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URBAN ACTIVATORS | bronzeville Chicago, Illinois


URBAN ACTIVATORS | bronzeville Chicago, Illinois

A publication of: urban-activators.org + Illinois Institute of Technology School of Architecture


INTRODUCTION

[7] Studio Introduction + Events Timeline

NEIGHBORHOOD

[13] History [17] Maps [33] Plans

PROCESS

[49] Process [53] Stakeholder Interviews [59] Stakeholder Meetings

YOUTH WORKSHOP

[69] Youth Workshop

PROJECTS

[85] Site Selections [87] The Station [91] [___] In The Alley [97] Community Park [101] Digital Library [105] Community Rec Center [109] Music Box [113] Incubator Kitchen [117] Forum Market [121] Lunch Box


CONTRIBUTORS angela khermouch, tom folta, steve pistello, lauren wissman BOOK LAYOUT angela khermouch, tom folta, steve pistello, lauren wissman EDITED BY monica chadha steve pistello FACULTY monica chadha mike newman WITH SUPPORT FROM legends south pete stam richard h. driehaus foundation


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[6]


about us We are a group of students that are part of a community engagement design studio at the Illinois Institute of Technology School of Architecture. We have spent the semester with the Bronzeville community to identify opportunities for the neighborhood. Through community engagement, stakeholder meetings, and individual interviews, we have been developing plans and ideas that we hope can serve as catalysts for residents, business owners, stakeholders and city agencies. We have also been working to identify individual and organizational resources that promote community interaction. The information developed during the semester will be made available to the community. Please find us online @ www.urban-activators.org Sincerely, Tom, Angela, Shaun, Dan, Danny, Maria, Lauren, Steve and Tenesha

[7]

INTRODUCTION


Being able to work with the students of Monica is really cool. Sometime they are mostly working on their projects.

ANGELA

TENESHA

One of the students name Tenesha’s project is about creating space for the youth, and the piece she trying to define is an inhabited wall; She’s also trying to come up with different activities that would be exciting. So that is what Tenesha is working on.

DANNY MUI Danny is working on a digital library with a small café, lounge, tablets, computer lab for Facebook , emails , homework , and more. Through talking to youth and understanding the youth needs, Danny create a place to hangout, read, and do homework.

Another student named Daniel is working on diagrams of his building design, he also made a model of his idea. Daniel’s reason for making diagrams and models for his building designs is because he wants to make it faster and better to understand what his presentation is mostly about.

DANNY V


student interviews AND SKETCHES by monifa WILLIAS

Tom is designing a community kitchen for people to start up their own business and it’s mostly for the community so they can have something to do. For example, it has a community garden as well as community spaces. A future addition will include spaces to train for jobs and start up business.

TOM

Steve’s project is called The Youth Art Center. He is turning the old firehouse on 40th street into an art center and connecting it to the stockyard line. The art would be made of recycled materials, so people can bring old things that are still useful, so that they can turn it into art. It is mostly about giving kids something to do after school.

Shaun’s project is a plaza with a café holding the site together. The plaza has a performance space, out door classroom, and interactive walls to encourage art and learning. The café has an outdoor seating area that can be used by everyone. The main materials are wood, metal screen, and landscaping.

Maria is working on The Forum building on 43rd street. The idea is to recover it by redesigning it. The first floor used to be separated retail shops that become a market in one single open space where people can rent small stalls. This floor is connected to the second floor, so when you get done ordering your food you can just go up to sit and eat while watching a performance.

STEVE

SHAUN


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[10]


TIMELINE OF EVENTS August 22 - Beginning of Semester Introduction to the course and tour of Bronzeville. Initial plan of the semester and major events and deadlines covered.

September 11-16 - Potluck Table One week spent conceptualing, designing, and creating a working table and bench set for the Community Potluck and future community events.

September 16 - Community Potluck Community focused activities aimed at finding out different viewpoints and stories about Bronzeville from community members.

September 30 - Stakeholder Meeting Sharing personal stories about Bronzeville. What are residents looking for in the neighborhood and how are different spaces used?

October 13 - Community Charette Opportunity for community residents, businesses, and local organizations to generate ideas/opportunities and programs for the neighborhood.

November 4 - 5 - Youth Workshop Youth workshop hosted by Detrot’s TAP (The Alley Project) and Young Nation aimed at collaborating with youth regarding their present and future visions of Bronzeville.

November 14 - Community Feedback Display gallery of resulting work from the Youth Workshop. Display and community feedback regarding current state of student projects.

December 1 - Final Student Presentation Final presentation and gallery of student work.

[11]

INTRODUCTION


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[12]


Neighborhood

[13]

NEIGHBORHOOD


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

Camp Douglas established during civil war

1915 1919

Leisure district of the Black Belt emerges Became known as “The Stroll:” located on State from 26th-39th Street. Home of theaters, restaurants, dance halls, and businesses centered on 35th and State

Chicago Race Riots began - The Black Belt suffered a housing shortage Black population was expanding, but the availability of housing to blacks did not

[14]

44, 130 residents of Bronzeville

Stockyards branch open

Robert Abbott founds The Chicago Defender

Elevated Green line open to Jackson Park

1893 1896 1905 1907 1910

The Great Migration begins Black swell from the South into what became known as the Black Belt

1861

Worlds’ Columbian Exposition Ida B. Wells and Frederick Douglass protest African American exclusion from exhibiting at the fair

1779

The first African American, Jean Baptiste Point du Sable moves to Bronzeville

BRONZEVILLE HISTORY TIMELINE

1920s


[15]

Legends South development under construction

Housing projects begin to be demolished

The revitalization of Bronzeville begins

1969

Lake Shore Drive opened

1957 1962

Red Line opened

Robert Taylor Homes housing project and Dan Ryan expressway completed

L Stockyards Branch closed

233, 903 residents of Bronzeville

Great Depression Begins Bronzeville community starts the dive into disrepair.

1929 1930 1986 1990s 2000 2006 TODAY

NEIGHBORHOOD|history


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[16]


maps

[17]

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


bronzeville neighborhood boundaries

Illinois

Chicago

[19]

Bronzeville

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[20]


building density Within any region, state, city, or neighborhood there are changes in density. Density can be considered both good and bad. This idea holds true within Bronzeville. The building density within the neighborhood varies from street to street. Many areas with medium density, characteristic of a Bronzeville, allows for new development. The adjacent map highlights the built areas within Bronzeville.

[21]

18.4% of buildings in Bronzeville are vacant

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


vacant land use

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[22]


vacant lands During the studio’s research of Bronzeville, we found the magnitude of unused land to be intriguing. There are over 2,000 city owned vacant properties within the neighborhood limits. While this is fewer than other neighborhoods in Chicago, it is still an outstanding figure. In the past few decades nearly all of the large scale public housing projects were torn down and the families residing in them were displaced. This large drop in the population pushed an already struggling community over the edge. A majority of vacant lands were created at this time. While the vast amount of unused land within Bronzeville is important to understand, it is important to look at the vacant land by use and scale. At this level of detail we were able to further analyze and understand the community’s perception and look at how the neighborhood is affected. We used this analysis, in part to look at future possibilities.

over 2,000 city-owned lots sit vacant

[23]

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[24]


TRANSPORTATION Bronzeville is conveniently situated along the CTA Green Line train tracks and includes stops at 35th, Indiana, 43rd, 47th, 51st, and 55th streets. The area is also sufficiently covered by city bus routes. As shown in the map, many zones of Bronzeville are within multiple transportation stop radii. The availability of public transporation makes Bronzeville an accessible community. Being linked to the elevated train allows for easy access to Chicago’s downtown; which is only three stops away. Most Bronzeville residents take advantage of the area’s public transportation. The rates for usage are reasonable and the routes are efficient. Any future development of Bronzeville would be supported by the transportation already available to the area.

1 51st Street Green Line train stop. 2 A Chicag Transit Authority (CTA) bus. 3. Indiana Street Green Line train stop.

[25]

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[26]


Crime Homicide Aggravated BatAssault Sexual Assault Weapons Violation

The image is a crime map comparing various reported crimes in the Bronzeville area for the May – August 2011 period. Dots that are shades of red represent violent crimes. Shades of blue represents crimes of theft. Dots that are shades of green involve property damage. A“hot spot” has high amounts of crime and high levels of hostility and violence in types of crimes. The creation of this crime map helped identify the individual “hot spots” for each crime type. This crime map was a tool used to analyze and select the final site location. The information is from www.chicagopolice.org .

Burglary Vehical Theft Robbery Larceny Arson Vandalism Drug Abuse Gambling

Crimes reported in 1965

Crimes reported in 1991

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Crimes reported in 2009

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[28]


parks There is a lot of green space in the Bronzeville neighborhood. However, many of these spaces are under-utilized due to concerns about safety. Some of these spaces are public parks, while others are just vacant pieces of land. These spaces are open for everyone and could be better used by the community.

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[29]

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[30]


schools There is a dense population of schools in the Bronzeville neighborhood. The students that attend these schools are from the surrounding area and usually walk or take the school bus to get to and from the school. After school, many students are seen on the streets heading towards their homes or community centers. Most of the youth that we talked to were from the Bethoven Elementary School and DuSable High School.

Caption Ihicat. Dae il et odist, cum expel ium nonsequ untium veliquid eatur re sit, sinihit pro venectum, corrum as dolum re suntibus ex et omnianis nesequi num volores de et lantis duci doluptat inus earchic tatur? Quidessime cus endendelecto ersperbus, occus, everum

[31]

NEIGHBORHOOD|maps


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[32]


neighborhood plans Existing neighborhood and strategic plans for the Bronzeville area

[33]

NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[34]


re-connecting neighborhoods

Street cars to support commercial activity Create a “Blues District� on 43rd street Improve lighting, signage and bike parking Key Commercial Develpment Improved pedestrian access to the lakefront Transit oriented development

Key area for community building Key mixed use development

The main objective of this plan is to reconnect regions of chicago by improving access to public transportation, increasing commercial services, and improving the pedestrian environment. The major focus is the Mid-South area, which encompasses the Bronzeville neighborhood. The plan focuses on improvements in three key areas: transit , access and Design, and commercial development. Successful implementation of this study will be done by prioritizing and phasing the items based on cost and the necessary coordination. The phasing breaks down as follows:

Short term (1-5 Years)

Mid term (5-10 Years)

Long term (10-15 Years)

[35]

NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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quad communities development

Access points to lake

Key residential development Educational program Mixed-use development

Proposed bike lanes Cottage Grove beautification

Hundreds of residents, business owners, institutional leaders, and youth came together to develop the qualityof-life plan to aid the creation of a healthy, sustainable, mixed-income neighborhood in the Quad Communities area, targeting the problems of limited retail, under-funded public education, limited job opportunities, inadequate safety, and limited recreational and educational opportunities for youth. Implementation: Implemented initiatives to improve public education. Created early childhood education program at Robinson Elementary for pre-kindergarteners. Created and launched a $20,000 Neighborhood Beautification Program. Organized extensive feedback information on commercial and retail development. Secured federal and regional funding to implement a community-driven employment transportation project

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NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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cottage grove beautification Mixed use corridor more residential - less commercial Nodes Mixed use corridor

Mixed use corridor more commercial - less residential

The goal of the Cottage Grove beautification plan was to establish an identity and character for the area. They intended to do this by using art to foster a sense of community between residents, business owners and visitors. Using art to create a unique ‘destination’ commercial corridor would help catalyze commercial development and attract new business. Implementation: Convene intergovernmental taskforce to development Cottage Grove Beautification Implementation plan. (Spring 2006) Complete and install banners (Summer 2006) Launch fund-raising campaign (Summer/Fall 2006) Install remaining artwork on Cottage Grove (Spring -Fall 2007)

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NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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chicago community climate action

The goal of the Chicago Community Climate Action Toolkit is to address climate concerns within the city of Chicago while catering to community needs using Field Museum research, the city’s Chicago Climate Action Plan (CCAP), the Chicago Wilderness Climate Action Plan for Nature (CAPN), and the input of community groups. Through this research and a “Climate Clinic” workshop came the creation of the Bronzeville Community Garden which hosts cooking demonstrations, neighborhood green tours, and field trips to local centers of green education. Goals: Inform residents about the necessity for stainability and shows how to successfully implement sustainable practices. Build and beautify communal spaces. Provide healthy food and educate others about healthy eating. Show the neighborhood what is possible-and inexpensive-to accomplish.

[41]

NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[42]


rebuilding bronzeville

Rebuilding Bronzeville through Collaborative Action was written by the Southside Partnership as a working document and position paper for future action. The three key elements: education,jobs and housing, have become the focal points of an intense planning process expected to yield new action plans for the development of Bronzeville. The South Side Partnership has been around since 1989, implementing and organizing ever since. The focal points of the intense planning process is expected to yield new action plans for the development of Bronzeville in the new century. Accomplishments: Conceived the idea of involving residents,businesses, and institutions in creating their own plan for the development of their community. Acquired $10M investment for the renovation of King Drive Catalyzed and supported the work of individual partners in leveraging several major public works and historical preservation projects. Sponsored programs and initiatives to improve academic achievement, job opportunities for youth, and school performance.

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NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[44]


mid-south strategic plan

This strategic plan was conceived as a blueprint for the rejuvenation of one of the most historically significant areas of the City of Chicago. The plan is the result of an evolutionary process involving years of effort by the city and community, represented by the Mid-South Planning Group and its major institutions. The plan outlined land use recommendations and an assessment on how Bronzeville should proceed into the future. Land- Use Recommendations Residential - Smaller communities Circulation - Less restrictions Hotel/ Office - Space to house more tourist Retail-Shopping opportunity at every scale Research and Development Parks Parks & Open Space - High priority Strategic Assessment Community Development Residential Development Retail Development Non-Retail Development Tourism -Oriented Development Historic Preservation

[45]

NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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strategic plans summary

[47]

NEIGHBORHOOD|plans


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[48]


process

[49]

PROCESS


Some of the meetings we attended included: Bronzeville Community Garden Meeting Business Development Community Meeting Alderman’s 3rd Ward Meeting Grand Boulevard Federation Meetings

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[50]


Community Meetings Over the course of the semester, we attended a collection of community held meetings. These meetings took place in several areas of Bronzeville and with many different constituents. Topics of the meetings ranged from business development to community garden planning. Attendees included residents of Bronzeville, local activists, businesses, and our studio members.

[51]

PROCESS|meetings


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[52]


stakeholder interviews Our research and exploration of Bronzeville included a series of interviews with community residents, business owners, organization leaders and activists, which allowed us to develop a better understanding of the neighborhood. Several of these key stakeholders continued to work with us throughout the semester, and for that, we thank them. The following pages contain excerpts from the interviews.

[53]

PROCESS|interviews


royce cunningham Association: Architect Position in Community: Resident, Business Owner, Activist Royce Cunningham grew up in Bronzeville. He was born in 1952 at 28th and Michigan Ave. His family was middle class and owned a three story brownstone building where they lived until it was demolished to make way for Illinois Institute of Technology campus. His family moved to 29th and Michigan Ave. This was during a time when Bronzeville was rich in music; Jazz, Blues, Gospel. After graduating from IIT, Royce remained in Bronzeville instead of moving out to suburbs, unlike many other middle class residents who did move. The suburbs provided an outlet from gangs, high density, and lack of opportunities and good schools for the youth. However, Royce sees a reverse migration back to Bronzeville currently taking place. In the future, Royce would like to see more collaboration and sharing of resources between institutions and organizations from and around Bronzeville. He also sees an increase in the younger generations of Bronzeville residents attaining higher education and returning or remaining in the Bronzeville community. Royce acknowledges the many amenities and institutions which are in relative close proximity in Bronzeville (White Sox, Lake Michigan, IIT, the many churches, historic buildings, and museums). However, Royce would like to be part of a more open collaboration and mixing of cultures from different parts of the world with the aid of technology. He would also like to be part of making Bronzeville a sort of campus made up of a network of schools. This would help in attracting families and bring down the IIT

“Royce would like to be part of a more open collaboration and mixing of cultures from different parts of the world with the aid of technology.�

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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norman bolden Association: Norman’s Bistro Position in Community: Resident, Business Owner Norman Bolden is the owner of both Norman’s Bistro and Room 43, an event pace, both of which are heavily supported by the community. He sees some growth in terms of development and new businesses in present-day Bronzeville, however, he thinks there is still a lot that could improve. He believes Bronzevile could become a very progressive community with a large density of residences and businesses by building on its strong cultural history. He hopes to see the development of a theater company in the near future to reflect this rich culture. He thinks there is a lot of opportunity for new businesses to open and for a stronger network among existing businesses to develop.

Norman Montgomery Association: Bronzeville Visitor Information Center Position in Community: Activist Mr. Montgomery was born and raised in Bronzeville and grew up in the Ida B. Wells projects. He left for a brief time for college, but returned because Bronzeville is home. Mr. Montgomery has a vivid recollection of what Bronzeville as a community used to be like. Everyone looked out for one another and neighbors were treated like family. The presence of local owned businesses provided the area with city life and prosperity. Mr. Montgomery attributes the degradation of Bronzeville to redlining: the restriction of property insurance and loans to certain areas. Once the businesses started disappearing, people started moving out. Mr. Montgomery believes the strength of Bronzeville lies in its architecture and would like to see existing buildings re-used and transformed into what they once were. Through his work with the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center, Norman hopes for Bronzeville to become the thriving, walk-able community that it once was.

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“Bronzeville’s strengths lie in its architecture, linkages to American history, and diversity.”

PROCESS|interviews


steve michelis Association: 200 Liquor Store Position in Community: Business Owner Steve Michelis is the owner of 200 Liquor store in 47th and Indiana. He’s been there for more than 30 years but is not a resident of Bronzeville. In our interview Steve talked about how people in Bronzeville now want to buy more expensive, high end, quality things. He expressed his desire for more retail and entertainment in the neighborhood such as “good restaurants, not fast food. There are no nice restaurants other that 43rd and Prairie. We need night clubs, lounge rooms, jazz clubs…”.

“...can’t predict the future, but hope it booms.”

patricia fox Association: Bronzeville Visitor Information Center Position in Community: Activist Ms. Fox grew up in Bronzeville, but moved quite a few places before eventually returning. The reason for her return was to help revitalize her home community. She is an IIT alumna who is actively working within the community, via the Bronzeville Visitor Information Center, to help existing or new business get established in the area. Ms. Fox has a deep interest in maintaining but improving the existing architecture (particularly the Rosenwald building). She recalls a time when Bronzeville was full of life and had a strong sense of community. Through the remodeling and preservation of historic buildings and values, she hopes that Bronzeville will return to its former state.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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“…must help preserve what is here to promote travel and tourism.”


Gladys Faye Edwards Association: African Arts Gallery Position in Community: Activist The African arts gallery is one of the only cultural aspects in this area of Bronzeville. It clearly is representing something that Bronzeville has been known for. Gladys Faye Edwards recognizes that Bronzeville is in a transitioning state where it is beginning to redefine itself. She understands Bronzeville more as a concept and less as a boundary because 30 years ago one would consider Bronzeville as just a small area but now people has defined a much greater edge. With Bronzeville being such a well know location of the past, there is a need to revitalize the community so that it can once again be known as a destination. Ms. Edwards has been accepted by the neighborhood and is in hopes that she can be a great impact and hopefully others will become inspired.

“ Bronzeville is a concept because the boundaries which define it as a space continues to change over time”.

tanya durr

Association: Graffiti Pizza Position in Community: Resident, Business Owner Tanya Durr is the owner of Graffiti pizza. She has lived in Bronzeville all her life, and opened her business about a year ago. In our Interview Tanya talked about her experience living in the projects as a child. She described the strong sense of community, the closeness between people living there, and how much fun and friends she had. She compared this to the present where the community is much more disperse and people don’t share the same values or beliefs. She also talked about the importance of supporting neighborhood businesses, especially now that wealthy people that have lived here for a long time are coming out. “People who used their back doors are now using their front doors”. She expects growth for Bronzeville but hopes it maintains its essence and

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PROCESS|interviews


marques sullivan Association: Youth In Action Position in Community: Activist It is important to note that Marquez Sullivan is not from Bronzeville and does not spend much time in this part of Chicago. His perception of Bronzeville’s past is focused on the effects that the creation of new mixed-income housing had on the community, mainly, gang activity increased. However, he sees the present condition of Bronzeville as improved and heading in the right direction. He still sees much need and opportunity yet to be fulfilled while other aspects have received too much attention. For the future of Bronzeville, Marquez sees more involvement and control by residents over the direction and economy of the community. Marquez is currently involved with after school programs meant to keep the city’s youth in a positive environment. He believes that the youth are important as they are the future. His organization has partnered with Chicago Public Schools to work with the youth. This has led him to work in two main areas, Legend South and Local Shore. In Maqruez’s opinion, the people of Bronzeville share similar goals and interests. The people of Bronzeville have been working hard in the process of achieving these goals and overcoming the negative stereotypes which have overshadowed Bronzeville’s rich history and the accomplishments of its residents, young and old.

“The people of Bronzeville have been working hard in the process of achieving these goals and overcoming the negative stereotypes which have overshadowed Bronzeville’s rich history and the accomplishments of its residents, young and old.”

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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stakeholder meetings

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PROCESS|stakeholder meetings


Community potluck As a way to start a conversation about Bronzeville, food sounded like it would be the best ice breaker. The idea of this kickoff event was to invite residents and many others to a potluck where the IIT students set the scene with their designed and build tables, and everyone else would bring a dish. The students also came with small activates to begin drawing information from the people of the neighborhood. The event was a success; many people from the community came out, participated in the activities, told their stories, and ate a lot of food.

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1 The tables and benches we designed specifically for the potluck. 2 The tables folded closed, in transit to the potluck. 3 A map on which residents posted their favorite and least favorite parts of Bronzeville. 4 Residents describe the history of Bronzeville and the former Robert Taylor homes. 5 The food is served! 6 The residents participate in the mapping activities.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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MAKING THE Community table

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PROCESS|stakeholder meetings


Let’s talk about bronzeville meeting This community meeting was mainly about having a conversation about Bronzeville. The IIT students interviewed many of the stakeholders individually. There were also group discussions which included the use of some of the tools prepared by the students. In general, there was a strong concern about the lack of large grocery stores and the limited selection of healthy, fresh foods available in the smaller convenience stores. Additionally, the elders of Bronzeville often have difficulties traveling and finding the basic necessities. The younger generations also have been affected by their environment. Overall, the Bronzeville environment has too many vacant lots, too many dark streets and alleys, not enough fresh produce, long and under-served corridors, and too few outlets for the youth. As one of the stakeholders put it, “It takes a neighborhood.�

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3 1 Danny presenting our research maps. 2 Community memer, Leroy Kennedy, uses the activites tool to describe the programs he would like to see in Bronzeville. 3 The community members highlighted on the map the places where they spend a majority of their time.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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Activities tool We created a voting system where the community was allowed to voice their opinion by placing votes on what types of programs they would like to see in the neighborhood. After this information was analyzed, the top five activities were taken and the quality of the desired programs was further evaluated.

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1 The Caption programs Ihicat. activity Dae il et sheet. odist,2-3 cum residents expel ium select nonsequ the types untium of programs veliquid eatur that they re sit,would sinihitlike protovenectum, see in Bronzeville corrum as and dolum explain why. re suntibus ex et omnianis nesequi num volores de et lantis duci doluptat inus earchic tatur? Quidessime cus endendelecto ersperbus, occus, everum

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PROCESS|stakeholder meetings


Community ChaRrette The Community Charrette was an event held at Savoy Community Center that was aimed at community members. We setup the event in a way to allow free-form discussion regarding our work so far. The whole event was based around three large site models that we made of potential sites in the Bronzeville area. Each site had separate blocks representing different types of programs that we have received feedback on from within the community. The overall goal of this event was to bring forth to the community all of the information we have compiled over the past 4 months. The result was an interactive approach to seeing what program elements community members thought would best activate a given site. The event provoked discussion with interesting points that would eventually become significant parts of projects. As a whole, the event acted as a charrette for community residents, businesses, and local organizations to generate ideas/opportunities and programs for the neighborhood.

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1 Architects from Chicago firm Studio Gang Architects talk about ideas regarding programs and concepts. 2 Maria talks with a community member about the program blocks presented. 3 The program blocks on the 43rd St corridor.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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Describe your neighborhood activity At the community charrette event, the attendees were given a piece of paper on which they were to write one word that describes the Bronzeville neighborhood. This activity was presented alongside the scaled site models of various parts of Bronzeville that acted as an aid in presenting and getting feedback on our initial site selections. The community members’ input greatly influenced the development of our goals and ideas in the design process.

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1 In the foreground, a Bronzeville resident fills out the “Describe your neighborhood” card while in the background, Daniel presents his site ideas to another Bronzeville resident. The images on the right are some examples of the responses that were written on the neighborhood description sheets: 2 “expanding” 3 “great” 4 “tranquility”

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PROCESS|stakeholder meetings


Youth Mentor meeting At this stakeholder meeting, the youth seemed very enthusiastic about their participation. They welcomed our planned activities with interest and enjoyment. One activity in particular, in which the youth were asked to draw a diagram of the relationships of activities in their ideal community center, was not only fun for the youth but also allowed them to become familiar with and aware of being an active participant in the design process. Hopefully, this encouraged them to think about the community and their place in the community in a constructive way. Learning to learn should be encouraged by all. As one of my new friends said while doing this activity, “…learning is the most important thing in my community center…here the community can come together to learn and teach and share knowledge.”

Bronzeville youth participate in the various activities that we developed for this event regarding their daily routine and what they would like to see in the neighborhood.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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1

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1 Cutouts of some of the words the youth collectively decided on to describe Bronzeville. 2 CameelahTaking pictures in Bronzeville. 3 Monifah taking pictures in Bronzeville. 4 Maria taking pictures in Bronzeville 5 Antwan and Tyrique participating in the indoor workshop at Savoy community room. 6 Danny in itroductions at Savoy community room. 7 Demarcus and Monifah during the indoor activities at Savoy community room.

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PROCESS|stakeholder meetings


Youth photography workshop In partnership with Detroit “Young Nation� we organized a photography workshop for kids who live in Bronzeville ages 9 to 17. In one of the exercises, the 9 participants collectively agreed upon four words that they felt best described Bronzeville: Unique, Positive, Black, and Potential. After an introduction to basic technical and compositional photography concepts, the youth went out into the neighborhood to take pictures that fit into the four chosen descriptions of their community. The kids selected their favorite pictures which were compiled and displayed for a final exhibition.

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PROCESS|photography workshop


Bronzeville/IIT Project: Workshop Planning Friday, November 4th 4:00p-6:00p

Introductions and workshop planning with Detroit Young Leaders, Bronzeville Youth and IIT Students.

Team Building Hopes and Fears Rose and Thorn (Gaby) Friday, November 4th, 6:00p-8:00p Name Tag Swap (Ruben)

Clarifying Project Goals Question Activity... Who Do You Want/Need To Introduce/Educate To Bronzeville? Why?

Youth-Created Word List To Represent Bronzeville Determine Final Word List (Black, Potential, Unique and Positive) Voted on by Bronzeville Youth and IIT Students

Introduction To Photography - Cultural

Saturday, November 5th, 12:00p-4:00p (10 min excess) We reviewed the goals of overall project and today’s agenda. Rubin led a Bounce the Ball Ice Breaker before Erik and Gabi led a photography introduction.

Twenty Questions (Gaby and Erik)

Photographing Bronzeville Bronzeville Youth tell their stories through photography. Teams of 2-3 Bronzeville youth walked the neighborhood with IIT students.

Teams brought back their photos, stories and ideas to share with the group.

After a chance to reflect about the day and talk about the exhibit’s aspirations, the Detroit team and Bronzeville youth headed to dinner at Inspiration Kitchen.

Monday, November 6th, 4:00p-7:00p

Bronzeville Youth came to the IIT campus to work on creating their narratives and devel oping the exhibition.


Art is a powerful community development tool because it engages. Urban Activators | Bronzeville | Youth Workshop Chicago brought together young leaders from Southwest Detroit and youth from the Legends South community. This workshop was designed to engage local youth; provide mentoring opportunities for youth, emerging leaders and students; and allow young leaders who have trained in Detroit to expand their skills and reach a new community within a new context. The workshop was intentionally rooted in the process. The work of the youth, their voices and their visions are what built the final product, an exhibition. The workshop was based on the premise of the freedom to experiment, to express one’s own thoughts and to share those with a wider audience. One Voice: “This project that I am doing is special to me cause I grew up in this neighborhood since I was one years old. It was not long ago that this neighborhood was filled with nothing but projects…[now] they are really making this community a better place to live…It has become safer for children to live and play. I love playing at the Basketball Court until one day a young boy I use to play ball with was killed by a drive-by shooting while playing…but that didn’t stop me from loving my community.” Jaylin Brown Funding: The Richard H. Driehaus Foundation Young Nation Legends South Community [In Kind] Stam.p [Peter Stam]


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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projects

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PROJECTS


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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Site Selection After spending the beginning of our semester collecting information on Bronzeville, its residents, culture, and history, we compiled the information to start pulling information out of it. With this basic information, along with the precedents we studied at the beginning of the semester, all the students went out to locate sites they thought had ideal conditions for urban activators to come into and create a positive influence. We brought together a multitude of different site typologies, but when pinned up, we were able to see connections to group sites according to certain aspects. The result was 4 distinct areas each with a different typology and environment. These 4 areas are the 43rd street corridor, 48th and State area, 35th & Cottage Grove area, and 40th & Dearborn area. Each area created large site models which were the focal pieces for the Community Charrette meeting. Each group of students created blocks of example programs that have come up as desirable in our research. The community used those program blocks to show and explain what programs they want in those areas.

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PROJECTS|sites


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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The station

steve

The Station is a recycled art center for the youth of Bronzeville. People within the community drop off unwanted used items at The Station, where the items are recycled and used in workshops to teach the youth about art. This program concept was developed based on the feedback from both the kids and the parents that live in Bronzeville that there is not enough after school activities for the youth within the community. The building design coincides with the recycled program concept in that it utilizes the existing fire station on 40th and Dearborn which is scheduled to be decommissioned in 2012. The design also activates the adjacent abandoned Stockyard Line elevated railroad tracks by forming a connection between The Station and the tracks that makes the tracks accessible to both the neighborhood and the art center. The abandoned tracks are turned into a linear park, which in later phases could expand along and reconnect the enitre rail line system which runs throughout Bronzeville.

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PROJECTS|the station


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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PROJECTS|the station


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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[

] in the Alley

Daniel Vega Generally, alleys are not viewed as being desirable public spaces. However, alleys can be made into great public places that become more than just thoroughfares. Activating an alley offers additional public space to the residents and encourages them to use it in creative ways that are productive and rewarding. Chicago has nearly 2000 miles of alley. This proposal is for a traveling program that will complement a smaller permanent program which serve to make alleys spaces into alley places. The traveling program will focus on three main activating components: a stage for outdoor performances and events; a kitchen with three connected kiosks; and four individual composting toilets. The anchor program will be a fixed bench with tool storage and will have electrical outlets, connections to potable water supply, and inlet for gray water cistern. In combining a traveling program with an anchor program, it will allow a sense of transience and predictability, familiarity mixed uniqueness, and structure connected to opportunity. By starting the activation process on a small scale, it allows the project to grow organically from the bottom-up. It is projected that the leaders of the community will become the driving force in implementing these tools and programs to make place in alley space.    



H



H

H

H

HISTORY

level of historical significance on locally, nationally and/or internationally





E



E

E

E

ENVIRONMENT

level of public spaces with environmental interest, recreation, and/or services

C

C

C

C

CULTURE

level of diversity of opportunities and places for cultural expression offered



S

S

S

S

SAFETY

level of sense of safety and/or health benifits offered

Possible Site Location

     

ALLEY TYPES

• • • • • • • • •

Single Family Residential...

can become place for private activities greater possiblity for neighborhood unity extension of the home place for families and elders ideal place to personalize extended periods unused requires organization to maintain can attract outsiders may require access for city services

Multi-Family Residential...

can become place for neighborhood activities possibility for pockets of community within extension of building outdoor areas private place with public access ideal place for evenings and weekends more fluctuation of active periods more pollution and degradation of materials can attract become unsafe requires access for city services



   

    

  • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • • •

       

  

  

   



Low Density Mixed Use...

can become place for community activities allows for a shared sense of place extension of public spaces possibility for large outdoor spaces ideal place for special events and activities might not be sustainable requires organization to function & maintain can attract crime and become unsafe may require access for city services

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• • • • • • • • •

High Density Mixed Use...

can become place for regional activities possiblity for city unity extension of urban fabric visually complete and acceptable ideal place to meet and gather can create sense of overcrowding requires organization to maintain neighbors may object or complain requires access for city services

H

E

C

S

H

E

C

S

H

E

C

S

H

E

C

S

H

E

C

S

Alley Type

Single Family Residential Multi-Family Residential Low Density Mixed Use High Density Mixed Use Commercial

• • • • • • • • •

Comercial...

can become place for global activities possiblity for international connections extension to othe parts of the world place for cultural exchange ideal place for entrepreneurialship highly competitive realestate often not very welcoming or atractive might not contribute much to community requires access for city services

PROJECTS|[____] in the alley 


“   ”

   



“…… ”

STAKEHOLDER TYPES

“”

• • • •

Residents...

are the most affected by change know their place best are the majority of the community provide cultural continuity

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

• • • •

Students...

are the future of the community can include all age groups willing and able to contribute provide cultural change

• • • •

Community Activists...

secure the wellbeing of the community are engaged in political and social issues can involve a diversity of people may be part of grassroots organizations

• • • •

Business Owners...

provide services, products, jobs can benifit from partnering with communities create destinations for public needs offer capacity building and experince



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   

+0Ä75'/1&'



/1$+.'/1&'





 

 

���



(4106'.'8#6+10



 

 







 24'Ä75'/1&' +0Ä75'/1&'

0

+0Ä75'/1&'2.#0

 

 





  

 

/1$+.'/1&'





24'Ä75'/1&'

+0Ä75'/1&'



 

MATERIAL TYPES







L W 8 ft

Plywood

• walls, floors, benches, stairs...

y ft

4 ft

Wood Studs

Polycarbonate

• structural framing members

• skylight and storage padding

x ft



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PROJECTS|[____] in the alley


S S



S 

E C

H C

C

 

H 





E

E



H



H



E



C



S

         



C



H

 







SPACE TYPES

 

Nook

Side Strip


    





 Infill

Southern Node Nothern Node

 Song Birds Pedetrians Vehicles

 Fresh

Fast Food Smells Gasoline Smells Poluted

 Parking Lot Vacant Lot



Side Strip

Vacant Lot

Corridor

Parking Lot 


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

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The TheCommunity CommunityPark Park

Community Park

TENESHA

TENESHA Tenesha

Stakeholders of Bronzeville have made it clear that there is a need for a destination, and something for the kids to do. In studying Bronzeville, the site located on 35th and Cottage Stakeholders of Bronzeville have made it clear that there is a need for a destination, and something for the kids to do. In studying Grove appeared to be a space of opportunity. This is a space that targets the local - neighBronzeville, the located on 35thmade and Cottage appeared to be for a space for much opportunity. This for is a space that the Stakeholders of site Bronzeville have it borhood clear Grove thatincluding there is the a need a destination, something kids to targets do. In studying residential, school, andand commercial areas. the Programmatically this local neighborhood includingonthe residential, school, and commercial areas. Programmatically this project aims to create a central Bronzeville, the site located 35th and Cottage Grove appeared to be a space for much opportunity. This is a space that targets project aims to create a central zone that begins to blur the edge between the residents, the zone that begins to blur the edge between the residents, students, and shoppers so that interaction can happen, and one day the students, shoppers so that interaction can happen,this andproject one day the to community local neighborhood including the residential, school,and and commercial areas. Programmatically aims create a that central community that once was can form again. Understanding concept I have chosen to theI entire outdoorto space with small once can that form again. Understanding concept have can chosen populate theday the zone that begins to blur the edge between the was residents, students, and shoppers that sopopulate that interaction happen, and one scaled, more intimate zones. Within each zone there is aspace possibility of many different activities and events to each take place.there I have a outdoor with small scaled, moreto intimate zones. Within community that once was can form again. entire Understanding that concept I have chosen populate the entire outdoorzone space withissmall specified a few, but the idea is for the community to give this location anactivities identity that represents them.place. I haveI have created a spacea and possibility of many different and events to take specified few,Iitbut scaled, more intimate zones. Within each zone there is a possibility of many different activities and events to take place. have is up to the people from the residential, school, and is commercial areas to give it life. the idea for the community to give this location an identity that represents them. I have specified a few, but the idea is for the community to give this location an identity that represents them. I have created a space and it created a space and it is up to the people from the residential, school, and commercial isBronzeville up to the people from the residential, school, commercial areas to give it life. Neighborhood areas and to give it life. City Landmark

Bronzeville

Neighborhood

Conservation Area Historic District

City Landmark

Local Landmark

Conservation Area

National Landmark

Re

Commercial

Historic District

Bronzeville Boundary

Local Landmark

sid

National Landmark

Commercial

Public Library

Bronzeville Boundary Senior Center / Nursing Community Center Technology Resources

31st

35th

Education SITE

Public Library

1/4 mile = 5 mins. walk

Youth Center

Senior Center / Nursing

Bronzeville Boundary

ial

sid

ent

ial

Education SITE

SITE Technology Resources

35th Youth Center 39th

ent

Re

Community Center

Bronzeville Boundary SITE

39th 43rd

1/4 mile = 5 mins. walk

31st

43rd

Chicago 47th

Solution Problem Chicago 47th 51st

Solution Solution Create place that... give people an destination There are no Destinations allows one to feel apart of community People do not feel apart of Community all ages can hang out There is nothing for the Kids Solution is an attraction/ belongs to Bronzeville There is nothing to do here Problem ( According to Stakeholders) Create place that... promotes diverse interaction

Cottage gr

King dr

51st

State

Problem ( According to Stakeholders) Problem

There are no Destinations People do not feel apart of Community There is nothing for the Kids There is nothing to do here

Cottage gr

King dr

State

Location: 35th St. and Cottage Grove Blvd.

Location: 35th St. and Cottage Grove Blvd.

[97]

give people an destination allows one to feel apart of community all ages can hang out is an attraction/ belongs to Bronzeville promotes diverse interaction

PROJECTS|community park


Chicago Neighborhood Bronzeville Bronzeville

Neighborhood

Site

Site age Cott

Rhodes Ave.

Jewel Osco

Gro ve

Lake Meadows Apts.

Woodland Park

Lake Meadows Shopping Center

Lake Meadows Apts. Douglas Monument Park

Lake Meadows Apts.

Church

35th Street

Boundary blurred: People interact

Edge: no interaction

Lake Grove Apts.

CHI Arts highschool

Lake Grove Apts.

Doo Little Elementary

adults shoppers

Court

Residents

revenue

Commercial

Browning Ave. Ellis Park

Lake Grove Apts. Pedestrian Access Vehicle Access Fence

n

tio

rac

kids

#4 - Cottage Grove Bus

tourist

att

Grass

West point Baptist Church

Parking Rhodes Ave.

identity

1 destination

Students

N

Pedestrian Node Point

potential residents

young adults

Education

tory His of ille ev nz Bro

tory His of ille ev nz Bro

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

ity un mm e k co d th blac is te e Th as first ranc bo ns su in ny tio na ned pa ow com s ck Bla of go ds ca an Chi from us s uo e to sly Th cam inou 1940 nt co 90s 18

Conversation

y ntur ce th n as lis” 20 ly know po Ear ea Metro ar ck la “B

n io nt

Quiet

Active e” ub “R re er And Fost r of nal de un atio ue Fo ro N leag ll Negseba ba

Calm

Loud

Movement

te At of er nt Ce

Still

tory His of ille ev nz Bro

Busy

[98]


Site

Entertainment Center

Zone

FFaarm a me errs m maarrket ett e C nc Co n ertt Mu M ussiicall Mag c sho Magi Ma ow w IIcce Skkat atin ng Playground Community meeting Dance cl c asss/ Practicce Baand B nd Pra rattiice c Arrt Galle A Ga e Ga erry Ch he esss TTo ou urrna rn naam me ent nts Cllaasss o C ou uttttiin ng gss Chu Ch urrch u h piccni nicc Family BBQ Debate teams Ping Pong Bo oard g gaam me es Comp Co mput uter er Gam ames e

E.C. Zones

C Catalyst ffor other areas in Bronzeville

Zone

5 pieces

Waatc W attcch m mo ovviie ess

Seat

Seat

Walk thru

Carved

Table

Walk thru

Seat

Lu uncch ssp pac pa ace ace Book Reading Afterschool turtoring L sten Li ste to mu st ussiic

Table

Carved Structure: Steel Skin: Fabric Manipulatable pie eces: Solar Light Pan nels C Closed box = no activity Open/ interchangable box = activity O

Puppet Show and more more...

Infill = Discovery Frame = Stability

The Entertainment Center

[99]

PROJECTS|community park


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[100]


Digital library

Danny mui

Through a series of events, we were able to engage the community in order to get their input on Bronzeville and better understand what the neighborhood needs. We created activities/tools to record all of the valuable data from residents, community members and youth. This project, a digital library, was designed based on the feedback received from youth in the neighborhood regarding what they wished Bronzeville had. There seemed to be a shortage of places for they children to go to afterschool and hang out with their friends. The library consists of a cafe, a study area, a book collection, office spaces, and most importantly, the digital lab. The digital lab has computer stations and tablets readily available for the kids to use in order to access the library’s e-book collection.

[101]

PROJECTS|digital library


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[102]


The thick wall contain a more private space where youth can get together to talk, get on the internet, read, watch tv, and create music. The thick wall also and “ramping benches� acts as borders providing the youths a safer outdoor environment to hang out with their peers.

A glass wall in between allows visibility into the Digital Lab and the Lounge. All of Bronzeville are invited to use the the lab and the lounge as a get together spot.

[103]

PROJECTS|[____] in the alley


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[104]


community rec center

Lauren

After engaging in community discussions within Bronzeville, we recognized a need for youth based activities. Partnering with Danny, we created a campus where residents of Bronzeville, particularly youth, could work and play. The rec center is obviously focused on the ‘play’ aspect of the dual project, housing activities such as a weight room, arcade, billiards area, private recreation room for miscellaneous activities, and locker rooms. The public vs. private programs are separated via an interactive wall, which is also featured in the digital library. The wall serves as seating, storage, a passageway, and equipment compartments. The intention of the project is to create a desirable gathering space with a variety of activities to keep the youth of Bronzeville involved and active.

[105]

PROJECTS|community center


WALL SEPARATING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE by

1

lob

bill

s

ice

ds iar

off

trash area

arcade

“nowhere for children to develop their talents.” by

om

t ro

2

igh

lob

ate priv room rec

o tro res

“...no after school activities.”

we

ms

“nowhere to workout except one YMCA facility in all of Bronzeville.” 10'-6"

INTERACTIVE WALL SEPARATING PUBLIC AND PRIVATE 0'

-3'

by

1

lob

s

bill

ice

off

ds

iar

trash area

arcade

om

by

t ro

igh

2

we

lob

s

om

tro

res

ate priv room rec

0' -3' PUBLIC weight room

arcade

billiards

lobby 1

lobby 2

WALL

PRIVATE

offices

restrooms

private rec room

trash area

-3'

weight room

INTERACTIVE passageway WALL

-2'

billiards

storage

lobby 1

seating

lobby 2

equip. comp.

-3'

-1'

offices

0' -2' -1'

+1'-6''

arcade

-3'

0'

0'

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[106]

restrooms

private rec room

trash area


REC ROOM STORAGE (SPECIFIC TO ROOM ACTIVITIES)

CUBBY SEATING (INDOOR/OUTDOOR)

REC ROOM ENTRANCE 1

RECEPTION DESK

DOORWAY TO OFFICES WRAPPER SEATING MAIN ENTRANCE NEAR ENTRANCE

OUTDOOR PATIO ENTRANCE REC ROOM ENTRANCE 2

CUBBY SEATING (FOR REC ROOM)

OUTDOOR SEATING

CUBBY SEATING (INDOOR)

ROOF STAIRWELL

ARCADE GAMES

VENDING MACHINES

TREADMILLS

DRINKING FOUNTAINS 1 PASSAGEWAY 2 STORAGE

RESTROOM ENTRANCE

3 SEATING

SECONDARY RECEPTION DESK

4 EQUIPMENT COMPARTMENT

PHASE 1: LANDSCAPING/BASKETBALL COURT/DIGITAL WALL

SECONDARY ENTRANCE

PHASE 2: DIGITAL LIBRARY ADDITION/INTERACTIVE WALL

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PHASE 3: COVERED COURT/LIBRARY ADDITION

PROJECTS|community center


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[108]


bronzeville music box

angela The Bronzeville Music Box is the first phase of a larger plan to rebirth the image of Bronzeville as a hub for music. The Music Box provides a place for the community to gather and watch music, programming for kids in the neighborhood to take music classes as well as a small performance space for greater Chicago to come and see performances by professional artists. By addressing the needs of the Bronzeville community as well as attracting patrons with it’s small performances, the Music Box would be a self-sustained initiative within the neighborhood.

[109]

PROJECTS|music box


CHICAGO CORRIDOR

CTA Green Line Trafficked Corridor Parks/Playgrounds Schools/Community Centers Site

VIEW

LEARN COMMUNITY CORRIDOR

ENTERTAIN

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[110]

KIDS CORRIDOR

N The Bronzeville Music Box is located at the intersection of three corridors used by three different groups of people. This project accommodates these three groups by providing for opportunities to view, learn about, and be entertained by music, a large aspect of Bronzeville’s history that has been lost.


This section through the site shows the viewing, learning and entertaining zones of the Bronzeville Music Box. The interior of the building can be used as a classroom or practice space for musical artists, and acts as the learning zone. When the back doors slide open, this interior space with the help of the informal grassy seating behind becomes the entertaining zone for small musical performances. The elevated slab in front with the red letter seating acts as the “front porch� or viewing zone for people to watch the activity inside. A

N

0

5

10

20

Prairie Ave.

43rd Street

A

Located at the corner of 43rd street and Prairie avenue, the Bronzeville Music Box is on a site with a strong street presence, but plenty of space to accommodate expansion. The openness of the building allows for interaction between what is occurring inside and on the street. [111]

PROJECTS|community center


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[112]


Incubator Kitchen

Tom

My project focuses on creating a community incubator kitchen and community garden. The incubator functions as a kitchen, where community members can rent out space to cook in a commercially licensed kitchen in order to start businesses in the food industry. The second phase of this project expands the business incubator to include complementary services such as marketing and selling products, packaging, investing, and so on. The building functions by defining the edge of the site, and then splitting the edge into a building edge and a soft landscape edge. The interior of the site is then filled in with the garden element. The building is built transparent, in order to display the kitchen and dining area while still allowing full view to the interior of the site. This program is a response to community feedback I received regarding creating more community spaces, creating opportunities for jobs, and safety issues.

[113]

PROJECTS|incubator kitchen


Place Building

Define Edges

Building vs Lanscape Edge

Fill With Garden

Section view from NorthEast running through dining and kitchen

Program Spaces Dining Garden Public Space Kitchen Second Phase Support


Edge Conditions

Public Space

Transparency

Direct Interaction

View from kitchen to dining

Display Interaction

View from dining to kitchen

Public / Private


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[116]


forum market

maria

The project looks for the restoration of the Forum building as an activator for 43rd street corridor. It emphasizes and works with the large amount of pedestrian traffic attracted by the green line stop, besides the building, and its historic character, constructed in 1899 and abandoned for more than 40 years. Retail opens towards the street in the form of a market where small stalls are rented as business incubators occupying the first floor. The second floor, where the historic architectural character lies, serves the market as an eating area with performing space, and is connected to the first floor by a central void, exposing the old architectural features of the great hall to street walkers.

[117]

PROJECTS|forum market


Four important concepts were identified in the community: Retail, Performance, History and Food. United they give form and program to the building. The first floor, an open marker, with small stalls to rent as business incubators, serve the second floor, a dining area with an outdoor terrace The market opens to the street integrating pedestrian activity on the busy sidewalk, while the second floor connects to the market and the street with a void that reveals the historic architecture of the great hall.

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[118]


The hole in the floor opens the historic qualities of the building to the exterior.

The first floor integrate the outdoor and indoor activities.

Individual market stalls are flexible to arrange different types of products for startup businesses.

[119]

PROJECTS|forum market


URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[120]


lunch box

shaun

The site, located at 43rd and Calumet, is situated among unfilled lots and unused buildings. The goal of the 43rd street team is to re-establish the once thriving cultural hub along the 43rd street corridor. Lunch Box is a plaza that is host to three main spaces: The Grove - an outdoor classroom, The Platform - performance and outdoor art gallery, and The Cafe - acts as an anchor to the site, holding the community bulletin board and much of the public seating. Like the layers of complexity found within Bronzeville, Lunch Box utilizes the layering of materials and spaces to create an area for youth and adults within Bronzeville to gather, learn, and display their creative abilities. The ultimate goal of the Lunch Box, along with the other projects along 43rd street, is to help strengthen the sense of community that is already present in Bronzeville.

[121]

PROJECTS|community center


EXTEND THE SIDEWALK

THE CAFE ACTS AS AN ANCHOR TO THE SITE. A SMALL SCALE BUSINESS THAT CAN HELP BRING A LONG TERM CHANGE TO THE AREA.

ENGAGE THE COMMUNITY

MEMBERS OF THE COMMUNITY EXPRESSED A CONCERN MORE THAN ONCE ABOUT A LACK OF PRODTIVE ACTIVITIES FOR ADULTS AND KIDS TO DO. THIS PROJECT PROVIDES A PLACE TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES, AS WELL AS GATHER TO MEET, TALK AND RELAX. PLATFORM FOR EXPRESSION

CLASSROOM FOR REFLECTION

URBAN ACTIVATORS|bronzeville

[122]


SOME HAVE SAID THAT THERE IS A VOID IN SCHOOLS WHEN IT COMES TO EXTRA-CIRRICULAR ACTIVITIES. THE PARK ACTS AS AN EXTENSION FOR THE MULTIPLE SCHOOLS AND COMMUNITY CENTERS IN THE AREA. THIS PROJECT HAS THE POTENTIAL TO HOST OUTDOOR CLASSES WHERE ADULTS AND YOUTH COULD LEARN THE RICH HISTORY OF BRONZEVILLE. THEY THEN WOULD HAVE THE OPPORTUNITY TO TO USE THE GALLERY AND STAGE AS A PLATFORM TO EXPRESS THEIR IDEAS FOR HOW BRONZEVILLE COULD BE IN THE NEAR FUTURE.

[123]

PROJECTS|community center


URBAN ACTIVATORS | bronzeville Thank you to all who participated !


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Bronzeville Urban Activators