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ANNUAL EDITION LATEST EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT


LITE

HOT SUN

NEWS EVENTS out

LATEST in

2013

MIAMI DAY BY

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DAY


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CONTENT

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5 8

of

Main Articles Red Bull Hatuey and the Arts

Calle 8 Fastival

13

Wine & Food

4

Miami Art

6 Art 4 Space 11 Pieces Art 15

Film Festival

Editorial ART DIRECTOR Angel Nieves

SENIOR DESIGNER James Castillo

DIGITAL IMAGING SPECIALIST Wilm Canas

ART ASSISTANCE Jeanet Gonzalez

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Lite /Annual Edition 1

Angel Nieves


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MIAMI ART MUSEUM by Julie Anderson

MATCHING ARCHITECTURE TO THE ART IN A NEW MIAMI MUSEUM This question has been bothering art lovers for a while. One institution after another has embarked on vast new building projects over the last decade, and in nearly every case the museum and its architects struggled to figure out the right balance between architectural expression and the need to showcase art. Yet after all this time and all those buildings, the question is still being asked. No architects have been more deeply or visibly embroiled in this struggle than the Swiss team of Jacques Herzog and Pierre de Meuron. Since the 2001 opening of their Tate Modern — a building that instantly became the emblem of London’s rise as an art world capital — they have designed more than half a dozen art museums, each one a provocative reworking of the conventional formula. Much of this work paid off. Their Schaulager in Basel, Switzerland, a mixture of galleries and art storage spaces that opened in 2003, is considered by many to be one of the most appealingly intimate places to look at art built in recent memory. But other designs, like the 2005 expansion of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, got decidedly mixed reviews in the art world, with some critics arguing that too much of the architects’ personalities had seeped into the galleries. And in retrospect the Tate Modern, with its huge public spaces and huger crowds, may function better as a spectacle than an art space.

The team’s recently unveiled design for the Miami Art Museum is likely to ignite the debate all over again. Some architects no doubt will snipe that it looks too safe, an insult in design circles, as if Mr. Herzog and Mr. de Meuron were inspired by a fear of inciting yet more art world ire. On a breathtaking site overlooking Biscayne Bay, its boxy exterior, surrounded by slim 50-foot columns and capped by a vast flat roof, it could even be momentarily confused with 1960s-era performing arts developments like the Kennedy Center. But the design for the Miami Art Museum is not a regurgitation of outmoded historical forms. Instead it breaks those forms apart and then pieces them back together to create something wholly new. It’s as if the architects had stepped back to contemplate the long arc of museum designs — including their own — before moving forward again along the evolutionary chain.

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MATCHING ELEGANCE, SUN, BEACH, PAINT,AND ART. Lite /Annual Edition 3


MIAMI

ART

by Julie Anderson

MUSEUM

The $130 million building project has been overseen by Terry Riley, a former head of the Museum of Modern Art’s department of architecture and design who helped plan that museum’s expansion, and who was the Miami museum’s director until his resignation last month. (Mr. Riley is returning to his architectural practice, but he will continue to lead the Miami project as a consultant. Financing comes largely from a $100 million local bond issue. (The museum is still raising money for an endowment to help pay for operating expenses and acquisitions.) The museum is to face Biscayne Bay to the east and a vast public park, scheduled to begin construction next year, to the south. It is intended to be part of a cultural development that also includes a planned Science Museum by Grimshaw Architects.

Mr. Herzog and Mr. de Meuron’s design has strong connections to Classical and modern precedents. It is part of a lineage that reaches back past postwar performing arts centers to Mies van der Rohe’s New National Gallery and Karl Friedrich Schinkel’s neo-Classical Altes Museum, all the way to the Parthenon.

The architects reinforce the sense of grandeur by placing their building up on a concrete platform, as if to stress art’s elevated status. A grand staircase — nearly the entire 180-foot width of the platform — connects it to the waterfront: something like the grand staircase in front of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, but with a better view. A smaller stair connects to the park. The first sign that something unexpected is going on here is a surprising feeling of weightlessness. The base, which would typically be a heavy solid platform, is conceived as a thin concrete slab that seems to hover several feet above the ground.

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HATUEY AND THE ARTS CORAL GABLES ART MUSEUM

November 10-December 28, 2012 in Gallery 109 Who was Hatuey? Hatuey was an early sixteenth century Taíno chief from the island of Hispaniola. Celebrated as Cuba’s first national hero, Hatuey is recognized as the first fighter against colonialism in the New World, attaining legendary status for leading a group of natives against invading Spaniards. Hatuey’s name carries on as the first martyr in the struggle for Cuban independence. Hatuey personifies the passion and spirit behind the crafted ale that bears his name.

Exhibition opens november 28 at:

8:00 AM The Coral Gables Museum is proud to feature the entries of the HATUEY and the Arts contest’s top ten finalists. HATUEY invited the local arts community to influence the creative direction of HATUEY beer’s next marketing campaign. The contest challenged both experienced and aspiring artists to design an ad for the brand for the chance to win up to $5000. The entries are exhibited within the Museum’s Bacardi Lounge, a temporary installation running through December in celebration of the Building Bacardi exhibit also on view. The winner of this competition will be announced at the Coral Gables Museum on December 7, 2012.

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TICKETS ON SALE DECEMBER 12

Ticketmaster.com Lite /Annual Edition 6


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Elections

Democrat

Barack Obama

50%

4,236,032

LATINO VOTE:

71%

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electoral votes:

29

20

Mia


012

ami

Results

Republican

mitt romney

49%

4,162,174

LATINO VOTE:

27%

electoral votes:

0.0

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SUSTAINABLE ART FESTIVAL

UNFRAMED

LANDSCAPE The Plan is: A day full of visual and performance artists expressing their art in ways that are environmentally conscious. Reused mediums, green themes, recycled art, you name it. If its art and its somehow environmentally friendly or ecocscious, it belongs here at the Pieces Arts Fest.

CONTEMPORARY ART This understanding of landscape has, however, been revealed as culturally-constructed, the product of political ideologies, and conveying human domination over nature. Furthermore, landscape is perceived through a frame by a distant spectator, who remains alienated from the object of his gaze.

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This understanding of landscape has, however, been revealed as culturallyconstructed, the product of political ideologies, and conveying human domination over nature. Furthermore, landscape is perceived through a frame by a distant spectator, who remains alienated from the object of his gaze.

The exhibition Unframed Landscapes researched our relationship with nature across the full range of current media, including: landscapes painted from train windows, video photography exploring gender and landscape, computer animation researching images of a natural phenomenon on the web, digital snaps expressing the marginality of nature in city life,

computer animation researching images of a natural phenomenon on the web, digital snaps expressing the marginality of nature in city life, The participating artists were Balázs Beöthy, Ivan Bura, Péter Császar, János Fodor, Andrea Huszár, Tibor Iski Kocsis, Csaba Nemes, Ana Opalic and Matk


BEYOND

GREEN

IS ALL ABOUT THE PIECES

This understanding of landscape has, however, been revealed as culturallyconstructed, the product of political ideologies, and conveying human domination over nature. Furthermore, landscape is perceived through a frame by a distant spectator, who remains alienated from the object of his gaze.

The exhibition Unframed Landscapes researched our relationship with nature across the full range of current media, including: landscapes painted from train windows, video photog raphy exploring gender and landscape, computer anima tion researching images of a natural phenomenon on theweb, digital snaps express ing the marginality of nature in city life,

The Nature Conservancy paired Dutch designer Christien Meindertsma with lambs and sheep from the Lava Lake Ranch in Hailey, Idaho. Using organic wool from these sheep, she created a hand-knitted rug made up of 11 hexagonal tiles that hook together. Each unit is made from 3 1/2 pounds of wool, which is roughly equal to the yield of a single sheep. Meindertsma chose the shape of a hexagon for each tile to suggest the abstract profile of a sheep–with four feet, a head and a tail. Identity cards or “passports” link each module to a sheep from the flock. She used knitting needles the size of yardsticks and an extra thick yarn that highlights her knitting technique as well as emphasizes the beauty of the material.

THURSDAY,JULY 25,2013 DOORS OPEN 2:00PM-10:00PM

ART EXHIBITIONS FROM 7:00PM-9:00PM

WEST PARK 8590 SW WEST AVE, MIAMI, FL, 33412

GET TICKETS AT: WWW.PIECESART.COM

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& FOOD WINE FESTIVAL

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by The Food Network

Is a national, star-studded, four-day destination event showcasing the talents of the world’s most renowned wine and spirits producers, chefs and culinary personalities. Hosted by Southern Wine & Spirits of Florida and Florida International University (FIU), the Festival benefits FIU’s Chaplin School of Hospitality and Tourism Management and the Southern Wine & Spirits Beverage Management Center. Going into its 12th year, the Festival has raised approximately $17 million to date for FIU.

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THE FOOD NETWORK Now one of America’s most prestigious gourmet gatherings, the Festival began as a one-day event known as the Florida Extravaganza held at FIU’s Biscayne Bay Campus. For five years, from 1997-2001, the Florida Extravaganza showcased wines from national and international wineries paired with food from local restaurants and chefs working with students of FIU’s School of Hospitality and Tourism Management. In 2002, Lee Brian Schrager, current vice president of corporate communications & national events at Southern Wine & Spirits of America, took the reins and relocated the event to South Beach. The renamed South Beach Wine & Food Festival® attracted close to 7,000 guests to a series of dinners, seminars, a Grand Tasting Village and live Auction in its first year.


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FILM Mission History

&

FESTIVAL

of 2013

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The mission of the Miami International Film Festival (MIFF) is to bridge cultural understanding and encourage artistic development and excellence by provoking thought through film. By bringing the best of world cinema to Miami, MIFF presents the city and the film industry with a singular platform that fosters creative and technical talent.

The Miami International Film Festival had its beginnings as the main activity of the Film Society of Miami, Inc., which was founded in 1983. Since its first edition, which opened on February 3, 1984, the Festival has continued to bring the finest in world cinema to South Florida. The Festival has gained recognition with its consistently high quality of programming and presentations from filmmakers, critics, and the film industry. During the early years, films were screened in a variety of local theaters in the greater Miami area. By the sixth Festival in 1989, the Gusman Center for the Performing Arts had become the official residence.


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