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Angela Mok Student No: 583593 Semester 2/2012

Group 13

module2_design


I attempted to each of the control points separately, however his proved to be tedious and did not give me the desired outcome.

583593 Angela Mok

digitalisation techniques

Starting off with my clay model from Module 1, I attempted to apply the model geometry by tracing profile curves and generating contours technique to create a digital representation of my model. However this proved to be problematic as it distorted the curves of the model when I applied the 'curve from 2 views' command.


After I lofted my contours, the shape I ended up with was not ideal as I planned to situate the lantern on my shoulder for the final presentation and this outcome would not suffice. I experimented by adjusting control points and moving the contours into different positions but could not reach a desirable model.

I began be dividing my clay model up into 1cm sections (model at scale 1:5 for reference). I then placed the pieces onto grid paper and used the 'pictureframe' command to import my photo into Rhino. By tracing each section using curves, I was able to create the contours I needed to loft.

583593 Angela Mok

digitalisation techniques

Thus, I decided to remake my clay model and try the model geometry by tracing sectional slices technique. This technique proved to be more effective as I had greater accuracy and control over the outcome of my digital model.


Thus I decided to use the 'flow along curve' command to help me in my lofting process. This proved to work much better as it gave me the silhouette I desired.

I also applied the 'orient' command to adjust which way the curvature leaned towards. 583593 Angela Mok

digitalisation techniques

The curvature I wanted in my design was not coming through in my digital representation.


Firstly I attempted to loft separate sections and combine them together in various ways. I also explored the 'transform along curve' command more by changing the curvature of the curves I used. Finally I decided to further develop the idea of overlap by twisting. The twisted shape still provides an overlapping effect as each segment goes from large to small and large again. I also kept the base shape in a “V� formation to represent the ideas of accumulative growth explored in my natural form of the armadillo shell.

583593 Angela Mok

further development

Once I reached my basic shape, I decided to explore another concept in my original 'overlap' model I discussed in Module 1. After receiving feedback that my first proposal was too literal, I explored other ways that overlap can occur.


Thus, I decided to opted for a model with less curvature, and concentrate on better defined panelling.

583593 Angela Mok

further development

I decided on a twisted design for my final model as it expressed my ideas of overlap in an abstracted way rather than being too literal. However, after attempting to panel this design, I realised the twist was too extreme, especially at the end and caused my panel design to extrude panels in an uncontrolled manner.


2D panel triangle 2D panel brick

When I experimented with 2D panels, I took interest in the triangular patterns it created, especially the sharpness it gave to my design. However the ends of my model seemed unresolved. I particularity enjoyed the 'brick' panelling as it created strips of panels, leaving gaps throughout my model. This interest translated to my final model's panelling technique.

2D panel diamond

583593 Angela Mok

panelling experimentation 2D

2D panel wave


3D panel boxX

Custom 3D panel

Whilst experimenting with 3D panelling, I found the ends of my model to become more refined than 2D modelling, creating more of a closing.

Custom 3D panel

During my experiment with custom panelling, I enjoyed playing with inverting my custom designs to see the different effects it would give.

583593 Angela Mok

panelling experimentation 3D

3D panel pyramid


By folding the paper in one direction and cutting slits in the adjacent direction, I created diamond/ triangular shapes which is similar to the panelling techniques I have been exploring. I also cut the shapes so that they are smallest towards the end and largest towards the opening. In my photos I aimed to show how the smaller end is darkest, whilst the larger end released the most light. I would like to utilise this in my final lantern design.

583593 Angela Mok

prototype& lighting

I constructed a cone-like shape to represent the accumulative structure of my design.


I liked the idea that it had a darker and lighter colour through the tower, creating patterns through colour, panelling and the structure itself. This is an idea I would further like to develop. My model also exhibits a similar curved/ twisted structure, thus the Swiss Re Tower provided inspiration towards how I should further develop my design.

583593 Angela Mok

precedents_ swiss re tower

The Swiss Re Tower in England exhibits a curved panelling structure which I found quite interesting.

Images by: http://besttopdesign.com/architecture/architecture-building-of-swiss-re-tower-in-london-by-foster-partners/


FLUX is an architectural exhibition that was created by students from the California College of Arts in 2009. Its twisted form, expressing pattern from looking into the structure as well as from the outside inspired me to create ribs using the 'fin edges' command.

583593 Angela Mok

precedents_ FLUX

Images by:http://matsysdesign.com/2009/06/25/flux-architecture-in-a-parametric-landscape/


The different segments were highlighted, which increased the sense of 'overlap'. Also, I applied the triangulate edges command the ends of my model so they look more resolved.

583593 Angela Mok

further refinement

Using 'fin edges' I created a set of notches and ribs for my model.


I applied the 'offset faces' command to create panels for the ribs and notches I created earlier. This not only added more interest but also was interesting the types of patterns I could create. The fig. 1 shows an offsetted face where triangles are cut throughout. Fig. 2 I applied the 'point attractor' command and the holes gradually decrease in size towards the small end.

Fig. 2

In fig. 3 I chose to hide the ribs/ notches to see what the patterns offset face created on its own. I kept the point attractor element as I enjoyed the effect it gave to my overall model.

Fig. 3

583593 Angela Mok

further refinement

Fig. 1


Perspective

Front

In my final design, I chose to incorporate the wave 2D panel custom tweaked in conjunction with ribs/ notches.

583593 Angela Mok

final design_orthographic

Top

I also kept the point attractor element as it created the shadowing I desire for the lantern lighting. Right


With the completion of module 2 I have developed skills in transferring a hand-made clay model into a digitalised model and then further developing and refining this through 2D and 3D panelling. These tasks have shown me that small scale boundaries can be increased and explored using computer modelling and then applied to real life architecture (as shown in my chosen precedents). Scheurer's Lost in Parameter Space comes to mind as I think about scale and boundaries. The reading synthesise my ideas perfectly as it describes how abstraction and reduction techniques can be applied in the virtual world in order to assist the design in a reallife scale.

Week 6's lecture discussing how patterns did not have to be static also interested me. However I did not feel like the twisted design of my model could incorporate movement in such a way. Fleishmann's Material Behaviour also provided inspiration towards my design as it helped me start thinking about the actual material (in this case paper used in my prototype) used. I realised there were certain boundaries this created and if not handled correctly, my model would not be able to hold itself up. I found this module quite challenging as the majority of the tasks presented were new to me. However, I found the more I grappled with the functions of the Rhino software, the more I realised how it could express my ideas with ease.

583593 Angela Mok

reflection

Prototyping and exploring other patterns created through light/ folding rather than concentrating purely on the geometric form was inspired by week 5's lecture on Composition; form and matter. In the lecture we were reminded to keep an open mind while considering forming our models, as patterns can arise from beneath surface level. I particularly took interest in the way in light was grappled with in the many architectural examples used, rather than focusing too much on geometric form.


References Fleischmann, M., Knippers, J., Lienhard, J., Menges, A., and Schleicher, S. (2012): Material Behaviour: Embedding Physical Properties in Computational Design Processes, D:Architectural Design, Wiley, 82 (2), March, pp. 44-51 Scheurer, F. and Stehling, H. (2011): Lost in Parameter Space? IAD: Architectural Design, Wiley, 81 (4), July, pp. 70-79 http://www.architectureweek.com/2005/0504/index.html http://besttopdesign.com/architecture/architecture-building-of-swiss-re-tower-in-london-by-foster-partners/ http://www.copyright-free-pictures.org.uk/london-england/48-swiss-re-tower.htm

583593 Angela Mok

http://matsysdesign.com/2009/06/25/flux-architecture-in-a-parametric-landscape/

Module 2 FINAL  

Module 2 FINAL

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