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“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Angels Among Us Pet Rescue Welcomes Lance White to the Organization! I am excited to announce that Lance White, former President of the Humane Society of Forsyth County ("HSFC") will be joining our team as Chief Executive Officer for Angels Among Us Pet Rescue ("AAUPR"). For those of you who don't know Lance, he has a passion for animal rescue and believes in working together for a common cause. He has been a good friend, advocate and coach to AAUPR since our inception. He is very familiar with our organization, and he already knows many of our team members. Lance has been the President of HSFC for the past five years, where he increased the number of lives saved from an average of 300-400 annually to over 1,700 animals saved in 2013 on an operating budget of less than $500,000. Additionally, Lance was instrumental in opening a thrift store in 2010, which directly supports HSFC and continues to make a strong financial contribution to their organization. In just five years since our inception in 2009, AAUPR has become one of the largest animal rescue groups in the southeast U.S. Led by a committed team of volunteers and fosters, we saved an impressive 1,975 animals in 2013! We are very proud of our accomplishments and sincerely appreciate your incredible commitment and teamwork that have made our success possible. With the addition of Lance to our leadership team, we will continue to work hard to retain the volunteer-based culture and passion for helping animals that are foundational to who we are, how we operate, and why we do what we do. We are excited about the experience, talents and vision that Lance brings to Angels Among Us, and we look forward to his leadership in helping us accomplish more great things and save more lives in 2014. Please join me in welcoming Lance to our team and give him your full support. Mark Weinberg Angels Among Us Pet Rescue

“Angels Herald� Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Abbie’s Story: Family, Teamwork, and the Kindness of Strangers By: Karen Dunkley It is our constant fear. Being so careful, ever vigilant, but mistakes can still happen. You try your best, and yet…an open door, a small hole in the fence, a dog scooting right out from under your feet, a dropped leash. The yard crew didn’t mean to leave the gate unlatched, they were working hard, trying to finish up and get to the next job. They didn’t stop to make sure the gate was secure, and it wasn’t. And so everything changed. Everything changed for sweet, gentle Abbie and most assuredly for her family. But everything changed for Shep too. And that is why this story matters. This is a story of devotion and love, and standing by those we care about, at all costs. The hero of this story just might surprise you. Nancy’s dog Abbie and her foster pup Shep had slipped through the open gate and were gone. Just gone. They hadn’t even been outside for long, but it only takes a moment and dogs love to explore: Innocents never understanding the dangers of traffic and busy roads. Of being hungry and lost. Nancy was distraught and asking for help to look for her precious charges. There are Angels who are experts at finding and catching lost dogs and how I really wished they could be there with us, but on this workday that just wasn’t possible. So we came to help, the three of us. None of us had ever done it before, looking for a lost dog. In this case two. Others, like Allison, were working by phone, calling shelters and clinics in hopes the pups might have turned up someplace. Our little group would do the best we could for Abbie, Shep, and Nancy, with an army of Angels backing us up. But there would be others, too that would help without even being asked. People helping each other, doing what was good and right. The kindness of strangers. We are a family, rescuers. We are there for each other and for the animals. So Lane, Laura, and I came to do whatever we could on that cold winter day. We were determined to try. When I got there Nancy was putting up flyers and crying. I hugged her and asked what I could do to help. She looked at me with so much despair in her eyes and I understood. My dogs have “gotten out” before too. It’s not a sign of anything neglectful or bad, it just happens. Most have been there at one time or another and it is a terrible and helpless feeling. Nancy told me she had gotten a call from one of her flyers already, someone had seen a black dog and a brown dog running by the busy highway, a few miles from her house. With silent tears running down her face she said “They saw the black one get hit by a car. The lady driving the car had gotten out looking upset and had checked on the injured dog” we hoped perhaps she

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


was able to get her to the vet. If it even was Abbie, we just didn’t know. So far, there were no dogs fitting their descriptions at any place Allison checked. We decided to split up. Lane was driving around the area in and out of the neighborhoods in larger and larger circles in hopes of a glimpse of Shep or Abbie. Laura and her kids were driving around, putting up flyers, and keeping in touch with Allison. Nancy and I were going to distribute flyers everywhere possible. I asked Nancy where the caller saw the dogs and where she thought they might have gone. “They were running that way” she pointed. “I went up there and didn’t see any sign of them.” I had a hunch, a strong intuition that the dogs had not gone far. I decided to park and go on foot. Nancy had covered a lot of ground already so I drove past where the lady had reported seeing them and parked behind a church. There were acres of fields and woods close to the busy highway, a perfect spot for lost and frightened dogs to hunker down. I walked around, softly calling to them just in case they could hear me. A recreation center was nearby so I took some flyers inside then went to the church. The door was locked so I rang the doorbell and waited. As I stood warming my hands I turned my head to the left and there he was. Shep was looking right at me. I knew him from the pictures Nancy had shared with us, I had no doubt it was him. He was 100 yards or so away and steadily holding my gaze. I walked slowly towards him while fumbling with my cell phone. “Can I help you?” The lady answered the door. “No, no, I’m good now, thanks.” As I walked toward Shep, I realized what he was doing. The closer I got it was clear Shep was checking on sweet Abbie who was lying beside the road. She was not alive. But he did not leave her all night, and would not leave her still, even with a stranger approaching, even with all of the traffic. Nancy had explained Shep is very skittish so I slowly walked over to get between him and the road while calling the others on my cell. Shep was looking at me with cautious curiosity but wouldn’t come. I didn’t blame him after all he’d just been through; I squatted down and tried to relax just hoping he wouldn’t take off into the woods. And then I called Nancy. Shep knew Nancy and not me so the hope was that he might come to her. But I had to tell Nancy about dear Abbie, too. It would be so much for her to bear. She was very quiet and then asked me “where?” I told her and we ended the conversation. Nancy would do what was needed to save her foster Shep, even with the terrible news she had just heard. Now with everyone on the way, I just had to be patient and keep Shep in sight. I had been standing on the sidewalk for a while, not realizing how much time had passed when a lady from a business across the busy highway noticed me there and naturally wondered why. Laura and Lane had just arrived and Shep was very nervous with all of the interest. We explained our mission to the lady, whose name is Melissa, and she immediately said “I have some deli meat and treats, maybe that will help!” and went back across the highway before we could say thank you. We were lying low, speaking in whispers even, and waiting for Nancy to come. Lane had tried to approach him but Shep wasn’t having it. Before long we saw Nancy

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


parking her car near the church and I went to her. Together we walked back towards Shep and poor Abbie so still on the grass. Nancy was holding herself together, trying not to look at Abbie, fighting the tears. She could fall apart later; right now she still had a life to save. Just then the kind lady from across the highway, whom none of us had ever met and would likely never see again, came back with her arms full of goodies; her act the very definition of compassion, doing what she could to help a bunch of strangers and a lost dog. Nancy clutched her leash, took a deep breath, and then with a handful of Melissa’s deli meat went down the slope after Shep. At first Shep came near, he knew his foster mom was there to help but he was too stressed to get close enough for a leash. He was hungry, though, and smelled the delicious food Nancy held out to him. Tempted. Calmly, gently Nancy spoke to Shep, coaxing him ever so patiently even through her tears. Handing him bites of the meat; he would take it and then shy away from her, not quite sure. Then he would bolt into the woods or toward the pond! We all held our breath. Slowly, watchfully he would return to Nancy. A bit closer this time. After what felt like forever, in reality perhaps an hour, he came so close to her, letting his guard down a bit. He took another bite of the deli meat and allowed his foster mother to loop a leash around his neck. There were quiet cheers from all of us watching from the sidewalk, not wanting to spook Shep but overjoyed. Nancy, so brave and strong, knelt down to hug Shep, murmuring to him, telling him it would be alright now, that he was safe again

She had to pass Abbie’s body to get Shep to her car. He glanced and briefly sniffed but he already knew. His job here was done; he didn’t need to stand watch any longer, now he could go. Lane and I took care of Abbie’s body and were getting ready to leave. Nancy and Shep were in her car, I tapped on the window. Placing Abbie’s collar into Nancy’s hand with both of mine I said “Abbie saved his life. We never would have found him otherwise. Shep was a true and loyal friend never leaving Abbie’s side.” Nancy nodded and we both wiped away tears. When I checked on Nancy the next morning she told me she was going to adopt Shep. "How could I not after what he did for Abbie?” Silver lining, Shep….you’re finally home.

In loving memory of Abbie. “Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


5 Myths About Surgery By: Shawn Messonnier, DVM

Do you cringe at the thought of your companion going under the knife? De-bunking these common beliefs about surgery will help you feel more at ease.

When Barb discovered a lump on her golden retriever’s side, it took her awhile to bring it to the veterinarian’s attention. Why? “I was scared,” she admits. “I didn’t want him to undergo an operation. I had to drum up some courage before I took him to the vet.” As it turned out, the lump was benign, but if it hadn’t been, Barb’s fear and hesitation could have had serious consequences. The truth is most dogs will need one or more surgical procedures at some point in their lives. It could be for spaying or neutering, dental work, or a tumor or wart removal. People often have anxieties about subjecting their dogs to operations. This article addresses six of the most common myths associated with surgery in dogs.

Myth #1: “My dog is too old for surgery.” I hear this way too often. How sad that our senior citizens of the canine world are denied proper medical care because someone thinks they’re “too old.” No dog is too old to receive necessary surgery. Of course, there may be other factors involved besides age. For example, a 15-year-old Labrador with hip dysplasia and arthritis might be a candidate for total hip replacement surgery. But his person may decide against it due to the cost, the post-operative physical therapy required, and the fact that the dog has already reached the end of his life expectancy. But the dog is not “too old” to have surgery, even if it might not be the preferred option due to his age.

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


In my practice, most of my surgical patients are ten years of age and older, and many are 15 years of age and older. These animals routinely receive surgery for dental work and the removal of various skin growths, including tumors. None are “too old” for this type of care. With modern anesthetic drugs and monitoring, and analgesic (pain relieving) medications, all these animals do very well and have no negative post-operative effects.

Myth #2: “All tumors should be removed.” Some veterinarians recommend that people have any and all growths on their dog removed. While I’m a big fan of early diagnosis of cancerous tumors, I don’t believe in doing surgery just for the sake of doing surgery. Here are the guidelines I use to help people determine if and when a growth or tumor should be removed: • Any growth large enough to aspirate with a small needle and syringe should be aspirated, and the contents of the aspirate examined microscopically. • If the tumor is a benign lesion, such as a fatty tumor or cyst, I may use herbal or homeopathic therapy to help shrink it. However, if it is large, or is growing or bothering the dog, I will schedule surgery to remove it. • If the aspirate shows a malignant cancer, the growth is removed surgically. • If the aspirate is non-diagnostic, the growth is removed surgically and biopsied. • Following surgical removal of any lesion that is cancerous, or for which a diagnosis was not made using aspiration cytology, the lesion is sent to a pathologist for further microscopic examination and definitive diagnosis. My personal feeling is that most of the time, it is a waste of money to have small benign lesions removed. My one exception would be if the dog is scheduled to have another anesthetic procedure such as a dental cleaning done, during which the lesion can be removed. I try to avoid surgery whenever it’s not necessary in order to spare people the expense, and to prevent subjecting dogs to unnecessary anesthetic procedures.

Myth #3: “It’s okay to wait for a tumor to grow before removing it.” Again, it is okay to wait and watch benign lesions before removing them, as they rarely grow. However, unless an aspirate of the tumor has been examined microscopically, I believe all tumors should be viewed as potentially malignant until proven otherwise. There is no reason to wait and watch cancer grow when tumors can easily be removed when they are small. Removing tumors when they are small may actually cure the cancer without the need for chemotherapy or radiation. Therefore, unless we know that the tumor is benign and unlikely to hurt the dog, it should be removed rather than watching it grow to potentially harm or kill the animal.

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Myth #4: “Analgesic medicine is not necessary for most surgeries.” Analgesic (pain killing) medication should be used whenever we know or suspect a dog may feel pain. For the majority of surgeries, some type of analgesic medication should be given. The best way to use it is through pre-emptive analgesia and multimodal analgesia. • Pre-emptive analgesia means giving the medication before pain occurs — that is, prior to surgery. • Multimodal analgesia means giving the dog several different classes of medication, such as NSAIDS and opioid medications, and even local anesthetics, which work on different biochemical pathways to relieve pain. Of course, naturopathic medications that assist in healing, such as herbs and homeopathics, can be included in the multimodal approach to analgesia. Following surgery, additional analgesic medications should be given at home for several days (or longer, depending on the procedure) to assist in healing. One word of caution: many veterinarians, in an attempt to reduce the costs of a surgical procedure, either do not use any (or enough) analgesic medications, or offer it as an option prior to the procedure. I personally believe this is malpractice and encourage you not to subject your companion to any surgical procedure in which some type of analgesic medication is not used. Myth #5: “The lowest cost provider should be the one you choose for your dog’s surgery.” There are veterinarians who call themselves “low cost”. While I appreciate the desire and need for people to save money, it’s important that cutting costs doesn’t reduce the quality of care the dog receives, or put his health or life at risk. There are only so many ways to cut costs with surgery. Usually this requires “leaving something out”. If that “something” is essential to your dog’s wellbeing, it could possibly affect him in a negative way. Some low cost veterinarians reuse needles, syringes and scalpel blades (sterilizing them between procedures, but not using fresh new ones). Some use less expensive anesthesia, which makes it more challenging to control a dog’s vital signs. Others do not have animals monitored by a technician or machine during surgery. If you’re considering having surgery for your dog, no matter how “routine” the procedure may seem, find out ahead of time just what is or is not included in the price you are quoted. Chances are, your dog is going to need at least one operation in his lifetime. Arming yourself with the right information will help you make the best possible choice for his healthcare, and give you better peace of mind. Reprinted by permission of www.animalwellnessmagazine.com

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Angels’ Featured DOG for March: TARRY! Contributed by Julie O’Bryant, Angels Publications Don’t you love blends?   

peanut butter and jelly peas and carrots chocolate and caramel

All of these are favorites of many. Tarry is the best of blends: an American bulldog mix female who is approximately 68 sleek pounds, 2 years old, chipped, spayed and up to date on all her shots! American Bulldogs have a reputation for being as sweet as pie, loyal, calm, gentle and loving. They are the clowns of the canine world. She will make some lucky family very happy! She doesn't jump, rarely barks, and absolutely adores children! She must feel toward them as any loyal animal must feel toward precious young. This is particularly poignant, as Tarry was meant to be maternal. She lost her entire litter of 10 pups not long after giving birth to them on a cold shelter floor alone. So, now she watches over "her" human youngsters, guarding and guiding them just as she would her own pups! She is a playful wrestler and would be a faithful companion for children 7 years, or older. She is patient, gentle and gets along fabulously with other dogs, and behaves admirably around cats. She regards all as members of her family and worthy of love and devotion. Her excellent manners include being completely housebroken and ready for her new home. Are you looking for a loving companion for you and your family? Don’t “tarry” any longer. This girl is ready and waiting for you to make her dream come true by giving her a forever home and family to watch over for the rest of her life! To find out more about our featured canine, or one of the other dogs up for adoption through Angels Rescue, please contact the Angels Among Us Pet Rescue by email to "inquiry@angelsrescue.org". Don’t forget to check out the other wonderful pets up for adoption by visiting the Angels website: www.angelsrescue.org/adopt. Also, please visit, like, and follow our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/angelsrescue. “Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Meet the 2014 Publications Team for Angels Among Us Pet Rescue

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


A THREAD OF HOPE

~ The Foster Failure Club ~ Submitted by Jennifer Jones Pruitt, Foster Mom

This will be the last post on here for the girls... we have found them the perfect forever home. This picture is not one you are used to seeing from me. Not the usual gorgeous blonde and fluffy black beauty. NO, this picture is way more important. I found this little matt behind Bessie Mae's left ear several months ago. I could not cut it. I would rub it between my fingers, and imagine their lives before us. Something so simple really impacted me. It made me realize why scratches on our original wood floors, and more miles than I even count, have been put on my car - going to vet appointments and driving the roads in search of a black beauty named Pheebie for 11 long days, while she eluded us. Most especially, it reminded me why we had to say YES, when we were asked if we would take on 2 dogs….would we please save them, having only an hour and a half to spare? Would we please FOSTER? And not too long ago, I determined that when I found the perfect home and family for the girls, I would cut this matt from behind her ear, symbolizing that their old life, where they were severely matted, filthy, and scavenging for every meal…that awful life, was over for good. We are very confident in our ability to find them a wonderful, happy, caring home and family, but what we got hung up on, was “could we find anyone to love them more”? The very simple answer to that is NO. As of this morning, Bessie Mae no longer has the little matt behind her ear, and Pheebie no longer wants to run away in fear, but instead, plop in your lap for cuddles- all 60 lbs of her! Today, they both are having something added to their lives...because TODAY, they are officially getting the last name of "Pruitt". Welcome home, girls! “Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Angels’ Featured CATS for March: Baker & Spiderman! Contributed by Jill Kaloustian, Angels Publications Please meet Baker and Spiderman – this pair is a “bromance” made in heaven! These two are looking for a forever home together as they are strongly bonded and would be lonely if they were split up. Both boys are neutered, microchipped and up-to-date on all their shots and vetting. They love adults and children over 10. They've never lived with small children or dogs but they are generally goodnatured and will probably get along with most species! They love to wrestle so smaller cats, beware! Baker and Spiderman came to Angels Among Us from a horrible hoarding situation. More than one hundred cats (and a shocking number of dogs) were being kept in little more than a hovel – in conditions so cramped and dirty, most of us couldn't bear to imagine what they went through. It was estimated that 100 cats were removed from the property but only approximately two dozen survived. Many were deathly ill, emaciated and flea ridden, suffering from upper respiratory infections. All were malnourished and weak. Many were dying. Unfortunately, Baker had contracted an eye infection that was so far advanced the vet was unable to save his eye. Spiderman's URI was so severe that he required months of treatment and by the time he was healthy again he'd permanently lost his voice. These boys will always carry the physical scars of their ordeal but even after all they've been through they are sweet, loving and playful. They are the embodiment of an unbreakable spirit, forgiveness and faith. They've been in foster care for a little over a year and are more than ready to find their forever home – together. Spiderman is a handsome seven year old tuxedo cat who is playful, affectionate and just a little bit mischievous. He's always been a talker and even though his voice is faint, he still “chatters” at his humans. The only thing he loves more than wrestling with Baker is jumping into your lap for cuddles. He's a very nice sized kitty at 12.5 pounds. Baker is two year-old orange and white tabby who is nothing short of gorgeous! He is an impressive 14 pounds and has no trouble holding his own against “Spidey” his brother, whose frame seems dainty in comparison! Baker loves attention from his human companions and would like to be near you at all times! He hopes his new family is willing to let him sleep in the bed with them. :) He loves naps and stretching out in the sunshine when it pierces through the windows of his foster home. To find out more about our featured feline, or one of the other cats up for adoption through Angels Rescue, please contact the Angels Among Us Pet Rescue - Cats team by email at "catinquiry@angelsrescue.org". Also, please visit, like, and follow Angels' Cats page at www.facebook.com/angelsrescue.cats.

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Where Are They Now? – Update

ADOPTED!

AAU’s 5000th Save has found a forever home!! Madeline Scottline (aka Maddie) is a very special dog. She was Angels Among Us Pet Rescue's 5000th save! Angels transporter extraordinaire, Scott Roberts, got to choose our 5000th pull. Maddie was late into her pregnancy and wound up delivering five beautiful babies. Fido's Market and Answers Pet Food sponsored this little family through adoption. All five puppies went to great homes and then it was mom's turn. Leslie Sykes saw Maddie on “Petfinder.com” and instantly fell in love. She and her dog, Oscar, drove all the way from Charlotte, NC for a meet and greet. The Sykes family had recently lost their older rescue dog and Oscar was in mourning (as was the whole family). Maddie (now Dilly) was just what everyone needed! Adoptive mom, Leslie, reports that Dilly is wonderful! The kids love her and she is amazingly gentle with them. She is laid-back inside the house, wild (in a great way) outside, and behaving herself way beyond expectations. She clearly has come a long way in a short time, but she is just what we needed. Dilly sends all of her Angels and Fido’s families lots of kisses & love! Thank you, Sykes family, for loving this sweet girl. She was, and always will be, special to us. Find your next best friend at www.angelsrescue.org/adopt/.

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Special Thanks To Our Angels Supporters! ~ Contributed by Kimberly Kay ~

Holy Cat Food! Thanks to Rucker Horse & Pet and everyone who voted for us. Angels Among Us was one of the three winning rescues chosen to receive 1,733 lbs. of cat food! Earlier this month, Rucker held a contest where people were asked to name their favorite local rescues and winners were chosen based on the number of "likes" each rescue received. We are so grateful to both Rucker and our supporters who voted for us. Just think how many cats this will feed! Since we are a volunteer organization and all of our cats and kittens are living in foster homes, this means the world to us! Not only will our cats receive good quality food, it will also help our foster families reduce expenses so they are able to help even more cats - which means more lives will be saved! In order to help even more cats, we donated a small portion of the food to the Feral Cat Program in Forsyth County. As the weather turns cold again, our hearts break for the feral cats trying to survive on their own. We appreciate the work they do to help control the cat population by spaying & neutering as well as providing food & shelter for feral cats. Without the support of our fans, we could not do what we do. Every cat you foster or adopt, every donation, every "like" or "share" does make a difference. From the bottom of our hearts, we thank you for helping us . ~Rescue One Until There Are None ~

“Angels Herald� Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Thank You Very Much! How YOU Can Help! Sign up for our monthly donation subscription:     

Furry Friends - $10 Silver Whiskers - $25 Gold Collars - $50 Platinum Paws - $100 Angels Among Us - $250

Visit our website for details! www.angelsrescue.org/donate

February 2014 Traffic Report Traffic on our Facebook page, our website as well as the Petfinder site helps to provide visibility and funding, enabling Angels Among Us Pet Rescue to rescue and find loving foster and adoptive homes for these rescues.

February 2014 Rescue Stats: 359 - active foster homes 517 - adoptable pets 142 - pets adopted 190 - pets rescued 5,010 - total adopted* 5,323 - total rescued* February 2014 Website Stats: 139,970 - page views 60, 685 - website visits 42,862 - unique visitors February 2014 Facebook Stats: 90,990 - Facebook fans

In this issue of the Angels Herald, we would like to thank the following individuals and companies for their generous donations and support:

Anne Newell Angel of the Month! Leslie Popp Chelsea Marlin Lori Huster Mary Holbrook Teresa Horton Carole Trulio Vicki Benjamin Adrienne Herrig Betty Ballentine Cheryl Nelson Christopher Connell Dianne Short Fiona Harris Randy Mask Scott Rooney Jason Heigl Foundation Karen B. Griffin Custom Homes Angels Among Us would like to say a special “thank you” to Linda Thomas for her work in going to NC on the hoarding case to pick up a pregnant dog in the process of giving birth outside under a tree in the cold. The mama dog finished delivering her puppies while Linda drove back to Georgia – all the while reassuring the scared mom that she and her puppies were going to a better life where they would be loved and cherished! What a great story of saving lives! (more to come on this story in our April issue)

About Our Organization Angels Among Us Pet Rescue is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to rescuing dogs and cats from high-kill shelters in north Georgia. We operate through a network of foster homes in the metro Atlanta area. Our efforts are funded by tax-deductible contributions from compassionate people and organizations that care and want to help make a difference. ANGELS AMONG US PET RESCUE PO BOX 821 ALPHARETTA, GA 30009 Fax: (877) 969-8669

Email: info@angelsrescue.org Website: www.angelsrescue.org

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue


Upoming Events, Fundraising Opportunities Please make your plans to join us at the many Adoptions, Special Promotions, and Fundraising Events scheduled this month. You can go to this link to see all Events and Adoptions listed on AAU’s Facebook Events Page: www.facebook.com/angelsrescue/events Make sure you check the Events Calendar listings on Facebook often, as Events and Special Promotions are being added or changed during the month! SEE YOU THERE!! **********************************

Telling the Angels Rescue Good News Through Social Media Look for Angels Rescue on all the following social media platforms, and choose to follow, like, share and help us use social media to save lives!

www.facebook.com/angelsrescue

“Angels Herald” Newsletter

March, 2014 Issue

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