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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Wire~News

The Journal of the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America

Spring 2013 Top Sires & Dams of 2012, Breeder/Puppy Issue

Re g u l a r Fe a t u r e s 8 9 13 16 17 20 28 34 35 36 37 40 44 45 59 60 68 69 70 72 73

Club Officers/Committee Chairs Presidents Message/ Delegate’s Report Editorial Health Forum Health Forum Financial Legacies - Baldwin We Remember Notes From Becky – Delta Dogs CHIC - Nelson Club Business – 2015 Judge’s Ballot Club Business – 2015 Judge’s Ballot National GWP Rescue - Baumbarger New Beginnings - Galan-Parsons New Beginnings - Galan-Parsons Agility - Trotter Agility - Trotter New Titles - Sargent New Titles - Sargent New Titles - Sargent Advertising/Content Information Advertising/Content Information

S p e c i a l Fe a t u r e s 24 32 42 46 49 52 54 57 64 66

Whelp Wise – Cunningham First Day Testing for Puppies – Turner Southern Classic -- Johnson Early Bird Training – Duffin She Was Only Here – Krueser Eastern NE Specialty -- Nelson Tale of Two Roosters – Hirneisen Understanding Your Puppies – Turner Eastern NE Specialty – Nelson GWP Club of WI Hunt Tests – Vogel

On the Cover “Annie”

CH. Tova’s Ani Von Der Winston SH, UPT 131 Prize III Annie is our “go to girl” in all situations. She is intelligent and creative when hunting and predictable in the field. She is gentle and attentive in the house and great with even the youngest children. We’ve been told that she is a great dog to hunt over and we proudly agree. Annie is a once-in-a-lifetime dog! Ed & Elaine Maloney Northwest GWPs

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Index to Advertisers Cover Inside 3 6 7 10 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 21 22 23 26 27

Ed & Elaine Maloney – Northwest GWPs Judy Chesire & Penney Ljungren – Heywire/SureShot Pete & Norma Paduch -- Hawk Haven Wires Victor Malzoni -- Hampton Court Victor Malzoni -- Hampton Court Mike & Angie Johnson – Reece Kennels Mike & Angie Johnson – Reece Kennels Mike & Angie Johnson – Reece Kennels Patti Roberts Wayne Yamshita Wayne Yamshita LaMar & Kay Gunnarson – Ridgehaven Kennels Cathy Milachek Sharon Jahn Purina Claire Winsch Betty Stroh & Laura Myles – Hilltop Farms/Inverness Betty Stroh, Pete & Norma Paduch – Hilltop Farms/Hawk Haven Kennels

29 Ed & Elaine Maloney – Northwest GWPs 30 Lisa Minnick & Alice Resnick – Harvest Meadows 31 Angie Johnson & Angela Milowski – Reece/Wireworks Kennels 38 Courtney & William Bastian – Claddagh Kennel 39 Courtney & William Bastian – Claddagh Kennel 51 Jim West & Rhonda Haukoos – Wild West Kennel 58 Jo & Pat Neil – Shydal GWPs 62 Dawn Phillips & Sandy Moore, DVM – DayBreak GWPs 63 Dawn Phillips, Jack & Kari Loken – DayBreak GWPs 71 Miranda Wagner – Portraits by Miranda Diana Wise Sarah Ecolani - Fun Time Dog Shop Steve Minas – Upland Ranger CnL Paca 74 Miranda Wagner – AmWires Inside Lisa & Octavian Popescu – Willamette GWP Back C. Jim West & Rhonda Haukoos – Wild West Kennel

W i r e ~ N e w s Fu t u r e I s s u e s

Coming Soon

Summer 2013 Wire-News Field and Working Dogs Issue HIGHLIGHTING: GWPs in the Field GWPs making their mark in Obedience and Rally GWPs burning up the Agility Courses GWPS working in the Community Ad Deadline – June 15, 2013 Please send Ads & Payment to: Adam Cunningham, Advertising Manager 9088 N. Awl Rd. Parker, CO ironwiregwp@gmail.com Content Deadline – June 1, 2013 Please forward Club Business, Photos and Articles to: Diane Turner, Editor turner.p.diane@gmail.com

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2 0 1 2 GW P C A B o a r d o f D i r e c t o r s President Ray Calkins, 13235 SW Bell Rd., Sherwood, OR 97140 (503) 682-2968 gwpcascade@gmail.com Vice President Elizabeth (Liz) Dixon, N7815 County Rd N, Spring Valley, WI 54767 (715) 778-4675 bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Secretary Lori Sargent, 5775 N. Chester Rd., Charlotte, MI 48813 (517) 543-3628 birddog@windsweptwires.net Treasurer Erika Brown, 236 Park Ave., Woodstock, GA 30188 (770) 591-4329 geauxerika@yahoo.com Eastern Director Garnett Persinger, 13838 St. Highway 198, Conneautville, PA 16406 (814) 587-2365 13838@windstream.net Midwest Director Chuck Casanova, 19910 Platte View Rd. , Gretna NE 68028 (402) 691-9498 clc51@hotmail.com Western Director Robert Perry, 527 NW Elm Ave., Suite 3, PMB 200, Redmond, OR 97756 (541) 504-9197 aspendel@aol.com

C o m m i t t e e C h a i r s & Po s i t i o n s Breeder Referral -- Bernee Brawn – justagwp@verizon.net Bylaws – Mark Sargent – birddog@windsweptwires.net Canine Health (CHIC) – Robin Nelson – gwpoint@aol.com Delegate to the AKC – Patricia Laurans – plaurans@earthlink.net Field Advisory Committee – Elizabeth Dixon – bkwdsgwp@svtel.net Futurity (Field) – Tom Lococo – tom.lococo@novartis..com Futurity (Show) – Laura Myles – invernesskennels@frontier.com GWPU – Open – Volunteer Needed Judges’ Education – Judy Cheshire – heywiregwp@gmail.com National Events Coordinator – Laura Reeves – scotiadawges@gmail.com 2013 Nationals – Rhonda Haukoos – brillowkennels@iowatelecom.net 2014 Nationals – Board of Directors Maturity (Show) - Audrey Meinke – fairwindxx@sbcglobal.net Membership & Wire-News Mailing – Erika Brown – geauxerika@yahoo.com Rescue – Heidi Baumbarger – bluelinekennels@windstream.net ROM – Courtney Vogel – courtneyvogel@hotmail.com Show Advisory Committee – Judy Cheshire – heywiregwp@gmail.com Top Ten Field – Lynn Sandor – sandorcpa@comcast. net Top Ten Other – Lori Sargent – birddog@windsweptwires.net Trophies – Sue Degraw – schnellberg@comcast.net Versatility – Greg DuBois – grgdubois@comcast.net Wire-News Editor – Diane Turner – turner.p.diane@gmail.com Wire-News Advertising – Adam Cunningham – ironwiregwp@gmail.com Wire Mail – Steve Kreuser – gwpca_update@hotmail.com Web Master – Angie Johnson – angiehef@aol.com 8

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Pr e s i d e n t s M e s s a g e - R a y C a l k i n s As we come out of winter, it is time to get outside with our dogs. Spring training, hunt tests and field trials are now underway but the weather can be unpredictable at times.  The AKC Pointing Breed Gun Dog Championship was held at Branched Oaks in Nebraska beginning on March 16.  Our wirehairs did well.  The non-retrieving championship was won by Brillows Big Wild West, owned by Rhonda Haukoos and Todd Tuls and handled by Jim West.  Tumalo Teddy, owned and handled by John Williams placed fourth in the two series retrieving championship.  CONGRATULATIONS!!! 

Ray A K C D e l e g a t e ’ s Re p o r t - Pa t L a u r a n s

MARCH 11th - 13th, 2013 DELEGATES MEETING Sunday the 11th _ I met with the other Coordinating Committee Chairs-- the AKC CEO, COO and BOD Chairman. 12th - Starting at 9:00 am I attended several committee meetings in the morning. I listened to the discussion and spoke regarding the admittance of the Agility Clubs as member clubs. That same afternoon I chaired the Parent Club Committee and later I attended the Delegate Caucus. That same day, I participated in the Coordinating Committee Meeting with the other Committee Chairs, the President and the Chairman of the AKC Board. My day ended at 6:20 pm. 13th - I attended the Delegates Meeting which began at 9:00 am. There was a presentation regarding Public Relations and Marketing. During the meeting the new AKC Social Media VP was introduced.

The AKC Financial Report was presented and there was an increase in revenues and investments and expenses were held in check; therefore this quarter revenues increased about 4%. We passed an amendment to the AKC Constitution and Bylaws that added, as one of the objectives of the AKC, the support, the well-being and the health of the canine. We passed an amendment to the Charter and Bylaws of the AKC that would permit Licensed Agility Clubs that meet the criteria to become AKC member clubs. A proposal was defeated that would have reduced the number of Delegate meetings. Items that will be voted on at the June meeting were read and discussed. During this meeting we held the election for directors of the AKC. Those elected to the Board were: Alan Kalter, American Bullmastiff Association Harvey Wooding, Westminster KC, Carl Ashby, United States Kerry Blue Terrier Club Lee Arnold, Southern Colorado KC As always, it is my pleasure to serve as the Delegate for the GWPCA. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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From the Editor

Fr o m T h e E d i t o r - D i a n e Tu r n e r During the past winter, Adam Cunningham, Wire-News Advertising Manager, and I designed a survey that went out to our readership via the Wire-Mail. Since this is your magazine, we were interested to know how you felt about the content and the advertising. Unfortunately only 37% of GWPCA members responded. But the results were interesting and in some cases surprising. A resounding 81% of you wanted more articles on canine health and so in this issue we kick off the Health Forum with an article from GWPCA member Karen Potter DVM. who writes not only from the perspective of a veternarian, but with the emotion of an owner who recently lost a beloved dog due to a migrating grass awn.

Fifty-three percent of you wanted more articles about field events, while only 32% were interested in stories and photos about shows. So in this issue, we feature a great story about hunting pheasant in Michigan by Rich Hirneisen and another by Steve Krueser who relates his experiences training and handling his 2012 #1 Puppy/ Derby Dog, Lindsey. Forty-two percent of you found articles on breeding and whelping as Extremely Important, so since this is our “Breeders’/Puppy Issue” Wire-News is featuring articles on a new whelping service, testing puppy temperaments and starting seven-week-old puppies in the field. Since a good number of you (37%) wanted to follow up on the NGWPR rescue dogs, staff writer Debbie Galan-Parsons in her column, New Beginnings, interviews the forever family of Pfeffer, a misunderstood puppy who spent two months on death row in a California shelter. And we had an amazing number of requests to bring back Ann Duffin’s column, A Word from Becky--the Delta dog. Overwhelmingly, GWPCA members felt that only 25% of the Wire-News should be devoted to advertising. Forty-one percent of you felt that soliciting outside or commercial advertising was acceptable, while 2% of you were adamant that you did not want such advertising. We asked how you felt about going to an on-line only version of Wire-News instead of receiving a copy in the mail and 80% of our readers protested. We also asked if you would consider paying more to have a printed copy of the Wire-News-- overwhelmingly you declined. And that presents an interesting dilemma! The costs of printing and mailing continue to soar so in an attempt to use the space wisely and weigh the incoming revenue with the costs we’ve tightened up the white space, reduced the size of the type by a point and cut some things. We know that some of you will not like these changes, but bear with us as we attempt to find a balance. In this issue and the upcoming issues you will find more than 25% of space devoted to advertising, but we will always try to bring you informative and entertaining articles, updates on club business and interesting photos. Adam’s goal is to get the Wire-News on a selfpaying basis so the magazine will not drain the club coffers and he needs your help to do so. We are ever-so grateful to all those who placed ads this issue, please continue to support the WireNews. We hope you enjoy the 2013 Spring Issue of the Wire-News. Happy Reading,

Diane Turner ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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H E A LT H F O R U M

Foreign Bodies Can Be Deadly

A Dog Lost Too Young, Doing What He Loved By Karen Potter, DVM

Before I begin, I must state that this story is not intended to scare anyone from hunting or running their dogs. This story is only meant to bring additional education about migrating grass awn foreign bodies and their risks to our dogs. Duncan, CH Heiss Draht Digging for the Horizon JH NA I, was a special, striking solid liver German Wirehaired Pointer who had the opportunity to touch the lives and hearts of many prior to being lost to a migrating grass awn at the young age of three years. As a six-week old puppy we saw something special in Duncan and he never let us down. When he was under seven months of age he was a NAVHDA Natural Ability prize I, an AKC Junior Hunter and later an AKC show champion from the Bred-By-Exhibitor Class with four major wins. He turned heads, both with his beauty and his desire to please and ability in the field. He was training for his AKC Master Hunter and NAVHDA Utility tests. On November 13, 2012, Duncan began having breathing abnormalities (increased respiratory rate and effort including using his abdominal muscles to breath) and was immediately taken to his veterinarian. Although I am a veterinarian myself, I work in a practice that is four hours from Duncan’s primary home and could not oversee his case. Diagnostic tests were performed. The radiographs showed fluid in his chest cavity and he had an elevated white blood cell count in his bloodwork. The rest of his tests were unremarkable.

CH Heiss Draht Digging For the Horizon JH

His veterinarians attempted to remove some of the fluid from his chest, but they were unable to make him more comfortable at that time. He was transferred that day to a specialty practice for further hospitalization and diagnostics.

Immediately upon presentation to the specialty practice it was identified that he was not getting enough oxygen in his blood. With ultrasound guidance they were able to remove 250 mL of pus-like fluid from his chest. He was started on IV fluids, two IV antibiotics and kept on oxygen therapy to help him obtain oxygen more easily and make him more comfortable. At 4:00 am chest tubes were placed on both sides at which time they evacuated another 650 mL of very odiferous, infected fluid. With the information that we now had, we were suspicious that the cause of Duncan’s sickness would be a migrating foreign body. They were working to stabilize him for thoracic (chest) exploratory surgery on the morning of November 15th. Duncan on point in the field. 16

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H E A LT H F O R U M At 9:00 am on November 15, 2012, Duncan went into surgery for the planned thoracic exploratory. When the surgeon opened his chest the full extent of the damage was seen. Duncan had only one portion of one lung lobe that was relatively normal; the rest was all diseased tissue. They also found the migrating foreign body that caused all of this damage. It is shocking to believe that a piece of a plant, no bigger than the tip of a pen, could be of such harm. Duncan went into cardiac arrest while still in surgery. The doctors were performing CPR when then contacted me at which point I told them to stop. The damage was too severe and we were not going to bring our boy back. There are certain barbed grass awns such as foxtail barley, cheatgrass and wild rye. These are only a few examples as there are many more as well. The grass awn is a protective sheath that covers certain types of grass seeds. Some of these awns are barbed which can get in the dogs skin, eyes or ears, can be ingested or in Duncan’s case, inhaled.

The grass awn found in Duncan’ lung.—the point of a pen shows just how small the awn was.

Because they are barbed, they travel in a unidirectional path and for example, if they are inhaled, they cannot be sneezed back out. The awn then continues to travel through the entire respiratory tract and eventually breaks out into the chest cavity where the infection festers. The awns that get into the skin, eyes and ears can travel in the same manner and can cause large areas of infection and a lot of damage. The grass awns are thought to be a greater risk in the late summer and fall when the seeds are being released from the plants.

We will never know how long Duncan may have had the grass awn in his system but the infection that he had was very chronic. It is amazing how a dog will compensate and not show signs of sickness. Only a week before his death, Duncan was out hunting on preserves and continuing in his field training. The only sign prior to his respiratory issues was a decrease in his appetite but Duncan was never a very eager eater. He would have turned 3 years old the day after he died. Unfortunately our hunting dogs are considered the poster child for this type of disease. They are the population most at risk as they are exposed to the grasses that can cause problems. This was once considered mainly a problem that would be seen in the western states. As habitat programs have brought in different grasses, we may start seeing more cases in other areas. At this time there are studies to determine the number of these cases, their locations and where habitat programs are planting these grasses. Duncan never hunted in any states other than Michigan and Indiana. Education is all we can do. We cannot stop hunting, training or running our dogs – that is not fair. We can however, be aware that this risk exists. Checking dogs thoroughly after running and combing out any grasses can help with those on the outside. The awns that are inhaled or ingested will not be as easily noticed. If a dog has repeated severe sneezing, don’t be afraid to investigate. Some dogs won’t give us much sign, as Duncan did not, and because our hunting dogs can be stoic it may be too late before we know they are sick. Duncan’s story was devastating and still brings tears to my eyes, but I feel sharing his story to help educate others is the best way to honor his short life. Karen Potter is a GWPCA member and a veterinarian. For further information, visit: The Grass Awn Project: www.meanseeds.com ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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FINANCIAL LEGACIES

Time and Treasure Determine the Future Decisions We Make Today Impact Our Family’s Future By Dick Baldwin Our legacies are built upon one decision at a time. How we invest our time and treasure will determine what was important to us. Or lives are full of responsibilities pulling us in many directions. Our jobs and families and social involvements require that if we are to be effective, we must exercise wisdom. One effective tactic is to engage wise counsel as we look to provide balance in the different areas of our lives. The government has the need to fund its activities through an old means called taxes. Ah, yes. TAXES. As Mama used to say there are only two certainties in life. . . death and taxes! Along with these two certainties there can be added ones-divorce, illness, lawsuits, injury and disability. Loss of income and other financial disasters have been fairly common in our current economic environment. With all of change since the financial crisis new laws have been enacted that can literally take every bit of our life’s work away. The old days of the family farm being a legacy to the next generation have gone the way of antiquity. As distressing as these things are, it is good to know that we have at our disposal some strategies that provide protection from the ravages of those entities that can invade our lives. The old saying is, “people who fail to plan, can plan to fail.” A team of professionals can provide the expertise that can effectively provide strategies to minimize and remove many of the current threats to our futures. In today’s environment, it is vitally important that we do not procrastinate in the planning of our and our family’s futures. If we leave it up to the government and the courts to provide for our future than we shall certainly reap what we fail to sow. Without the appropriate legal instrument in place the probate courts and the government can decide how all of your assets are spent and even in the event of illness or disability the court can establish a guardianship over you or your loved ones. One of the essential steps in any estate or disability planning should be for the care of your dogs. Making arrangements for their physical care through a legally established document will be an 20

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important step to the well-being of each of your wiry companions. Establishing financial funding for your dogs’ future needs is something that each owner must consider. Our rescue coordinators are all too aware of the dangers of not planning for your dogs. Many times, GWPs found in shelter situations are there solely because relatives were called upon to take over in a time of death or illness. Through these folks are well-meaning and truly feel a shelter is a good place for their family member’s beloved canine companions, most GWP owners would disagree. We all need to be diligent in our attention to the new realities that we are currently facing in our nation and the subsequent economic challenges. Fourteen trillion dollars in national debt has only one solution and our pocketbooks will be impacted to the point that our children and grandchildren will have limited chances of economic well-being if we do not plan effectively. In the next issues of the Wire-News I will be contributing some of the possible strategies that can help us prepare for our economic futures and that can offer some suggestions for those who have multiple dog households. But remember, that any strategies presented in my column are subject to different state laws and should only be viewed as suggestions that need to be reviewed by legal and tax professionals in your state. I am not an attorney or an accountant. If you have questions of a financial nature or you have concerns in planning for your canine family members I will attempt to answer your questions in my next column. Please contact me at: dickbaldwin@earthlink.net. Dick Baldwin is a financial planner and GWP owner who lives in Ohio.


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Proudly feeding six of the past six Westminster Best In Show winners.

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Trademarks owned by Société des Produits Nestlé S.A., Vevey, Switzerland


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WHELPING BOX

Taking the Stress Out of Whelping A Service Helps Breeders Monitor Labor By Adam Cunningham

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he whelping process causes a lot of excitement in our home. It does, however, come with a certain amount of anxiety. We, like all breeders, hope that it will be a smooth process, but there is always a hint of worry that plagues us. Recently, one of our bitches was only carrying two puppies and our vet expressed concern about possible complications. She suggested a service called Whelp Wise (www.whelpwise.com). The service was developed in 1997 by Karen Copely, a high-risk obstetrical nurse and dog fancier who saw the need to help breeders through the whelping process. Whelp Wise helps to monitor a bitch in the days preceding whelping and identifies any critical issues that may develop. I did my research and decided to give it a try as it was the best option to avoid a C-section for our soon-to-be-mother. Five days prior to my bitch’s due date Whelp Wise sent a package that included a uterine monitor, a fetal heart rate Doppler and an instructional video. We unpacked the equipment and set it up following the easy-to-understand instructions. The uterine contraction monitor is placed on the side of your dog for a period of 60 minutes. This is followed by a Doppler exam process to identify the heart beats and locations of the puppies We began monitoring the bitch twice daily. The information was and transmitted via a phone line and within 15 minutes of transmission a specialist would call and update us on the bitch’s progress. Monitoring uterine contractions and fetal heart rates allows Whelp Wise to positively identify the onset of labor and accurately estimate the time that whelping will begin. Uterine contractions and heart rates are measured twice daily prior to the whelping process. This confirms that all is going well or it can identify any developing problems in a timely manner. Whelp Wise will instruct you to increase the monitoring sessions if they feel it is indicated Common problems such as inertia can be identified and treated in the home setting using low-dose medication which can be obtained at your vet’s office in pre-filled syringes or can be ordered by the Whelp Wise vet and shipped. The amount of medication can be adjusted as the vet instructs. This way the medications support the labor process but do not over stimulate the uterus. All medication doses are determined by the uterine

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contraction pattern. In cases where there are strong contractions but the puppy is not moving medication should not be given. This situation can also be identified, helping to prevent problems such as uterine rupture.

With the help of Whelp Wise our bitch delivered two healthy pups.

Monitoring the heart rates of the pups allowed me to know that the puppies were doing well during the last few days of gestation and during whelping. Stressed pups can be identified by specific heart rate patterns, allowing the breeder and veterinarian to make timely and informed decisions about interventions that are more likely to result in healthy pups.

My bitch was having a difficult time keeping the contractions going, so after the first puppy we monitored her and gave low-doses of medication to induce the labor for the second pup. A few hours later he was on his way but he got stuck. Whelp Wise walked us through the process of releasing and delivering him then guided us in resuscitating him. With their help, we delivered two healthy puppies and did not put our bitch through any undue stress in the whelping process. I have no doubt that without them we would have lost the second puppy and ended up at the office so the vet could perform a C-section. The Whelp Wise service is useful for bitches that have a history of premature labor, fetal resorbtion, pyometra, fetal loss or other medical problems or for bitches who have scheduled C-Sections but need to carry their pups for the longest time possible prior to surgery. The cost of the Whelp Wise service depends on the length of use of the equipment but the average cost is around $450 plus the cost of shipping from Wheat Ridge Colorado. Throughout the entire process, Whelp Wise kept us informed of our bitch’s progress and offered continuing education to us about the whelping process. It is a service I will use again not only for the information provided but also the peace of mind we had. The Whelp Wise employees were very dependable and consistent in calling to report the status of our bitch every time we transmitted a monitoring session. Our bitch happened to be delivering her pups during Thanksgiving week and we were supported night and day-24 hours a day—by a knowledgeable and helpful staff.

Monitoring uterine contractions and fetal heart rates allows Whelp Wise to positively identify the onset of labor and accurately estimate the time that whelping will begin.

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WE REMEMBER

We Remember Walt Whitmore By Ann Duffin I don’t remember when I met Walt Whitmore but I always thought he was a special guy! For many years Walt and Tina bred GPWs under the “Afterhours” prefix. Walt used to carve the most beautiful emu and ostrich eggs. Terry and I purchased one and the scene is of a man, horse and dog. It is very special and we will always treasure it. I still chuckle at Walt’s show clothes. He and Tommy Cagle must have shopped at the same men’s store. As I recall, they both loved their over-alls. We all can remember many nationals where Tina and Christie Chism, Walt’s daughter, were so annoyed with Walt and chastised him, insisting that he could not go into the ring dressed in his over-alls. To their frustration, Walt ignored them. Then he would go into the ring and beat one of them! Maybe he knew something we didn’t. I bet he is still chuckling. Rest In Peace Walt, your memory will bring a smile to all those who knew you.

We Remember Guy Rezzardi By Randy Berry The Field Trial Community lost a great friend and supporter on February 24, 2013. Guy Rezzardi passed away suddenly at his home in Iuka, Illinois. Guy and wife, Lori, are well-known for their willingness to work at field trials no matter the breed. If you needed a judge, marshal, bird planter, scout or amateur handler Guy was willing. He was a well-respected scout, handler and judge of pointing breeds. He worked mostly with German Shorthaired Pointers and German Wirehaired Pointers and was a past member of the GWPCA. Prior to his death, Guy was attending a field trial in one state and Lori was judging in another. On Sunday evening, Guy stopped by a friend’s home in Kansas on his way home. He spoke with another friend by phone once he arrived at home. Later Lori tried to reach him and there was no answer. On Monday morning when again Lori could not reach Guy, she contacted a neighbor and asked that he check on Guy. The neighbor found Guy on the kitchen floor. Having been without a competitive GWP for several years, Guy had recently acquired a young GWP male and was looking forward to once again showing and competing in the field with a GWP. Guy was a long-time member of the Architectural Ornamental Iron workers Union and had been a member of the United States Army. Guy is survived by his wife, Lori and a son, Guy Jr. and numerous nieces and nephews. Services were held on February 29, 2013 in Channahon, Il. We will miss you, Guy. You were a good dog man, a tremendous supporter of the sport and a great person.

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PUPPY TEMPERAMENT

First Day Testing Can Predict Temperament Testing of Puppies Indicates the Ideal Dog By Diane Turner, Wire-News Editor You’ve planned for years. You’ve calculated the days and it’s almost time. You gather the supplies you’ll need – thermometer, scissors, thread, towels, crystal ball – Crystal Ball? Wouldn’t that be great? You may not have a crystal ball to determine each pup’s future but Grace Blair, a medical doctor and poodle breeder, believes that a series of tests given immediately after the litter is whelped can be a reliable indicator of each pup’s future. Over the past 20-some years, using methods based on Clarence Pffafenberger’s 1977 book entitled, New Knowledge of Dog Behavior, Blair has honed the tests. According to Blair “the potential of each puppy can be maximized by stimulating its learning, ability, interests and natural instincts.” And it begins shortly after the puppies arrive. Blair suggests that by placing each pup on its back in the palm of your hand you can identify the ideal temperament. The reactions you will see are standard. Blair says, “Some puppies will be very comfortable on their backs, others will Blair suggests that by placing struggle slightly, then the pup on its back in the palm relax and a few will be of your hand you can identify unable to relax and will the ideal temperament continue to struggle. These latter puppies will need a lot of socialization and rarely will become top ranking dogs. They tend to be more noise sensitive, can panic under stressful situations and have more difficulty in problem solving under stress. ” Blair feels that the ideal working or show temperament can be indicated on the first day and identified on the day following. She suggests that each puppy be handled and stimulated by touch each day. She trims nails for the first time on day three and 32

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tails are docked and dewclaws removed that day or the next. On day four she begins what she describes as an important exercise. She suggests that one by one each pup be placed in a shallow metal pie pan. Again you watch for each puppy’s reaction. Some will be very laid back –with little or no concern about getting out of the pan. This type of easy-going puppy may simply go back to sleep. These type of dogs, Blair says are a challenge to motivate all of their lives. Another pup may panic and struggle or act paralyzed. This type of pup will need to learn to trust and you can begin teaching trust by placing a finger under his chin and gently guiding him out of the pan to a soft blanket placed under the tin. There may be a puppy who initially panics but then climbs out on his own. And then there will be the pup who gives a sniff or two and then shows independence by simply climbing out of the pan. Blair places the puppies in the pan each day and by day seven she says most will have learned to climb out easily. As the puppies mature Blair stimulates them daily with a number of exercises and items. She exposes them to the scent of orange peels, nail polish, a variety of feathers (great for hunting breeds) meat, and cat hair. She insists that any item can be offered to stimulate the use of their noses. Blair uses a variety of household items to expose them to different surfaces and feelings. Ice cubes, a pan of gravel, cotton, nylon, bricks, newspapers, plastic and sheet metal are all used as footing for the puppies in order to stimulate their sense of feel. However, it is the gentle stroking by their human caregiver, Blair says, that is the most important and best. She also believes in exposing the pups to vibratory stimulus. For this exercise she uses a vacuum cleaner, a ticking clock, a mixer and a hair dryer. And as the pups open their ears, she begins a regime of exposing them to noise. She suggests clapping, pounding on the wall, dropping pans, turning on a radio in their area, using a bell, switching the vacuum cleaner on


PUPPY TEMPERAMENT and off and firing a cap gun. Once their eyes, open Blair brings in a TV and begins taking them outside to “see the world” there they focus on trees, cars, fencing, patio furniture and all the other things in the yard. By day 21 the exercises include tasting – she says this is the time puppies begin to explore the world through their sense of taste – use anything that is not dangerous and let them taste it.

stress later in life. The energy levels of each puppy can be determined by PAT and then the puppy can be placed with a family with like energy.

And though most of us do introduce our puppies to the play pen, strangers and small children Blair does it earlier than is usual. By day 12 her puppies are in the play pen and by days 13 and14 she has strangers and small children visit. Around day 22 she allows the pups to explore a small wading pool, but only IF the puppy is interested. She warns that forcing a puppy into the water at that age will ruin its chances of doing water retrieval later in life.

There is also a section of the PAT testing that looks Puppies learn to trust through an at the puppy’s exercise using a pie tin. structure. The Volhards claim that what you see at 7 weeks is what you will get once the puppy reaches adulthood. PAT scoring ranges from one -- the highest response – to a score of six – the least interested response. Each puppy will have a mixture of scores, but the Volhards suggest that the dog with mostly ones in all categories is a dog that will be dominate and should be placed only in an experience dog-savvy home.The puppy with more twos also has leadership aspirations but may not be as difficult to manage as the puppy with more ones.

Blair introduces her puppies to bird work, tracking and agility starting at day 63. She makes no corrections when training but encourages the puppies to have fun with all of the exercises. Most breeders are familiar with the temperament testing that can be performed before puppies go to their permanent homes. Over the years it has been determined that the best time to perform the Volhard Puppy Aptitude Test (PAT) is at 49 days. PAT is a series of tests used to help select the right puppy for the right home. Some of the PAT tests were developed during the 1930s for dogs bred to be guide dogs. During the 1960s more tests were developed to determine if puppies could be tested for dominance and submission. Later the Volhards, who were experienced trainers, took the previous developed tests, added some of their own and began testing puppies. PAT consists of 10 separate tests and each is scored with a number system from one to six. PAT includes social attraction testing, an exercise requiring the puppy to be restrained for a short period of time, a test to see if the puppy has a talent in retrieving and tests determining touch, sight and sound sensitivity. During the testing the heart rate of the puppy is monitored for indications of how it will deal with

Dogs who have mostly threes and fours are sure to be right for most first-time owners. These are the dogs that become obedience stars. A puppy scoring in the fives is certain to be shy and will need a lot of socialization. These dogs are often sound sensitive and have extreme reactions to new places and can develop separation anxiety. The puppy whose scores are heavily into the sixes is an overly independent puppy. He will, according to the Volhards, have difficulty bonding with people. Using the Blair testing and exercises then performing the Puppy Aptitude Testing at 49 days should help most breeders determine the temperament and aptitude of each puppy in a litter. While these tests are not as perfect as a crystal ball in predicting the future of your puppies, the testing can indicate the possibilities for each puppy You can learn more about these testing methods by visiting Dr, Blair’s Versatility In Poodles website or the Volhard Dog Training site.

Many successful show dogs were puppies that garnered a high number of two’s in the PAT testing. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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D E LTA T H E R A P Y D O G S

Notes from Becky Since this is our Wire-News “Puppy Issue,” I was asked to give a bit of advice to any of those pups and their human companions who are interested in therapy work. I had to put my head on my paws and think about what it is that makes a great therapy dog. After all there are many aspects of therapy work and each is of significance, but what is the most important thing for a young dog with aspirations of therapy work to concentrate on? After a great deal of thought, I decided that the first and foremost thing a therapy dog must do is to be bomb-proof! As a therapy dog, I never know what challenge I will face at the hospital, nursing home, school, or where ever I volunteer. With Delta, there are two categories of qualification. The first is predictable--the lower class and it isn’t as restrictive. Next is the complex and that really requires a dog or other animal to deal with tougher conditions. Can you imagine stepping into a beehive? That’s what going into a school can be like! I just attract kids--they swarm around me and hover over me. A therapy dog just has to take it in stride. And, in fact, most of us therapy dogs thrive on all that attention! No matter, a therapy dog must be calm and steady. An outgoing personality helps too. And being enthusiastic about the work is really important. My attitude is contagious. We therapy dogs need to enjoy being visited by people and we must be comfortable in unusual and different surroundings. A great therapy dog should give unconditional love and should ask nothing in return. I think there are a lot of GWP puppies out there who would have a great time if they gave therapy work a try. I know most will be wonderful Delta dogs if their guardians will agree and do their part. Now that I handled that for my editor, I want to relate a recent incident that made my Mom’s eyes well up with tears. We signed in at school recently and our first reader was in sitting in the office. He had gone to see the nurse because he had had an asthma attack. As he waited to return to class, he told the school secretary that he had to be better soon because “Becky was coming.” The secretary asked him if he would like to give me a welcoming cookie. I guess his face lit up and his asthma attack began to disappear. I know that getting a cookie for me was a simple task, but the cookie tasted especially good that day knowing that it helped Spencer feel better. Mom and I walked Spencer back to his classroom, got his box of books and went to read! Later Spencer’s teacher asked to speak to us. She told us that the students had recently finished some reading tests and she couldn’t believe how much improved Spencer’s scores were. She is convinced that having Spencer read to me is really helping. The teacher told us that Spencer doesn’t get much help at home and I knew in that moment how important it is that we go to the school and why Mom and I do our therapy work. Until next time, Becky and Ann

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CHIC

CHIC

CladdaghNRipsnorter Baby Come Back Chic # 85177

What does it mean to you? By Robin Nelson CHIC stands for Canine Health Information Center. It is a centralized canine health database, not an honors program. CHIC is designed to encourage health testing and the sharing of ALL results, normal and abnormal.

CladdaghNRipsnorter’s Back’N Badger Chic# 85499

RipsnorterNCladdagh Backing Up the Dream Chic #86802

Aimn Hi Jet Stream Chic #87096

CladdaghNRipsnorter Back To Madtown Chic #97097

The German Wirehaired Pointers with CHIC numbers are not genetically superior to the GWP’s without CHIC numbers. The GWP’s with CHIC numbers have merely completed the CHIC requirements which are specific to our breed, and ALL health test results have been made available to the public. CHIC was established to provide collective health information to scientists and researchers on multiple generations of dogs. Normal and abnormal results must be included as researchers attempt to reduce the incidence of genetic disease and improve the health of our dogs. If you haven’t already, check CHIC out! You can search kennel names or an individual dog. Detailed information is provided including whether the health screening has been done, age at the time of testing, test results, and a pedigree analysis. It is very easy to evaluate the sire, dam, siblings, and offspring of a selected dog. Go to www.caninehealthinfo.org. Click on CHIC breeds. Find German Wirehaired Pointers in the alphabetical list. Click on GWP and our specific breed requirements will appear. Click on search and you will find the names of 62 GWP’s who have completed all the health clearances. Click on each individual dog to review their test results.. If a dog does not have a CHIC number, but you are interested in confirming health test results, go to www.offa.org and do a “Quick Search” of the dog’s name.

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2 0 1 5 GW P C A N a t i o n a l S p e c i a l t y S h o w J u d g i n g B a l l o t Determining the judge for each National Specialty is the responsibility of the GWPCA members. This is your opportunity to voice your opinion and be part of the selection process. Vote for 3 different judges in your order of preference. A judge will only be counted once per ballot. All ballots must be signed and received by the GWPCA Secretary by June 1, 2013. The Secretary will also accept votes by email. All email ballots must come individually (one email per member – if two members of a household are both members, the secretary must receive two separate emails). All email ballots must have the header “2015 Judges Selection Ballot” and each must include the members’ name and address in the body of the email. E-mail to Lori Sargent, birddog@windsweptwires.net or send to 5775 N. Chester Rd., Charlotte, MI 48813. Please use the following example for correct set up of either email or USPS ballots: My choice for 2015 GWPCA National Specialty judges are: 1. 2. 3. Members Name: Members Address: Please select three of the following judges in your order of preference: Jon Cole – Tennessee - I am a second-generation dog person who grew up in the world of Sporting, Working, Terrier and Hound breeds as a youngster.  As I approached University age, I began breeding and showing Bull Terriers (under the Kennel Name Bejobos) in the 60’sand 70’s.  Our breeding program was quite successful allowing us to breed and finish a number of Champions winning Groups and BIS’s. A few years later, we became interested in Bedlingtons. As with the Bull Terriers, the Bedlingtons proved very successful for my wife and I in the show ring.  As time passed other breeds entered our lives - West Highland White Terriers, Smooth Fox Terriers, Shih Tzus and finally Greyhounds.  Currently I have a Miniature Bull Terrier, and a Schipperke.I began judging Terriers in 1971. I have been granted approval, in the United States, for All Breeds. I now judge extensively throughout the year, and do not show or breed dogs any more.  My judging has taken me to all parts of the United States, as well as, Canada, Mexico, South America, Australia, New Zealand, Africa, the Far East, Russia and Europe.  I had the opportunity to judge your National several years ago which I enjoyed greatly. Judging has given me the opportunity to meet wonderful people all over the world, and see the types of dogs they breed and show. Michael Faulkner – Virginia - The sport of Purebred Dogs has been an integral part of Michael Faulkner’s life.  As a youngster Michael was active in Junior Showmanship and assisted his parents with their kennel and breeding program.  In the late 1960’s Michael acquired his first Golden Retriever, along with Field Spaniels in the 70s, starting a lifelong love for these two breeds. During the late 1970’s Faulkner pursued his education earning his BFA, MS.ED, from Alfred University, Alfred, New York while maintaining a breeding program and actively showing his Golden Retrievers, Field Spaniels, Springer Spaniels and Pointers.  Upon the completion of his education Michael established a partnership with the late David White.  For 12 years this team dominated the Sporting Group, completing championships in all of the Sporting breeds, along with numerous group and best in show winners in all seven groups. Michael has owned, bred and or exhibited ten multiple best in show winning Golden Retrievers along with owning and breeding champion Field Spaniels, Pointers, English Springer Spaniels and Pugs. Faulkner retired as a professional handler in 1995 and immediately embarked on a judging career.  Michael is approved to judge all Sporting breeds, numerous other breeds in five of the seven groups and is proud of his numerous national specialty assignments, international judging experiences and having judged the Westminster Kennel Club on five occasions, including the Sporting Group in 2006. Ruth Ann Freer-Godfrey –Delaware - My involvement in exhibiting and breeding purebred dog began in 1969 with the purchase of my first German Shorthaired Pointer. Under the banner of Lieblinghaus, Reg., I have been fortunate to be the breeder, and/or owner of over 100 Champions, 2 Dual Champions, Field Champions, Amateur Field Champions, Hunt Test, Agility and Obedience Titlists, two GSPCA Hall of Fame Inductees, Best in Show Winners, Top Winning GSPs, including the # 1 GSP in 1990, and GSPCA Show Dog of the Year, as well as two GSPCA National Specialty Best in Show winners. Numerous Lieblinghaus bred dogs and bitches have been awarded All Time GSPCA ROM & ROMX Top Producing Sires and Dams and/or Sires and Dams of the Year. I handled one of my Dual Champions to his Field Championship myself, which was quite a learning experience!. I was also fortunate to be a co-owner of the German Wirehaired Pointer, Ch Brewmeister of Brookside. I showed Brew myself, winning Groups and ranking him in the Top

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2 0 1 5 GW P C A N a t i o n a l S p e c i a l t y S h o w J u d g i n g B a l l o t Ten. He was an influential sire behind many breeding programs. Brew was also a Best in Show Winner. As a licensed AKC handler, I had the opportunity to handle several GWPs to championships, breeds and group placements. I have been an AKC licensed judge since 1992 and am presently licensed to judge 17 of the Sporting Breeds. I had the honor of judging the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America National Specialty in 1994 in Yuba City, California. That gave me the opportunity to attend the GWP National Field Trial where I rode the Derby Stake. I am also a Licensed AKC Hunt Test Judge and have judged many German Wirehairs in the field . It is always a top honor and a highlight to judge at a National Specialty. I have a special place in my heart for German Wirehaired Pointers and appreciate the opportunity to have my name on the ballot for consideration to judge the GWPCA National Specialty. Sharon Pinkerton – United Kingdom - I first owned and showed a GWP in the UK in 1977. The breed gained Championship status in 1986 and ours was the very first Show Champion GWP bitch in the breed to gain her title in that same year. Under the “Bareve” prefix, we also bred the first ever full Champion (show and field trial award) bitch in the breed and are still the only kennel in the UK to have bred/shown Championship show Group winners (8 in total) and the only all-breed BIS winner in the UK.   We have now won over 400 CC’s (300 more CC’s than any other breeder) and have been the Top UK GWP Breeder from 1986 to 2012 inclusive, with over 51 UK Champions, 12 of which are Full Champions (show and field trial award).   We’ve had numerous annual Top GWP’s and have had the #2 Top Dog all Breeds in 2007, #5 Top Dog all Breeds in 2006 and #7 Top Dog all Breeds in 2004.   I also won my first Field Trial award in 1993 and have since won over 20 F/T awards from the Novice to the Open stake.On my judging side, I first judged GWP’s in 1982 and was passed to award CC’s (challenge certificates) in 1989. I have judged the breed in the USA (GWPCA National Show Futurity 1997), the Danish Club show in 2012 and the Helsinki winners show in 2012.   I am approved to judge the Gundog Group at Championship level and also approved for multiple other gundog breeds and one hound breed.   I am also a Kennel Club F/T judge and have judged 3 F/T’s to date and numerous Working Tests. Mr. L. E. Skip Stanbridge – Canada - Mr. Stanbridge has successfully bred and exhibited Belgian Shepherd Dogs under the kennel name, MI-SHA-OOK, since 1961. His Belgians have won All Breed Best In Shows as well as Specialty Shows. Mr. Stanbridge was a founding member of the Belgian Shepherd Dog Club of Canada.. He currently is the National President. Mr. Stanbridge also bred and exhibited Schipperkes for several years during the 1970s.First approved to judge in 1974, Mr. Stanbridge is now approved as an all breed judge by the Canadian Kennel Club and is granted the same status by the American Kennel Club. Each year, Mr. Stanbridge judges extensively throughout Canada and the United States. Included in these assignments have been the prestigious Westminster and Santa Barbara Kennel Clubs in the United States, the United Kennel Club in Canada and numerous National Specialty Shows on both sides of the border. In addition, Mr. Stanbridge has judged in numerous other countries Mr. Stanbridge conducts breed and judging seminars and is centrally involved with the Canadian Kennel Club and Canadian Dog Judges Association Annual Conference for Senior Conformation Judges. Mr. Stanbridge has also written numerous articles on the Belgian Shepherd Dog and has co-authored a book on the same topic. Mr. Stanbridge has recently retired from Mohawk College in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada where he held the positions of Vice-President and Dean. Bonnie Threlfall – North Carolina - I grew up “in dogs”, showing my father’s Labradors in the breed, obedience, & junior showmanship rings. We were honored to win the Labrador National in 1964. At the same time, I had an Irish Water Spaniel of my own, who became the breed’s first Ch. U.D., and was the great-grandmother of “Irishtocrat”, the 1979 Westminster BIS winner. I have owned and bred English Cocker Spaniels since 1968, maintaining an average of three to five, all kept as pets. Edgewood English Cockers have, at one time or another, won every major award offered at the National. I have been a member of the English Cocker Spaniel Club of American since 1969, was a founding member of the Owner-Handler Association (my father being its first president), a founding member of the Delaware Valley English Cocker Club, a founding member of the Cary Kennel Club (all-breed), and also have memberships in the Mason & Dixon English Cocker Club, the Seaboard English Cocker Club, & the Cocker Spaniel Club (England). After being employed as an assistant to Robert & Jane Forsyth, I was a professional handler for 15 years finishing over 450 champions in numerous breeds in all seven groups. It was an honor, a pleasure, and an education to work for some of the top breeders in the country in a number of breeds. In 2000, I was approved to judge all Sporting breeds, and now judge all Hound breeds and 15 breeds in the remaining five groups. I have judged National specialties for five breeds (the English Cocker National twice), Westminster, the AKC/Eukanuba National Championship, an FCI show in Sweden, and awarded C.C.s in my breed in England.

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N AT I O N A L G W P R E S C U E

YOUR RESCUE DOGS NEED YOUR HELP By Heidi Baumbarger, NGWPR National Coordinator This year is off to a busy start for rescue. Though we have had several adoptions, more dogs have come into our program.  Currently there is a greater need for foster homes than ever.  Fostering a dog is very rewarding.  If you have the time and space to help one of these sweet dogs in need contact me at 704-843-0944 or ngwprescue@gmail.com for more information.   If you can›t foster, please consider helping with some of the other rescue needs.  We need to fill the following positions:   Fund-raising Coordinator – The fund-raising Coordinator organizes the NGWPR activities at the National Specialty. Each year at Nationals the rescue program has a silent auction, a raffle and auctions the “Ugly Duck Print.” The coordinator’s position requires computer access and telephone work. Patti Roberts, our past fund-raising coordinator, did a great job. Patti feels that the personal contact she provided by contacting our GWPCA members by phone really paid off. The major funding for the rescue program comes from the dedication and work of the Fund-raising Coordinator. So if you have time, a computer and phone skills please contact Heidi immediately! Transport Coordinators – Transportation coordinators work closely with the NGWPR National Coordinator and the Regional Coordinators organizing transportation for our rescue dogs to travel to foster homes, in some cases, to their forever home, to training facilities and to veterinarians. The dogs are transported not only by ground transports but occasionally by air. Transportation coordinators need to work with our GWPCA members who have offered to drive our rescue dogs organizing meeting places, times etc. They also need to become familiar with the various volunteer transportation organizations, the professional transportation operations and the requirements for air transport. This is a position that requires computer work and phone contacts—the rescue dogs do not come into the transportation coordinator. Ideally NGWPR needs a transportation coordinator in each section of the country. Drivers – We have worked diligently to set up a transportation system of our own. To complete the system, NGWPR needs volunteer drivers throughout the country to transport the rescue dogs. Ideally drivers will do 1-2 hour legs, meet with another driver who will take the dog on. If you are willing to provide transportation in your area please contact Heidi. Since NGWPR is a non-profit organization, any mileage can be claimed on your federal tax form as an donation. Webmaster – NGWPR relies on its website to advertise the dogs in our foster care program. The webmaster is in charge of adding dogs to the adoption list and moving dogs to the “Happy Endings” page once the dogs are adopted. The Webmaster also is in charge of adding training information to the foster section and generally maintaining the site. The new site is user friendly and enhances the NGWPR program. If you are computer literate and enjoy working on the computer, then this job is for you! Contact Heidi immediately. Microchip Manager – NGWPR works closely with the AKC CAR program to provide microchips for every rescue dog and to provide microchips for any GWPCA member/breeder who requests chips. The position entails keeping a log of each chip that is sent to our Regional Coordinators for the rescue dogs, to log the chips sent out to our breeders for their litters, ordering chips from AKC and then packing and mailing the chips out when requested. Our breeders are instructed to send the payment for the chips they order directly to the NGWPR Treasurer, so the Microchip Manager only needs to record the payment once notified by the treasurer that the payment has been made. A computer to keep track of the chips is necessary and having a post office close at hand (for mailing out chips) makes it easier. There are far more needs than just these, but these are the immediate needs.  If you have any special talent that you feel could help your rescue in some way, please feel free to bring it to our attention.   We have started a new website and are very excited about it.  Please check it out atwww.nationalgwprescue.com .  We would love to hear feedback and comments.   Remember this is your breed and your rescue!  It is the help from GWPCA member volunteers that keep it running.  Please help in any way you can.  If everyone does a small part, things will run more smoothly and no one will burn out.  Thanks to all of you who already volunteer!

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N AT I O N A L G W P R E S C U E

NGWPR MICROCHIP PROGRAM

“Your Puppy’s Ticket Home”

Microchips provide constant identification for your pet. Animal Control Facilities, Shelters, and Vet Offices scan each lost animal. A microchip provides a name, phone number & address so that the owner/breeder can immediately be contacted. NGWPR MICROCHIPS CAN BE PURCHASED FOR $18 PER CHIP! NGWPR CHIPS INCLUDE LIFETIME REGISTERATION WITH NO ANNUAL FEE! THE $18 FEE INCLUDES SHIPPING! NGWPR KEEPS A LOG OF EACH LITTER MICROCHIPPED – AN ADDED PROTECTION! NGWPR recommends that you microchip your litters. Microchipping each puppy in your litter provides peace of mind. You know that none of your pups will ever end up in a shelter and euthanized because you didn›t know the pup was there. Each chip comes in a sterile package with its own syringe & needle. It’s simple, easy & does not require a vet to insert the chip. Breeders can be listed as the primary or secondary contact without any liability. (The AKC Legal Department designed the CAR program to provide liability protection to breeders who microchip their puppies) More and more competitive & health testing programs are requiring DNA & Microchips to identify each dog. For more info on this program, please contact Diane Turner at dturner596@aol.com or 520-490-2601. PLEASE CONSIDER MICROCHIPPING ALL OF YOUR PUPPIES BEFORE THEY LEAVE YOU!

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NEW BEGINNINGS

Pfeffer Finds A New Life In Pennsylvania A GPW Puppy Slated to be Euthanized is Adopted by Long-Time GWPCA Members By Debbie Galan-Parsons Recently, I had the pleasure of speaking with Jack Strathmeyer, a long-time GWPCA member who lives in York, Pennsylvania. Jack and his wife, Pam, have been involved with Wirehairs since 1960, enjoying dogs purchased from GWPCA breeders, as well as fostering a few rescue Wires, and giving a forever home to a special little girl called “Pfeffer”. Jack recalled meeting a young black and white female Wire by the name of “Molly” some years ago. He was so taken with her color and looks that he told Pam “before I die, I want a black and white one.” As the breed standard evolved and the black color was considered a severe fault, Jack’s hopes of obtaining a black GWP became less optimistic. Then in 2011, during a conversation with Diane Turner, National Rescue Coordinator, Jack mentioned that if the national rescue program ever got a small, black and white female, with some furnishings, that he and Pam would adopt her, because, as he told me, he “just wanted to do something nice for a Wire”. As fate would have it, it was not long until a small, young, black roan female ended up in a shelter in Roseville, California. Turner was notified that the seven-month-old puppy was on the euthanasia floor and that her days were numbered. Pepper, as she was then called, had been released to the shelter by her first owner when she was only five months old. The owner said that the dog’s “high-energy and her aggressive behavior” were the reasons the dog was being relinquished. During her stay at the shelter, Pepper growled at everyone and her aggressive behavior caused the shelter volunteers and the staff to be fearful. Her behavior made it impossible for the shelter to place her in a home. However, one of the adoption counselors, noticing how young the dog was, asked to be allowed to contact the national breed club rescue in hope that someone would give the puppy a chance. Turner placed a call to Francis Marsh, a GWPCA member and NGWPR volunteer, and Marsh went to the shelter to evaluate the puppy. Pepper minded her manners during her visit and arrangements were made for Marsh to pick Pepper up a few days later and take her to the airport to catch a flight to Phoenix, Arizona. When Pepper arrived in Phoenix she came barreling out of her crate and leaped into the Turner’s arms. No growling – no biting – just pure joy at being out of her crate. Without a care, Pepper walked through the air cargo terminal, through the parking garage and hopped into the waiting van. On the two-hour trip to Tucson she sat in the lap of Turner’s sister. But before they arrived home, Pepper began to growl. Confused by the sudden change in behavior, it took a few seconds before the two women suddenly realized, Pepper was talking—her message – “I need a break!” Pepper arrived at the Turner home and spent six weeks working on manners skills and basic obedience.

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NEW BEGINNINGS

It didn’t take long until everyone in the Turner household understood Pepper’s strange communication. Whenever Pepper was happy, or when she wanted to play or when she needed something, Pepper growled. The puppy was not at all aggressive but she was very “talkie.” And it was this misunderstood behavior that had been the reason she ended up in shelter care. In the meantime, the Strathmeyers were in constant communication with Turner tracking Pepper’s progress. Once they made the decision to adopt Pepper, the puppy’s name was changed to “Pfeffer”-- the German version-- as all of the Strathmeyers’ dogs have had German names. Shortly thereafter, little Pfeffer was on a plane heading to Pennsylvania to be with Jack and Pam for Christmas. Upon arrival at the airport, Jack recalls taking Pfeffer out of the crate and watching her walk with Pam through the airport--as if they had been together all along. Everything went along perfectly from there. Pfeffer went home with the Strathmeyer’s, was introduced to their other Wire, Freya, and her new life in Pennsylvania began. According to Jack, Pfeffer had no issues from the start and said that she is one of the nicest and most wellbehaved dogs they have had, adding “if every Wire I had was like this dog…I’d take another dozen!” Today, Pfeffer continues to thrive in the Strathmeyer home. She is not only a wonderful companion, but has also turned out to be very birdy, establishing and holding point, and working beautifully with Freya. The Strathmeyers’ love and understanding of Wires is clearly demonstrated with Pfeffer’s success, as Jack explained, “things need to be right, and people need to treat them right.” I asked Jack if he had any goals for Pfeffer, and I found his response most touching…”I want her to never think about Roseville again.” Amazing, Jack, I believe that if Pfeffer had to, she would relive it all over again, just to end up with you and Pam!

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TRAINING PUPPIES

Starting Early Equals A Well-Trained Hunting Dog Seven Week Old Puppies Begin Field Training at Von Duffin By Terry Duffin Thirty years ago when we started breeding there weren’t too many GWP owners who worked their dogs in the field. So for us it was really a learn-by-doing experience. Early on we began working with our first litters of puppies and discovered that we could begin training them for the field as early as seven weeks and today we still do that. But any early training we do is always low key and fun! Once the pups are on their feet and almost able to run, I encourage them to play together outside. At first they will stay in a group but as they gain more confidence they start to separate and investigate on their own. This is the hard part and you need more human eyes to watch them and hands to help keep them out of trouble as each puppy becomes more confident.

Running in a group teaches pups to compete with each other.

Together they are bolder and running in a group teaches them to compete with each other. As they gain more selfconfidence they go out in smaller groups. We watch them carefully as we do not want anything to frighten them. It can take forever to rid a puppy of fear, if you can ever overcome the fear. It is at this stage that I introduce the pups to feathers and wings. I start by using a fishing pole with about five feet of twine used as the line and a bird wing attached at the end. And by a bird wing, I mean a game bird wing not a chicken wing! You would be surprised how many people who are new to training use chicken wings to begin a pup’s education. Next, I flip the line out and the puppy will want to chase the wing. After a bit of time, the pup will stop and point the wing. This is done simply to get the puppy interested in birds. Even if the puppy does not point, it is stimulating the puppy’s bird-drive. Though this is fun game, don’t wear it out or the puppy will soon be pointing by sight not by nose. Live birds can be frightening for young puppy so it is necessary to be exceptionally careful in managing their first experience with birds. I start our puppies on live birds when the pups are between three and five months old. Use small birds that cannot hurt the pup. Quail and pigeons are good because they are cheaper and homing pigeons are best because the birds are just going to fly away. If the puppy points the bird be ready to flush the bird. As the puppy is pointing, use a bird release trap so you can keep control of the pup on its point. Don’t allow the puppy to catch the bird. This is where a bird harness and a long line can be helpful.

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TRAINING PUPPIES By using a long line and a pinch collar on the puppy, you can control the puppy when it starts pointing and grabbing at the birds. The idea of the collar and line is to restrain the puppy not to yank it off the ground— so be gentle! The bird harness is used to restrain the bird and can be purchased at most hunting dog supply outlets. At this stage referring to a good training manual can be very helpful. One of the books that comes to mind is the NAVHDA’a green book, The Training and Care of the Versatile Hunting Dog. Keep your work sessions brief—remember you are dealing with a baby who has little attention span. During this time our puppies are in the house with us. We work on manners and some basic skills. We teach fetch in the hallway. We close the doors leading to the other rooms and toss an empty paper towel roll down the hall. The puppy will go get the roll. When the puppy has it, I run away. He has no other place to go so he follows me. I kneel down and take the roll from him and praise, praise and praise again. We graduate to toys and then to dummies as we work in the hallway.

Terry Duffin and Ebony after an early training session.

We do use treats as rewards, but not for field exercises. Our puppies are in the house with us so we have the opportunity to do lots of other training where we do use treats. Our puppies sleep in crates until we feel they are reliable and trustworthy at night. A dog of eight weeks has already been trained. The question is what has the puppy learned? Has it learned love, trust, confidence, respect and most of all that life can be fun? Or has it learned to be fearful? Has it experienced mistrust? Has the pup a lack of confidence? Does he avoid people or run from the sound of a gun? Does he already hate to retrieve? These are just some of the problems that young dogs can experience if they are mishandled at an early age. So as you work with your puppy be CAREFUL! Think about how your actions and training methods can affect a young dog throughout its lifetime. Robert C. Paulsen Jr. was a trainer who lived in Bend, OR where we live. I met him back in the 1970s, when he was training labs and we became good friends. He was an excellent trainer and he wrote an article that he handed out to his clients to help them understand field training. Paulsen suggested that for a puppy “learning can be envisioned as an inverted pyramid, where the higher level skills (the most difficult ones) are supported by the lower skills (the easier ones). Learning the higher skills depends on the dog totally understanding and “mastering” the lower skills.” The diagram below shows how some of the skills might be arranged and can help us understand why the higher skills can’t be learned until the lower ones have been mastered by the dog. Fully Trained Hunter: ducks, pheasant, chukar+ 12 - 18 mo. Handles at 100 yds.+--search for & flushes birds-- Steady to flush Honor—Double retrieve—Steady to shot birds—Steady to gun Line & handleat 100 yd.—Raise Enthusiasm=s FUN— 9 - 12 mo. Baseball—Deliver to Hand—Leave on Command Line to 40 yds – Force Fetch—Steady to Throw 5 - 8 mo. Heel – Single Retrieve Stay—Acclimate to Gun Happy Bumpers Sit-Carry Objects Come Continued on page 50 2 - 5 mo. FUN! ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E

assignments came and I was thrust back into the sport. It was as if I had never left and soon I found myself judging hunt tests throughout New England.

She Was Only Here to Finish Her Junior Hunter Title My Reintroduction to Field Trials By Steve Krueser

M

any seasons had passed since the time I had run a dog in a field trial. When we purchased our first puppy, Blaze from Barb and Ed Tucker, we would never have imagined the world that would open up to us. Twenty-plus years before, while living in Michigan, I ran our pups Blaze, Stosh, Tac, Madison and Bogie in puppy/ derby stakes. The youngsters graduated to broke dog stakes and I moved into judging.  As time went by, our pups grew older and I had nothing to run in trials and I drifted farther away from the sport and our club. Several years later we moved to a new home in Connecticut. Within a span of three years our aging pups left us one by one, leaving only Bogie.  With no old friends around and lots of time on my hands, I needed something to do. Wanting to reconnect, I looked into the area hunt tests and mentioned to the folks involved that I was available to judge.  Judging 48

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A new pup, Josh, Heywire’s Don’t’ Look Now, entered our lives and things changed. We showed Josh, finished his bench championship, my wife Lisa handled him to his JH title, and I guided him to his NAVHDA NA Prize 1. One of the many new friends that I met judging, Andrew Campbell, who has Pointers and Vizslas, often invited me to trials, but I didn’t have a dog to run. I knew that Josh was not ready. I would love to have a dog to run but it was not in the cards at that moment. Well, that was about to change… Lindsey was a gift that came out of nowhere. In 2012 Lisa and I attended the Delaware Valley Specialty and we were presented with the idea of bringing a puppy bitch, Sure Shot’s It’s a Jungle Out There, home with us for a while. “Lindsey needed to socialize-- to get out and see new things. And she needed to learn that it wasn’t bad to go for a ride in the car.  With Josh away at bird camp and only Bogie at home we agreed. Lindsey came home with us to see the world. The first week she was here, Bogie showed her how to swim in Blackwell’s Brook, our pool, and run the property lines! Before we knew it she was diving in the brook and pool with Bogie and she was fetching everything.


F E AT U R E A RT I C L E Day by day Lindsey was changing. We would take her for car rides with a reward at the end to reinforce that trips in the car weren’t so bad.  We exposed her to pigeons and quail and found that she had a good run and pointed nicely. While she was with us we decided to enter her in a Junior Hunter test.  Lindsey had the time of her life and passed her first leg with no problem at all.  We continued working with Lindsey, allowing her to grow up, to gain confidence and to enjoy all of the new experiences. The time was getting near for two-year-old Josh to come home from bird camp and we couldn’t wait, but a few days before Josh arrived, Lindsey came into season. We didn’t want any accidents so Lindsey temporarily went back to her breeder.   Four months later Lindsey was entered in the Westminster Kennel Club Hunt Test. Since we live close by, and I had developed a relationship with her, I wanted to be there to handle Lindsey. On that day,  Lindsey did a great job with solid, staunch points!  Her run was starting to get bigger and she hit every objective, one by one.  She passed with outstanding scores. It was so much fun to run her again!  Now we had two Junior Hunter legs under our belt, and it was decided that she would come back home with us to finish her Junior Hunter title. In early October there was what is known as a “double header” – a weekend with four hunt tests scheduled to be run on the same grounds. I knew she would pass, but I filled out entries for three of them just in case.  Well, that third entry was needed, because something had changed in our “little girl.” Her confidence was high, her trust in me had grown, she was on a mission to find birds and her run was getting bigger—pushing the limits as to what is acceptable for Hunt Testing. In the first test, she took off, took a left-hand turn, went right to the bird field and got stuck on birds.  She was on point for several minutes, and I couldn’t get her back to run the course - FAIL!

run, someone suggested that maybe this little girl needed to try a couple of trials! Of course, my friend Andrew was there to encourage me. So, the entries for a field trial were mailed in and Lindsey and I took off for our first trial weekend. In our first start, my nerves got the best of me and I forgot what to do. Luckily, I had a couple of judges that were more than willing to give me a few tips, and remind me of things that I had forgotten.  Lindsey did not place but the judges liked what they saw. The next day we were ready!  As I was riding the course, I recalled the educational points Ed Tucker had given me years before and Bernee Brawn’s “go get em’” encouragement. And thankfully I remembered Bernee’s horse handling tips. And I remembered my past dogs’ runs.  I was amazed that so many things from the past that came to mind while running Lindsey. Although she didn’t win that day, I knew we were coming together as a team.  She placed second in Open Puppy and third in Amateur Walking Derby.  It was a good start for us!   The next weekend came and we entered three stakes.  Lindsey won two of them and placed third in the other.  We continued to train and formed a working relationship that was tough to beat.  One of her first wins was in Amateur Walking Derby, and I will never forget that day.  Lindsey worked beautifully, and her range was ever-increasing.  I

By then I was wondering what to do! Luckily, the afternoon and the next morning’s course both changed to a wider, more open area. Lindsey handled it well with quite a bit of range. When she went on point, she held it until I caught up with her for the flush.   I was so relieved when she passed for a fourth time. Her run and independence were getting too much for hunt testing and for me. I could not help but worry as Lindsey was not yet my dog and I feared I might lose her!  During her last ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E lost sight of Lindsey in the rolling hills and tall brush, but I trusted her. I knew that she would be up front. As I rounded the top of the hill, I saw her about 200 yards out, standing--she was out in the open, next to a Pine tree and ON POINT! The judges separated, and we headed down to work our bird.  Lindsey was standing that bird like she was on a mission. It was a derby stake, and we had our bird!  As I walked up, the judge yelled to his partner to come and have a look. He asked me if she would stand, and I said “sure!” I gave her a “ho” and nervously waited for the other judge to arrive. Lindsey stood her bird with intensity. The judge finally made his way over and just said, “Wow!”  It was then that I realized I was looking at one of the most beautiful points I had ever seen, and that point won her the stake! During the next few weekends, Lindsey won or placed in every Puppy and Derby stake she entered.  The field trial folks in New England were starting to talk about Lindsey and that was exciting but best of all we were having fun! Galleries formed just to watch Lindsey run and each time they were rewarded. In just over two months, Lindsey and I had formed a bond and become a team. She had both her Amateur and Open Puppy and Derby points.

Continued from page 47

As the season drew to a close, Andrew asked if it was time for Lindsey to go home. “She is home!” I answered without another thought. Lindsey gave me the opportunity of a lifetime! No one dreamed that this young dog would show so much potential as a field trial dog. Lindsey stood her birds, honored brace mates, and impressed everyone who saw her run. I can never repay all of the help I received. Thanks to Penny Ljungren, Lynn Sandor, Bernee Brawn, and Doug and Judy Ljungren for all of their encouragement during this period.  And a special thanks to Lisa, for tolerating all the time I spent away and for helping in so many ways and I’ll be ever grateful to our recently departed Bogie for helping Lindsey find her way. Of course I can’t forget the help and guidance from Andrew Campbell, Michael Ernest, Katie Tazza, and the rest of the New England field trial gang! The New England clubs welcomed us and made us feels like we were a part of their community. Am I hooked again? You Bet! The future for Lindsey and me is wide open! Lindsey was an unexpected gift at just the right time!

The diagram on page 48 is authored by Robert C. Paulsen in “A Dog’s Life.”

The most important question with any dog doesn’t center on how old the dog is when it starts formal training, but rather on what the dog has done or what has been done to the pup before the formal training begins. A dog that has learned a lot of bad habits or has had an owner who has lost his temper repeatedly is MUCH harder to train than one who has no experience at all. To successfully train a field dog, the dog must experience love, a kind hand and understand it is fun to retrieve and to hunt.

Terry Duffin has been a GWPCA member for 30-some years. In 1991 he won the Field Futurity. He and wife, Ann, have bred three Dual Champions and numerous Master Hunters. Terry has been licensed to judge field events since 2000 and is a popular judge .

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Congratulations!!! Our Clients had another fabulous year! Their dogs had a fabulous showing in the GWPCA Top Ten Field rankings, at the Inaugural GWPCA Southern Classic and at the AKC Pointing Breed Gun Dog Championship. We can’t say thank you enough for the continued trust and support of our wonderful clients and the opportunity to work with their dogs.

Row 1: (Left) - DC Sure Shot’s Sonora Gone Heywire “Sonora;” #1 Open Gun Dog; #2 Combined Gun Dog/Owner Penny Ljungren. (Center) - Uodibar’s Freebee “Freebee;” #1 Open Gun Dog, #5 Combined Gun Dog/Owners Claire & Kelly Winsch. (Right) - NAFC DC AFC GCH Ariel’s Justa Gotta Go Now “Louie;” #7 Open Gun Dog/Owner Bernee Brawn & Mary Pat Ezzo. Row 2: (Left) - FC Brillows Wild West Ponder Rosa “Fuzzy;”#3 Open Gun Dog, #2 Combined Gun Dog/Owner John Sodoro. (Center) – Brillows W’West Justa Here We Go Again “Buzz;” #2 Puppy-Derby Dog/Bernee Brawn. (Right) – Idawire Cynister Jagged Edge “Jazz;” #4 Puppy-Derby Dog/Owners Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell. Row 3 (Left) – FC High Power’s Jolt to the System “Jolee;” #4 Open Gun Dog, #10 Combined Gun Dog, New FC/Owner Belinda DeLaby. (Center) – Ironwire’s Aquire the Fire Rocks Cynister “Fire;” #9 Puppy-Derby Dog/Owner Lacy Magoon. (Right) – Idawire Cynister Just Go With It “Jenny;” #5 Puppy-Derby Dog/Owners Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell.

WE HAVE LIMITED SPACE AVAILABLE FOR SUMMER CAMP . . . IF INTERESTED, PLEASE CALL JIM WEST @ 402-679-5316 OR E-MAIL jim@wildwestkennels.co ©2013 GWPCA

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ALL TIME TOP PRODUCERS

e m Top Producers 1985-2012 i T l l A Compiled by Lori Sargent, (birddog@windsweptwires.net)

BENCH CHAMPIONS Sires: Dams: CH RIPSNORTER’S THUNDERHART 52 CH DRAKKAR’S SHE’S ALL THAT 21 CH WINDHAVEN’S STUTZER STUMPER 45 CH GEROMINOS SHOW GIRL 15 CH SHURCAN BARON OF AFTERHOURS 41 CH MOUNTAIN VIEW’S NEXT STRIKE 15 CH GEROMINOS FLYING WARRIOR 33 CH BRIAR PATCH RIPSNORTER GAL 14 CH GEROMINOS GLORY OF ASPENROSE 25 CH DRAKKAR’S ALL EYES ON ME CD 14 DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH 22 CH RIPSNORTERS AFFARRAH OF THE HART 14 CH RIPSNORTERS MTN VIEW LOOKOUT 22 CH AFTERHOURS CASSIO LOCKET 13 CH LAURWYN CASSIO MOCHA CAKE 21 CH WINDHAVEN’S WHEEL OF FORTUNE 13 CH RIPSNORTER MAKIN A STATEMENT 21 CH LARKSPURS KAIZANS LET IT BE 11 CH LARKSPURS WINDMILL WINSTON JH 20 PEGDENS POLLY MADISON 11 DC AFC JETSETS RAGTOP DAY AT SCOTIAL JH 19 CH RIPSNORTERS LIGHTENIING STRIKES 11 CH RLB’S JESSIE THE BODY MH 19 CH CASSIO LAURWYN’S CRUMB CAKE 10 NFC NAFC DC CASCADE ROUGE MH 17 CH JAMAR WEISENS RITE ON TARGET 10 CH WEIDENHUGEL MERLIN V NICO CD MH 17 CH LARKSPUR ZOE DANCER 10 CH WILDFIRE’S BENTLEY 16 CH TOPMOST WINDFALL OF DANTERS 10 CH WEIDENHUGEL EINER V PILOT 14 NFC NAFC DC AFC RUDOLPHS BILTZEN VON DUFFIN 14 DC CADENBERG VICTOR TREY MH 12 AFTERHOURS ACE HIGH JH 11 CH RLB’S MAC THE KNIGHT MH 11 CH SIDE BY SIDES CHATANUGA CHOO MH 10

FIELD CHAMPIONS/AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPIONS Sires & dams on this list must have produced 3 titled dogs

Sires: Dams: NFC NAFC DC AFC CASCAD IKE MH 12 NAFC DC AFC CASCADE JAGD FREUND 10 FC AFC HALB BON POMMOREGON 9 NFC NAFC DC AFC RUDOLPHS BLITZEN VON DUFFIN 9 NFC NAFC AFC CASCADE STEAMER MH 8 NFC NAFC DC CASCADE ROUGE MH 7 NFC DC SURE SHOT’S HOT ROCKS MH 7 DC WILDWING’S SHAMELESS 7 DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH 6 OKK BO LAVEAU 6 WALKERS RIP OFF 6 BACKWOODS FLEXIBLE FLYER 5 HERR SCHMARDT V FOX RIVER 5 NAFC DC AFC SURE SHOT’S POINT BLANK CD MH 5 CH SURE SHOT’S ROCK ON JH 5 NFC FC SURE SHOT’S SLICK NICKEL 5 OVERBARON’S COUNTRY HUSTLER 4 RAWLEE GENE’S DELIGHT 4 HAAG’S DIRECTOR TD SH 3 NFC DC JAY-MAR’S BLAKE’S WINDCZAR SH 3

CH DC HAAR BARON’S GREMLIN ANKA VON GRAFENBERG OKK EBONY FLO LAVEAU CH VON DUFFIN’S LADY BUG CDX MH CH BACKWOODS MO KICK GISELA VON GRAFENBERG OKK FLO JO LAVEAU CH JUSTA ARIEL TOO TUFF TO TAME NA SH RAWHIDE’S DIZZY LIZZY CH SCHNELLBERG’S LIVE WIRE SH FC JAY-MAR’S BLAKE’S BLUE ANGEL RIPSNORTER RLB’S SAMATHA

HUNT TEST TITLES

These dogs must have produced 3 master hunters Sires: MH SH JH NFC NAFC DDC CASCADE ROGUE NFC NAFC DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH DC JAY-MARS BLAKE’S WINDCZAR SH` DC JED’S SILENT POLAR EXPRESS DC RKB’S JESSIE THE BODY MH DC SGR DIRTY LAUNDRY DC SGR SILENT RUNNING MH CH WEIDENHUGEL EINER V PILOT DC AFC DUNKEES JUSTA TOP FLITE MH HANOVER VON TREBORWOLF 52

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7 7 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3

2 6 1 1 6 5 4 1 3 4

13 3 1 0 10 6 13 1 18 0

12 8 8 8 7 6 6 4 4 4 3 3


ALL TIME TOP PRODUCERS (Sires: continued) MH SH JH) CH DARLING’S TICK TOCK MH CH FAIROAKS TIMEBOMB V WIESEN MH NAJ GUSTAV JAEGER MH JAY-MAR’S BLUSASSY’S BARON

3 3 3 3

1 3 1 1

1 1 1 0

Dams: MH SH JH NFC DC AFC NAVAHO SIDEKICK MH FC AFC SGR WITCHES BREW LARKSPUR’S CARAMEL AT HEYWIRE CH SCHNELLBERG IN THE ROUGE CH JAY-MAR’S AUTUMN REIGN CD SH KATRIN JAEGER MH CH VON DUFFIN’S LADY BUG CDX MH HELLBENDER’S DESERT STOM JH

4 4 3 3 3 3 3 3

0 0 3 3 1 1 0 0

0 0 2 1 1 1 2 0

Top Producing Sires & Dams of 2012 Compiled by Lori Sargent, (birddog@windsweptwires.net) BENCH CHAMPIONS Sires: Dams: GCH RIPSNORTER’S MNT. VIEW LOOKOUT 4 CH HEYWIREN CEDBRK JUSTA PON A TIME 4 GCH TIMO II V. BOCKENHAGEN AT KINMAX MH 4 RIPSNORTER MAKIN DRAMA DARNELLE 3 GCH MOUNTAIN VIEW NATION ACCLAIM 2 AFTERHOURS MAKE A WISH 2 CH LARKSUPURS DANGEROUS CURVES AHEAD SH 2 CH RLBS GOT MOXIE AT DRAKKAR MH 2

FIELD CHAMPION/AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION Sires: FC AFC Dams FC AFC DC WILDWING’S SHAMELESS NAFC DC RUDOLPH’S BLITZEN VON DUFFIN CH ST. CROIXS DIAMOND JIM WHITETAIL ELI’SBROTHER JH

2 3 1 1 1

CH VON DUFFINS LADY BUG CDX MH BRILLOWS FLYIN FRIZZ B CH JAY-MARS LIVER AND ONIONS JH SLICK SHOOTEN MAGGIE JH

2 1 1 1

3

DUAL CHAMPIONS Sires: Dams: DC WILDWING’S SHAMELESS NAFC DC RUDOLPHS BLITZEN VON DUFFIN

1 1

SLICK SHOOTEN MAGGIE JH CH VON DUFFINS LADY BUG CDX MH

1 1

HUNT TEST TITLES Sires: MH SH JH GCH TIMO II V BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAX 1 2 DC WILDWINGS SHAMELESS 1 1 NFC NAFC DC AFC CASCADE IKE MH 1 CHUMP CHANGE MIDNIGHT HOWLIN HANK SH 1 GCH MOUNTAIN VIEW NATIONAL ACCLAIM 1 WATZ VOM LIETHER-MOOR 1 Dams: MH SH JH CASCADE RUM RUNNER 1 CH LARKSPURS DANGEROUS CURVES AHEAD 1 PAULINE II V BOCKENHAGEN AT KIMMAX 1 RIPSNORTER MAKIN’ DRAMA DARNELLE 1 VOM BRITT’S IZ A BELLE SH 1 CH VON DUFFINS LADY BUG CDX MH 1 ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS

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F E AT U R E A RT I C L E

A Tale of Two Roosters By Richard Hirneisen Last year I had this one chance and I blew it. But my Wirehairs, Georgie and Buzz, didn’t. Buzz pointed and Georgie backed a wild rooster pheasant on public hunting land in Michigan’s Huron County. It flushed straight out, an easy shot.

Early one chilly October morning I drove 80 miles north up into what we Michiganders call “the thumb,” which used to offer the best pheasant hunting in the state. I was headed for an old and familiar hunting spot of mine, a Michigan Department of Natural Resources (MDNR) state game area. It’s 140 acres surrounded by farm fields and woodlots, which used to be managed for small game habitat before the recent recession crippled the MDNR budget. In the last few years the fields of CRP had become overgrown with noxious weeds and invasive species. Food crops had not been planted. But there were still pockets of cover that occasionally held a bird or two if you hunted long enough and hard enough with good enough dogs.

I threw my Binelli autoloader to my shoulder. But I couldn’t find the safety! As the rooster flew out of range without a feather ruffled, I realized my mistake. For a couple years I’d been hunting, shooting sporting clays, and gunning for hunt tests and field trials with side-by-side shotguns. I had retired my Binelli. The safeties on both my double guns were located on top of the tang, not on the trigger guard, as on my Binelli. My thumb went instinctively to the tang--but there was nothing there to push off. That was the one and only shot I got at a wild Michigan pheasant in 2011--and the first season in 25 years I didn’t get even one. I’ve hunted them for twenty-five years. There used to be good numbers here, even on public land. Sure, it wasn’t like Iowa or the Dakotas, but it was pretty darn good. In one season in the mid-1990s I took a total of fourteen roosters on private and public land. Shooting ten or more a season had not been unusual. But pheasant numbers have been declining in Michigan for at least a decade. Habitat degradation and farming practices, avian diseases and increased predation, all may have contributed. In the last few years, seeing only three or four roosters a season had become the norm. If I shot one or two, I was happy. But I have always been an optimist when it comes to hunting. So, this season, 2012, after an unusually mild winter and a very early spring, I had hopes that more pheasants had survived to breed, and more chicks had survived the hatch. Maybe the good old places held birds again. 54

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Rich and Buzz with one of their Michigan Pheasants. As soon as I pulled into the parking area I saw hopeful signs. Twelve rows of standing corn ran up one side of the half-mile long field. A strip of freshly cut corn ran up the other side. And all the way up the middle ran a strip of waist-high little bluestem a hundred yards across. It looked like the MDNR finally had money to spend on habitat improvement. As far as I could tell, I was the only hunter there. It was a weekday, and chances were that the ground hadn’t been hunted since the previous weekend. I enjoyed this perk of retirement--being able to hunt on weekdays. Georgie was a bit lame, recovering from a bout with tendonitis in her shoulder. I left her crated in the truck and collared up Buzz. Georgie would get her chance when the sun got higher and the thermometer rose above freezing.


F E AT U R E A RT I C L E I released Buzz into the little bluestem, directly into the wind. Though he was very excited, I could follow the sound of the bell on his collar and could tell he was quartering nicely and staying well within range--if I moved forward briskly enough. Occasionally he bounced up out of the high grass, looking for me. A hundred yards from the end of the field he got birdy, slowed, and pointed. As I walked in to flush, he looked up at me and seemed to soften his point. I kicked around for a few seconds, decided the bird was running, stepped back, and released him. By the time we got to within a few yards of the end of the field, which ended in a cut bean field, Buzz had pointed twice more, and each time I had released him after not finding a bird. Each time he proceeded to track more slowly, creeping forward cautiously. I had no doubt now that this was indeed a pheasant we were following, probably a rooster, and it was fast running out of escape routes. Releasing your dog when it’s hot on the trail of a pheasant can be risky business. Many if not most pointing dogs will end up pushing the bird too hard and will get too far ahead and the bird will flush wild and out of gun range. Buzz’s final point, only a few feet from the cut bean field, was a beautiful thing. He had inched forward, carefully lifting and stepping one paw at a time, finally freezing in place, intense, quivering, totally concentrated on that incredible aroma just in front of his nose. Now, if only it was a rooster, not a hen… It happened so fast that I hardly remember the Binelli going up, and I don’t remember hitting the safety, but I must have found it instinctively because I’d been practicing with that gun most of the year, but I do distinctly remember seeing the flash of white feathers around the neck and the rooster tumbling into the grass and Buzz running after to claim it. A year ago we hunted this place three or four times without seeing a bird. This year, in just 15 minutes in the field, I had a long-spurred rooster in the bag. After an uneventful trip back to the truck, I watered Buzz, picked some burrs out of his coat, crated him, and drove ten miles north to just across the Huron County line, to another MDNR game area, another old favorite spot, where last year I had missed my only chance to shoot a wild Michigan rooster because I forgot where the safety was.

Pheasant Restoration Initiative sign. As I pulled into the parking area, I saw a sign that read “Habitat Cooperator, Michigan Pheasant Restoration Initiative, Restoring Habitat Together.” That sign wasn’t there last year. I saw positive changes. Weedy fields had been replaced with prairie grass, thickets had been brush-hogged, and a big strip of uncut corn ran for a halfmile right up the middle. I collared Georgie, ran her ½ mile up the field and back down a fencerow. She pointed and I flushed a hen that she chased at least a hundred yards before I could get her back. Having been cooped up for two months with tendonitis, she was obviously bursting with energy and enthusiasm. I put her up and turned Buzz loose on the other side of the road, in a promising-looking field right behind the new sign. We went only a hundred yards before he got birdy and went on point. It was the same routine as before. I walked in to flush, couldn’t find the bird, released him. He moved ahead slowly, cautiously, then crept forward in slow-motion, finally stopping in a point so solid I was sure we had the bird pinned. When I stepped in, the bird flushed into the sun and for a millisecond I couldn’t tell if was a rooster or a hen, but when it veered slightly to the right I saw the white ring around its neck, fired, and the bird went down. The regular pheasant season is over now. But, as I said before, I’m an optimist when it comes to hunting, and I am now looking forward to our late pheasant season, which starts December 1, right after our firearm deer season ends. If there is a pheasant renaissance happening here in Michigan I sure want to be one of the first to find out.

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2 0 1 3 N AT I O N A L S

2013 Nationals Regional Club Basket Program Once again it’s time to start preparing for our GWPCA National Specialty. And this year we’re headed to Nebraska! How Does the Basket Program Work? Each Regional Club puts together a basket or container and sends it to Nebraska. The Basket is filled with nice-quality regional items and products.

Baskets should be decorated – each will be judged for the title of “Best Club Basket.” Single Tickets will be sold and ticket holders vote for the “Best Club Basket” by placing their ticket into the receptacle for the basket of their choice. Club’s win the “Best Club Basket” by the amount of Money (tickets) received.

One Ticket will be drawn from each basket and the holder of the winning ticket takes the basket home.

A club must use the winnings to promote a worthy community or national project. Winning clubs in the past have purchased Kevlar jackets for police dogs, supported the national rescue program, or they have helped a local rescue program. So start planning your Basket Project now! Questions? Call Sylvia at 715-372-4692!

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UNDERSTANDING PUPPIES

Understanding Your Puppies

Insights to Puppy Development From Whelping to Eight Months By Diane Turner, AKC STAR Puppy Instructor

Many things influence the development of puppies. Genetics obviously play an important role in determining the type, structure, health and temperament of a puppy. But research has also shown that the experiences of the mother dog during her pregnancy influence the type of puppies she produces. If a mother dog is under stress during her pregnancy she will have more fearful babies. And if that stress occurs during the final trimester of pregnancy, the puppies can show a reduced-learning potential and/or extreme behaviors. Puppies that exhibit hyperactivity and lack-of- attention often fall into this category and often it is because the dam produced a high level of the stressrelated hormone cortisteriod, As we all know, a puppy’s brain is formed in the womb but from the moment the puppy takes its first breath, his brain is set on course of rapid development. A day-old puppy’s brain is about size of a human middle finger-from the tip to the first joint—that equals about 10 cubic centimeters. By eight weeks his brain will have increased to about 60 cubic centimeters. At 16 weeks the puppy brain will equal 80 cubic centimeters and at 9 months of age when the brain reaches its full growth it weighs about 100 cubic centimeters Though puppies are born blind and deaf, their sense of smell is developed when they are born. Remember that dogs are all about their noses so encourage the use of their noses by introducing them to various scents from the moment they are whelped. If you want the pups to be interested in bird work, place a quail or pheasant wing near their whelping box. The time between birth and three weeks is the time of imprinting. By their caregivers handling them each day, newborns puppies are imprinted with the smell and touch of humans—a bond that will last throughout the lives of the puppies. Around 10-14 days their eyes begin opening and at about 20 days their ear canals open. They stop crawling and try to stand on wobbly legs. Each day they become more aware of their environment and they may bark or cry when separated from their littermates. Around five weeks the weaning process begins. Mother dogs who are more-harsh in discouraging nursing produce puppies who are more submissive. The weaning process – how gentle or harsh the mother is – has lasting effects on the personality of each puppy. Puppies who are gently weaned show more interest in retrieving, playing ball and learning. The type of weaning will forever influence a puppy’s trainability and confidence. During this period, puppies are honing their communication skills. At about 49 days they begin to wag their tails in an attempt to communicate – before it has just been a reaction. In the past, many puppies went to their new homes at 7 weeks. This, it was felt, was the optimum time for puppies to bond with humans. However after years of examining this practice, it

appears as if dogs who are taken away from the mother and the littermates that early are the ones with a greater tendency to bite as adults. It is during this time each puppy learns how to react to its littermates and how his behavior will influence a reaction. If a puppy uses his mouth too harshly with the mother, she will make a correction. Littermates will cry out when another puppy bites too hard. Instinctively the puppy will curtail his mouthing and rough play. Since bite control is one of the most important lessons a puppy needs to learn, many breeders are sending puppies home a bit later and giving “Mom” a chance to teach her puppies proper behavior – a job that-she does so much better than we humans can! This is the time that breeders must also begin teaching bite control. Mouthing may not seem to be an issue at eight weeks, but if it is not controlled and becomes a habit it will be a problem when the dog weighs 70 pounds. From eight to ten weeks puppies go through a period that can strongly influence the outcome of their future behavior. Puppies should be cautiously socialized since traumatic events can have a lasting effect. Between eight and sixteen weeks puppies are most open to learning. Pups that start puppy classes at eight weeks learn-to- learn. Throughout their lives, these pups grasp new things more quickly, are more interested in learning new exercises and develop a stronger work ethic. Socializing puppies of this age with other dogs is also important. But never allow a puppy to approach an older dog without taking great care. It only takes one bad experience to influence a puppy and create a dog-defensive personality. Puppies who stay with their littermates until nine weeks usually have good canine social skills. However, staying with siblings too long can influence puppies to bond more with dogs than humans From three to eight months is referred to as the “juvenile period.” Fear of strangers, new objects and anything the puppy interprets as different can peak during this period. The puppy must continually be exposed to a great variety of objects and situations if he is going to gain confidence. Expose him to different things but do not force a situation that will traumatize the puppy or result in a bite. Do not coddle a frightened puppy, by doing so you are merely reinforcing his fearfulness. A positive diversion is a great way to solve the problem—throw the ball or offer a treat for a sit or some other positive behavior. During these crucial first months of a puppy’s life his development is rapid and he is not only learning how to interact with humans and other canines but he is learning rules and boundaries as he explores new places and objects. The sum of these experiences will dictate his temperament, his personality and his ability to learn as he grows into adulthood.

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AGILITY

Double Qs and High Points Qualify Three GWPs for National Agility Championship Finals By Ashlee Trotter

Left to right: Chris & River; Ashlee & Spirit; Kay & Championship Belle Congratulations to all of our 2013 AKC Agility National Qualifiers!

We had a record breaking 3 GWPs qualify for this year’s event. In order to do so, each team needed to earn 6 Double Q’s and 400 points.  CH MACH Scotian Whiskey River MXB MJS 6 year old female, owned by Chris Eberhardt/Laura ReevesLocco Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MXJ MJB NF 4 year old female, owned by Kay & Mike 2 Braddock 3 MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXS MJC XF 10 year old male, owned by Ashlee  Trotter

1

A

Double Q is qualifying in both the Master Standard and the Master Jumpers with Weaves course on the same day. The Master Standard course contains all of the agility obstacles including jumps, tunnels, weave poles, tire jump, table, a-frame, dogwalk, and teeter.  The Master Jumpers with Weaves course contains only jumps and weave poles, tunnels are optional to be included as well.  The Standard Course Time (SCT) is calculated by measuring the yardage of the course and multiplying the yardage by an estimated average speed for a dog to complete the course.  The dog earns points by running the course faster than the SCT. (SCT – Dog’s Time = Points) If the SCT is 60 seconds and the dog completes the course correctly in 45 seconds then the dog would earn 15 points.  Any fractions of a second are rounded down to the nearest whole number.

Results from the 2013 AKC Agility National Championship! We had two GWPs compete at the 2013 AKC Agility National Championship in Tulsa, Oklahoma March 15-16, 2013. CH MACH Scotian Whiskey River MXB MJS 6 year old female, owned by Chris Eberhardt/Laura Reeves-Locco MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXS MJC XF 10 year old male, owned by Ashlee  Trotter

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AGILITY Dogs are entered in divisions based on their height at the withers, dogs measuring between 18-22” compete in the 20” division; dogs measuring taller than 22” compete in the 24” division. River and Chris competed in the 20” division. They had a perfect first round and a single fault in each of the 2nd and 3rd rounds for a strong finish of 290 points out of a possible 300.  They finished overall at 146th out of 409 entered dogs! That put their overall finish squarely in the top 36% of the 20” division. Well done, ladies! Spirit and Ashlee competed in the 24” division.  They also had a single fault in each of the 1st and 3rd rounds.  They had a perfect run in the 2nd round finishing 17th for that round.  Overall they finished also with a score of 290 out of 300 placing 48th out of 143 entered dogs, for a finish in the top 34% of the 24” division.  Whoo hoo!

Congratulations to new MACH River! aka MACH CH Scotian Whiskey River MXB MJS & Owner/Handler Chris Eberhardt River is six years old, co-owned with Laura Reeves. She was co-bred with Carolyn Isolm, out of Jetset’s Dreamcatcher at Scotia x Wildacres Boxcar Willie. River is Chris’s 3rd agility GWP, but her first to earn a MACH. In fact, River is only the 3rd GWP in history to earn a MACH. She’s had a great year in 2012; she qualified for the AKC Agility Invitational, qualified for the AKC Agility National Championships, and finished the year as the AKC’s #1 GWP in agility for 2012! When they aren’t tearing up an agility course, River is a breed champion, a great pheasant dog (she earned her NAVHDA NA title with a perfect score), and they have done quite a bit of obedience training too. River exemplifies the versatility of the GWP! Chris’s next challenge is to tackle tracking and to continue in agility – we wish them both the best of luck!!

2012 AKC Agility Invitational Results We had four wonderful GWPs attend the 2012 AKC Agility Invitational in Orlando, FL, Dec. 14-16, 2012. The support and teamwork of their people was wonderful - we did our best to be ringside to watch each other’s runs and to cheer on our own! Below are the results, MACH CH Scotian Whiskey River took top honors as the #1 finish for GWPs, she finished 52nd overall in the 20” height class. The other 3 dogs all run in the 24” height class, so their placements are listed for that class. Name

Score

Placement

1

MACH CH Scotian Whiskey River MX MXB MXJ MJB owned by Chris Eberhardt/Laura Reeves-Locco

390

52

2

MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXS MJG XF owned by Ashlee Trotter

380

64

3

Afterhour’s Frosted Mocha MX MXS MXJ MJS MXF MFB owned by Diane Philibert/Mark Rosenblatt

370

69

4

Jed’s Sf Blue Belle UDX RE JH MX MXJ MJB NF owned by Kay & Mike Braddock

360

75

The 2013 Invitational will once again be in Orlando, FL the qualifying period ends June 30th, so there is plenty of time to rack up some points! We hope to see you there!

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2011 GWPCA Nationals Ionia, Michigan Hosted by Fort Detroit GWP Club

Come see the beautiful fall colors of Michigan and join us for, what we promise, will be a memorable Nationals!

Event Calendar: Thurs. Sept. 29, 2011 - All Breed Obedience, Beginner Novice & Welcome Party Fri. Sept. 30, 2011 - Fort Detroit GWP Club Specialty & Sweeps, National GWP Obedience/Rally (GWPs only) & All Star Invitational Sat. Oct. 1, 2011 - Futurity, National Sweepstakes, Maturity, All Breed Agility & National Meeting, CGC Testing Saturday dinner – barbeque $20/person plus cash bar; Sun. Oct. 2, 2011 - GWPCA National Specialty Show, Jr. Showmanship, All Breed Agility & Awards Banquet Sunday banquet - $30/person plus cash bar. Mon. Oct. 3, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 1, Field Trial & Water Test Tues. Oct. 4, 2011 - Hunt Test Day 2, Field Trial October 5 to Conclusion - Field Trial **All Information is Subject to Change

Sue DeGraw, Nationals Coordinator schnellberg@comcast.net Barb Tucker, Show/Agility Chairman Kay Braddock, Obedience/Rally Trial Chairman John Schoonover, Field Trial Chairman Mark Sargent, Hunt Test Chairman Roger Doyle, Donations Trish Hirneisen, Hospitality Roger Doyle & Rich Hirneisen, Merchandise There is camping available at the fairgrounds and at the field trial grounds.

Wrangler Available

Host Hotel –

American Inn & Suites, Ionia 616-527-2200 We do NOT recommend any other hotels in the area except the Best American Heritage Inn in Portland, about 15 miles away from Ionia 517-647-2200, gm@greatamericanheritageinn.com We would like clubs to step up and offer to host a hospitality night. Available nights are Monday-Friday. Meals will be offered every day. The more donations we get for meals from clubs, the less each individual will have to pay for their meal. Contact Trish Hirneisen at (248) 258-4884 or rich.hirneisen@gmail.com We are also asking clubs to put together baskets for raffle, like we have done in the past. Ads for the catalog are due July 30 to Arden Shaw. Donations for trophies – information will be available soon and on the Nationals website. Merchandise information will be available

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E A S T E R N N E S P E C I A LT Y

G e r m a n W i r e h a i r e d Po i n t e r C l u b o f E a s t e r n N E S p e c i a l t y The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of Eastern Nebraska hosted their sixth annual Specialty in conjunction with the Lewis and Clark Cluster held in Omaha, Nebraska, November 17, 2012. Our entry supported majors, the weather cooperated, and we enjoyed the company of fellow GWP fanciers willing to travel from Colorado, Iowa, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Specialty wins and points were shared. Several German Wirehaired Pointers left Omaha as Champions! Sherry Jackson finished her bitch Devata OB-LADI OB-LA-DA on Friday. Jodi Quesnell finished our BOSS winner Idawire J Edgar Saturday, and Courtney Vogel-Bastian finished CladdaghNRipsnorter’s Back’N Badger on Sunday. Our Specialty and Sweepstakes winners were grateful for the exquisite Sean Ferraro Perry sketch and card trophies. Congratulations to all!

Sweepstakes Judge- Ms Maureen Sullivan Gamble Best in Sweepstakes

Idawire Jazz Singer. SR 71114808. 12/10/2011. Breeder: Jodi Quesnell. By CH Cynisters Believe It or Not-CH Piemonte Idawire Echo V Chisola. Owner: Tonna Quesnell.

Best of Opposite Sweepstakes

Idawire J Edgar. SR71114801. 12/10/2011. Breeder: Jodi Quesnell. By CH Cynisters Believe It or Not-CH Piemonte Echo V Chisola. Owner: Jodi Quesnell

Best Veteran In Sweepstakes

CH Brillow Ally’s Li’L Snippet. SN78035911. 10/17/2000. Breeder: Rhonda Haukoos & Brian Amundson. By CH Willy Point Roosters SH-CH Ansel’s Brillow Ally. Owner: Julie Cockrum.

Regular Classes Judge- Mr. Frank N Summerside Best of Breed

CH Claddagh’s Hotcakes at Sangrud JH. SR57512201. 6/25/2009. Breeder: James & Helen Witt & Courtney Vogel & W Bastian. By: CH Darnelle’s ‘Party On’ JH-CH Ripsnorter’s Mt. View Explorer SH. Owner: P & K Wehking & Courtney Vogel & William Bastian

Best of Opposite

CH Reece Afterhours In the Eye of the Storm. SR59437103. 11/25/2009. Breeder: Michael & Angie Johnson & Christi Chism. By CH Reece Afterhours The Buck Stops Here JH-CH Afterhours Once In A Lifetime JH. Owner: John & Linda Eidemiller. (NO PHOTO)

Winners Dog and Best of Winners

Idawire J Edgar. SR71114801. 12/10/2011. Breeder: Jodi Quesnell. By CH Cynisters Believe It or Not-CH iemonte Echo V Chisola. Owner: Jodi Quesnell.

Reserve Winners Dog

CladdaghNRipsnorter’s Back ‘N Badger MH. SR62716305. 6/10/2010. Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney Vogel-Bastian. By CH Timo II V Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH-Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owner: Bob Karrick & Ann Karrick & Courtney Vogel-Bastian.

Winners Bitch

Idawire Jazz Singer. SR 71114808. 12/10/2011. Breeder: Jodi Quesnell. By CH Cynisters Believe It or Not-CH Piemonte Idawire Echo V Chisola. Owner: Tonna Quesnell.

Reserve Winners Bitch

CladdaghN Ripsnorter Baby Come Back SH. SR62716302. 6/10/2010. Breeder: Courtney Vogel-Bastian & Lisa George. By CH Timo II V Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH-Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle. Owner: Thomas Weber & Courtney Vogel-Bastian. (NO PHOTO) 64

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E A S T E R N N E S P E C I A LT Y

Best in Sweepstakes

Best Veteran in Sweepstakes

Best of Breed

Winners Dog and Best of Winners

Reserve Winners Dog

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WI HUNT TEST

Wisconsin Club Hosts Hunt Test By Courtney Vogel The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of Wisconsin hosted an autumn Hunt Test. There were a good number of entries and most members of the club came out to help. Carol Cagle chaired the event with the assistance of her best-friend Gracie. Eight GWP’s were entered in our test, seven in Master Hunter, and one in Senior Hunter.  Those with passing scores were, Randy Piette’s “Whiskey” earned 2 legs towards MH, William & Courtney Bastian’s “Camus” earned his 6th and final leg of MH, and Thomas Weber & Courtney Bastian’s “Babe” (Handled by William Bastian) earned her 4th and final leg of SH.   We had great food and company! Much gratitude to all of our volunteers for making this hunt test a fun and successful one!

Randy Petite and Whiskey qualified for two legs towards their Master Hunter Title.

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Babe owned by Thomas Webber and Courtney Vogel earned her fourth and final leg of her Senior Hunter Title.


WI HUNT TEST

Gracie assisting her favorite Hunt Test Chairperson, Carol Cagle.

Judges at the German Wirehaired Club of Wisconsin autumn Hunt Test.

Lots of members turned out to help.

William Bastain and Courtney Vogel’s Camus qualified for his sixth and final leg of his Master Hunter Title.

Most GWP Club of Wisconsin members came out to assist with the Hunt Test. Due to the space constraints of Nationals coverage the Winter Issue of the Wire-News was unable to carry the Wisconsin Hunt Tests update.

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NEW ACHIEVEMENTS

AKC New Titles – October –December 2012 Compiled by Lori Sargent CHAMPION CH Aimn Hi Dancing Doc Hudson (D) SR56463007 (10/19/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Eric Szabo & Heather Szabo CH Dual Shot’s Flying High (B) SR67869401 (10/6/12) by DC Dual Shot’s Behind Bars x CH Dual Shot’s Buffalo Girl JH; Breeder: Karla Hawkins; Owner: Karla Hawkins CH Heywire Looks Like Almond Joy At Reece BN RN CA (B) SR61537107 (10/5/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH; Breeder: Judy Cheshire & Bernee Brawn & Doug Ljungren; Owner: Joni Cornell & Audrey Meinke & Angie Johnson CH Hh Lookout Celtic Field Of Vision JH (B) SR69016405 (10/7/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson & James Witt; Owner: Jim Boyd & Michelle Boyd & James Witt & Ed Shupp CH Hilltops Winter Scotch At Inverness (D) SR71372703 (10/6/12) by Inverness Laphroaig x Cedarbrook’S.K.S. Tzarr.Hearts.On.Fire; Breeder: Betty Stroh & Kosta Sunda; Owner: Laura Myles CH Weidenhugel Jetta V Treff (B) SR65865801 (10/28/12) by FC AFC W eidenhugel Impulse V Xero RN MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee; Breeder: Mildred Revell; Owner: Sharon Jahn CH Cadenberg F. Argos V. Sep (D) SR72386802 (11/11/12) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Solvraevens Fie; Breeder: Silke Alberts; Owner: Gary A Bonini & Theresa Y Bonini CH Claddaghnripsnorter’s Back’N Badger TD MH (D) SR62716305 (11/18/12) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x Ripsnorter Makin’ Drama Darnelle; Breeder: Lisa George & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian; Owner: Bob Karrick & Courtney J Vogel-Bastian & Ann Karrick 68

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CH Devata Ob-La-Di Ob-La-Da (B) SR18926305 (11/16/12) by CH Side By Sides Chatanuga Choo MH x CH Scotian Sagebrush Renegade; Breeder: Sherry L Jackson; Owner: Sherry L Jackson CH Idawire J Edgar (D) SR71114801 (11/17/12) by CH Cynisters Belive It Or Not x CH Piemonte Idawire Echo V. Chisola; Breeder: Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Jodi Quesnell CH Ridsnorter Makin’ Waves With Jay-Mar (B) SR65365001 (11/18/12) by CH Ripsnorter Makin A Statement x CH Jay-Mar’s Thank God For Credit Cards JH; Breeder: Lisa George & Nickol Litwin & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Lisa George CH Hh Lookout’s Cherryfield (B) SR69016402 (12/1/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Rlb’s Got Moxie At Drakkar MH; Breeder: Edwin Shupp & Joyce Wilkinson & James Witt; Owner: Serena Oehlers GRAND CHAMPION GCH CH Cynister Idawire Rose Red (B) SR50801916 (10/19/12) by CH Cynisters In The Center Ring x CH Cynister Idawire Rose Quartz; Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Jodi Quesnell; Owner: Anthony Wagoner & Jodi Quesnell GCH CH Aimn Hi Jet Stream SH (B) SR61717307 (12/15/12) by GCH CH Timo II V. Bockenhagen At Kimmax MH x CH Devata Rip It Up At Scotia; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom; Owner: Kay Gunnarson & LaMar Gunnarson NATIONAL FIELD CHAMPION NFC NAFC FC AFC Tumalo Timberjack (D) SR46095612 (10/8/12) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x Slick Shooten Maggie JH; Breeder: Brady Shannon; Owner: John Williams & Sandra Williams NATIONAL AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION NFC NAFC FC AFC Tumalo Timberjack (D) SR46095612 (10/8/12) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x Slick Shooten Maggie JH; Breeder: Brady Shannon; Owner: John Williams & Sandra Williams

AMATEUR FIELD CHAMPION CH AFC Proulx’s Wireswest Big Jake (D) SR44876602 (9/15/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Von Duffin’s Lady Bug CDX MH; Breeder: Meg Eden; Owner: Carrie E Proulx & Joseph A Proulx II COMPANION DOG CH Surefire’s Secret Little Spot CD BN JH (D) SR56797905 (10/14/12) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder: Joan Payton & Andy Payton; Owner: Joan Payton & Andy Payton Weidenhugel Jade V Treff CD BN RN (B) SR65865808 (10/5/12) by FC AFC Weidenhugel Impulse V Xero RN MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee; Breeder: Mildred Revell; Owner: Sharon Jahn Jay-Mar’s On The Road Again CD BN RE NAJ NF (D) SR53880202 (11/3/12) by DC St Croix’s Diamond Jim x CH JayMar’s Liver And Onions SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Judith Rowley Wolf Vom Altmoor III CD TD (D) PAL256589 (10/16/12) Jeanne Ludlow & John Bergin, Jr. GRADUATE NOVICE CH Drakkar’s Rlb He Caught My Eye CD BN GN RE (D) SR51817503 (11/4/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Drakkars Ididnt Do It Of Rlb RN; Breeder: Roger Bultman & Joyce Wilkinson & Terrence Boldin; Owner: Donna Leveque & Bob Leveque Lorbas Joker Vom Hessenjaeger CD GN RAE (D) SR44724403 (12/8/12) by Herr Neptun Vom Hessenjaeger x Frau Hessi Vom Hessenjaeger; Breeder: Margie Hollnagel; Owner: Marlene Brzoska BEGINNER NOVICE CH Surefire’s Secret Little Spot CD BN JH (D) SR56797905 (10/14/12) by DC Nyramskov’s H. Hector x CH Surefire’s Secret Moonshine RN JH; Breeder: Joan Payton & Andy Payton; Owner: Joan Payton & Andy Payton


NEW ACHIEVEMENTS Jerelin’s Nacote Of Mill Pond BN RN JH CGC (D) SR60634202 (12/15/12) by CH Jerelin’s Fly Me To The Moon MH x CH Jerelin’s Justa Pat Hand MH; Breeder: Linda H Krepak & Bernee Brawn; Owner: Stuart Kerzner RALLY NOVICE Jerelin’s Nacote Of Mill Pond RN JH (D) SR60634202 (10/27/12) by CH Jerelin’s Fly Me To The Moon MH x CH Jerelin’s Justa Pat Hand MH; Breeder: Linda H Krepak & Bernee Brawn; Owner: Stuart Kerzner Reece Afterhour RKM Tempest Win One For The Gipper RN (B) SR69398201 (10/20/12) by CH Laurwyn Cassio Piece Of Cake x CH J an J After Hours Dana JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson; Owner: Angela E Johnson & Kathy Marks & Christine Whitmore & Belinda DeLaby Kansas City Kate RN (B) PAL254054 (11/3/12) Owner: Nancy E. Ondrus RALLY ADVANCED Weidenhugel Jade V Treff CD BN RA (B) SR65865808 (10/21/12) by FC AFC Weidenhugel Impulse V Xero RN MH x Weidenhugel Ida V Yankee; Breeder: Mildred Revell; Owner: Sharon Jahn RALLY EXCELLENT CH Larkspur’s Intrepid V. Erebus UD RE JH OAP OJP (D) SN81151201 (11/25/12) by DC Cadenberg Victor V Trey MH x Cottonwood’s Makersaidtakeher; Breeder: Heather Box-Quisenberry & Dale R Hurlock & Gina McCain; Owner: Anna C Kostishak & Gina McCain TRACKING DOG Tikka T3 TD (B) SR67827201 (10/28/12) by Soltan Of Cedar Breaks x Jjps Breanna Bird; Breeder: James Petersen; Owner: Jeremy Haack

Wolf Vom Altmoor III TD (D) PAL256589 (10/14/12) Jeanne Ludlow & John Bergin, Jr. JUNIOR HUNTER CH Blueline’s Aspen Glow JH (B) SR63724101 (10/14/12) by CH Blueline Drivin’ Me To Drink x CH Blueline Buggin’ You JH; Breeder: Heidi J Baumbarger; Owner: Heidi J Baumbarger CH Cynisters Time Turner Cando JH (D) SR58523702 (10/7/12) by CH Cynisters Shooting Star x CH Cynisters She Devil; Breeder: Cathie Magoon & Courtney Magoon & Diane Turner & Larry Turner; Owner: Cathy Milachek & Cathie Magoon Ruger Gus Dakota Arbach JH (D) SR71834003 (10/14/12) by Fritz Vom Dakota Arbach x Kate Dakota Arbach; Breeder: Gary L Arbach; Owner: Douglas Brent Herrington Sure Shot’s It’s A Jungle Out There JH (B) SR70342503 (10/28/12) by DC Wildwings Shameless x CH Sure Shot’s Reckless; Breeder: Penny Ljungren; Owner: Penny Ljungren & Bernee Brawn CH Blueline Lightning Bug JH (B) SR63724102 (11/11/12) by CH Blueline Drivin’ Me To Drink x CH Blueline Buggin’ You JH; Breeder: Heidi J Baumbarger; Owner: Heidi J Baumbarger Jay-Mar’s Can I Buy You A Drink JH (D) SR69812507 (11/17/12) by CH Jay-Mar’s Over The Limit JH x CH Rlb’s Drakkar Laika What Yousee SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber Jay-Mar’s Remeber My Name JH (B) SR69812501 (11/17/12) by CH Jay-Mar’s Over The Limit JH x CH Rlb’s Drakkar Laika What Yousee SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber Jay-Mar’s Surprise Apperance JH (B) SR69812502 (11/11/12) by CH Jay-Mar’s Over The Limit JH x CH Rlb’s Drakkar Laika What Yousee SH; Breeder: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber; Owner: Nickol Litwin & Christopher Hieber & Patricia Hieber

Reece Afterhours In It 2 Win It At Whitetail JH (B) SR69398202 (12/2/12) by CH Laurwyn Cassio Piece Of Cake x CH J an J After Hours Dana JH; Breeder: Michael R Johnson & Christine Whitmore & Angela E Johnson; Owner: Deb Darby & Angela Johnson CH Tova’s Atomic Von Der Winston JH (B) SR47345703 (12/1/12) by CH Larkspurs Windmill Winston JH x CH Ayla V.D. Sonnenberg; Breeder: Anthony J Wiseman & Eva S Wiseman; Owner: Eva S Wiseman CH Windmill Aspendel Texas Traveler JH (D) SR65036703 (12/9/12) by CH Ripsnorter’s Thunderhart x GCH CH Aspendel’s Pale Rider JH; Breeder: Betsy Watkins & Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro; Owner: Betsy Watkins & Anna C Kostishak JUNIOR HUNTER RETRIEVER Doyle’s Primecut Of Raw Power MH JHR (D) SR03766102 (12/9/12) by Ruffed Rider Roiled Up x Belle V Wildflicken; Breeder: Gordon Bigelow; Owner: Sarah Shull SENIOR HUNTER CH Whitetail’s Huntershill Holley SH (B) SR54078102 (10/28/12) by CH Dke Liberty Aztec JH x Whitetail’s Iowa Ice JH; Breeder: Debbie Darby; Owner: Bill Hill CH Rlb’s Drakkar Laika What Yousee SH (B) SR32934501 (11/17/12) by CH Rlb’s Jessie The Body MH x CH Drakkar’s All Eyes On Me CD; Breeder: Lois Bultman & Roger Bultman & Terrance Boldin; Owner: Patricia Hieber & Christopher Hieber MASTER HUNTER CH Hawk Havens Grand Stand MH (D) SR62369106 (11/4/12) by GCH CH Mountain View National Acclaim x CH Larkspurs Dangerous Curves Ahead SH; Breeder: Pete Paduch; Owner: Peter L Paduch & Norma L Paduch NOVICE AGILITY CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars NA OAJ CA (B) SR56463003 (11/3/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld

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NEW ACHIEVEMENTS OPEN AGILITY Afterhours Edged Weapon TD OA NAJ (D) SR53690110 (11/2/12) by CH Afterhours Let The Wookie Win x CH Afterhours Memphis Mafia; Breeder: Christine Whitmore & Christi Chism; Owner: Deborah Cutter CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars OA AXJ CA (B) SR56463003 (11/11/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld OPEN AGILITY JUMPER Aspendel’s Hearts On Fire NA OAJ NF (B) SR47981603 (12/29/12) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x CH Ripsnorters To Dee Fields; Breeder: Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro; Owner: Pamela Baak & Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro Afterhour’s Joie De Vivre NA OAJ NF (B) SR45156705 (10/28/12) by CH Afterhours Fuzzy Navel x CH Weaver’s Morgen Raine; Breeder: David M Weaver; Owner: Diane Philibert & Christi Chism & Mark Rosenblatt CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars OAJ (B) SR56463003 (10/26/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld EXCELLENT AGILITY Jed’s Easy Street JH AX AXJ (B) SR36438504 (12/22/12) by Dual Rivers Trampoline x Brushbuster Starts Em Right; Breeder: Gordon Bigelow; Owner: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker

Rosie Rocket AX OAJ NF (B) PAL253260 (12/9/12) Owner: Maureen Richard EXCELLENT AGILITY JUMPER CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars OA AXJ CA (B) SR56463003 (11/11/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld Jed’s Easy Street JH OA AXJ (B) SR36438504 (12/1/12) by Dual Rivers Trampoline x Brushbuster Starts Em Right; Breeder: Gordon Bigelow; Owner: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker AGILITY EXCELLENT PREFERRED T. Wolfs Wired After Grizzly AXP AJP (B) ILP159162 (12/1/12) Owner: Cindy Schneider EXCELLENT AGILITY JUMPER PREFERRED Jerelin’s Know When To Hold JH AXP AJP (B) SR08116805 (10/12/12) by DC AFC Bounty’s Justa Pegleg Pete x CH Jerelin’s Afternoon Delite MH NA; Breeder: Linda H Krepak; Owner: Jean Reese AGILITY FAST NOVICE Aspendel’s Hearts On Fire NA NAJ NF (B) SR47981603 (10/19/12) by NFC NAFC DC AFC Rudolph’s Blitzen Von Duffin x CH Ripsnorters To Dee Fields; Breeder: CH Ripsnorters To Dee Fields; Breeder: Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro; Owner: Pamela Baak & Robert Perry & Sean Ferraro MASTER BRONZE AGILITY Jed’s SF Blue Belle UDX OM1 RE SH MX MXB MXJ MJB NF (B) SR48693303 (10/12/12) by CH Jed’s Wild Turkey x Jed’s Lexus Lx Von Duffin; Breeder: Edward Tucker & Barbara Tucker; Owner: Mike Braddock & Kay Braddock MASTER SILVER JUMPER Afterhour’s Frosted Mocha MX MXS MXJ MJS MXF MFB (B) SR10065201 (11/18/12) by Afterhours Ace High JH x CH Afterhours Happy Hooker JH; Breeder: Christi Chism & Christine Whitmore; Owner: Diane Philibert & Mark Rosenblatt

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CH MACH Scotian Whiskey River MXB MJS (B) SR35640805 (B) SR35640805 (11/18/12) by CH Wildacres Boxcar Willie SH x CH Scotian Jetset’s Dreamcatcher; Breeder: Laura Reeves & Carolyn V Isom & Jane Bonaccorso; Owner: Chris Eberhardt & Laura Reeves-Lococo MASTER CENTURY JUMPER MACH Vom Grafenauer’s Free Spirit VCD1 RA JH MXS MJC XF (D) SR02055005 by Vom Grafenauer Cascade Huba x Vom Grafenauer Can Of Corn; Breeder: Thomas Grafenauer; Owner: Ashlee Trotter MASTER AGILITY CHAMPION CH MACH Scotian Whiskey River MXB MJB (B) SR35640805 (B) SR35640805 (11/17/12) by CH Wildacres Boxcar Willie SH x CH Scotian Jetset’s Dreamcatcher; Breeder: Laura Reeves & Carolyn V Isom & Jane Bonaccorso; Owner: Chris Eberhardt & Laura Reeves-Lococo COURSING ABILITY Heywire Looks Like Almond Joy At Reece BN RN CA (B) SR61537107 (9/15/12) by GCH CH Ripsnorter’s Mt View Lookout JH x CH Heywire ‘N Cedrbrk Justa ‘Pon A Time JH; Breeder: Breeder: Judy Cheshire & Bernee Brawn & Doug Ljungren; Owner: Joni Cornell & Audrey Meinke & Angie Johnson CH Aimn Hi For Jet Set’s Dancing With The Stars OAJ CA (B) SR56463003 (10/27/12) by DC AFC Jetset’s Ragtop Day At Scotia CD JH x CH Wildacres Ima Gypsy Dancer MH; Breeder: Jim Isom & Carolyn V Isom & Genevieve M Capstaff; Owner: Laura Reeves Lococo & Angela Merfeld


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ADVERTISING INFO

The German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America Wire-News The GWPCA Wire-News is published by the German Wirehaired Pointer Club of America, Inc. The GWPCA is a non-profit Michigan corporation which was founded in 1959 to promote and develop the German Wirehaired Pointer. Since 1959 the GWPCA has been recognized by the American Kennel Club as a member club responsible for the development of the GWP in the United States. The GWPCA Wire-News is published for GWPCA members and is a benefit of membership. The editors of the Wire-News wish to encourage members to write interesting and informative articles for the Wire-News. The editors reserve the right to edit any article sent for publication and the right to refuse any article deemed inappropriate. Letters and articles published in the Wire-News do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the GWPCA or the Wire-News staff.

Publishing Schedule

Issue Summer 2013 Autumn 2013 Winter 2013

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Front Cover (Color)—Includes inside story Back Cover (Color) Inside Front or Back Cover (Color) Full Page Black & White Half Page Black & White Quarter Page Black & White Business Card - yearly Business Card - per issue Color (Contact Ad Manager for availability)

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Ads must be camera ready. Ad space may be reserved prior to deadline. Ad dimensions: 8.75 in.x11.25 in. Text must be kept within ½ inch of each side so it is not lost when page is trimmed. If you need assistant preparing your ad please contact one of the following: Angie Johnson @ angiehef@aol.com Sean Perry @ Aspendel@aol.com Trinitie Webb @ trix.are.fer.kidz@gmail.com, Payment must be received by the ad deadline: Send payment to Adam Cunningham, Advertising Manager 9088 N. Awl Rd. Parker, CO 80138 – Contact Adam @ ironwiregwp@gmail.com or 303-720-2275. Content Articles should be in Mircosoft Word 9 pt. Century Schoolbook – single spaced. Be sure to include by-line as you wish it to appear. Please forward in a document file to: Diane Turner, Editor @ turner.p.diane@gmail.com. Contact Diane at 520-490-2601 if you have questions. Photos: Photos to accompany articles must be forwarded in a separate file. TIFF is the preferred format for electronic submission. This format produces large files but it does not lose information. JPG images should be the largest pixel format (2400x1900 or similar). Snapshot images (400x300 pixels) will not produce well enough for publication. DIGITAL IMAGES SHOULD BE AT LEAST 1 MB. ©2013 GWPCA WIRE NEWS 73


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Wire~News Spring 2013  

Wire~News Spring 2013

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