owner: Elaine C Gray FC Sure Shot’s Pretty Summer Endless Play RN JH (D) SR41495409 (4/15/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Sure Shot’s Pretty Penny JH; Breeder: Serena Sorenson & John Sorenson; Owner: Hilde Stapgens 44

WIRE NEWS

©2012 GWPCA

RALLY ADVANCED & RALLY EXCELLENT

CH Drakkar’s Rlb He Caught My Eye BN RA (D) SR51817503 (3/30/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Donna Leveque & Bob Leveque

JUNIOR HUNTER

ADPG Cloud Creek Oceanfront Property JH (D) SR68935102 (2/5/12) by CH Inverness The Mighty Quinn x Adpg Afterhours Surf’s Up; Breeder: Danielle Gerbert & Donald W Padgett; Owner: Danielle Gerbert HH Lookout Playing The Field JH (D) SR69016407 (2/12/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & James Witt & Joyce Wilkinson; Owner: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson Jay-Mar’s Makin’ Friends And Enemies JH (B) SR65365007 (2/4/12) by CH Ripsnorter Makin A Statement x CH JayMar’s Thank God For Credit Cards JH; Breeder: Lisa George & Nickol Litwin & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Nickol Litwin & Ashley Nitinthorn ADPG Cloud Creek Dock Of The Bay JH (D) SR68935104 (3/24/12) by CH Inverness The Mighty Quinn x Adpg Afterhours Surf’s Up; Breeder: Danielle Gerbert & Donald W Padgett; Owner: William Hill & Danielle Gerbert Purepoint Stellar Pursuit JH (B) SR63731307 (3/31/12) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x Weaver’s Autumn Harvest; Breeder: Melissa Iverson & Michelle Weaver; Owner: Michelle Weaver & Lori Ackerman Schwarzwald’s Clad In A Tux JH (D) SR68999802 (3/25/12) by Griffs Viking Chewbacca x Schwarzwald’s Braeden; Breeder: Kyle T Hough & Patrick Lamantia; Owner: William Schmidt & Gayle Schmidt Windswept’s Anduril Flame O’ The West JH (D) SR63519104 (3/25/12) by CH Inverness Yankee Gunnar x CH Windswept’s Solar Flair SH; Breeder: Lori Sargent & Mark Sargent; Owner: Marten Compton & Lori Sargent HH Lookout Katyjo’s On A Field Trip JH (B) SR69016401 (4/1/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson & James Witt; Owner: Marion Sirk & Danny Sirk HH Lookout Celtic Field Of Vision JH (B) SR69016405 (4/14/12) by by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson & James Witt; Owner: Jim Boyd & Michelle Boyd & James Witt & Ed Shupp M C Avastar JH (B) SR69325108 (4/22/12) by Shell Shocked Hawkeye x 45 Cash The Check; Breeder: Lawrence Ficek; Owner: Janet M Nahorn & Barbara C Grygiel


NEW TITLES SENIOR HUNTER

Scotian Windswept Expedition SH (D) SR52349201 (5/28/11) by CH Scotian The Man In Black JH MX MXJ MXF x CH Windswept’s Justa Firestarter RN SH; Breeder: Lori Sargent & Mark Sargent & Bernee Brawn; Owner: Laura Reeves-Lococo & Lori & Mark Sargent & Stephanie M Rainwater Red Barn’s Kodi’s Hunter SH (D) SR45736601 (4/14/12) by CH Side By Sides Chatanuga Choo MH x CH Schnellberg’s Live Wire SH; Breeder: Roger W Doyle & Pamela Doyle; Owner: Charles Kissinger

MASTER HUNTER

L.B.’s Good Golly Miss Dotty MH (B) SR55820007 (4/22/12) by Chump Change Midnight Howlin’ Hank SH x Vom Britt’s Iz A Belle SH; Breeder: Leo O Boman; Owner: Leo O Boman

NOVICE AGILITY

Afterhour’s Joie De Vivre NA NAJ (B) SR45156705 (1/27/12) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x CH Weaver’s Morgen Raine; Breeder: David M Weaver; Owner: Diane Philibert & Christi Chism & Mark Rosenblatt

NOVICE AGILITY PREFERRED

High Power’s Jesse James RAE SH NAP OJP (D) SR31167502 (1/1/12) by CH Rlb’s Jessie The Body MH x CH Abigail Von Blu Sands VCD2 UD MH; Breeder: Gregory A Dubois & Cathy Dubois; Owner: Nancy E Ondrus

OPEN AGILITY JUMPTER

Newman NA OAJ (D) PAL202056 Owner: Elizabeth M. Drifka & Wayne J. Drifka Red’s Emerald Cut CD RN NA OAJ (B) SR34749907 (3/31/12) by CH Rlb’s Mac The Knight MH x Backwoods Driving MS. Daisy; Breeder: Richard Brannan; Owner: Thomas Guschl & Carol Guschl

EXECELLENT AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED

T. Wolfs Wired After Grizzly OAP AJP (B) ILP159162 (3/18/12) Owner: Cindy Schneider

MASTER AGILITY JUMPER

Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ (B) SR48693303 (1/27/12) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock Madeline’s Prince Charming MX AXJ (D) PAL201024 (4/13/12) Owner: Stephanie Rainwater

AGILITY FAST NOVICE

Afterhour’s Joie De Vivre NA NAJ (B) SR45156705 (1/27/12) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x CH Weaver’s Morgen Raine; Breeder: David M Weaver; Owner: Diane Philibert & Christi Chism & Mark Rosenblatt

AGILITY FAST NOVICE PREFERRED

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ NAP NJP XF NFP (B) SR11401304 (4/14/12) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Scotian Northern Light JH NA NAJ; Breeder: Stephanie Rainwater & Jack Rainwater & Laura Reeves; Owner: Shannon L Jackson

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ NAP NJP XF NFP (B) SR11401304 (4/14/12) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Scotian Northern Light JH NA NAJ; Breeder: Stephanie Rainwater & Jack Rainwater & Laura Reeves; Owner: Shannon L Jackson

NOVICE AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED

THERAPY DOG

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ NAP NJP XF NFP (B) SR11401304 (4/14/12) by CH Weidenhugel Merlin V Nico CD MH x CH Scotian Northern Light JH NA NAJ; Breeder: Stephanie Rainwater & Jack Rainwater & Laura Reeves; Owner: Shannon L Jackson

CH Von Duffins Seven of Nine (B) SN74597003 (7/20/11) by Cadenberg Mick V Rogue DC Von Duffin’s RKLD Cappuccino; Breeder/Owner: Ann & Terry Duffin

OPEN AGILITY

Jed’s Easy Street JH OA OAJ (B) SR36438504 (1/22/12) by Dual Rivers Trampoline x Brushbuster Starts Em Right; Breeder: Gordon Bigelow; Owner: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker

To learn more about AKC titles go to:

www.AKC.org ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

45


GWP STANDINGS

Field Top Ten January Through May 15, 2012

Field Top Ten Rankings based on dogs defeated. Submitted by Lynn Sandor (sandorcpa@comcast.net)

OPEN SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS)

Dogs Defeated

Number of Placements

Dog Name

Owner

1

NAFC DC AFC Ariels Justa Gotta Go Now

M Ezzo/B Brawn, PA

70

4

2

FC Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa

J Sodoro, NE

67

4

3

DC Jonnee Blue

R & D Lewis, CA

60

3

4

Uodibar's Freebee

C & K Wisch/R Haukoos

51

3

5

NAFC DC AFC Cascade Tumalo Tess

J & S Williams, OR

44

2

6

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras

M Eden, OR

43

2

7

CH Dual Shot's Behind Bars

Yamashita/K Hawkins, OR

38

3

8

FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl

M Eden, OR

34

3

9

Backwoods Drama Queen

G Dixon/ E Dixon,WI

23

1

10

Snowy River's Tnt Timber Tick

B Silcott/M Verdorn

21

2

Dogs Defeated

Number of Placements

In Open Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 21 GWPs placed 38 times, defeating 582 dogs.

AMATEUR SENIOR DOGS (GUN DOGS) Dog Name

Owner

1

FC AFC Wingfield's High Cotton JH

D & P Coller, IN

86

6

2

DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras

M Eden, OR

59

3

3

FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl MH

M Eden, OR

47

2

4

FC AFC Tumalo Timberjack

J & S Williams, OR

44

3

5

CH Rlb's Got Moxie At Drakkar MH

E Shupp, PA

38

3

6

CH Proulx's Hot Shot Pepper

J & C Proulx, OR

32

2

7

FC Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa

J Sodoro, NE

30

2

8

CH Dual Shot's Behind Bars

K&W Yamashita/Hawkins

26

2

9

Snowy River's Tnt Timber Tick

B Silcott/M Verdorn

25

3

10

CH Wireswest First Dibs

M Eden, OR

24

2

In Amateur Senior Gun Dogs, a total of 20 GWPs placed 40 times, defeating 512 dogs.

46

WIRE NEWS

Š2012 GWPCA


GWP STANDINGS

JUNIOR DOGS (PUPPY/DERBY COMBINED)

Dogs Defeated

Number of Placements

S Jahn, CA

41

7

Ironwires Aquire The Fire Rocks Cynister

B Dean/L Magoon

25

5

3

Idawire Apple Pie Ala Mode

B & S Mueller, WI

22

2

4

Blueridge Foxie Sadie Grace

M Headrick

16

3

5

Inverness Whiskey Lullaby

C Casanova/R Nelson, NE

13

3

6

Cascade Mercury Rising

J Calkins, OR

10

2

7

Brillows Sureshot Hardknock Doc

R Haukoos, IA

8

2

8

Weidenhugel Kate V Gus

C Heiller/K Boyd/L Sandor/M Eden

6

1

9

CH Ironwire AC-DC

A Cunningham, CO

5

2

10

Blackburn's Jackson

C Blackburn

5

1

Dog Name

Owner

1

Weidenhugel Jetta V Treff

2

In Junior Dogs, a total of 16 GWPs placed 35 times, defeating 165 dogs.

DC, FC or AFC Titles Earned Dual Champion, Field Champion: DC Jonnee Blue (B) SR46095611 (5/12/12) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph's Blitzen Von Duffin x Slick Shotten Maggie JH Breeder: Brady Shannon Owner: Robert & Debbie Lewis Field Champions: FC Brillow's Wild West Ponder Rosa (B) SR54471404 (4/7/12) by Whitetail Eli's Brother JH x Brillows Flyin Frizz B Breeder: Rhonda Haukoos Owner: John Sodoro FC Jay-Mar's How Do You Like Me Now JH (D) SR53880209 (4/27/12) by DC St Croix's Diamond Jim x CH Jay-Mar's Liver And Onions SH Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher & Patricia Hieber Owner: Nickol Litwin & Christopher & Patricia Hieber FC AFC Wireswest Radical Girl MH (B) SR44876605 (5/6/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin's Lady Bug CDX MH Breeder: Meg Eden Owner: Meg Eden Amateur Field Champion: DC AFC Wireswest Mardi Gras (B) SR44876603 (3/31/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin's Lady Bug CDX MH Breeder: Meg Eden Owner: Meg Eden AFC Wireswest Radical Girl MH (B) SR44876605 (4/6/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin's Lady Bug CDX MH Breeder: Meg Eden Owner: Meg Eden

Š2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

47


GWP STANDINGS

Conformation Top Ten January 1 Through April 30 2012

Rankings based on competition as reported by AKC. Submitted by Lori Sargent (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

BIS/GROUP ALL BREED COMPETITION

Points 23,201

BIS 13

G1 41

G2 10

G3 5

G4 1

GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH (D) K. Courtelis/ M&A Johnson/C. Whitmore

6,237

3

10

7

8

3

3

GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) B. Stroh, N&P Paduch

1,975

0

2

1

4

5

4

GCH Drakkar’s ‘N RLB’s Eyefull (B) K. Courtelis/J. Wilkinson/R. Pate/L. Bultman

379

0

0

2

1

1

5

GCH Afterhours Trickeration JH (B) R. Wickes/M. Hancock/C. Whitmore/C. Chism

281

0

0

1

1

2

6

GCH Drakkar’s RLB Celtic Private Eye (D) J & M Boyd, J. Wilkinson

237

0

0

1

1

2

7

GCH Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) F. Neuwirth/C.Whitmore/A. Johnson

163

0

0

0

0

1

1

GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) V. Malzoni Jr.

2

BREED POINT COMPETITION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 7 8 9 10

48

GCH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH (D) K. Courtelis/M&A Johnson/C. Whitmore GCH Mt. View Ripsnorter Silvercharm (D) V. Malzoni Jr. GCH Mountain View National Acclaim (D) B. Stroh/N&P Paduch GCH Drakkar’s RLB Celtic Private Eye (D) J&M Boyd/J. Wilkinson GCH Harvest Meadows Truth Be Told (B) L Minnick/A. Resnick GCH Afterhours Reece Have Gun Will Travel (D) F. Neuwirth/C.Whitmore/A. Johnson CH Hawk Haven’s Grand Stand (D) N&P Paduch GCH Weidenhugel Abby V Jessie (B) C. Heiller/K. Boyd CH Cynister Idawire Rose Red (B) A Wagoner/J. Quesnell Reece Wired To Win At Harvest Meadows Afterhours (D) L. Minnick/A. Johnson GCH Afterhours Trickeration JH (B) R. Wickes/M. Hancock/C. Whitmore/C. Chism

WIRE NEWS

©2012 GWPCA

Dogs Defeated 135 105 52 43 27 14 13 13 8 7 6


GWP STANDINGS

Obedience/Rally & Agility Top Ten January Through April 30, 2012

Obed/Rally/Agility Rankings based on 3 highest scores. Submitted by Lori Sargent (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

UTILITY 1 2 3

Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX OM2 JH – L. Swisher

584.5

Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock Pryor Creeks Gracie Mae VCD1 UDX VER RAE TDX MH – C&T Cagle

579.5 373.0

OPEN 1 2 3 4 5

Larkspur’s Glengarry Glen Gus VCD1 UDX OM2 JH – L. Swisher Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock Pryor Creeks Gracie Mae VCD1 UDX VER RAE TDX MH – C&T Cagle

591.5 582.5 574.0

CH Scotian Tougher Than Leather CD JH – C. Casanova/R. Nelson Andra V Argos CD RE – P. Menotti

195.0 182.5

GRAD NOVICE 1

CH Roy the Upland Hunter CD GN RE – L & O Popescu

581.5

RALLY EXCELLENT 1 2 3

CH Drakkar’s RLB He Caught My Eye BN RA – D&B Leveque Afterhours Major’s Sunny Sky CD RAE AX MXJ XF – S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi

Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RA NA OAJ OF - S. McKeever/J. Quattrochi

194 184

82

RALLY NOVICE 1 2 3 4 5

Tumalo’s Gus – M. Brown Willamette’s Zorra – L&O Popescu Willamette’s “Mr. Bones” - L&O Popescu FC Sure Shot’s Pretty Summer Endless Play JH – H. Stapgens Willamette’s Sachi - L&O Popescu/A Wilson CH Harvest Meadow’s Singin Gerdie Bird JH – L. Minnick

189 189 169 168 153 88

AGILITY EXCELLENT 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

CH Cynister’s Jumpin Jack Splash RN MX MXJ - S&J Rainwater/L. Reeves CH Scotian Whiskey River MX MXJ - C. Eberhardt/L Reeves Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH XF – A. Trotter SGR Dirty Witch MX MXJ AXP AJP SH - T. Brooks Madeline’s Prince Charming AX AXJ CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

350 348 344 342 310 214 104

OPEN 1 2

Afterhours Memphis Red Hot Lover BN RN NA OAJ OF – S. McKeever/J. Quattroch Afterhours Joie DeVivre NA NAJ – D. Philibert/M. Rosenblat/ C. Chism

108 98

OPEN PREFERRED 1

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

315

NOVICE FAST 1

Jed’s SF Blue Belle UD RE JH MX MXJ – M&K Braddock

155

NOVICE PREFERRED 1

CH Scotian Movin On Up RN MX MXJ XF - S. Jackson

386

©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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PURINA

Purina Parent Club Partnership Program Funding the Future of Our Breed Our national breed club, the AKC Canine Health Foundation and Purina are working to ensure a healthy future for the German Wirehaired Pointer. Since 2002, thousands have chosen to make a positive impact on the health of their breed by participating in the Purina® Parent Club Partnership (PPCP) Program. To date, the PPCP program has provided nearly $2 million for canine health research. When you collect weight circles (proofs of purchase) from bags of participating Purina® brand dog foods, our national breed club can receive funding for breed-specific health studies that enable our dogs to live longer, healthier lives. The more weight circles you turn in, the greater your potential earnings for the GWPCA. Some clubs have already generated thousands of dollars for their breed. Half of the funding each year is designated for canine health research and AKC Canine Health Foundation grants. The other half is eligible to provide additional funding for health research, education and rescue efforts, including, but not limited to:    

Cancer research Illustrated breed standards Health screening clinics Breed rescue

  

Wildlife habitat studies Educational outreach Scholarship programs

Where does funding go? The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America will earn 10% of the value of your qualifying Purina weight circles. Of that amount, half goes directly to the AKC Canine Health Foundation fund for our breed and half comes to our club. For example: If you submit Purina Weight Circle points valued at $100, Purina will give $10 to support our breed: $5 goes to the national breed club’s Donor Advised Fund at the AKC Canine Health Foundation to support health research and $5 goes directly to our national breed club for health research, rescue and education.”

Enroll Today Join Purina® Pro Club®, Purina’s loyalty program and start earning rewards right away. If you are already a member, make sure you notify Purina® Pro Club® that you would like to start earning funds for the GWPCA. 1. 2. 3. 4.

Apply at PurinaProClub.com or 1-877-PRO-CLUB (1-877-776-2582) Declare German Wirehaired Pointer for the Parent Club Partnership Program Save your Purina weight circles from eligible Purina® dog foods Submit your weight circles to Purina® Pro Club®

Purina will make a donation to the GWPCA & the AKC Canine Health Foundation for all qualifying weight circles you submit.

PURINA PARENT CLUB PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America TOTAL EARNINGS Since 2002

$18,161.89

343 Pro Club Members declared GWP for the PPCP Program 41 who declared submitted weight circles TOTAL EARNINGS YTD $747.25 50

WIRE NEWS

©2012 GWPCA


COU

S

The birds are scarce, but he continues his search working the ditches and fence rows quartering through the field. He slams on point and you say to yourself, "this is what it‘s all about." His breeding, your training/conditioning combined with high-quality nutrition have made this possible. Give him the high-quality nutrition that helps keep him in the field when other dogs are heading for the truck. Feed what many top field trialers feed — Purina® Pro Plan® Performance Formula.

• Real chicken is the #1 ingredient, for a high-quality protein source to help support muscle mass for strength and provide energy • VO2 max optimizes oxygen metabolism so dogs burn fat more efficiently • Natural sources of glucosamine for joint health and mobility m • High levels of antioxidants to help support a healthy immune system • Rich in omega-3 fatty acids, including EPA and DHA • Highly palatable For more information of interest to sporting dog enthusiasts, visit www.proplan.com/sportingdog/mag Purina is a proud sponsor of:

Trademarks owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland

©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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GW P C l u b o f S o u t h e r n C a l i f o r n i a S p e c i a l t y Sweepstakes - Judge Mr. Mark Stephenson Best In Sweepstakes JAY-MAR’S REMEMBER MY NAME, SR69812501, 8/27/2011, Breeder: Nickol and Patricia and Christopher Hieber. By Jay-Mar’s Over the Limit JH x CH RLBs Drakkar Laika What You See JH. Owner: Nickol Litwin and Patricia & Christopher Hieber. Bitch.

Best In Opposite Sweepstakes HH LOOKOUT FIELD MARSHAL, SR69016406, 7/4/2011, Breeder: Ed Shupp, Joyce Wilkinson and James & Helen Witt. By GCh. Ripsnorters Mt. View Lookout JH x CH RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH. Owner: C Heiller, K. Boyd and E. Shupp. Dog. Agent Kathi Boyd.

Best In Veteran Sweepstakes CH SUREFIRE’S SECRET MOONSHINE JH RN. SR21922302, 10/16/2004, Breeder: Andy & Joan Payton. By CH Schnellberg’s Stand N Deliver x CH Surefire’s Home Brewed Secret JH RN. Owner: Andy & Joan Payton. Bitch.

Regular Classes - Judge Mrs. Sue Sellers Rose Best of Breed & Group 3 GCH AFTERHOURS REECE HAVE GUN WILL TRAVEL, SR50045103, 4/11/2008, Breeder: Mike & Angie Johnson and Christine Whitmore. By GCH Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Lookout JH x CH J an J Afterhours Dana JH. Owner: Franz Wireth, Christine Whitmore & Angie Johnson. Dog. Agent Oscar Quiros.

Best of Opposite CH SUREFIRE’S THORNY LITTLE SECRET JH, SR56797902, 5/26/2009. Breeder: J an A Payton. By DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH. Andy & Joan Payton. Bitch.

Select Dog CH GERONIMO’S FLYING CALYPSO, SR37303604, 07/30/2004. Breeder: Gary & JoAnn Steffes & Laura Myles. By CH Geronimo’s Calypso Choice JH x CH Geronimo’s Cheyenne Bronco. Owner: JoAnn Steffes. Dog.

Select Bitch CH GERONIMO’S GODDESS V DAZZLE, SR57376702, 06/01/2009. Breeder: JoAnn Steffes and Laura Myles. By Cynister’s Winter Solostice x CH Geronimo’s Dazzle V Inverness JH. Owner: JoAnn Steffes & Laura Myles. Bitch

Winners Dog BONE POINT’S JOKER, SR64388201, 9/25/2010. Breeder: Greg Whitten and Kelly Jobes. By Chukar Husk x McNally’s Super Ali. Owner: Karla Weber. Dog

Reserve Winners Dog HH LOOKOUT FIELD MARSHAL, SR69016406, 7/4/2011, Breeder: Ed Shupp, Joyce Wilkinson and James & Helen Witt. By GCh. Ripsnorters Mt. View Lookout JH x CH RLB’s Got Moxie at Drakkar MH. Owner: C Heiller, K. Boyd and E. Shupp. Dog. Agent Kathi Boyd.

Winners Bitch and Best of Winners JAY-MAR’S REMEMBER MY NAME, SR69812501, 8/27/2011, Breeder: Nickol and Patricia and Christopher Hieber. By Jay-Mar’s Over the Limit JH x CH RLBs Drakkar Laika What You See JH. Owner: Nickol Litwin and Patricia & Christopher Hieber. Bitch.

Reserve Winners Bitch WEIDENHUGEL JETTA V TREFF, SR65865801, 12/12/2010, Breeder: Mildred Revell. By FC AFC Weidenhugel Impulse V Zero MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee. Owner: Sharon Jahn. Bitch. 54

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GW P C l u b o f S o u t h e r n C a l i f o r n i a S p e c i a l t y

Best of Breed

Best of Opposite Sex

Best of Winners and Winners Bitch

Winners Dog

Best in Veteran Sweepstakes

Winners Dog & Veteran Bitch 10 yrs Older Š2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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D E LTA P E T PA RT N E R S

A Word From Becky To be a Delta pet partner, one has to be re-evaluated and have a vet exam every two years. This was my year and we signed up for the evaluation. When my mom put my vest on, I thought I was going to work and was so excited, like always. We arrived a little early at the facility and the person who was supposed to go ahead of me, was not there yet. So we were asked if we wanted to go first. I was so excited and I think my mom wanted to get this over with. She gets more nervous than me! I won’t ever let her down but she still stews a bit. We started off and I could see everyone here loved me. So I strutted my stuff even more. Nothing phased me. In fact, the examiner asked if we could be photographed for her website. My mom said” Sure”, so they took lots of pictures of me, meeting new people, meeting people in wheelchairs, with crutches, being sort of loud and unruly. I just kept going like always. We had no problems and ended up with a perfect score. In fact, the evaluator told us that we were a wonderful team and a real asset to the community. So now I am licensed for another two years. I do get tired (I am now eleven) but I sure love my work. School has been out but we have been busy at the hospital. It makes me so happy to be welcomed by the staff and other volunteers. And then when I meet new people, they gush over me and thank me so much for coming. I wouldn’t miss it for the world. Sometimes in the cancer treatment area, I see some of the same people over and over again. They act so happy to see me, like I make their day. Their pets and admiration towards me make mine! I will be anxious to get back to school, though. I just love those kids! Stay tuned for my next adventures. My mom sent in to AKC all the information about making me have the Therapy Dog title. I now can add that to my name, CH Von Duffin’s Seven of Nine Therapy Dog! We want to thank our friend, Janice Allen, who is always to willing to take my picture for this article. Happy Fall everyone, Becky 56

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©2012 GWPCA


N AT I O N A L R E S C U E

NGWPR Summer Update By Diane Turner, National Rescue Coordinator

With barbeques, fireworks and Fourth of July With barbeques, fireworks and Fourth of July celebrations celebrations only days away, it is hard to imagine that only days away, it is hard to imagine that the NGWPR the NGWPR fund-raising activities for the 2012 fund-raising activities for the 2012 National Specialty are National Specialty are well underway. NGWPR Fundwell underway. NGWPR Fund-Raising Coordinator Patti Raising Coordinator Patti Roberts and a team of Roberts and a team of volunteers are working diligently volunteers are working diligently to make certain that to make certain that the silent auction and raffle are a the silent auction and raffle are a success. success. Helping Patti this year, is new member Diane Helping Patti this year, is new member Diane Aurigemma, who in February adopted Angel Grace, a Aurigemma, who in February adopted Angel Grace, a liver and white special needs youngster. Once Angel, liver and white special needs youngster. Once Angel, who has vision impairment, was settled in her new who has vision impairment, was settled in her new home, Diane jumped in and volunteered to help with home, Diane jumped in and volunteered to help with the rescue program. Also assisting in the western part the rescue program. Also assisting in the western of the country, are Arizonans Angela Milowski and part of the country, are Arizonans Angela Milowski Steve Minas. The majority of NGPWR’s funds come and Steve Minas. The majority of NGPWR’s funds

from our GWPCA membership. So when any of the come from our GWPCA membership. So when any of funding raising committee contacts you for your the funding raising committee contacts you for your donation, please be generous. Already a wonderful donation, please be generous. Already a wonderful Coach Coach purse has once again been donated by the purse has once again been donated by the Shupps,, a Shupps,, a lovely bronze sculpture of a GWP in the field lovely bronze sculpture of a GWP in the field has been has been offered by award-winning sculpture Leslie offered by award-winning sculpture Leslie Hutto and a Hutto and a sterling silver belt buckle with a Wire on sterling silver belt buckle with a Wire on point has been point has been commissioned by Steve Minas. commissioned by Steve Minas. As of mid-June, NGWPR has placed 32 GWPs into new As of mid-June, NGWPR has placed 32 GWPs into new homes and there are 21 dogs currently in foster care, homes and there are 21 dogs currently in foster care, with with two more awaiting foster homes. The cost to two more awaiting foster homes. The cost to maintain maintain this number of rescue dogs is daunting even this number of rescue dogs is daunting even though our though our volunteers provide food, small items and volunteers provide food, small items and training without training without cost to the program. cost to the program.

Treasurer Amy Amy Cunningham Cunningham has has provided provided aa cost cost breakdown breakdown since since January, January, 2012: 2012: Treasurer May 24, 24, 2012 2012 Treasurer’s Treasurer’s Report Report May Current Balance: (pending deposit $600 additional) Income YTD: Adoption Fees Donations, Calendars, T-shirts

$ 6,498.06

$5,720.00 5,450.00 270.00

Expenses: Boarding Insurance Microchips Transport Veterinarian Treasurer’s Checks

Transportation costs costs are are one one of of the the greatest greatest expenses. expenses. Transportation Often GWPs are found in rural high-kill facilities. When Often GWPs are found in rural high-kill facilities. When we have no volunteers in the immediate area, we must we have no volunteers in the immediate area, we must pay to to have have the the dog dog moved. moved. Occasionally, Occasionally, we we have have aa dog dog pay with issues and we find that moving the dog to a foster with issues and we find that moving the dog to a foster with more more training training experience experience benefits benefits the the dog dog and and allows with allows it to be readied for adoption more quickly. it to be readied for adoption more quickly. So if if you you are are planning planning aa trip trip and and can can provide provide So transportation for a rescue dog, please contact one one of of the transportation for a rescue dog, please contact the NGWPR coordinators. If you are flying and a dog NGWPR coordinators. If you are flying and a dog can canwith fly with you to your destination andmet be by metitsbyfoster, its fly you to your destination and be foster, again please let one of the coordinators know again please let one of the coordinators know your plans. your plans.less It is much less forfly our to fly It is much expensive forexpensive our dogs to asdogs excess as excess baggage than to fly alone as air cargo. baggage than to fly alone as air cargo. The rescue rescue program program belongs belongs to to each each GWPCA GWPCA member member The and so occasionally a member is contacted and asked to and so occasionally a member is contacted and asked mentor a family that has just adopted a rescue dog. to mentor a family that has just adopted a rescue dog. Each rescue dog spends time in a foster home learning Each rescue dog spends time in a foster home learning manners and and basic basic obedience. obedience. Each Each dog dog is is evaluated evaluated for for manners temperament and for bird instinct. We try to place our temperament and for bird instinct. We try to place our dogs with hunting experience or bird instinct with those adopters who wish to train a dog as a weekend hunting

$8,344.60

896.00 520.00 339.00 3,117.11 3,406.49 66.00

www.NationalGWPRescue.org

we will never guarantee that a or dog willinstinct hunt. Adopters dogs with hunting experience bird with those are told hunting experience or instinct is a bonus. adopters who wish to train a dog as a weekend hunting

companion; however our adoption contract states that we Therefore, you are asked mentor, please supportare will never ifguarantee that atodog will hunt. Adopters the dog and the family. If you identify a problem told hunting experience or instinct is a bonus. with the dog, please contact one of the coordinators or the foster caregiver immediately. to the adoptive Therefore, if you are asked toSuggesting mentor, please support family that dog is “worthless and un-trainable” is the dog and the family. If you identify a problem with simply not acceptable. that a or the the dog, please contactWe onedoofrecognize the coordinators previously un-encountered problem can develop foster caregiver immediately. Suggesting to the once adoptive the dog is in a new home. The NGWPR coordinators family that dog is “worthless and un-trainable” is simply want to know about anyrecognize such issue with a dog. Theunnot acceptable. We do that a previously rescue program will provide help for the family encountered problem can develop once the dog and is in a new more training for thecoordinators dog. Our goalwant is toto keep ourabout rescue home. The NGWPR know any dogs in their new homes. such issue with a dog. The rescue program will provide

help for the family and more training for the dog. Our goal Please be our supportive of our rescue dogs. Many have is to keep rescue dogs in their new homes. been through a great deal of anguish in their lives and each deserves your support yourdogs. understanding. Please be supportive of ourand rescue Many have been

through a great deal of anguish in their lives and each deserves your support and your understanding. ©2012 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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Wire~News Summer 2012  

Wire~News Summer 2012

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