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Working with Word 2013 Basics One Workshop Assembled and or created for Broward College By Frank Zuccaro Presented by Dr. Angel M. Rodriguez


BASIC ONE WORKSHOP PART ONE WHAT’S NEW IN WORD 2013? With the recent launch of Office 15 at a media event, new trends have surely been set. The flurry of Windows 8, its metro user interface and a clean and resourceful look has brought in criticism from around the world, but the overall balance is being seen in Microsoft’s favor, as it embarks upon technology integration, cloud-connectivity, and modern, touch-friendly outlook. In what follows, we will inform you exactly where Microsoft Word 2013 from the Office 15 Suite aims to reform your experience with documents. It is surely time to embrace text-flow, PDF, collaborations, and the World Wide Web through a resourceful Office App Library for the better. A cleaner discussion thread and Microsoft SkyDrive (OneDrive) integration promise a unique experience for the novice as

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well as advanced users.

The overall Office experience has been revamped with a new logo, faster loading time and a landing page enhanced with user friendly themes and templates. To access features like document sharing and remote access, you are required to create a Microsoft Office account online, as it will be used as a default account for sharing and accessing documents from remote locations. INTEGRATED ACCOUNT MANAGEMENT & CONNECTED SERVICES The landing page provides you with a sleek interface organized into three sections: the navigation sidebar, account information and product information. The navigation bar allows you to access essential word processing functionalities including sharing, exporting and return buttons. The overall Word interface is highly responsive Page 3 of 246


obeying the click, instantly. As illustrated below, Word 2013 comes with customizable themes (that can be selected from the Office Background dropdown menu boasting multiple attractive themes). Moreover, understanding the power of social media and its penetration in generating viral content, Microsoft has decided to ride the wave by offering Connected Services that virtually allows you to access documents from any device on the go. Just use your Microsoft or OneDrive account or connect using Youtube. Still not satisfied with the feature? Why not Add a service and connect your work to your favorite online hot spots. The Product Information on the left allows you to Manage account or analyze the overall subscription of the Office Suite with update details.

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When adding a new service, Word 2013 allows you to link your existing Microsoft account with another online service like LinkedIn. If you don’t have a LinkedIn account, just click the Join Now button on the top right corner to create one. You can specify the access duration and upon approving the link, the new service will get connected to Word, successfully. Page 5 of 246


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OBJECT PLACEMENT BEYOND THE RIGHT CLICK In all previous versions, placement options relevant to objects like pictures, figures, etc. were accessible from the right-click menu. You may have used the Wrap Text feature, placement and adjustment with text, re-sizing and rotation utilities. In Word 2013, a simple click reveals all relevant functionality with the layout options floating on the right, while re-sizing buttons on and around the object. Options can be easily expanded by clicking See more. Double click on the picture to zoom for a better view of the target. With live layout and alignment guides, you can drag your image wherever you want with the text adapting in real-time, accordingly.

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ENHANCED TEMPLATES DIRECTORY A comprehensive template directory comes to view upon clicking New. It is advisable to load the Welcome to Word document for a quick tour of Word 2013. A large number of useful and popular templates are organized in the New tab as user-friendly tiles. Moreover, the search bar allows you to browse, view and select from hundreds of online templates in the Office Library. Suggested searches enhance the searching experience by highlighting frequently used categories. Page 8 of 246


OFFICE APPS: REDEFINING CREATIVITY Office Apps are a new way of adding creative and useful applications to Microsoft Office 2013 suite. The MerriamWebster Dictionary and eFax app for Word 2013 are useful ways of increasing productivity while creating and managing documents. Moreover, there are loads of free featured apps and a huge collection in the Office Store awaiting your click. You can manage your apps and refresh to keep track of any updates. Page 9 of 246


INSERT PICTURES FROM THE WEB, INSTANTLY The Insert tab on the ribbon reveals some new and useful additions. One such feature is the option to insert online pictures. Microsoft has updated its Royalty Free Photos and Illustrations directory that can be accessed Page 10 of 246


using the search bar in the Insert Pictures window. You can also browse your online OneDrive storage for clipart stored in the cloud. Too often do we use our Image Search to identify relevant photos in the web browser to paste into Microsoft Word. Now, you can use the Bing Image Search and Flickr account to hunt and insert online pictures for good from within Word 2013.

INSERT ONLINE VIDEOS AND INTERACTIVE CONTENT EASILY Page 11 of 246


In an attempt to promote dynamic content in documents, Word 2013 presents to you the option to add online videos may it be from social media sites like YouTube, search engines like Bing Video search or videos from any other website (using embed code). To insert a video successfully, type a keyword in the relevant search bar to view results.

Word 2013 displays all results, mentioning the total number of links. Just click the result to preview the video before actually inserting it into the document. Similarly, multiple video results can be added by selecting, Page 12 of 246


previewing and inserting, accordingly. Text Reflow allows you to fit the interactive content in the most appropriate manner.

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SIMPLIFIED MARKUP VIEW FOR BETTER COLLABORATIONS Working with text had never been so interactive. Online Pictures and Videos already added color and dynamic content to the Word document ensuring fast track follow up on relevant topics. Now, with a simplified markup view meant to highlight changes in your document in a neat, effective manner encourages you to focus on collaborating work. The left sidebar indicates changes while a small cloud on the right indicates comments at the respective places. With Word 2013, you can instantly reply to comments in an organized manner to give rise to useful discussion threads. With Microsoft OneDrive and SharePoint, working on projects and documents online as a collaborated effort could have never been simpler. These markers and comment threads allow you to highlight necessary details, corrections and pointers for the rest of your team to keep in mind. Similarly, keeping track of the activity around your workspace has thus, been made possible.

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SAY GOODBYE TO PDF READERS & EDITORS All of us use PDF documents, but we often rely on third party tools to extract pictures or specific pages from the overall structure. Using Word 2013, you can easily open a PDF file like any other Word Document. Editing text, tables or lists, re-sizing pictures, adding, removing and highlighting information are all possible as well.

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By default, when you open PDF file in Word 2013, it shows you the protected view, preventing your system from getting infected by virus-injected PDF documents. However, you can click Enable Editing to open your PDF document in Word 2013 editor, and edit not only text, but also tables, images, margins and other elements.

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CONCENTRATE, IN THE IMPROVED READING MODE Special focus has been directed at improving the Reading Mode in a manner that all relevant utilities like the toolbar, ribbon, and scrollbar disappear from view unless they are needed. This cleans the interface, allowing the user to fully concentrate on reading. Double click on any picture and it will zoom to view, fading out everything else. To activate Reading mode, click the relevant option in the View tab and enjoy the experience.

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UNDERSTAND THE IMPACT, DEFINITELY The Review tab has a new Define feature that presents definitions of words and phrases, instantly using the relevant Word Apps like the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. Results and displayed on the right sidebar as soon as Page 19 of 246


you select the text. Say goodbye to right-click menu and dictionary access when your results are displayed at a single click. Now, you can truly understand the impact of your content.

CONCLUSION Page 20 of 246


It is always beneficial to look at new features objectively. Microsoft Word 2013 has indeed come with new tidings for progress in the area of word processing. You are now in a position to present documents online to people who do not have the latest version of Microsoft Office, how? This can now be achieved using the cloud-based storage and synchronization of documents for access, wherever needed. Just provide your team members with the respective link that can be pasted in browsers for viewing. Thus, with a modern, polished and internet-friendly Word 2013, the new life spells out productivity for us all.

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GETTING TO KNOW WORD 2013 Word 2013 is very similar to Word 2010. If you've previously used Word 2010, Word 2013 should feel very familiar. But if you are new to Word, or have more experience with older versions, you should first take some time to become familiar with the Word 2013 interface.

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The Word Interface low resolution

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THE WORD INTERFACE HIGH RESOLUTION

When you open Word 2013 for the first time •

The Word Start Screen will appear

Create a new document Page 24 of 246


Choose a template

Access your recently edited documents.

From the Word Start Screen

Locate and select Blank document to access the Word interface.

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Click the buttons in the interactive below to become familiar with the Word 2013 interface.

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WORKING WITH THE WORD ENVIRONMENT Word 2013 continues to use features like the Ribbon, the Quick Access Toolbar, and BACKSTAGE view. THE RIBBON – A TABBED RIBBON SYSTEM The Ribbon contains multiple tabs, each with several groups of commands.

The Home tab gives you access to some of the most commonly used commands including copy & paste, formatting, paragraph alignment, and document styles.

The Home tab is selected by default whenever you open Word

The Insert tab allows you to insert pictures, charts, tables, shapes Page 30 of 246


The Design tab gives you access to a variety of design tools, including document formatting, effects, and page borders

The Page Layout tab allows you to change the print formatting of your document, including margin width, page orientation, page breaks, and more.

The References tab allows you add annotations to your document such as footnotes and citations. From here, you can also add a table of contents, captions, and a bibliography. These commands are especially helpful when composing academic papers.

The Mailings tab allows the composition of letters, address envelopes, and create labels. You can use the Review tab to access Word's powerful editing features, including comments and track changes. Making it easy to share and collaborate on documents

The View tab allows you to switch between different views for your document and split the screen

Contextual tabs will appear on the Ribbon when working with certain items, like tables and pictures. They contain special command groups.

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TO MINIMIZE AND MAXIMIZE THE RIBBON: You can minimize the Ribbon if it takes up too much screen space.

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1.

Click the Ribbon Display Options arrow in the upper-right corner of the Ribbon.

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2.

Select the desired minimizing option from the drop-down menu:

• Auto-hide Ribbon: Auto-hide displays your document in full-screen mode and completely hides the Ribbon from view. To show the Ribbon, click the Expand Ribbon command at the top of screen.

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• Show Tabs: This option hides all command groups when not in use, tabs will remain visible. To show the Ribbon, simply click a tab.

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Show Tabs and Commands: This option maximizes the Ribbon. All of the tabs and commands will be visible. This option is selected by default when you open Word for the first time. TO CUSTOMIZE THE RIBBON IN WORD 2013 You can customize the Ribbon by creating your own tabs. Commands are always housed within a group. You can create as many groups as you want in order to keep your tab organized. You can add commands to any of the default tabs; you must however create a custom group in the tab. 1.

Right-click the Ribbon Page 37 of 246


2.

Select Customize the Ribbon... from the drop-down menu.

3.

The Word Options dialog box will appear.

4.

Locate and select New Tab.

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5.

Make sure the New Group is selected

6.

Than select a command

7.

Click Add. You can also drag commands directly into a group.

8. Click OK. The commands will be added to the Ribbon.

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If you don't see the command you want 1.

Click the Choose commands from: drop-down box Page 41 of 246


2.

Select All Commands.

TO VIEW THE RIBBON IN TOUCH MODE IN WORD 2013: TURN TOUCH MODE ON OR OFF Touch Mode spaces the buttons a little farther apart on the screen, so they’re easier to Click. You can turn on Touch Mode by Clicking the Touch Mode button on the Quick Access Toolbar.

Or Click the Touch/Mouse Mode hand icon on the Quick Access Toolbar and Click Touch.

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If you don’t see the button or the icon on the Quick Access Toolbar, you can add it.

Press, hold, and then release any button on the Quick Access Toolbar Click Customize Quick Access Toolbar. Under Popular commands, Click Touch Mode or Touch/Mouse Mode Click Add. To turn Touch Mode off 1.

Click the Touch Mode button again Or Page 43 of 246


2.

Click the Touch/Mouse Mode hand icon

3.

Click Mouse.

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THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR Located above the Ribbon, the Quick Access Toolbar lets you access common commands. By default, it shows the Save, Undo, and Repeat commands. TO ADD COMMANDS TO THE QUICK ACCESS TOOLBAR: 1.

Click the drop-down arrow to the right of the Quick Access Toolbar.

2. Select the command you wish to add from the drop-down menu. To choose from more commands 3.

Select More Commands.

4.

The command will be added to the Quick Access Toolbar.

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THE RULER

The Ruler is located at the top and to the left of your document. It makes it easier to adjust your document. You want; you can hide the Ruler to create more screen space. Page 46 of 246


TO SHOW OR HIDE THE RULER: 1.

Click the View tab.

2.

Click the checkbox next to Ruler to show

or hide

the ruler.

NAVIGATING THE RIBBON [KEYBOARD]

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Another way to do this

Hit the Alt key. Then type W, K (one key at a time). When you’re done searching, click the X to clear your results. Your headings won’t be yellow anymore, and all your pages will appear. Page 48 of 246


READ MODE DOCUMENT VIEWS Word 2013 has a variety of viewing options that change how your document is displayed. You can choose to view your document in Read Mode, Print Layout, or Web Layout. These views can be useful for various tasks, especially if you're planning to print the document.

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•

To change document views, locate and select the desired document view command in the bottom-right

corner of the Word window.

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Read Mode: In this view, all of the editing commands are hidden so that your document fills the screen. Arrows appear on the left and right side of the screen so that you can toggle through the pages of your document If your document has many pages, Word 2013 has a handy new feature called Resume Reading that allows you to open your document to the last page you were viewing. When opening a saved document, look for the bookmark icon to appear on the screen. Hover the mouse over the bookmark, and Word will ask if you want to pick up where you left off. Page 51 of 246


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NAVIGATION PANE REORGANIZE A DOCUMENT IN THE NAVIGATION PANE Use the Navigation pane to change the structure of your document. You can drag headings to new locations, change heading levels, and add headings.

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REORGANIZE A DOCUMENT IN THE NAVIGATION PANE First, apply styles to the headings. The styles tell Word how to show the headings.

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Then open the Navigation pane by pressing 1.

Ctrl+F

2.

Clicking View

or

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3.

Click Navigation Pane.

or

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4.

By clicking the page counts in the status bar.

To move a heading and its content 1.

Click Headings in the Navigation pane

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2.

Drag the heading to its new location.

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The heading and text in the document move will to that location. To change a heading’s level or to add a new heading before or after it 1.

Right-click the heading in the Navigation pane and choose the action you want.

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2.

To print just that part of the document, right-click the heading and choose Print Heading and Content.

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MOVE AROUND IN A DOCUMENT USING THE NAVIGATION PANE Use the Navigation pane in Word to go to the page or heading you want--without scrolling. To open the Navigation pane, press CTRL+F, or click View Navigation Pane.

You can also open the Navigation pane by clicking the page count in the status bar. BROWSE BY HEADINGS If you’ve applied heading styles to the headings in the body of your document, those headings appear in the Navigation pane. Page 61 of 246


The Navigation pane doesn’t display headings that are in tables, text boxes, or headers or footers. 1.

Click Headings.

2.

To go to a heading in your document, click that heading in the Navigation pane.

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To show or hide the subheadings under a heading, click the arrow next to the heading.

If you scroll through your document, Word highlights the heading in the Navigation pane to show you where you are. To go back to the top, click Jump to the beginning.

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BROWSE BY PAGE Click Pages. Then click a thumbnail image to go to that page.

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When you do scroll through your document, Word highlights the page you’re on in the Navigation pane to show you where you are. MORE ABOUT THE NAVIGATION PANE It's like a tour guide for your document. Click a heading, a page, or a search result and it'll take you right there. GROUP SEARCH RESULTS BY HEADINGS OR PAGES Word provides a couple more views into the results. To see the results by heading, click Headings. Word colors a heading yellow if the text under that heading contains a result.

To see only the pages that contain results, click Pages. Page 66 of 246


FIND TEXT OR OTHER DOCUMENT CONTENT Use the Navigation pane to find text and other content in a document. Group results by headings or pages. Or press Ctrl+H to open the Find and Replace box. Looking for text or a table in your document? Maybe a footnote? The Navigation pane helps you find all of these and more. If you have a lot of search results, you can group them by headings or pages. To open the Navigation pane, press Ctrl+F, or click Home Find. You can also open the Navigation pane by clicking the page count in the status bar. Find text by typing it in the Search document box. To search for anything else, click the magnifying glass and then click what you’re looking for.

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If you don’t see the magnifying glass, click the X. The magnifying glass reappears. If you’re searching for graphics, tables, or other things, click Pages or Headings to see where those items are.

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If you’re searching for text, click Results to see each instance in the document. Click a result to go to it in your document. When you type in your document or make a change, Word pauses the search and clears the Results pane. To see the results again, click the Next Search Result or Previous Search Result arrow.

When you’re done searching, click the X.

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BACKSTAGE VIEW Backstage view gives you various options for saving, opening a file, printing, or sharing your document. TO ACCESS BACKSTAGE VIEW: 1.

Click the File tab on the Ribbon. Backstage view will appear.

2.

Click the buttons in the interactive below to learn more about using Backstage view.

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CREATING AND OPENING DOCUMENTS There are several ways to begin working with a document in Word 2013. You can choose to create a new document—either with a blank document or a pre-designed template—or open an existing document from your computer or OneDrive. TO CREATE A NEW, BLANK DOCUMENT: When beginning a new project in Word, you'll often want to start with a new, blank document. 1.

Select the File tab. Backstage view will appear.

2.

Select New and then click Blank document.

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3.

A new, blank document will appear.

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TO OPEN AN EXISTING DOCUMENT: An existing document is a document that has been previously saved. To learn more about saving a document, visit our lesson on Saving and Sharing Documents. 1.

Navigate to Backstage view and then click Open.

2.

Select a location option: Page 74 of 246


•

Recent Documents displays all of your recently edited documents, including those saved to OneDrive.

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OneDrive gives you access to your OneDrive folders. Select OneDrive and click Browse. Page 76 of 246


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• Computer gives you access to the files you've saved locally on your computer. In our example, we will select this option and then click Browse.

1.

The Open dialog box appears. Locate and select your document and then click Open. Page 78 of 246


TO PIN A DOCUMENT: If you frequently work with the same document, you can pin it to Backstage view for quick access. 1.

Navigate to Backstage view.

2.

Click Open. Your recently edited documents will appear.

3. Hover the mouse over the document you wish to pin. A pushpin icon document. 4.

Click the pushpin icon.

The document will appear in Recent Documents until it is unpinned.

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will appear next to the


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1.

To unpin a document, simply click the pushpin icon again.

2. You can also pin folders to Backstage view for quick access. From Backstage view, click Open and then locate the folder you wish to pin, and then click the pushpin icon. USING TEMPLATES A template is a pre-designed document you can use to create a new document quickly. Templates often include custom formatting, and designs, so they can save you a lot of time and effort when starting a new project. TO CREATE A NEW DOCUMENT FROM A TEMPLATE: 1.

Click the File tab to access Backstage view.

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2.

Select New. Several templates will appear below the Blank document option.

3.

Select a template to review it.

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A preview of the template will appear, along with additional information about how the template can be used. Click CREATES to use the selected template.

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A new workbook will appear with the selected template. Page 84 of 246


You can also browse templates by category or use the search bar to find something more specific.

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It's important to note that not all templates are created by Microsoft. Many are created by third-party providers and even individual users, so some templates may work better than others.

CHECK SPELLING AND GRAMMAR All Microsoft Office programs can check the spelling and grammar of your files. In Microsoft Word 2013 you’ll find the Spelling & Grammar options here: •

Click Review

Click Spelling & Grammar to start the spelling and grammar checker.

Choose from these options as the spelling and grammar checker goes through each word: Page 86 of 246


Check the spelling and grammar all at once.

Check spelling and grammar automatically, as you type.

Recheck the words you previously checked and chose to ignore (but changed your mind).

CHECK SPELLING AND GRAMMAR ALL AT ONCE Checking all the spelling and grammar in your document is useful when you want to quickly proof your text. You can check for possible mistakes and then decide if you agree with the spelling and grammar checker. After you click Spelling & Grammar you can fix each error that Word finds in different ways. In the task pane at the right of your document, you will see the spelling and grammar choices:

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Fix the error using Word’s suggestions If you want to fix the error by using one of the suggested words, select the word in the list of suggestions and click Change.

Create a dictionary entry If the word is a real word that you use and one that you want Word—and ALL of the Office programs—to recognize too, click Add.

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Ignore the word Maybe you want to ignore this misspelled word (for whatever reason): Click Ignore or Ignore All.

CHECK SPELLING AND GRAMMAR AUTOMATICALLY Checking spelling and grammar while you type may be a preferred way for you to save time: You make the necessary corrections and changes while you’re writing, not waiting until after (you think) your document is complete. 1.

Click File

2.

Click Options

3.

Click Proofing.

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4.

As you can see in the picture above, you can choose to automatically check spelling, grammar—one or the other, both, or neither—or even other options, such as contextual spelling.

5.

Under Exceptions you can choose to hide grammar and spelling errors in your open document or, if you leave the options unchecked but keep any of the options above them checked, all of your new documents going forth will keep those settings.

HOW THE AUTOMATIC SPELLING CHECKING WORKS Word flags misspelled words with a red squiggly line under it as you work so that you can easily locate mistakes: When you right-click the misspelled word, you’ll see a menu where you can choose how you want to handle the mistake.

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HOW AUTOMATIC GRAMMAR CHECKING WORKS After you turn on automatic grammar checking, Word flags potential grammar, style, and contextual mistakes with a blue squiggly line under the word, term, or phrase as you work in your document. Just like with the spell checker, you can right-click the mistake to see more options. (In this case, the sentence might have been better off as a question instead of a sentence. RECHECK THE WORDS AND GRAMMAR THAT YOU PREVIOUSLY CHECKED AND CHOSE TO IGNORE You can also force a recheck of the words and grammar that you previously chose to ignore.

Open the document that you want to recheck. 1.

Click File

2.

Click Options

3.

Click Proofing.

4.

Under Correcting spelling and grammar in Word, click Recheck Document.

•

When you see the following message This operation resets the spelling checker and grammar checker so that Word will recheck words and grammar you previously checked and chose to ignore. Do you want to continue?

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Click Yes Page 91 of 246


6.

Click OK to close out of the Word Options dialog box.

7.

Click Review, Click Spelling & Grammar.

ADD WORDS TO YOUR SPELL CHECK DICTIONARY When you use the spelling checker, it compares the words in your document with those in the main dictionary, the one that ships with Microsoft Office. The main dictionary contains most common words, but it might not include proper names, technical terms, or acronyms that you use. In addition, some words might be capitalized differently in the main dictionary than what you want in your document. Adding such words or capitalization to a custom dictionary prevents the spelling checker from flagging them as mistakes. CREATE A CUSTOM DICTIONARY

Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box by following the steps in the Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box section. 1.

Click the File tab.

2.

Click Options.

3.

Click Proofing.

4.

Make sure the Suggest from main dictionary only check box is cleared.

5.

Click Custom Dictionaries.

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Than 6.

Click New.

7.

In the File name box, type a name for the custom dictionary.

8.

Click Save.

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If you want the new dictionary to be used for another language, while the new dictionary is still selected in the Dictionary List, select the language on the Dictionary language menu.

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ADD AN EXISTING CUSTOM DICTIONARY The Custom Dictionaries dialog box lists the available custom dictionaries the program can use to check spelling. If the dictionary that you want to use — for example, one that you purchased from a third-party company — is installed on your computer but not listed in the Dictionary list box, you can add it. 1.

Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box by following the steps in the Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box section.

2.

Click Add.

3.

Locate the folder containing the custom dictionary you want

4.

Double-click the dictionary file.

If you want additional help installing a third-party dictionary, see the installation instructions for that dictionary.

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ADD, DELETE, OR EDIT WORDS IN A CUSTOM DICTIONARY 1.

Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box by following the steps in the Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box section.

2.

Select the dictionary that you want to edit. Make sure you don’t clear the check box.

3.

Click Edit Word List.

Do one of the following: •

To add a word, type it in the Word(s) box, and then click Add.

To delete a word, select it in the Dictionary box, and then click Delete.

To edit a word, delete it, and then add it with the spelling you want.

To remove all words, click Delete all.

CHANGE THE LANGUAGE ASSOCIATED WITH A CUSTOM DICTIONARY By default, when you create a new custom dictionary, the program sets the dictionary to All Languages, which means that the dictionary is used when you check the spelling of text in any language. However, you can associate a custom dictionary with a particular language so that the program uses the dictionary only when you check the spelling of text in a particular language. Page 96 of 246


1.

Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box by following the steps in the Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box section.

2.

In the Dictionary list box, click the dictionary that you want to change.

3.

On the Dictionary language menu, click the language for which dictionary should be used.

CHANGE THE DEFAULT CUSTOM DICTIONARY TO WHICH THE SPELLING CHECKER ADDS WORDS Whenever you check the spelling of a document, you have an option to add a word flagged as a misspelling to a custom dictionary. The default custom dictionary is the dictionary to which the program adds the word when you do this. Do the following to specify the default custom dictionary that Microsoft Office programs use for all languages or for each language that you work in: 1.

Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box by following the steps in the Open the Custom Dictionaries dialog box section.

2.

In the Dictionary list box, do one of the following:

To change the default dictionary for all languages, click the dictionary name under All Languages.

To change the default dictionary for a particular language, click the dictionary name under the language heading.

3.

Click Change Default.

If there is only one dictionary under a heading, it must be the default dictionary. In this case, the button isn’t available. Page 97 of 246


The next time that you check spelling, the program uses the default custom dictionaries that you selected.

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TURN SPELL CHECK ON OR OFF You're typing along, you make a mistake, and you see the wavy red underline.

You fix the mistake, but you've lost your flow, your idea. To avoid that distraction, you can turn spell check off, then check spelling manually when you're done writing. Here's how. 1.

Click File

2.

Click Options

3.

Click Proofing, clear the Check spelling as you type box, and click OK.

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To turn spell check on, repeat the process and select the Check spelling as you type box. Page 100 of 246


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TO CHECK SPELLING MANUALLY 1.

Click Review

2.

Click Spelling & Grammar.

TURN ON OR OFF AUTOMATIC GRAMMAR CHECKING You can choose to have Outlook and Word flag grammar mistakes automatically, as shown in the following illustration.

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To turn on or off automatic grammar checking for the currently opened document, do the following: 1.

Under Exceptions for

2.

Click Name of currently open file.

3.

Select or clear the Hide grammar errors in this document only check box.

To turn on or off automatic grammar checking for all documents that you create from now on, do the following: 1.

Under Exceptions for

2.

Click All New Documents.

3.

Select or clear the Hide grammar errors in this document only check box.

IMPORTANT If you turn off automatic grammar checking for a file that you share with other people, you may want to notify those people that you made this change.

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TURN ON GRAMMAR CHECKING ALL AT ONCE Select the Check grammar with spelling check box if you want to include grammar errors when you check the spelling all at once (for example, when you press F7). SHOW THE READABILITY STATISTICS Select the Show readability statistics check box if you want to display the readability statistics after you finish checking spelling all at once (for example, when you press F7). CONTROL THE RULES THAT THE GRAMMAR CHECKER APPLIES TO YOUR WRITING You can select one of two options from the Writing style menu: Grammar Only or Grammar & Style. If you want to change the types of grammar and style rules that the grammar checker uses when checking your writing: Click Settings. You can use the Grammar Settings dialog box to view the settings and make any changes that you want. RECHECK THE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR THAT YOU PREVIOUSLY CHECKED AND CHOSE TO IGNORE 1.

Open the document that needs to be checked.

2.

Click File.

3.

Click Options, and then click Proofing. Page 104 of 246


4.

Under Correcting spelling and grammar in Word, click Recheck Document.

To recheck the spelling and grammar 1.

click Yes when you see the following message: This operation resets the spelling checker and the grammar checker so that Word will recheck words and grammar you previously checked and chose to ignore. Do you want to continue?

2.

In the Word Options dialog box, click OK to get back to the document.

3.

Click Review, in the Proofing group, click Spelling & Grammar (or press F7).

HIDE SPELLING AND GRAMMAR ERRORS IN A WORD DOCUMENT You may have a Word document in which you don't want to see the spelling and grammar errors flagged with wavy red and green lines, or you may prefer that none of the documents that you create show the spelling and grammar errors. 1.

Click the File tab

2.

Click Options.

3.

Click Proofing.

To turn on or off automatic spelling checking and automatic grammar checking for the currently opened document: 1.

Under Exceptions for, click Name of currently open file.

2.

Select or clear the Hide spelling errors in this document only and Hide grammar errors in this document only check boxes. Page 105 of 246


To turn on or off automatic spelling checking and automatic grammar checking for all documents that you create: 1.

Under Exceptions for, click All New Documents.

2.

Select or clear the Hide spelling errors in this document only and Hide grammar errors in this document only check boxes.

CLEAR TEXT MARKED AS DO NOT SPELL CHECK IN WORD 1.

Select the entire document by pressing CTRL+A.

2.

On the Review tab, in the Language group, click Language

3.

Click Set Proofing Language.

4.

Clear the Do not check spelling or grammar check box.

ADD A WORD OR PHRASE TO YOUR CUSTOM DICTIONARY When you use the spelling checker, it compares the words in your document with those in its main dictionary. The main dictionary contains most common words, but it may not include proper names, technical terms, acronyms, and so on. In addition, some words may be capitalized differently in the main dictionary than in your document. Adding such words or capitalization to a custom dictionary prevents the spelling checker from flagging them. TROUBLESHOOT GRAMMAR CHECKING IN OUTLOOK AND WORD If you are not sure why the grammar checker flagged some text as grammatically incorrect, try some of the following: Page 106 of 246


To learn more about why Word flagged a possible grammar error While checking spelling and grammar automatically 1.

Right-click the word

2.

Click About This Sentence.

TURN OFF FIELDS FOR THE SPELLING CHECKER IN PROJECT You may have some fields in Project that you don't want to include when checking spelling. 1.

Click the File tab

2.

Click Options

3.

Click Proofing.

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4.

Under When correcting spelling in Project, clear the check boxes of the fields you do not want included.

TEST YOUR DOCUMENT'S READABILITY You can choose to display information about the reading level of the document, including readability scores according to the following tests: ENABLE READABILITY STATISTICS 1.

Click the File tab, and then click Options.

2.

Click Proofing.

3.

Under When correcting spelling and grammar in Word Make sure the Check grammar with spelling check box is selected.

4.

Select Show readability statistics.

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IGNORE TEXT OR AN ENTIRE STYLE In Word, you can take the additional step of creating a special style if you have a certain type of content that you don't want the spelling and grammar checker to check. For example, if your document contains technical content such as multiple blocks of computer code. 1.

Select the text that you want the spelling and grammar checker to ignore.

2.

On the Review tab, in the Language group, click Language

3.

click Set Proofing Language.

4.

Select the Do not check spelling or grammar check box.

You can also create a special style that is based on the selected text: 5.

Right-click the selection

6.

Click Save Selection as a New Quick Style.

7.

Give the style a name—for example, code—and then click OK.

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SAVING DOCUMENTS There are several different ways to save a document. As in previous versions of Word, you can save files locally to your computer. But unlike older versions, Word 2013 also lets you save a document to the cloud using OneDrive, which allows you to access and edit your document from anywhere. TO SAVE A DOCUMENT: It's important to save your document whenever you start a new project or make changes to an existing one. Saving early and often can prevent your work from being lost. You'll also need to pay close attention to where you save the document so it will be easy to find later. 1.

Locate and select the Save command on the Quick Access Toolbar.

2.

The Save As pane will appear in Backstage view. Select a save location option: Page 110 of 246


• OneDrive allows you to save your document to the cloud using your OneDrive folders. This option will be selected by default if you are signed in with a Microsoft account.

• Computer allows you to save the document locally on your computer. In this example, we'll choose this option and then click Browse. Page 111 of 246


1.

The Save As dialog box will appear. Select the location where you wish to save the document.

2.

Enter a file name for the document and click Save.

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Page 113 of 246


The document will be saved. Click the Save command again to save changes as you modify the document. You can also access the Save and Save As commands from Backstage view or by pressing Ctrl+S on your keyboard.

TO CHANGE THE DEFAULT SAVE LOCATION: If you primarily save files locally to your computer, you may wish to change the default save location so that Computer is selected by default when you save a document. 1.

Click the File tab to access Backstage view.

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2.

Click Options. The Word Options dialog box will appear.

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3.

Select Save

4.

check the box next to Save to Computer by default.

•

The default save location will be changed.

AUTORECOVER

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Word automatically saves your documents to a temporary folder while you are working on them. If you forget to save your changes, or if Word crashes, you can restore the file using AutoRecover.

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TO USE AUTORECOVER: To recover a document that was lost without saving, 1.

Reopen Word 2013. The Document Recovery pane will appear. Any auto-saved versions of the file will appear here.

2.

Click to open an available file. The document will be recovered.

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By default, Word auto-saves every 10 minutes. If you are editing a document for less than 10 minutes, Word may not create an auto-saved version. If you don't see the file you need, or if you're looking for an auto-saved version of a file that has no previously saved versions, you can browse all auto-saved files by 1.

Navigating to the Info pane in Backstage view

2.

Clicking Manage Versions

3.

Recover Unsaved Documents from the dialog Box.

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SHARING DOCUMENTS Word 2013 makes it easy to share and collaborate on documents using OneDrive. In order to share a document, it must first be saved to your OneDrive. When you share a document with someone, you're actually giving them access to the exact same file. This lets you and the people you share with edit the same document without having to keep track of multiple versions. Page 120 of 246


There are lots of different ways to share a document: you can invite specific people, post it directly to social networking sites, or get a link that you can use however you want. We recommend using the first option unless you're sharing a file that needs to be viewed or edited by lots of different people. TO SHARE A DOCUMENT: 1.

Click the File tab to access Backstage view, then click Share. The Share pane will appear.

2.

Click the buttons in the interactive below to learn more about different ways to share a document.

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HOW TO MANAGE AND SAVE DOCUMENTS IN ONEDRIVE One of the most important and new features in Word 2013 is saving documents to SkyDrive which will be available anytime and anywhere.

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SAVE FILES IN ONEDRIVE USE THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE.

1. Enter https://login.live.com/ in your web browser. 2.

Now use your any Microsoft ID and Password for login.

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OR

3. Enter www.office.com/myaccount in your web browser and use any Id password of Microsoft for login, then choose OneDrive in the services and product section.

4.

Now you are directed to your OneDrive where you manage and share your documents. Use the document and manage tool to add files from a computer and create files and folders.

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5. You can also upload a file in this site, up to 7 GB free, and access it from anywhere.

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NOTE: Microsoft Office 2013 provides the facility for saving your Word document directly in OneDrive. USE THE FOLLOWING PROCEDURE TO SAVE THE WORD DOCUMENT IN ONEDRIVE DIRECTLY.

1. First of all download the OneDrive windows exe which is available here. 2.

Now install the OneDrive exe in your computer and login with any Microsoft ID.

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3.

Open Word 2013 and write some simple text. Then click on the "File" tab and choose "Save".

4.

Now click on the "Browse" button and choose a location within OneDrive to save to.

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EXPORTING DOCUMENTS Be default, Word documents are saved in the .docx file type. However, there may be times when you need to use another file type, such as a PDF or Word 97-2003 document. It's easy to export your document from Word in a variety of file types.

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TO EXPORT A DOCUMENT AS A PDF FILE: Exporting your document as an Adobe Acrobat Document, commonly known as a PDF file, can be especially useful if sharing a document with someone who does not have Word. A PDF file will make it possible for recipients to view, but not edit, the content of your document. 1.

Click the File tab to access Backstage view.

2.

Click Export and then select Create PDF/XPS.

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3. The Save As dialog box will appear. Select the location where you wish to export the document, enter a file name, then click Publish.

By default, Word will export all of the pages in the document. If you wish to export only the current page Page 131 of 246


1.

Click Options in the Save as dialog box

The Options dialog box will appear. 2.

Select Current page and then click OK.

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Page 133 of 246


TO EXPORT A DOCUMENT IN OTHER FILE TYPES: You may also find it helpful to export your document in other file types, such as a Word 97-2003 Document if you need to share with people using an older version of Word, or a .rtf file if you need a plain-text version of your document. 1.

Click the File tab to access Backstage view.

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2.

Click Export and then select Change File Type.

3.

Select a common file type and then click Save As.

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1. The Save As dialog box will appear. Select the location where you wish to export the document, enter a file name, and then click Save.

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2. You can also use the Save as type: drop-down menu in the Save As dialog box to save documents in a variety of file types.

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BASIC RIGHT-CLICK TIPS Page 139 of 246


As a mouse user, you’ve noticed there’s more than one way to click. There’s the Left click that you do with your index finger, and there’s a Right click. RIGHT-CLICKS IN MICROSOFT OFFICE PROGRAMS In a Microsoft Word table, right-click and you’ll be able to do all sorts of table formatting, directly from the shortcut menu. For example, you can insert and delete rows, columns, and cells, add borders and shading, and

adjust the width

of the table.

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RIGHT-CLICKS WITH FILES I use both the CTRL+C and CTRL+V keyboard shortcuts and the right-click menus to copy selected text from one place to another in a document. Right-click a file in a folder and then click Cut, Copy, Delete, or Rename. I can even click Send To to copy a file directly to another location.

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To open a file or program quickly, right-click the file or program and then click Create Shortcut.

FYI - right-click the folder name, point to Extract All (Windows 7 only) or Open With, and then click an option for extracting the files. RIGHT-CLICKS WITH PICTURES When you double-click a photo on your computer, it opens in a program, such as Windows Live Photo Gallery, that is your default program for opening pictures. If you want to open a photo in another program (for example, if you want to edit it in Microsoft Paint), simply right-click the picture icon, click Open With, and then click the program you want to use to open the file. Page 142 of 246


You can download Photo Gallery for free: Paint is included with Windows 7 and Vista.

You can also print the picture right from this menu, without even opening the file. Page 143 of 246


And speaking of pictures, if you see a picture you like on a webpage, you can right-click the photo and print it or save it to your computer.

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Page 145 of 246


RIGHT-CLICKS WITH THE TASKBAR AND DESKTOP right-clicking the taskbar and then choosing an arrangement for displaying the open windows on the desktop so that I can see them.

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OR Click the program icon in the taskbar and then click Close all Windows to close all the files in that program.

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Page 148 of 246


Finally, I should point out that right-clicks aren’t only for use with documents and files. For example, every once in a while I get the urge to change the background on my desktop. So I right-click anywhere on the desktop and click Personalize (Windows 7 or Windows Vista) or Properties (Windows XP), click Next Desktop Background, and then choose a new photo.

These examples give you some ideas for why you might want to use the right-click menus yourself. You’ll understand their usefulness more fully if you give right-clicking a try while you’re working and see what’s on the menu. Page 149 of 246


TEXT BASICS Once you become familiar with the basics of text, you'll be able to create clean and professional documents in Word. Basic tasks include the ability to add, delete, and move text, as well as how to find and replace specific words or phrases.

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USING THE INSERTION POINT TO ADD TEXT The insertion point is the blinking vertical line in your document. It indicates where you can enter text on the page. You can use the insertion point in a variety of ways: 1. Blank document: When a new, blank document opens, the insertion point is located in the top left corner of the page. If you wish, you can begin typing from this location.

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2.

Adding spaces: Press the space bar to add spaces after a word or in between text.

• New paragraph line: Press Enter on your keyboard to move the insertion point to the next paragraph line.

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• Manual placement: After you've started typing, you can use the mouse to move the insertion point to a specific place in your document. Simply click the location in the text where you wish to place it. In a new, blank document, you can double-click the mouse to move the insertion point elsewhere on the page. TO SELECT TEXT: Before applying formatting to text, you'll first need to select it. 1.

Place the insertion point next to the text you wish to select.

2.

Click the mouse, and while holding it down, drag your mouse over the text to select it.

3. Release the mouse button. You have selected the text. A highlighted box will appear over the selected text.

When you select text or images in Word, hover over the text and a toolbar with shortcuts is displayed. If the toolbar does not appear at first, try moving the mouse over the selection.

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Other shortcuts include double-clicking a word to select it and triple-clicking to select a sentence or paragraph. You can also select all of the text in the document by pressing Ctrl+A on your keyboard. TO DELETE TEXT: There are several ways to delete, or remove, text: •

To delete text to the left of the insertion point, press the Backspace key on your keyboard.

To delete text to the right of the insertion point, press the Delete key on your keyboard.

Select the text that you wish to remove and press the Delete key.

If you select text and start typing, the selected text will automatically be deleted and replaced with the new text. COPYING AND MOVING TEXT Word allows you to copy text that is already in your document and paste it to other areas of the document. You can cut and paste or drag and drop the text. Page 154 of 246


Page 155 of 246


TO COPY AND PASTE TEXT: Copying text creates a duplicate of the text. 1.

Select the text you wish to copy.

2.

Click the Copy command on the Home tab. OR

3.

right-click the selected text and select Copy.

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4.

Place the insertion point where you wish the text to appear.

5.

Click the Paste command on the Home tab.

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6.

The text will appear.

TO CUT AND PASTE TEXT: 1.

Select the text you wish to cut.

2.

Click the Cut command on the Home tab. You can also right-click the selected text and select Cut.

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3.

Place your insertion point where you wish the text to appear.

4.

Click the Paste command on the Home tab. The text will appear.

Using keyboard shortcuts •

Ctrl+X to cut

Ctrl+C to copy

Ctrl+V to paste. Page 159 of 246


You can also cut, copy, and paste by right-clicking your document and choosing the desired action from the dropdown menu. When you use this method to paste, you can choose from three options that determine how the text will be formatted: Keep Source Formatting, Merge Formatting and Keep Text Only. You can hover the mouse over each icon to see what it will look like before you click on it.

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TO DRAG AND DROP TEXT: Dragging and dropping text allows you to use the mouse to move the text. 1.

Select the text you wish to move.

2. Click and drag the text to the location you wish for it to appear. The cursor will have a rectangle under it to indicate that you are moving text. 3.

Release the mouse button and the text will appear.

If text does not appear in the exact location you wish, you can press the Enter key on your keyboard to move the text to a new line.

FIND AND REPLACE When you're working with longer documents, it can be difficult and time consuming to locate a specific word or phrase. Word can automatically search your document using the Find feature, and it allows you to quickly change words or phrases using Replace. TO FIND TEXT: In our example, we've written an academic paper and we'll use the Find command to locate all references to a particular author's last name. Page 162 of 246


1.

From the Home tab, click the Find command.

2.

The Navigation pane will appear on the left side of the screen.

3.

Type the text you wish to find in the field at the top of the Navigation pane.

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4. If the text is found in the document, it will be highlighted in yellow, and a preview of the results will appear in the Navigation pane. 5. If the text appears more than once, choose a review option to review each instance. When an instance of the text is selected, it will highlight in grey:

•

Arrows: Use the arrows

to move through the results one at a time.

• Results previews: Select a result preview to jump directly to the location of a specific result in your document.

1.

When you are finished, click the X to close the Navigation pane. The highlighting will disappear.

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You can also access the Find command by pressing Ctrl+F on your keyboard. For more search options, click the drop-down arrow next to the search field.

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TO REPLACE TEXT: 1.

From the Home tab, click the Replace command.

2.

The Find and Replace dialog box will appear.

3.

Type the text you wish to find in the Find what: field.

4.

Type the text you wish to replace it with in the Replace with: field. Then click Find Next.

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1.

Word will find the first instance of the text and highlight it in grey.

2. Review the text to make sure you want to replace it. In our example, the text is part of the title of the paper, and does not need to be replaced. We'll click Find Next, again. 3. Word will jump to the next instance of the text. If you wish to replace it, select one of the replace options: •

Replace will replace individual instances of text. In our example, we'll choose this option.

•

Replace All will replace every instance of the text throughout the document.

4.

The selected text will be replaced. Page 169 of 246


5.

When you're done, click X to close the dialog box.

You can also access the Find and Replace command by pressing Ctrl+H on your keyboard. For more search options, click More in the Find and Replace dialog box. From here, you can select additional search options such as matching case and ignoring punctuation.

FORMATTING TEXT Page 170 of 246


In Word, you have many options for adjusting the font of your text including size, color and inserting special symbols. You can also adjust the alignment of the text to change how it is displayed on the page.

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TO CHANGE THE FONT: By default, the font of each new document is set to Calibri. 1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2.

On the Home tab, click the drop-down arrow next to the Font box. A menu of font styles will appear.

3. Move the mouse over the various font styles. A live preview of the font will appear in the document. Select the font style you wish to use.

The font will change in the document. Page 172 of 246


Page 173 of 246


TO CHANGE THE FONT SIZE: 1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2.

Select the desired font size formatting option:

• Font Size drop-down arrow: On the Home tab, click the Font Size drop-down arrow. A menu of font sizes will appear. When you move the mouse over the various font sizes, a live preview of the font size will appear in the document.

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• Font Size box: When the font size you need is not available in the Font Size drop-down arrow, you can click the Font Size box and type the desired font size. Then press Enter.

Entering a font size in the Font box • Grow and Shrink Font commands: Click the Grow Font or Shrink Font commands to change the font size.

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3.

The font size will change in the document.

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TO CHANGE THE FONT COLOR: 1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2.

On the Home tab, click the Font Color drop-down arrow. The Font Color menu appears.

3.

Move the mouse over the various font colors. A live preview of the color will appear in the document.

4.

Select the font color you wish to use. The font color will change in the document. Page 177 of 246


Your color choices aren't limited to the drop-down menu that appears. Select More Colors... at the bottom of the menu to access the Colors dialog box. 5.

Choose the color that you want and click OK.

TO HIGHLIGHT TEXT: Highlighting can be a useful tool for marking important text in your document. 1.

Select the text you wish to highlight.

2.

From the Home tab, click the Text Highlight Color drop-down arrow. The Highlight Color menu appears.

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3.

Select the desired highlight color. The selected text will then be highlighted in the document.

To remove highlighting, select the highlighted text, and then click the Text Highlight Color drop-down arrow. Select No Color from the drop-down menu.

To highlight many lines of text, simply click the Text Highlight Color command and the cursor changes into a highlighter

.

You can then click, hold and drag the highlighter over the lines you wish to highlight.

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TO USE THE BOLD, ITALIC, AND UNDERLINE COMMANDS: The Bold, Italic, and Underline commands can be used to help draw attention to important words or phrases. 1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2. On the Home tab, click the Bold (B), Italic (I), or Underline (U) command in the Font group. In our example, we'll click Bold. 3.

The selected text will be modified in the document.

TO CHANGE THE TEXT CASE: When you need to quickly change text case, you can use the Change Case command instead of deleting and retyping the text. 1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2.

On the Home tab, click the Change Case command in the Font group.

3.

A drop-down menu will appear. Select the desired case option from the menu.

4.

The text case will be changed in the document.

TO CHANGE TEXT ALIGNMENT: By default, Word aligns text to the left margin in new documents. However, there may be times when you want to adjust text alignment to the center or right. Page 180 of 246


1.

Select the text you wish to modify.

2.

On the Home tab, select one of the four alignment options from the Paragraph group.

3.

Click the arrows in the slideshow below to learn more about the four text alignment options.

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Align Text Left: Aligns all the selected text to the left margin. The Align Text Left command is the most common alignment and is selected by default when a new document is created.

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SYMBOLS

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Sometimes you may find that you need to add a symbol to your text, such as the Copyright symbol, Š. Word offers a large collection of symbols for currency, languages, mathematics, and more.

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1.

Place the insertion point in the location where you want to insert a symbol.

2.

On the Insert tab, click the Symbol drop-down arrow. A menu of symbols will appear. Page 190 of 246


3.

Select the desired symbol.

4.

The symbol will appear in your document.

MORE INSERT SYMBOLS Sometimes you need a character that’s not on your keyboard, like a foreign currency symbol, a trademark (™), or a fraction like 1/3. For a few symbols you can use the AutoCorrect feature to type them. For all others, go to: 1.

Insert

2.

Symbol.

Type

To insert

(c)

©

(r)

®

(tm)

(e)

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Page 192 of 246


AutoCorrect converts a series of keystrokes to symbols. Here are a few of the most commonly used ones. Click File Click Options Click Proofing Click AutoCorrect Options and scroll down the list on the AutoCorrect tab to see other keystrokes that convert to symbols. You can also create your own AutoCorrect character on the AutoCorrect tab by typing a keystroke in the Replace box, and typing what you want the keystroke to replace in the With box. To insert other symbols 1.

Click Insert

2.

Click Symbol.

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The Symbol gallery opens, which contains among other symbols, additional foreign currency symbols. 1.

Select a symbol to insert it.

2.

To see additional symbols, click More Symbols at the bottom of the gallery.

The Symbol box opens.

3.

Scroll through the list of characters to see all the symbols available in your current font (normal text) in the Font box. Notice that as you scroll the label in the Subset box changes. If you want to skip directly to the not-equal-to sign, for example, select Mathematical Operators in the Subset box.

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If you do not see the Subset box, look in the lower right corner of the Symbol box. In the From list, select Unicode (hex).

5.

If you don’t see what you want, select a different font in the Font box.

6.

When you see a symbol you want, click Insert

7.

Click Close. If you don’t want to insert a symbol, click Cancel.

TIP

For text that works like pictures, switch to one of the Wingding fonts in the

Font box.

FRACTIONS Some fractions (1/4, 1/2, and 3/4) automatically switch to a fraction character when you type them (¼, ½, ¾). But others do not (1/3, 2/3, 1/5, etc.). To switch to a fraction character

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1.

Click Insert

2.

Click Symbols

3.

Click More Symbols.

4.

In the Subset box, click Number Forms and select a fraction.

5.

Click Insert

6.

Click Close.

To find additional mathematical symbols, click AutoCorrect at the bottom of the Symbol box. Click the Math AutoCorrect tab to see a list of keyboard shortcuts you can type into your document to insert math symbols. Be sure to select the Replace text as you type check box. Depending on where you are in the document you may need to select the option Use Math AutoCorrect rules outside of math region.

If you don't see the symbol you're looking for, click More Symbols... to open the Symbol dialog box. Locate and select the desired symbol and then click Insert.

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PAGE LAYOUT AND FORMATTING The commands you will use to modify page layout and formatting are found in the Page Setup group on the Ribbon. These commands allow you to make adjustments to a page's orientation, margins, and size. PAGE ORIENTATION Word offers two page orientation options: landscape and portrait. Landscape means that the page is oriented horizontally, and portrait format is oriented vertically. Compare our example below to see how orientation can affect the appearance and spacing of text and images.

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TO CHANGE PAGE ORIENTATION: 1.

Select the Page Layout tab.

2.

Click the Orientation command in the Page Setup group.

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3.

A drop-down menu will appear. Click either Portrait or Landscape to change the page orientation.

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4.

The page orientation of the document will be changed.

PAGE MARGINS A margin is the space between the text and the edge of your document. By default, a new document's margins are set to Normal, which means it has a one-inch space between the text and each edge. Depending on your needs, Word allows you to change your document's margin size. TO FORMAT PAGE MARGINS: Word has a variety of predefined margin sizes to choose from. 1.

Select the Page Layout tab and click the Margins command.

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2.

A drop-down menu will appear. Click the predefined margin size you desire.

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3.

The margins of the document will be changed.

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TO USE CUSTOM MARGINS: Word also allows you to customize the size of your margins in the Page Setup dialog box. 1.

From the Page Layout tab, click Margins. Select Custom Margins... from the drop-down menu.

2.

The Page Setup dialog box will appear.

3.

Adjust the values for each margin and click OK.

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4.

The margins of the document will be changed.

PAGE SIZE By default, the page size of a new document is 8.5 inches x 11 inches. Depending on your project, you may need to adjust your document's page size. It's important to note that before modifying the default page size, you should check to see which page sizes your printer can accommodate. Page 204 of 246


TO CHANGE THE PAGE SIZE: Word has a variety of predefined page sizes to choose from. 1.

Select the Page Layout tab and then click the Size command.

2.

A drop-down menu will appear. The current page size is highlighted. Click the desired predefined page size.

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3.

The page size of the document will be changed.

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TO USE A CUSTOM PAGE SIZE: Word also allows you to customize the page size in the Page Setup dialog box. 1.

From the Page Layout tab, click Size. Select More Paper Sizes... from the drop-down menu.

2.

The Page Setup dialog box will appear.

3.

Adjust the values for Width and Height and click OK. Page 207 of 246


4.

The page size of the document will be changed.

5.

Alternatively, you can open the Page Setup dialog box by navigating to the Page Layout tab and clicking the small arrow in the bottom-right corner of the Page Setup group.

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BORDERS INSERT PAGE BORDER IN WORD 2013 PAGE BORDERS IN WORD You can change page borders of Word 2013 very easily. Changing the border means customizing the border with various styles; adding colors, shapes and various arts or changing width and/or thickness of the border. 1.

Click on the "Design Tab".

2.

Click on "Page Borders."

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3.

Now the "Borders and Shading" dialog box appears where you can insert borders and change settings.

PRINTING DOCUMENTS When preparing to print a document, you'll need to decide whether the information on the page will print as expected or if adjustments need to be made. The Print pane allows you to preview and modify the document before printing. Watch the video to learn how to print documents in Word. Page 210 of 246


TO ACCESS THE PRINT PANE: 1.

Select the File tab. Backstage view will appear.

2.

Select Print. The Print pane will appear.

3.

Click the buttons in the interactive below to learn more about using the Print pane. Page 211 of 246


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4.

Single and Double-Sided Printing

5.

Choose whether to print on one side or both sides of the paper.

6.

Print Range/Document Info

7.

From here you can choose to print the whole document, just the current page, or custom print to print specific pages.

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8.

Printer

9.

You may need to select the printer you want to use if your computer is connected to multiple printers.

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10. Print Page 215 of 246


11. When you are ready to print your document, click the Print button. 12. Pages Per Sheet 13. Word allows you to print more than one page on a single sheet. 14. While condensing pages onto one sheet can sometimes be helpful, note that the text will become more difficult to read as more pages are selected.

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15. Copies

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16. Here you can choose how many copies you wish to print of the document. 17. If you're planning to print multiple copies, it's a good idea to print a test copy first. 18. Page Selection 19. You can click the arrows to view a different page in the Print Preview. 20. Zoom Control/Zoom to Page 21. You can click the Zoom to Page button on the right to zoom in and out of the Preview pane. 22. Click, hold and drag the slider to use the Zoom control. The number to the left of the slider bar reflects the zoom percentage.

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23. Preview Pane Page 219 of 246


24. Here you can see a preview of how your document will look when printed. 25. Margins 26. Here you can adjust the page margins, which can help your information fit more comfortably on the page.

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27. Paper Size Page 221 of 246


28. If your printer uses different paper sizes, you can choose the paper size you wish to use.

29. Orientation 30. Here you can choose Portrait or Landscape orientation.

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31. Collation Settings 32. If you are printing multiple copies, you can choose whether you want the copies collated or uncollated.

33. You can also access the Print pane by pressing Ctrl+P on your keyboard. Page 223 of 246


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CUSTOM PRINTING Sometimes, you may find it unnecessary to print your entire document, in which case custom printing may be more suited for your needs. Whether you're printing several individual pages, or a range of pages, Word allows you to specify exactly which pages you'd like to print. TO CUSTOM PRINT A DOCUMENT: If you'd like to print individual pages or page ranges, you'll need to separate each entry with a comma (for example, 1, 3, 5-7, 10-14). 1.

Navigate to the Print pane.

2.

In the Pages: field, enter the pages you wish to print.

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3.

Click Print.

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ABOUT SKYDRIVE (ONEDRIVE) OneDrive provides a small amount of free space that you can use to save your files, documents and videos which can simply be shared with others. ONEDRIVE WORKING WITH YOUR MICROSOFT ACCOUNT AND ONEDRIVE

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Many of the new features in Office 2013 are geared towards saving and sharing files online. To use these features, you'll need to get a free Microsoft account if you don't already have one. Here are a few of the things you'll be able to do with your Microsoft account: •

Access YOU’RE files anywhere: You can save files to your OneDrive, so you'll be able to access them from any computer that has an internet connection. This also helps to keep your files safe if anything happens to your computer.

Edit documents in your web browser: If you're using a computer that doesn't have Microsoft Office, you can use the free Office Web Apps to edit documents in your browser. Office Web Apps includes simplified versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and OneNote.

Share files: It's easy to share your OneDrive files with friends or coworkers. You can choose whether they can edit or just read the files. This option is great for collaboration because multiple people can edit a document at the same time (also known as co-authoring). If you don't already have a Microsoft account, you can go to the Creating a Microsoft Account lesson in our Microsoft Account tutorial.

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TO SIGN IN TO OFFICE 2013: When you use Office for the first time, it will ask you to sign in to your Microsoft account. However, if you don't sign in at that time, you can always sign in later. 1.

In the upper-right corner, click Sign in.

2.

Type your email address and then click Sign in.

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3.

Click on the Password field.

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4.

Type your password and then click Sign in.

5.

Your account name will now appear in the upper-right corner.

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SIGNING OUT OF OFFICE 2013 If you're using Office at home or at work, it's usually more convenient to stay signed in. However, if you're using a shared computer (for example, at a library or business center), it's important to sign out when you're done. This will prevent other people from accessing your OneDrive files. Click the File tab.

Clicking the File tab Click Account and then select Sign out.

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Clicking Sign out STORING FILES IN THE CLOUD WITH ONEDRIVE Once you've signed in to your Microsoft account, your OneDrive will appear as an option whenever you save or open a file. You still have the option of saving files to your computer. However, saving files to your OneDrive allows you to access them from any other computer, and it also allows you to share files with friends or coworkers.

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.

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UPLOADING EXISTING FILES SAFELY You may already have documents on your computer, for example in your Documents library or on your Desktop. If you decide to upload them to OneDrive, it's important to understand that you're actually uploading a copy of each file. Another solution is to download the OneDrive Desktop App. The app creates a folder on your computer that stays in sync with your OneDrive.

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You can then simply move your documents into that folder to upload them to your OneDrive. Since the files will stay in sync, you are free to open them either from the folder, or from your OneDrive.

SHARING AND COLLABORATING WITH ONEDRIVE Office 2013 allows you to share documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. Once you've saved a file to your OneDrive, you can invite people to read or edit it. The people you share with do not need to have Office 2013. COLLABORATING IN OFFICE Page 238 of 246


With some projects, you may have several people that need to edit the same document. When you share a document with OneDrive, multiple people can edit it at the same time. This is known as co-authoring. Co-authoring can be used with Word and PowerPoint. If more than one person is editing a document, you'll see an icon at the bottom of the screen that shows how many other people are currently editing it. You can see their names by clicking the icon. Co-authoring works a little differently in each Office program. For example, in Word 2013, you won't see everyone's changes to the document as they make them. Instead, every time you save the document, it will update to show everyone's changes. Also, co-authoring does not work in Excel 2013, but it does work if everyone is using the Excel Web App.

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HEADERS AND FOOTERS Sometimes you want to provide a professional look and feel for your Word document by customizing your document's header and footer. Like logo image, date, page number or other text element. Suppose you want to add a date to every page of your document, then insert the date into the header portion of the document that is shown on all pages. CREATE HEADERS AND FOOTERS To create headers and footers use the following procedure. 1.

Open Word and click on the "Insert" tab.

2.

Now click on the "Header" button within the header & footer group Page 240 of 246


3.

Choose your desired layout; if it is not present then download it from office.com.

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4.

Use the "design" command to add the useful information such as picture, data, text etc.

NOTE: To automatically update the date and time, check the check box "Update automatically.�

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CUSTOMIZE THE HEADER AND FOOTER

To customize the header and footer, various options are available within the "option" group of the design command. They are: 1.

Different first page: Use for changing the header and footer of the first page.

2.

Different odd and even page: Use to make the header and footer different for odd and even pages.

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3.

You can also set the space for header and footer using the "Position" group.

4. You can also navigate among pages and go to a footer or header.

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NOTE: Follow the same procedure to add a FOOTER to your document.

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Word 2013 - Introduction Book  

Introduction to using Word 2013.

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