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Undergraduate Corner

from Rutgers along with Elaine Richardson and David Staley from OSU. The Speakers and Events Planning Committee, and specifically Melanie Beaudette (3rd year PhD) and Skylar Br’ez (2nd year MA), have been working hard to plan this amazing conference.

Greetings Women’s Studies fans! The Undergraduate Program has some exciting events coming up for the new 2009-2010 academic year. After such an enthusiastic response, we have decided to continue to host our quarterly meeting of the Subversive Craft Brigade. The Brigade is a chance for undergraduates to meet at Wholly Craft (3171 N High Street - owned and operated by former WS graduate, Olivera Bratich) and engage in feminist conversations while crafting, knitting, etc.! Keep an eye out for flyers advertising Autumn Quarter’s meeting.

WOMEN’S STUDIES

at The Ohio State University

Message from the Chair

Women’s Studies Students Meet With Women Leaders

With the start of the 2009/10 academic year, the Department of Women’s Studies at Ohio State is preparing for a very important change—conversion to the semester system—a change that offers us challenges as well as new opportunities. Our Graduate and Undergraduate Committees have been busy researching comparable women’s studies departments Jill Bystydzienski and programs for ideas about how curriculum may be organized under semesters. The departmental fall retreat focused on the conversion as the faculty considered which areas of our programs we want to emphasize, what we need to revise, and how to organize our efforts in order to make the changes on schedule. As we move forward, we are confident that our already excellent programs will be strengthened further by this thorough examination and revision of courses and rethinking of areas of concentration.

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areer Café is a collaboration between the Department of Women’s Studies and Triota, the Women’s Studies Honorary Society and is designed to connect current undergraduate and graduate women’s studies students with prominent female leaders. The purpose of the Career Café is to introduce Women’s Studies students to women leaders in the OSU and Columbus community who work in a variety of organizations and settings where the kind of knowledge and skills women’s studies students acquire can be used in important ways. The Café provides space where organizational leaders interact with Women’s Studies undergraduate and MA students. They discuss the work they do as well as possible internships and career opportunities for students in their organizations. This year, we had 6 speakers, 3 graduate students and 22 undergraduate students participated in the Café. A special thanks to our professionals and members of Triota, especially Kate Clonan-Roy, Ebony Richardson, and Tracie Sinsheimer whose efforts helped make this year’s event possible!

This quarter the Undergraduate Program will also be promoting the first ever Feminist Art Competition. The competition is a chance for undergraduate students of all majors to contribute a piece of artwork broadly related to the mission of feminism. It is expected that these art submissions will be on display in the Women’s Studies office for Winter Quarter, during which they will be judged by the Women’s Studies community. A winning piece of artwork will be on display in the Women’s Studies office the following academic school year. Again, look for flyers announcing the competition in mid-fall. As always, if you have any great ideas for undergraduate events, please email Stacia Kock, Undergraduate Advisor, at kock.4@ osu.edu. Thanks and cheers to a successful new year!

Greeting from WSGA Co-Presidents

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he Women’s Studies Graduate Association dove right into the 2009-10 school year. This year’s officers are: Sarah Carnahan (’09 MA graduate, 1st year PhD) and J. Brendan Shaw (2nd year MA), co-presidents; Taneem S. Husain (2nd year MA), treasurer; Nicole Engel (2nd year PhD), secretary; Victoria Genetin, (3rd year Phd), social chair; and Andrea Breau (2nd year MA), graduate student liaison to the department’s chair.

Share the Vision!

WSGA welcomed the incoming cohort of graduate students with a delicious potluck on September 21st in Goodale Park. Graduate students and faculty shared good food and excitement about the start of the new school year. All in attendance introduced themselves and shared one non-academic goal for the coming months. WSGA was introduced to the incoming students and its function as a voice within the department and an outlet for issues and concerns was explained.

NAME ADDRESS PHONE Pictured (L to R): Kate Clonan-Roy (Triota), Nicole Dunn (Women’s Fund), Christina Cappelletti (Cappelletti Designs), Dr. Lisa Hinkelman (ROXX), Ebony Richardson (Triota), Heather Adams (Amethyst), Hollie Hinton (Governor’s Office for Women’s Initiatives), Dr. Elaine Richardson (Professor, Literacy Studies), Tracie Sinsheimer (Triota)

The picnic also provided an opportunity for the incoming graduate students to talk with their peer mentors. Each new grad student is paired with a returning student in a mentor/mentee program designed to ease the transition into the Women’s Studies Department. Both the welcome picnic and the mentor program were the result of especially hard work by Genetin, the WSGA social chair.

Are you a Women’s Studies Alum? We’d love to hear from you!

WSGA looks forward to working on a variety of projects in the coming months. Its yearly holiday party will provide a nice send off to 2009 and allow students and faculty to share holiday cheer.

Please email Jill Bystydzienski at bystydzienski.1@osu.edu or call 292-1021

In the spring, WSGA will be welcoming prospective students for their visit to the department and Columbus. WSGA is particularly excited about hosting a symposium in April entitled Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality. We will be welcoming noted theorist Jasbir Puar

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Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

EMAIL DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS

Amount Enclosed

Women’s Studies Professional Development Fund (627690)

$

Women’s Studies Department (306738)

.

The Max Rice Jr. & Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund (313141)

Please contact me about my donation. Return to:

Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

Graduate Student Support (311584)

WOMEN’S STUDIES RESEARCH PROJECTS Elizabeth D. Gee Small Grants Endowment (602449)

At the same time as the conversion to semesters begins, we embark on a new era at the University with the transformation of the College of Arts and Sciences and a new Division of Arts and Humanities—the administrative umbrella for Women’s Studies. From a loose federation of five colleges (Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Mathematical & Physical Sciences), the new College is in the process of restructuring into three divisions (Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences; and Biological & Physical Sciences) with a more centrally organized administration. We look forward to additional opportunities that this change will present for how Women’s Studies can help to fulfill the College’s mission of providing students with an intellectually rich liberal arts education. We expect that the new structure will enhance possibilities for interdisciplinary initiatives and greater collaboration between the departments and programs that make up the College of Arts and Sciences. The Department experienced several transitions in recent months. This summer, the Administrative Associate responsible for fiscal matters and office management, Ada Draughon, retired after twelve years in the Department and 30 years with OSU. Ada performed her very demanding job with grace and aplomb, dealing with multiple Ada Draughon constituents—faculty, staff, students and administrators—always providing professional and friendly assistance and support. She was a mentor to many undergraduate and graduate students and a friend to staff and faculty members. Those who had the privilege to get to know Ada recognized her commitment to the highest standards of service, her great integrity, and exemplary work.

Our new Administrative Associate, Ana Shook, joined Women’s Studies in August and is quickly settling into her new position. She comes to us from the Department of Economics where she worked as the Graduate Coordinator. She also was the Assistant to the Director for Scholarship Services in the Office of Minority Affairs at Ohio State. We are very pleased to have Ana in the Department.

Ana Shook

A new faculty member has joined the Department this fall. Lynn Itagaki, Assistant Professor, holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English. Last year, she was a Visiting Scholar in Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at OSU, and we were fortunate to hire her into a permanent position. You can find out more about her work on p.2 of this Newsletter. With Dr. Itagaki joining the faculty, currently there are seventeen faculty members in Women’s Studies. We also are very proud that recently two of our faculty members became tenured and promoted to Associate Professor—Dr. Guisela Latorre and Dr. Rebecca Wanzo—and Dr. Cynthia Burack was promoted to Professor. With these promotions, the Department now has a majority of faculty (11 out of 17) in the tenured ranks. Another Women’s Studies doctoral student, Sarah Smith, graduated this summer. She is the fifth Ph.D. to obtain the degree since the doctoral program was established in 2002. Her dissertation was nominated for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award. See more about her scholarship, her new job, and the fund she started on p.4. The MA students who graduated in spring and summer 2009 are profiled here as well, and please note the accomplishments of other graduate and undergraduate students on the following pages. I am always looking for more effective ways to keep our alumni informed and involved with the Department. Women’s Studies now has an extensive alumni data base and I have recently convened a Friends of Women’s Studies group that is working on ways to connect the Department better with our various constituents. We are eager to know what our alumni are doing, and especially if you’ve been out of touch for a while, please send us your news. We would like to include information about our alumni in future Newsletters. In these turbulent times, we are faced with uncertainty about the future but rapid change also offers us opportunities for creative responses to transformation. I wish all of our colleagues and friends around the country and the world a productive and peaceful academic year full of new possibilities. -Jill Bystydzienski

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDY Mildred Munday Scholarship (645073)

Give online at giveto.osu.edu. 10/9/09 4:23:29 PM


Women’s Studies Welcomes Professor Lynn Itagaki

In Print: New Faculty Publications

Lynn Itagaki joined the faculty in Autumn 2009 as an Assistant Professor. She holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English and works with the Program in Asian American Studies. She received her M.A. in Asian American Studies and Ph.D. in English from UCLA and her B.A. with highest honors from Harvard University. From 2004 to 2009, she was an Assistant Professor in English at the University of Montana in Missoula. As the visiting scholar in Women’s Studies during the spring and fall quarters, she developed the four-part film series, “Asian/Pacific Islander Women, Activism and Art,” that highlighted a broad range of current issues facing API women today. In addition to 20th-21st century U.S. literature, she also specializes in Asian American studies, comparative race theory, feminist theory, and visual culture. She is currently finishing a book manuscript on the 1992 Los Angeles Crisis and the postcivil rights era, and her next project looks at how contemporary forms of spectatorship change the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. She has published articles and reviews in journals such as African American Review, Amerasia Journal, and MELUS.

Guisela Latorre, Walls of Empowerment: Chicana/o Indigenist Murals of California (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2008) Exploring three major hubs of muralist activity in California, where indigenist imagery is prevalent, Walls of Empowerment celebrates an aesthetic that seeks to firmly establish Chicana/o sociopolitical identity in U.S. territory. Providing readers with a history and genealogy of key muralists’ productions, Guisela Latorre also showcases new material and original research on works and artists never before examined in print. An art form often associated with male creative endeavors, muralism in fact reflects significant contributions by Chicana artists. Encompassing these and other aspects of contemporary dialogues, including the often tense relationship between graffiti and muralism, Walls of Empowerment is a comprehensive study that, unlike many previous endeavors, does not privilege non-public Latina/o art. In addition, Latorre introduces readers to the role of new media, including performance, sculpture, and digital technology, in shaping the muralist’s “canvas.” Drawing on nearly a decade of fieldwork, this timely endeavor highlights the ways in which California’s Mexican American communities have used images of indigenous peoples to raise awareness of the region’s original citizens. Latorre also casts murals as a radical force for decolonization and liberation, and she provides a stirring description of the decades, particularly the late 1960s through 1980s, that saw California’s rise as the epicenter of mural production. Blending the perspectives of art history and sociology with firsthand accounts drawn from artists’ interviews, Walls of Empowerment represents a crucial turning point in the study of these iconographic artifacts.

Professor Burack Returns from University of Manchester The Hallsworth Fellowships and Visiting Professorships were founded under the terms of a gift made by Professor H. M. Hallsworth in 1944 to assist and advance the study of Political Economy. I was fortunate to spend over three months early this year in the United Kingdom on a Hallsworth Research Fellowship at the University of Manchester. Manchester is an industrial city located in the north of England, and its university is a large research institution that enrolls over 40,000 students. During my fellowship I was affiliated with the School of Social Sciences and the Politics Department, and I enjoyed meeting colleagues in several other disciplines.

Rebecca Wanzo, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised (State University of New York Press: Albany, 2009) Why do some stories of lost white girls garner national media headlines, while others missing remain unknown to the general public? What makes a suffering person legible as a legitimate victim in U.S. culture? In The Suffering Will Not Be Televised, Rebecca Wanzo uses African American women as a case study to explore the conventions of sentimental political storytelling—the cultural practices that make the suffering of some legible while obscuring other kinds of suffering. Through an examination of memoirs, news media, film, and television, Wanzo’s analysis reveals historical and contemporary tendencies to conflate differences between different kinds of suffering, to construct suffering hierarchies, and to treat wounds inflicted by the state as best healed through therapeutic, interpersonal interaction. Wanzo’s focus on situations as varied as disparities in child abduction coverage, pain experienced in medical settings, sexual violence, and treatment of prisoners of war illuminates how widely and deeply these conventions function within U.S. culture.

My primary project during the fellowship period was a book manuscript on which I am currently at work: Tough Love: Compassion, Sexuality, and the Christian Right. I Cynthia Burack (right) with gave two talks on my research, one Professor Ara Wilson, former Women’s Studies for the Politics Department and an- faculty member, in Canterbury. other for the Sociology Department at the University of Newcastle, and I spoke to an undergraduate class about the policy agenda of the US Christian right. A conference on British conservatism gave me the opportunity to meet academics from other institutions and members of the volunteer and policy communities and to learn more about the domestic conservative political agenda.

“Tracing the invisibility of the suffering of African American women across media, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised offers an important analysis of the many ways in which African American women’s experiences have been excluded from narratives about social violence and victimization. Wanzo’s book serves as a reminder about the necessity of considering gender and race relationally for women’s studies, cultural studies, and studies of crime, media, and culture.” — Carol A. Stabile, author of White Victims, Black Villains: Gender, Race, and Crime News in U.S. Culture

As busy as I was, I was able to get more acquainted with the UK, including trips to London, Scotland, and many points in between. I met up with former OSU women’s studies faculty member Ara Wilson for a cup of tea and a stroll through Canterbury Cathedral. I recommend the North Yorkshire town of Whitby (one of the settings for Bram Stoker’s Dracula) and the lovely castle and Abby ruins on Lindisfarne Island. One suggestion: when you visit Lindisfarne do pay close attention to the tide table, or you might find yourself enjoying the hospitality of the village longer than you’d intended. We did.

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WS Attends Gloria Anzaldúa Conference in San Antonio

Bystydzienski Awarded NSF Grant

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raduate students Victoria Genetin, Lindsay Robertson (pictured right) and Nicole Nieto as well as Professor Guisela Latorre from OSU’s Women’s Studies traveled to San Antonio, Texas, to attend and participate at El Mundo Zurdo: An International Conference on the Life and Work of Gloria Anzaldúa this past May. The conference brought together scholars, activists, healers, and artists from different parts of the world to discuss the tremendous influence that this renowned Chicana feminist philosopher exerVictoria Genetin and Lindsay cised over the theory and praxis of Robertson pay their respects at Gloria Anzaldúa’s gravesite. social justice and gender equality. The conference also included a field trip to Hargill and Edinburg, Texas, where Gloria Anzaldúa grew up and where her final resting place is now located, only a few miles from the U.S./Mexico border. During the conference proceedings Victoria Genetin and Guisela Latorre presented their recent scholarly work, which has been critically influenced by Anzalduan theory; their papers were entitled respectively “An ‘Unconscious Allegiance:’ Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s Theory of ‘Spiritual Activism’ and Engaged Buddhism,” and “A Visual Borderlands: Chicana/Latina Artists as the New Mestizas.”

rofessor and Chair, Jill Bystydzienski, is a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation $3.6 million grant. Known as Project CEOS (Comprehensive Equity at Ohio State), the 5-year project (2008-2013) aims to increase the presence and success of women at all faculty ranks and in faculty leadership positions across the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Bystydzienski is working with Co-Principal Investigators Joan Herbers (Biology), Carolyn Merry (Engineering), Anne Carey (Mathematics), Anand Desai (Public Affairs), Jean Sander (Veterinary Medicine), and Anne Massaro (Human Resources) on changing academic college and departmental cultures through leadership workshops, learning teams, mentoring circles, and entrepreneurship training. She also has been a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation Gender in Science and Engineering Program award that funded a 3-year project focused on young (high school) women exploring engineering for possible study and careers. She and her colleagues, Margaret Eisenhart at University of Colorado-Boulder and Monica Bruning at Iowa State University, recently received supplemental funding from NSF to continue the study to follow the participants on Facebook as they go through their first year of college.

Women’s Studies Graduate Student Symposium

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New Direct-to-Ph.D. Path Coming Autumn 2010

Symposium on Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality will be organized in Spring 2010. To be held on April 9-10, 2010, this two-day event will showcase the work of both graduate and undergraduate students at Ohio State and beyond. Focusing on scholarship that reaches across interdisciplinary boundaries to gain nuanced understandings and analyses of issues in gender and sexuality, the symposium will feature panels that focus on racial and sexual politics, media studies, literacy, social movements, and more. Keynote speaker Professor Jasbir Puar of Rutgers University will lead a workshop as well as present her most current work on sexuality and terrorism. ProProfessor Jasbir Puar fessor Elaine Richardson of OSU’s School of Teaching and Learning will deliver a second keynote on race and sexuality, and history Professor David Staley, Director of the Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching, will conduct a seminar on new media. The Symposium seeks mainly to bring together and encourage a dialogue among both graduate and undergraduate students who do interdisciplinary work in interdisciplinary departments such as Women’s Studies, and those Professor David Staley who do interdisciplinary work in traditional disciplines, such as English, history, philosophy, sociology, etc. The Call for Papers for the Symposium was released in September 2009, and the submission deadline is December 31, 2009. We look forward to this exciting event!

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tudents seeking Ph.D. degrees in Women’s Studies at OSU will have another option in Autumn 2010, when the Department admits its first direct-to-Ph.D. class. Under the new program, qualified students holding Bachelor’s degrees will be eligible for admission. Applicants to the direct-to-Ph.D. track should have a degree in Women’s Studies or a closely related field and a strong grounding in feminist theory. They will need to demonstrate rigorous preparation, commitment to serious intellectual study, strong interest in research, and extraordinary scholarly ability. Beginning students will concentrate their efforts in core courses, along with specialization and elective work. Students will take three years to complete the 120 hours of coursework and take their Ph.D. candidacy examinations at the beginning of the fourth year. By winter quarter of the fourth year, students would begin work on their dissertations. Another option for those who elect to earn an M.A. en route is to take the M.A. exam after completing 45 credit hours. The Women’s Studies graduate programs have long offered a unique interdisciplinary approach to studying the experiences of women and the role of gender in society. The 17-member core faculty and more than 60 associated faculty members represent a broad spectrum of disciplines in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. For more than three decades, the Department of Women’s Studies has been home to an award-winning faculty in a dynamic, research-oriented setting with gender and feminist theory studies at its core. Graduate students are part of a challenging environment with unique opportunities for teaching and research. The Department will retain its current M.A. and Ph.D. programs, as well.

For the latest news, events and announcements, visit us online at:

women-studies.osu.edu 3

Awards & Recognition

Graduate Students News!

Six graduate students received their degrees during spring and summer commencements.

We are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2009 Women’s Studies Awards and Scholarship competitions! The winners were acknowledged at the Women’s Studies Spring Reception. The Robin Wiehm Writing Award went to Kati McGinnis; Elizabeth Zay received the Joellen Thomas Undergraduate Writing Award; The Common Difference Writing Awards went to Kathryn Linder, WS Ph.D. student, and Jessica Ziegenfuss, WS undergraduate student. The Virginia Reynolds Book Award went to Jasmine Mathis and two Mildred Munday Scholarships for $3,000 went to Rachael Needham and Tracie Sinsheimer. Congratulations all!

Sarah Smith received her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies in August 2009. She earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees as well from Ohio

State. Dr. Smith has concentrated her efforts on the study of gender and disability. During her time at Ohio State, she developed and taught classes on the topic. She currently holds

the position of Undergraduate Coordinator in the Women’s Studies Program at Bowling Green State University. Her dissertation, titled “Love, Sex, and Disability: The Ethics and Politics of Care in Relationships,” examines care and intimacy in relationships in which one partner has a physical disability and the other partner is able-bodied. She argues that care is constructed as a binary relationship in the applied fields (e.g., rehabilitation, nursing), popular culture, some aspects of the disability rights movement and the feminist care literature. The disabled partner is viewed as only the care-receiver, the nondisabled partner as only the care-giver. This dependency dynamic desexualizes the couple’s relationship. In self-representations, however, care is understood in terms of reciprocity and mutuality, and intimacy is often part of care. Smith’s work seeks to improve the treatment of people in disabled/nondisabled relationships; examine the intersections of disability, gender, class and race; as well as advance understandings of the relationships between popular culture, health sciences, and public policy. Her committee mem-

Sarah Smith and Max Rice Jr.

Andrea Breau, Taneem Husain (M.A. students) and Nicole Engel (Ph.D. student) all received University Fellowships for the 2008-2009 year. Christy Holmes (Ph.D. candidate) received the Post Prospectus Fellowship from the College of Humanities. Lea Popielinski (Ph.D. candidate) received $2,000 in support of her dissertation project through the Graduate School’s Alumni Grants for Graduate Research and Scholarship. Valerie Hendrickson, WS minor received a $1,000 Humanities Alumni Scholarship; Andrea Levengood, WS Major, received the Mortar Board Adult Women’s Scholarship for academic year 2008-2009. Elizabeth Lemmons, WS Honors Major, received $1,250 Richard and Karol Wells Scholarship through the College of Humanities. Caitlyn Seitz, WS minor, received $900 from The Robert and Mary Reusche Scholarship for Study Abroad. Lauren Strand, WS Honors major, received the 2009 Katherine L. Hall Prize from the College of Humanities. Jess Ziegenfuss, WS Honors Major, was a recipient of The Colleges of Arts and Sciences Award for Undergraduate Scholastic Excellence in Women’s Studies. Linda Krikos, faculty emeritus at The Ohio State University Libraries, has been selected as the 2009 winner of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Women’s Studies Section (WSS) Career Achievement Award.

bers were: Drs. Cynthia Burack (advisor), Brenda Brueggemann, Christine Keating

and Mary Thomas. Her dissertation has been nominated by

the Ohio State University’s Colleges of Arts and Sciences and the College of Arts and Humanities for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award.

Women’s Studies Major Winner at 2009 Denman

Dr. Smith recently established the Max Rice Jr. and Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund. The fund will provide students, faculty, and program support to create opportunities for Women’s Studies at Ohio State to advance the study of disability and/or sexuality. To make a donation online please go to giveto.osu. edu.

Katherine Clonan-Roy, Women’s Studies Honors Major received 1st place in Humanities at the 2009 Denman Undergraduate Research Forum for her research “Hermanas de Resistencia: The Socio-Political Activism of Indigenous Women in Chiapas, Mexico.” Starting this fall, Kate will teach in the Washington DC Region, bringing new energy and leadership to the challenge of closing the academic achievement gap for students in low-income communities. Kate was selected from a record 35,000 individuals who applied for Teach For America this year and will join nearly 4,100 new corps members teaching in 35 regions across the country.

Five M.A. students received their degrees as well. They are: Jennifer Apple, whose focus area was sexual regulation and sex work, will pursue her Ph.D. in Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University. Her long-range goal is to secure a teaching position in women’s and gender studies with a focus on sexuality. Leslie Bart’s focus area is in sexuality and transgender studies. She will be returning to Portland, Oregon, to pursue opportunities there. Sarah Carnahan will be staying at OSU to pursue her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies. Her focus areas are visual and narrative cultures, contemporary women’s war narratives, and new media narrative production. Eventually, she hopes to teach.

Jessica Ziegenfuss, Women’s Studies Honors Major also presented her research at the Denman Forum titled “The Media Apparatus: Theoretical Frameworks, Praxis, and Dialectic”; her work focuses on disrupting cause-and-effect narratives of pornography and violence. More than 500 students presented their research on May 13, 2009, in 11 categories, making this the largest and most competitive Denman Forum ever! Congratulations to Kate and Jess! To read abstracts of these research projects, visit denman.osu.edu.

Rachel Dudley’s focus area is “the intersection of person pain and cultural pain.” She will be attending Emory University for her Ph.D. and hopes to teach and continue her research. Melissa Scammahorn’s areas of interest are disability studies and public policy. Originally from the State of Washington, Melissa will make a visit home to the mountains and clean water as she decides whether to continue her education or seek other opportunities.

4 10/9/09 4:23:33 PM


Women’s Studies Welcomes Professor Lynn Itagaki

In Print: New Faculty Publications

Lynn Itagaki joined the faculty in Autumn 2009 as an Assistant Professor. She holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English and works with the Program in Asian American Studies. She received her M.A. in Asian American Studies and Ph.D. in English from UCLA and her B.A. with highest honors from Harvard University. From 2004 to 2009, she was an Assistant Professor in English at the University of Montana in Missoula. As the visiting scholar in Women’s Studies during the spring and fall quarters, she developed the four-part film series, “Asian/Pacific Islander Women, Activism and Art,” that highlighted a broad range of current issues facing API women today. In addition to 20th-21st century U.S. literature, she also specializes in Asian American studies, comparative race theory, feminist theory, and visual culture. She is currently finishing a book manuscript on the 1992 Los Angeles Crisis and the postcivil rights era, and her next project looks at how contemporary forms of spectatorship change the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. She has published articles and reviews in journals such as African American Review, Amerasia Journal, and MELUS.

Guisela Latorre, Walls of Empowerment: Chicana/o Indigenist Murals of California (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2008) Exploring three major hubs of muralist activity in California, where indigenist imagery is prevalent, Walls of Empowerment celebrates an aesthetic that seeks to firmly establish Chicana/o sociopolitical identity in U.S. territory. Providing readers with a history and genealogy of key muralists’ productions, Guisela Latorre also showcases new material and original research on works and artists never before examined in print. An art form often associated with male creative endeavors, muralism in fact reflects significant contributions by Chicana artists. Encompassing these and other aspects of contemporary dialogues, including the often tense relationship between graffiti and muralism, Walls of Empowerment is a comprehensive study that, unlike many previous endeavors, does not privilege non-public Latina/o art. In addition, Latorre introduces readers to the role of new media, including performance, sculpture, and digital technology, in shaping the muralist’s “canvas.” Drawing on nearly a decade of fieldwork, this timely endeavor highlights the ways in which California’s Mexican American communities have used images of indigenous peoples to raise awareness of the region’s original citizens. Latorre also casts murals as a radical force for decolonization and liberation, and she provides a stirring description of the decades, particularly the late 1960s through 1980s, that saw California’s rise as the epicenter of mural production. Blending the perspectives of art history and sociology with firsthand accounts drawn from artists’ interviews, Walls of Empowerment represents a crucial turning point in the study of these iconographic artifacts.

Professor Burack Returns from University of Manchester The Hallsworth Fellowships and Visiting Professorships were founded under the terms of a gift made by Professor H. M. Hallsworth in 1944 to assist and advance the study of Political Economy. I was fortunate to spend over three months early this year in the United Kingdom on a Hallsworth Research Fellowship at the University of Manchester. Manchester is an industrial city located in the north of England, and its university is a large research institution that enrolls over 40,000 students. During my fellowship I was affiliated with the School of Social Sciences and the Politics Department, and I enjoyed meeting colleagues in several other disciplines.

Rebecca Wanzo, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised (State University of New York Press: Albany, 2009) Why do some stories of lost white girls garner national media headlines, while others missing remain unknown to the general public? What makes a suffering person legible as a legitimate victim in U.S. culture? In The Suffering Will Not Be Televised, Rebecca Wanzo uses African American women as a case study to explore the conventions of sentimental political storytelling—the cultural practices that make the suffering of some legible while obscuring other kinds of suffering. Through an examination of memoirs, news media, film, and television, Wanzo’s analysis reveals historical and contemporary tendencies to conflate differences between different kinds of suffering, to construct suffering hierarchies, and to treat wounds inflicted by the state as best healed through therapeutic, interpersonal interaction. Wanzo’s focus on situations as varied as disparities in child abduction coverage, pain experienced in medical settings, sexual violence, and treatment of prisoners of war illuminates how widely and deeply these conventions function within U.S. culture.

My primary project during the fellowship period was a book manuscript on which I am currently at work: Tough Love: Compassion, Sexuality, and the Christian Right. I Cynthia Burack (right) with gave two talks on my research, one Professor Ara Wilson, former Women’s Studies for the Politics Department and an- faculty member, in Canterbury. other for the Sociology Department at the University of Newcastle, and I spoke to an undergraduate class about the policy agenda of the US Christian right. A conference on British conservatism gave me the opportunity to meet academics from other institutions and members of the volunteer and policy communities and to learn more about the domestic conservative political agenda.

“Tracing the invisibility of the suffering of African American women across media, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised offers an important analysis of the many ways in which African American women’s experiences have been excluded from narratives about social violence and victimization. Wanzo’s book serves as a reminder about the necessity of considering gender and race relationally for women’s studies, cultural studies, and studies of crime, media, and culture.” — Carol A. Stabile, author of White Victims, Black Villains: Gender, Race, and Crime News in U.S. Culture

As busy as I was, I was able to get more acquainted with the UK, including trips to London, Scotland, and many points in between. I met up with former OSU women’s studies faculty member Ara Wilson for a cup of tea and a stroll through Canterbury Cathedral. I recommend the North Yorkshire town of Whitby (one of the settings for Bram Stoker’s Dracula) and the lovely castle and Abby ruins on Lindisfarne Island. One suggestion: when you visit Lindisfarne do pay close attention to the tide table, or you might find yourself enjoying the hospitality of the village longer than you’d intended. We did.

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WS Attends Gloria Anzaldúa Conference in San Antonio

Bystydzienski Awarded NSF Grant

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raduate students Victoria Genetin, Lindsay Robertson (pictured right) and Nicole Nieto as well as Professor Guisela Latorre from OSU’s Women’s Studies traveled to San Antonio, Texas, to attend and participate at El Mundo Zurdo: An International Conference on the Life and Work of Gloria Anzaldúa this past May. The conference brought together scholars, activists, healers, and artists from different parts of the world to discuss the tremendous influence that this renowned Chicana feminist philosopher exerVictoria Genetin and Lindsay cised over the theory and praxis of Robertson pay their respects at Gloria Anzaldúa’s gravesite. social justice and gender equality. The conference also included a field trip to Hargill and Edinburg, Texas, where Gloria Anzaldúa grew up and where her final resting place is now located, only a few miles from the U.S./Mexico border. During the conference proceedings Victoria Genetin and Guisela Latorre presented their recent scholarly work, which has been critically influenced by Anzalduan theory; their papers were entitled respectively “An ‘Unconscious Allegiance:’ Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s Theory of ‘Spiritual Activism’ and Engaged Buddhism,” and “A Visual Borderlands: Chicana/Latina Artists as the New Mestizas.”

rofessor and Chair, Jill Bystydzienski, is a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation $3.6 million grant. Known as Project CEOS (Comprehensive Equity at Ohio State), the 5-year project (2008-2013) aims to increase the presence and success of women at all faculty ranks and in faculty leadership positions across the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Bystydzienski is working with Co-Principal Investigators Joan Herbers (Biology), Carolyn Merry (Engineering), Anne Carey (Mathematics), Anand Desai (Public Affairs), Jean Sander (Veterinary Medicine), and Anne Massaro (Human Resources) on changing academic college and departmental cultures through leadership workshops, learning teams, mentoring circles, and entrepreneurship training. She also has been a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation Gender in Science and Engineering Program award that funded a 3-year project focused on young (high school) women exploring engineering for possible study and careers. She and her colleagues, Margaret Eisenhart at University of Colorado-Boulder and Monica Bruning at Iowa State University, recently received supplemental funding from NSF to continue the study to follow the participants on Facebook as they go through their first year of college.

Women’s Studies Graduate Student Symposium

A

New Direct-to-Ph.D. Path Coming Autumn 2010

Symposium on Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality will be organized in Spring 2010. To be held on April 9-10, 2010, this two-day event will showcase the work of both graduate and undergraduate students at Ohio State and beyond. Focusing on scholarship that reaches across interdisciplinary boundaries to gain nuanced understandings and analyses of issues in gender and sexuality, the symposium will feature panels that focus on racial and sexual politics, media studies, literacy, social movements, and more. Keynote speaker Professor Jasbir Puar of Rutgers University will lead a workshop as well as present her most current work on sexuality and terrorism. ProProfessor Jasbir Puar fessor Elaine Richardson of OSU’s School of Teaching and Learning will deliver a second keynote on race and sexuality, and history Professor David Staley, Director of the Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching, will conduct a seminar on new media. The Symposium seeks mainly to bring together and encourage a dialogue among both graduate and undergraduate students who do interdisciplinary work in interdisciplinary departments such as Women’s Studies, and those Professor David Staley who do interdisciplinary work in traditional disciplines, such as English, history, philosophy, sociology, etc. The Call for Papers for the Symposium was released in September 2009, and the submission deadline is December 31, 2009. We look forward to this exciting event!

S

tudents seeking Ph.D. degrees in Women’s Studies at OSU will have another option in Autumn 2010, when the Department admits its first direct-to-Ph.D. class. Under the new program, qualified students holding Bachelor’s degrees will be eligible for admission. Applicants to the direct-to-Ph.D. track should have a degree in Women’s Studies or a closely related field and a strong grounding in feminist theory. They will need to demonstrate rigorous preparation, commitment to serious intellectual study, strong interest in research, and extraordinary scholarly ability. Beginning students will concentrate their efforts in core courses, along with specialization and elective work. Students will take three years to complete the 120 hours of coursework and take their Ph.D. candidacy examinations at the beginning of the fourth year. By winter quarter of the fourth year, students would begin work on their dissertations. Another option for those who elect to earn an M.A. en route is to take the M.A. exam after completing 45 credit hours. The Women’s Studies graduate programs have long offered a unique interdisciplinary approach to studying the experiences of women and the role of gender in society. The 17-member core faculty and more than 60 associated faculty members represent a broad spectrum of disciplines in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. For more than three decades, the Department of Women’s Studies has been home to an award-winning faculty in a dynamic, research-oriented setting with gender and feminist theory studies at its core. Graduate students are part of a challenging environment with unique opportunities for teaching and research. The Department will retain its current M.A. and Ph.D. programs, as well.

For the latest news, events and announcements, visit us online at:

women-studies.osu.edu 3

Awards & Recognition

Graduate Students News!

Six graduate students received their degrees during spring and summer commencements.

We are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2009 Women’s Studies Awards and Scholarship competitions! The winners were acknowledged at the Women’s Studies Spring Reception. The Robin Wiehm Writing Award went to Kati McGinnis; Elizabeth Zay received the Joellen Thomas Undergraduate Writing Award; The Common Difference Writing Awards went to Kathryn Linder, WS Ph.D. student, and Jessica Ziegenfuss, WS undergraduate student. The Virginia Reynolds Book Award went to Jasmine Mathis and two Mildred Munday Scholarships for $3,000 went to Rachael Needham and Tracie Sinsheimer. Congratulations all!

Sarah Smith received her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies in August 2009. She earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees as well from Ohio

State. Dr. Smith has concentrated her efforts on the study of gender and disability. During her time at Ohio State, she developed and taught classes on the topic. She currently holds

the position of Undergraduate Coordinator in the Women’s Studies Program at Bowling Green State University. Her dissertation, titled “Love, Sex, and Disability: The Ethics and Politics of Care in Relationships,” examines care and intimacy in relationships in which one partner has a physical disability and the other partner is able-bodied. She argues that care is constructed as a binary relationship in the applied fields (e.g., rehabilitation, nursing), popular culture, some aspects of the disability rights movement and the feminist care literature. The disabled partner is viewed as only the care-receiver, the nondisabled partner as only the care-giver. This dependency dynamic desexualizes the couple’s relationship. In self-representations, however, care is understood in terms of reciprocity and mutuality, and intimacy is often part of care. Smith’s work seeks to improve the treatment of people in disabled/nondisabled relationships; examine the intersections of disability, gender, class and race; as well as advance understandings of the relationships between popular culture, health sciences, and public policy. Her committee mem-

Sarah Smith and Max Rice Jr.

Andrea Breau, Taneem Husain (M.A. students) and Nicole Engel (Ph.D. student) all received University Fellowships for the 2008-2009 year. Christy Holmes (Ph.D. candidate) received the Post Prospectus Fellowship from the College of Humanities. Lea Popielinski (Ph.D. candidate) received $2,000 in support of her dissertation project through the Graduate School’s Alumni Grants for Graduate Research and Scholarship. Valerie Hendrickson, WS minor received a $1,000 Humanities Alumni Scholarship; Andrea Levengood, WS Major, received the Mortar Board Adult Women’s Scholarship for academic year 2008-2009. Elizabeth Lemmons, WS Honors Major, received $1,250 Richard and Karol Wells Scholarship through the College of Humanities. Caitlyn Seitz, WS minor, received $900 from The Robert and Mary Reusche Scholarship for Study Abroad. Lauren Strand, WS Honors major, received the 2009 Katherine L. Hall Prize from the College of Humanities. Jess Ziegenfuss, WS Honors Major, was a recipient of The Colleges of Arts and Sciences Award for Undergraduate Scholastic Excellence in Women’s Studies. Linda Krikos, faculty emeritus at The Ohio State University Libraries, has been selected as the 2009 winner of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Women’s Studies Section (WSS) Career Achievement Award.

bers were: Drs. Cynthia Burack (advisor), Brenda Brueggemann, Christine Keating

and Mary Thomas. Her dissertation has been nominated by

the Ohio State University’s Colleges of Arts and Sciences and the College of Arts and Humanities for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award.

Women’s Studies Major Winner at 2009 Denman

Dr. Smith recently established the Max Rice Jr. and Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund. The fund will provide students, faculty, and program support to create opportunities for Women’s Studies at Ohio State to advance the study of disability and/or sexuality. To make a donation online please go to giveto.osu. edu.

Katherine Clonan-Roy, Women’s Studies Honors Major received 1st place in Humanities at the 2009 Denman Undergraduate Research Forum for her research “Hermanas de Resistencia: The Socio-Political Activism of Indigenous Women in Chiapas, Mexico.” Starting this fall, Kate will teach in the Washington DC Region, bringing new energy and leadership to the challenge of closing the academic achievement gap for students in low-income communities. Kate was selected from a record 35,000 individuals who applied for Teach For America this year and will join nearly 4,100 new corps members teaching in 35 regions across the country.

Five M.A. students received their degrees as well. They are: Jennifer Apple, whose focus area was sexual regulation and sex work, will pursue her Ph.D. in Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University. Her long-range goal is to secure a teaching position in women’s and gender studies with a focus on sexuality. Leslie Bart’s focus area is in sexuality and transgender studies. She will be returning to Portland, Oregon, to pursue opportunities there. Sarah Carnahan will be staying at OSU to pursue her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies. Her focus areas are visual and narrative cultures, contemporary women’s war narratives, and new media narrative production. Eventually, she hopes to teach.

Jessica Ziegenfuss, Women’s Studies Honors Major also presented her research at the Denman Forum titled “The Media Apparatus: Theoretical Frameworks, Praxis, and Dialectic”; her work focuses on disrupting cause-and-effect narratives of pornography and violence. More than 500 students presented their research on May 13, 2009, in 11 categories, making this the largest and most competitive Denman Forum ever! Congratulations to Kate and Jess! To read abstracts of these research projects, visit denman.osu.edu.

Rachel Dudley’s focus area is “the intersection of person pain and cultural pain.” She will be attending Emory University for her Ph.D. and hopes to teach and continue her research. Melissa Scammahorn’s areas of interest are disability studies and public policy. Originally from the State of Washington, Melissa will make a visit home to the mountains and clean water as she decides whether to continue her education or seek other opportunities.

4 10/9/09 4:23:33 PM


Women’s Studies Welcomes Professor Lynn Itagaki

In Print: New Faculty Publications

Lynn Itagaki joined the faculty in Autumn 2009 as an Assistant Professor. She holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English and works with the Program in Asian American Studies. She received her M.A. in Asian American Studies and Ph.D. in English from UCLA and her B.A. with highest honors from Harvard University. From 2004 to 2009, she was an Assistant Professor in English at the University of Montana in Missoula. As the visiting scholar in Women’s Studies during the spring and fall quarters, she developed the four-part film series, “Asian/Pacific Islander Women, Activism and Art,” that highlighted a broad range of current issues facing API women today. In addition to 20th-21st century U.S. literature, she also specializes in Asian American studies, comparative race theory, feminist theory, and visual culture. She is currently finishing a book manuscript on the 1992 Los Angeles Crisis and the postcivil rights era, and her next project looks at how contemporary forms of spectatorship change the rights and responsibilities of citizenship. She has published articles and reviews in journals such as African American Review, Amerasia Journal, and MELUS.

Guisela Latorre, Walls of Empowerment: Chicana/o Indigenist Murals of California (Austin: University of Texas Press, 2008) Exploring three major hubs of muralist activity in California, where indigenist imagery is prevalent, Walls of Empowerment celebrates an aesthetic that seeks to firmly establish Chicana/o sociopolitical identity in U.S. territory. Providing readers with a history and genealogy of key muralists’ productions, Guisela Latorre also showcases new material and original research on works and artists never before examined in print. An art form often associated with male creative endeavors, muralism in fact reflects significant contributions by Chicana artists. Encompassing these and other aspects of contemporary dialogues, including the often tense relationship between graffiti and muralism, Walls of Empowerment is a comprehensive study that, unlike many previous endeavors, does not privilege non-public Latina/o art. In addition, Latorre introduces readers to the role of new media, including performance, sculpture, and digital technology, in shaping the muralist’s “canvas.” Drawing on nearly a decade of fieldwork, this timely endeavor highlights the ways in which California’s Mexican American communities have used images of indigenous peoples to raise awareness of the region’s original citizens. Latorre also casts murals as a radical force for decolonization and liberation, and she provides a stirring description of the decades, particularly the late 1960s through 1980s, that saw California’s rise as the epicenter of mural production. Blending the perspectives of art history and sociology with firsthand accounts drawn from artists’ interviews, Walls of Empowerment represents a crucial turning point in the study of these iconographic artifacts.

Professor Burack Returns from University of Manchester The Hallsworth Fellowships and Visiting Professorships were founded under the terms of a gift made by Professor H. M. Hallsworth in 1944 to assist and advance the study of Political Economy. I was fortunate to spend over three months early this year in the United Kingdom on a Hallsworth Research Fellowship at the University of Manchester. Manchester is an industrial city located in the north of England, and its university is a large research institution that enrolls over 40,000 students. During my fellowship I was affiliated with the School of Social Sciences and the Politics Department, and I enjoyed meeting colleagues in several other disciplines.

Rebecca Wanzo, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised (State University of New York Press: Albany, 2009) Why do some stories of lost white girls garner national media headlines, while others missing remain unknown to the general public? What makes a suffering person legible as a legitimate victim in U.S. culture? In The Suffering Will Not Be Televised, Rebecca Wanzo uses African American women as a case study to explore the conventions of sentimental political storytelling—the cultural practices that make the suffering of some legible while obscuring other kinds of suffering. Through an examination of memoirs, news media, film, and television, Wanzo’s analysis reveals historical and contemporary tendencies to conflate differences between different kinds of suffering, to construct suffering hierarchies, and to treat wounds inflicted by the state as best healed through therapeutic, interpersonal interaction. Wanzo’s focus on situations as varied as disparities in child abduction coverage, pain experienced in medical settings, sexual violence, and treatment of prisoners of war illuminates how widely and deeply these conventions function within U.S. culture.

My primary project during the fellowship period was a book manuscript on which I am currently at work: Tough Love: Compassion, Sexuality, and the Christian Right. I Cynthia Burack (right) with gave two talks on my research, one Professor Ara Wilson, former Women’s Studies for the Politics Department and an- faculty member, in Canterbury. other for the Sociology Department at the University of Newcastle, and I spoke to an undergraduate class about the policy agenda of the US Christian right. A conference on British conservatism gave me the opportunity to meet academics from other institutions and members of the volunteer and policy communities and to learn more about the domestic conservative political agenda.

“Tracing the invisibility of the suffering of African American women across media, The Suffering Will Not Be Televised offers an important analysis of the many ways in which African American women’s experiences have been excluded from narratives about social violence and victimization. Wanzo’s book serves as a reminder about the necessity of considering gender and race relationally for women’s studies, cultural studies, and studies of crime, media, and culture.” — Carol A. Stabile, author of White Victims, Black Villains: Gender, Race, and Crime News in U.S. Culture

As busy as I was, I was able to get more acquainted with the UK, including trips to London, Scotland, and many points in between. I met up with former OSU women’s studies faculty member Ara Wilson for a cup of tea and a stroll through Canterbury Cathedral. I recommend the North Yorkshire town of Whitby (one of the settings for Bram Stoker’s Dracula) and the lovely castle and Abby ruins on Lindisfarne Island. One suggestion: when you visit Lindisfarne do pay close attention to the tide table, or you might find yourself enjoying the hospitality of the village longer than you’d intended. We did.

2 Nltr.flg 2

WS Attends Gloria Anzaldúa Conference in San Antonio

Bystydzienski Awarded NSF Grant

G

P

raduate students Victoria Genetin, Lindsay Robertson (pictured right) and Nicole Nieto as well as Professor Guisela Latorre from OSU’s Women’s Studies traveled to San Antonio, Texas, to attend and participate at El Mundo Zurdo: An International Conference on the Life and Work of Gloria Anzaldúa this past May. The conference brought together scholars, activists, healers, and artists from different parts of the world to discuss the tremendous influence that this renowned Chicana feminist philosopher exerVictoria Genetin and Lindsay cised over the theory and praxis of Robertson pay their respects at Gloria Anzaldúa’s gravesite. social justice and gender equality. The conference also included a field trip to Hargill and Edinburg, Texas, where Gloria Anzaldúa grew up and where her final resting place is now located, only a few miles from the U.S./Mexico border. During the conference proceedings Victoria Genetin and Guisela Latorre presented their recent scholarly work, which has been critically influenced by Anzalduan theory; their papers were entitled respectively “An ‘Unconscious Allegiance:’ Gloria E. Anzaldúa’s Theory of ‘Spiritual Activism’ and Engaged Buddhism,” and “A Visual Borderlands: Chicana/Latina Artists as the New Mestizas.”

rofessor and Chair, Jill Bystydzienski, is a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation ADVANCE Institutional Transformation $3.6 million grant. Known as Project CEOS (Comprehensive Equity at Ohio State), the 5-year project (2008-2013) aims to increase the presence and success of women at all faculty ranks and in faculty leadership positions across the disciplines of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Bystydzienski is working with Co-Principal Investigators Joan Herbers (Biology), Carolyn Merry (Engineering), Anne Carey (Mathematics), Anand Desai (Public Affairs), Jean Sander (Veterinary Medicine), and Anne Massaro (Human Resources) on changing academic college and departmental cultures through leadership workshops, learning teams, mentoring circles, and entrepreneurship training. She also has been a Co-Principal Investigator on a National Science Foundation Gender in Science and Engineering Program award that funded a 3-year project focused on young (high school) women exploring engineering for possible study and careers. She and her colleagues, Margaret Eisenhart at University of Colorado-Boulder and Monica Bruning at Iowa State University, recently received supplemental funding from NSF to continue the study to follow the participants on Facebook as they go through their first year of college.

Women’s Studies Graduate Student Symposium

A

New Direct-to-Ph.D. Path Coming Autumn 2010

Symposium on Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality will be organized in Spring 2010. To be held on April 9-10, 2010, this two-day event will showcase the work of both graduate and undergraduate students at Ohio State and beyond. Focusing on scholarship that reaches across interdisciplinary boundaries to gain nuanced understandings and analyses of issues in gender and sexuality, the symposium will feature panels that focus on racial and sexual politics, media studies, literacy, social movements, and more. Keynote speaker Professor Jasbir Puar of Rutgers University will lead a workshop as well as present her most current work on sexuality and terrorism. ProProfessor Jasbir Puar fessor Elaine Richardson of OSU’s School of Teaching and Learning will deliver a second keynote on race and sexuality, and history Professor David Staley, Director of the Goldberg Center for Excellence in Teaching, will conduct a seminar on new media. The Symposium seeks mainly to bring together and encourage a dialogue among both graduate and undergraduate students who do interdisciplinary work in interdisciplinary departments such as Women’s Studies, and those Professor David Staley who do interdisciplinary work in traditional disciplines, such as English, history, philosophy, sociology, etc. The Call for Papers for the Symposium was released in September 2009, and the submission deadline is December 31, 2009. We look forward to this exciting event!

S

tudents seeking Ph.D. degrees in Women’s Studies at OSU will have another option in Autumn 2010, when the Department admits its first direct-to-Ph.D. class. Under the new program, qualified students holding Bachelor’s degrees will be eligible for admission. Applicants to the direct-to-Ph.D. track should have a degree in Women’s Studies or a closely related field and a strong grounding in feminist theory. They will need to demonstrate rigorous preparation, commitment to serious intellectual study, strong interest in research, and extraordinary scholarly ability. Beginning students will concentrate their efforts in core courses, along with specialization and elective work. Students will take three years to complete the 120 hours of coursework and take their Ph.D. candidacy examinations at the beginning of the fourth year. By winter quarter of the fourth year, students would begin work on their dissertations. Another option for those who elect to earn an M.A. en route is to take the M.A. exam after completing 45 credit hours. The Women’s Studies graduate programs have long offered a unique interdisciplinary approach to studying the experiences of women and the role of gender in society. The 17-member core faculty and more than 60 associated faculty members represent a broad spectrum of disciplines in the sciences, humanities and social sciences. For more than three decades, the Department of Women’s Studies has been home to an award-winning faculty in a dynamic, research-oriented setting with gender and feminist theory studies at its core. Graduate students are part of a challenging environment with unique opportunities for teaching and research. The Department will retain its current M.A. and Ph.D. programs, as well.

For the latest news, events and announcements, visit us online at:

women-studies.osu.edu 3

Awards & Recognition

Graduate Students News!

Six graduate students received their degrees during spring and summer commencements.

We are pleased to announce the recipients of the 2009 Women’s Studies Awards and Scholarship competitions! The winners were acknowledged at the Women’s Studies Spring Reception. The Robin Wiehm Writing Award went to Kati McGinnis; Elizabeth Zay received the Joellen Thomas Undergraduate Writing Award; The Common Difference Writing Awards went to Kathryn Linder, WS Ph.D. student, and Jessica Ziegenfuss, WS undergraduate student. The Virginia Reynolds Book Award went to Jasmine Mathis and two Mildred Munday Scholarships for $3,000 went to Rachael Needham and Tracie Sinsheimer. Congratulations all!

Sarah Smith received her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies in August 2009. She earned her B.A. and M.A. degrees as well from Ohio

State. Dr. Smith has concentrated her efforts on the study of gender and disability. During her time at Ohio State, she developed and taught classes on the topic. She currently holds

the position of Undergraduate Coordinator in the Women’s Studies Program at Bowling Green State University. Her dissertation, titled “Love, Sex, and Disability: The Ethics and Politics of Care in Relationships,” examines care and intimacy in relationships in which one partner has a physical disability and the other partner is able-bodied. She argues that care is constructed as a binary relationship in the applied fields (e.g., rehabilitation, nursing), popular culture, some aspects of the disability rights movement and the feminist care literature. The disabled partner is viewed as only the care-receiver, the nondisabled partner as only the care-giver. This dependency dynamic desexualizes the couple’s relationship. In self-representations, however, care is understood in terms of reciprocity and mutuality, and intimacy is often part of care. Smith’s work seeks to improve the treatment of people in disabled/nondisabled relationships; examine the intersections of disability, gender, class and race; as well as advance understandings of the relationships between popular culture, health sciences, and public policy. Her committee mem-

Sarah Smith and Max Rice Jr.

Andrea Breau, Taneem Husain (M.A. students) and Nicole Engel (Ph.D. student) all received University Fellowships for the 2008-2009 year. Christy Holmes (Ph.D. candidate) received the Post Prospectus Fellowship from the College of Humanities. Lea Popielinski (Ph.D. candidate) received $2,000 in support of her dissertation project through the Graduate School’s Alumni Grants for Graduate Research and Scholarship. Valerie Hendrickson, WS minor received a $1,000 Humanities Alumni Scholarship; Andrea Levengood, WS Major, received the Mortar Board Adult Women’s Scholarship for academic year 2008-2009. Elizabeth Lemmons, WS Honors Major, received $1,250 Richard and Karol Wells Scholarship through the College of Humanities. Caitlyn Seitz, WS minor, received $900 from The Robert and Mary Reusche Scholarship for Study Abroad. Lauren Strand, WS Honors major, received the 2009 Katherine L. Hall Prize from the College of Humanities. Jess Ziegenfuss, WS Honors Major, was a recipient of The Colleges of Arts and Sciences Award for Undergraduate Scholastic Excellence in Women’s Studies. Linda Krikos, faculty emeritus at The Ohio State University Libraries, has been selected as the 2009 winner of the Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Women’s Studies Section (WSS) Career Achievement Award.

bers were: Drs. Cynthia Burack (advisor), Brenda Brueggemann, Christine Keating

and Mary Thomas. Her dissertation has been nominated by

the Ohio State University’s Colleges of Arts and Sciences and the College of Arts and Humanities for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award.

Women’s Studies Major Winner at 2009 Denman

Dr. Smith recently established the Max Rice Jr. and Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund. The fund will provide students, faculty, and program support to create opportunities for Women’s Studies at Ohio State to advance the study of disability and/or sexuality. To make a donation online please go to giveto.osu. edu.

Katherine Clonan-Roy, Women’s Studies Honors Major received 1st place in Humanities at the 2009 Denman Undergraduate Research Forum for her research “Hermanas de Resistencia: The Socio-Political Activism of Indigenous Women in Chiapas, Mexico.” Starting this fall, Kate will teach in the Washington DC Region, bringing new energy and leadership to the challenge of closing the academic achievement gap for students in low-income communities. Kate was selected from a record 35,000 individuals who applied for Teach For America this year and will join nearly 4,100 new corps members teaching in 35 regions across the country.

Five M.A. students received their degrees as well. They are: Jennifer Apple, whose focus area was sexual regulation and sex work, will pursue her Ph.D. in Women and Gender Studies at Arizona State University. Her long-range goal is to secure a teaching position in women’s and gender studies with a focus on sexuality. Leslie Bart’s focus area is in sexuality and transgender studies. She will be returning to Portland, Oregon, to pursue opportunities there. Sarah Carnahan will be staying at OSU to pursue her Ph.D. in Women’s Studies. Her focus areas are visual and narrative cultures, contemporary women’s war narratives, and new media narrative production. Eventually, she hopes to teach.

Jessica Ziegenfuss, Women’s Studies Honors Major also presented her research at the Denman Forum titled “The Media Apparatus: Theoretical Frameworks, Praxis, and Dialectic”; her work focuses on disrupting cause-and-effect narratives of pornography and violence. More than 500 students presented their research on May 13, 2009, in 11 categories, making this the largest and most competitive Denman Forum ever! Congratulations to Kate and Jess! To read abstracts of these research projects, visit denman.osu.edu.

Rachel Dudley’s focus area is “the intersection of person pain and cultural pain.” She will be attending Emory University for her Ph.D. and hopes to teach and continue her research. Melissa Scammahorn’s areas of interest are disability studies and public policy. Originally from the State of Washington, Melissa will make a visit home to the mountains and clean water as she decides whether to continue her education or seek other opportunities.

4 10/9/09 4:23:33 PM


Undergraduate Corner

from Rutgers along with Elaine Richardson and David Staley from OSU. The Speakers and Events Planning Committee, and specifically Melanie Beaudette (3rd year PhD) and Skylar Br’ez (2nd year MA), have been working hard to plan this amazing conference.

Greetings Women’s Studies fans! The Undergraduate Program has some exciting events coming up for the new 2009-2010 academic year. After such an enthusiastic response, we have decided to continue to host our quarterly meeting of the Subversive Craft Brigade. The Brigade is a chance for undergraduates to meet at Wholly Craft (3171 N High Street - owned and operated by former WS graduate, Olivera Bratich) and engage in feminist conversations while crafting, knitting, etc.! Keep an eye out for flyers advertising Autumn Quarter’s meeting.

WOMEN’S STUDIES

at The Ohio State University

Message from the Chair

Women’s Studies Students Meet With Women Leaders

With the start of the 2009/10 academic year, the Department of Women’s Studies at Ohio State is preparing for a very important change—conversion to the semester system—a change that offers us challenges as well as new opportunities. Our Graduate and Undergraduate Committees have been busy researching comparable women’s studies departments Jill Bystydzienski and programs for ideas about how curriculum may be organized under semesters. The departmental fall retreat focused on the conversion as the faculty considered which areas of our programs we want to emphasize, what we need to revise, and how to organize our efforts in order to make the changes on schedule. As we move forward, we are confident that our already excellent programs will be strengthened further by this thorough examination and revision of courses and rethinking of areas of concentration.

C

areer Café is a collaboration between the Department of Women’s Studies and Triota, the Women’s Studies Honorary Society and is designed to connect current undergraduate and graduate women’s studies students with prominent female leaders. The purpose of the Career Café is to introduce Women’s Studies students to women leaders in the OSU and Columbus community who work in a variety of organizations and settings where the kind of knowledge and skills women’s studies students acquire can be used in important ways. The Café provides space where organizational leaders interact with Women’s Studies undergraduate and MA students. They discuss the work they do as well as possible internships and career opportunities for students in their organizations. This year, we had 6 speakers, 3 graduate students and 22 undergraduate students participated in the Café. A special thanks to our professionals and members of Triota, especially Kate Clonan-Roy, Ebony Richardson, and Tracie Sinsheimer whose efforts helped make this year’s event possible!

This quarter the Undergraduate Program will also be promoting the first ever Feminist Art Competition. The competition is a chance for undergraduate students of all majors to contribute a piece of artwork broadly related to the mission of feminism. It is expected that these art submissions will be on display in the Women’s Studies office for Winter Quarter, during which they will be judged by the Women’s Studies community. A winning piece of artwork will be on display in the Women’s Studies office the following academic school year. Again, look for flyers announcing the competition in mid-fall. As always, if you have any great ideas for undergraduate events, please email Stacia Kock, Undergraduate Advisor, at kock.4@ osu.edu. Thanks and cheers to a successful new year!

Greeting from WSGA Co-Presidents

T

he Women’s Studies Graduate Association dove right into the 2009-10 school year. This year’s officers are: Sarah Carnahan (’09 MA graduate, 1st year PhD) and J. Brendan Shaw (2nd year MA), co-presidents; Taneem S. Husain (2nd year MA), treasurer; Nicole Engel (2nd year PhD), secretary; Victoria Genetin, (3rd year Phd), social chair; and Andrea Breau (2nd year MA), graduate student liaison to the department’s chair.

Share the Vision!

WSGA welcomed the incoming cohort of graduate students with a delicious potluck on September 21st in Goodale Park. Graduate students and faculty shared good food and excitement about the start of the new school year. All in attendance introduced themselves and shared one non-academic goal for the coming months. WSGA was introduced to the incoming students and its function as a voice within the department and an outlet for issues and concerns was explained.

NAME ADDRESS PHONE Pictured (L to R): Kate Clonan-Roy (Triota), Nicole Dunn (Women’s Fund), Christina Cappelletti (Cappelletti Designs), Dr. Lisa Hinkelman (ROXX), Ebony Richardson (Triota), Heather Adams (Amethyst), Hollie Hinton (Governor’s Office for Women’s Initiatives), Dr. Elaine Richardson (Professor, Literacy Studies), Tracie Sinsheimer (Triota)

The picnic also provided an opportunity for the incoming graduate students to talk with their peer mentors. Each new grad student is paired with a returning student in a mentor/mentee program designed to ease the transition into the Women’s Studies Department. Both the welcome picnic and the mentor program were the result of especially hard work by Genetin, the WSGA social chair.

Are you a Women’s Studies Alum? We’d love to hear from you!

WSGA looks forward to working on a variety of projects in the coming months. Its yearly holiday party will provide a nice send off to 2009 and allow students and faculty to share holiday cheer.

Please email Jill Bystydzienski at bystydzienski.1@osu.edu or call 292-1021

In the spring, WSGA will be welcoming prospective students for their visit to the department and Columbus. WSGA is particularly excited about hosting a symposium in April entitled Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality. We will be welcoming noted theorist Jasbir Puar

5 Nltr.flg 1

Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

EMAIL DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS

Amount Enclosed

Women’s Studies Professional Development Fund (627690)

$

Women’s Studies Department (306738)

.

The Max Rice Jr. & Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund (313141)

Please contact me about my donation. Return to:

Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

Graduate Student Support (311584)

WOMEN’S STUDIES RESEARCH PROJECTS Elizabeth D. Gee Small Grants Endowment (602449)

At the same time as the conversion to semesters begins, we embark on a new era at the University with the transformation of the College of Arts and Sciences and a new Division of Arts and Humanities—the administrative umbrella for Women’s Studies. From a loose federation of five colleges (Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Mathematical & Physical Sciences), the new College is in the process of restructuring into three divisions (Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences; and Biological & Physical Sciences) with a more centrally organized administration. We look forward to additional opportunities that this change will present for how Women’s Studies can help to fulfill the College’s mission of providing students with an intellectually rich liberal arts education. We expect that the new structure will enhance possibilities for interdisciplinary initiatives and greater collaboration between the departments and programs that make up the College of Arts and Sciences. The Department experienced several transitions in recent months. This summer, the Administrative Associate responsible for fiscal matters and office management, Ada Draughon, retired after twelve years in the Department and 30 years with OSU. Ada performed her very demanding job with grace and aplomb, dealing with multiple Ada Draughon constituents—faculty, staff, students and administrators—always providing professional and friendly assistance and support. She was a mentor to many undergraduate and graduate students and a friend to staff and faculty members. Those who had the privilege to get to know Ada recognized her commitment to the highest standards of service, her great integrity, and exemplary work.

Our new Administrative Associate, Ana Shook, joined Women’s Studies in August and is quickly settling into her new position. She comes to us from the Department of Economics where she worked as the Graduate Coordinator. She also was the Assistant to the Director for Scholarship Services in the Office of Minority Affairs at Ohio State. We are very pleased to have Ana in the Department.

Ana Shook

A new faculty member has joined the Department this fall. Lynn Itagaki, Assistant Professor, holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English. Last year, she was a Visiting Scholar in Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at OSU, and we were fortunate to hire her into a permanent position. You can find out more about her work on p.2 of this Newsletter. With Dr. Itagaki joining the faculty, currently there are seventeen faculty members in Women’s Studies. We also are very proud that recently two of our faculty members became tenured and promoted to Associate Professor—Dr. Guisela Latorre and Dr. Rebecca Wanzo—and Dr. Cynthia Burack was promoted to Professor. With these promotions, the Department now has a majority of faculty (11 out of 17) in the tenured ranks. Another Women’s Studies doctoral student, Sarah Smith, graduated this summer. She is the fifth Ph.D. to obtain the degree since the doctoral program was established in 2002. Her dissertation was nominated for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award. See more about her scholarship, her new job, and the fund she started on p.4. The MA students who graduated in spring and summer 2009 are profiled here as well, and please note the accomplishments of other graduate and undergraduate students on the following pages. I am always looking for more effective ways to keep our alumni informed and involved with the Department. Women’s Studies now has an extensive alumni data base and I have recently convened a Friends of Women’s Studies group that is working on ways to connect the Department better with our various constituents. We are eager to know what our alumni are doing, and especially if you’ve been out of touch for a while, please send us your news. We would like to include information about our alumni in future Newsletters. In these turbulent times, we are faced with uncertainty about the future but rapid change also offers us opportunities for creative responses to transformation. I wish all of our colleagues and friends around the country and the world a productive and peaceful academic year full of new possibilities. -Jill Bystydzienski

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDY Mildred Munday Scholarship (645073)

Give online at giveto.osu.edu. 10/9/09 4:23:29 PM


Undergraduate Corner

from Rutgers along with Elaine Richardson and David Staley from OSU. The Speakers and Events Planning Committee, and specifically Melanie Beaudette (3rd year PhD) and Skylar Br’ez (2nd year MA), have been working hard to plan this amazing conference.

Greetings Women’s Studies fans! The Undergraduate Program has some exciting events coming up for the new 2009-2010 academic year. After such an enthusiastic response, we have decided to continue to host our quarterly meeting of the Subversive Craft Brigade. The Brigade is a chance for undergraduates to meet at Wholly Craft (3171 N High Street - owned and operated by former WS graduate, Olivera Bratich) and engage in feminist conversations while crafting, knitting, etc.! Keep an eye out for flyers advertising Autumn Quarter’s meeting.

WOMEN’S STUDIES

at The Ohio State University

Message from the Chair

Women’s Studies Students Meet With Women Leaders

With the start of the 2009/10 academic year, the Department of Women’s Studies at Ohio State is preparing for a very important change—conversion to the semester system—a change that offers us challenges as well as new opportunities. Our Graduate and Undergraduate Committees have been busy researching comparable women’s studies departments Jill Bystydzienski and programs for ideas about how curriculum may be organized under semesters. The departmental fall retreat focused on the conversion as the faculty considered which areas of our programs we want to emphasize, what we need to revise, and how to organize our efforts in order to make the changes on schedule. As we move forward, we are confident that our already excellent programs will be strengthened further by this thorough examination and revision of courses and rethinking of areas of concentration.

C

areer Café is a collaboration between the Department of Women’s Studies and Triota, the Women’s Studies Honorary Society and is designed to connect current undergraduate and graduate women’s studies students with prominent female leaders. The purpose of the Career Café is to introduce Women’s Studies students to women leaders in the OSU and Columbus community who work in a variety of organizations and settings where the kind of knowledge and skills women’s studies students acquire can be used in important ways. The Café provides space where organizational leaders interact with Women’s Studies undergraduate and MA students. They discuss the work they do as well as possible internships and career opportunities for students in their organizations. This year, we had 6 speakers, 3 graduate students and 22 undergraduate students participated in the Café. A special thanks to our professionals and members of Triota, especially Kate Clonan-Roy, Ebony Richardson, and Tracie Sinsheimer whose efforts helped make this year’s event possible!

This quarter the Undergraduate Program will also be promoting the first ever Feminist Art Competition. The competition is a chance for undergraduate students of all majors to contribute a piece of artwork broadly related to the mission of feminism. It is expected that these art submissions will be on display in the Women’s Studies office for Winter Quarter, during which they will be judged by the Women’s Studies community. A winning piece of artwork will be on display in the Women’s Studies office the following academic school year. Again, look for flyers announcing the competition in mid-fall. As always, if you have any great ideas for undergraduate events, please email Stacia Kock, Undergraduate Advisor, at kock.4@ osu.edu. Thanks and cheers to a successful new year!

Greeting from WSGA Co-Presidents

T

he Women’s Studies Graduate Association dove right into the 2009-10 school year. This year’s officers are: Sarah Carnahan (’09 MA graduate, 1st year PhD) and J. Brendan Shaw (2nd year MA), co-presidents; Taneem S. Husain (2nd year MA), treasurer; Nicole Engel (2nd year PhD), secretary; Victoria Genetin, (3rd year Phd), social chair; and Andrea Breau (2nd year MA), graduate student liaison to the department’s chair.

Share the Vision!

WSGA welcomed the incoming cohort of graduate students with a delicious potluck on September 21st in Goodale Park. Graduate students and faculty shared good food and excitement about the start of the new school year. All in attendance introduced themselves and shared one non-academic goal for the coming months. WSGA was introduced to the incoming students and its function as a voice within the department and an outlet for issues and concerns was explained.

NAME ADDRESS PHONE Pictured (L to R): Kate Clonan-Roy (Triota), Nicole Dunn (Women’s Fund), Christina Cappelletti (Cappelletti Designs), Dr. Lisa Hinkelman (ROXX), Ebony Richardson (Triota), Heather Adams (Amethyst), Hollie Hinton (Governor’s Office for Women’s Initiatives), Dr. Elaine Richardson (Professor, Literacy Studies), Tracie Sinsheimer (Triota)

The picnic also provided an opportunity for the incoming graduate students to talk with their peer mentors. Each new grad student is paired with a returning student in a mentor/mentee program designed to ease the transition into the Women’s Studies Department. Both the welcome picnic and the mentor program were the result of especially hard work by Genetin, the WSGA social chair.

Are you a Women’s Studies Alum? We’d love to hear from you!

WSGA looks forward to working on a variety of projects in the coming months. Its yearly holiday party will provide a nice send off to 2009 and allow students and faculty to share holiday cheer.

Please email Jill Bystydzienski at bystydzienski.1@osu.edu or call 292-1021

In the spring, WSGA will be welcoming prospective students for their visit to the department and Columbus. WSGA is particularly excited about hosting a symposium in April entitled Contemporary Interdisciplinary Scholarship on Gender and Sexuality. We will be welcoming noted theorist Jasbir Puar

5 Nltr.flg 1

Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

EMAIL DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAMS

Amount Enclosed

Women’s Studies Professional Development Fund (627690)

$

Women’s Studies Department (306738)

.

The Max Rice Jr. & Sarah Smith Women’s Studies Fund (313141)

Please contact me about my donation. Return to:

Department of Women’s Studies The Ohio State University 286 University Hall 230 N. Oval Mall Columbus, OH 43210

Graduate Student Support (311584)

WOMEN’S STUDIES RESEARCH PROJECTS Elizabeth D. Gee Small Grants Endowment (602449)

At the same time as the conversion to semesters begins, we embark on a new era at the University with the transformation of the College of Arts and Sciences and a new Division of Arts and Humanities—the administrative umbrella for Women’s Studies. From a loose federation of five colleges (Arts, Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences, Biological Sciences, and Mathematical & Physical Sciences), the new College is in the process of restructuring into three divisions (Arts & Humanities, Social & Behavioral Sciences; and Biological & Physical Sciences) with a more centrally organized administration. We look forward to additional opportunities that this change will present for how Women’s Studies can help to fulfill the College’s mission of providing students with an intellectually rich liberal arts education. We expect that the new structure will enhance possibilities for interdisciplinary initiatives and greater collaboration between the departments and programs that make up the College of Arts and Sciences. The Department experienced several transitions in recent months. This summer, the Administrative Associate responsible for fiscal matters and office management, Ada Draughon, retired after twelve years in the Department and 30 years with OSU. Ada performed her very demanding job with grace and aplomb, dealing with multiple Ada Draughon constituents—faculty, staff, students and administrators—always providing professional and friendly assistance and support. She was a mentor to many undergraduate and graduate students and a friend to staff and faculty members. Those who had the privilege to get to know Ada recognized her commitment to the highest standards of service, her great integrity, and exemplary work.

Our new Administrative Associate, Ana Shook, joined Women’s Studies in August and is quickly settling into her new position. She comes to us from the Department of Economics where she worked as the Graduate Coordinator. She also was the Assistant to the Director for Scholarship Services in the Office of Minority Affairs at Ohio State. We are very pleased to have Ana in the Department.

Ana Shook

A new faculty member has joined the Department this fall. Lynn Itagaki, Assistant Professor, holds a joint appointment in Women’s Studies and English. Last year, she was a Visiting Scholar in Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies at OSU, and we were fortunate to hire her into a permanent position. You can find out more about her work on p.2 of this Newsletter. With Dr. Itagaki joining the faculty, currently there are seventeen faculty members in Women’s Studies. We also are very proud that recently two of our faculty members became tenured and promoted to Associate Professor—Dr. Guisela Latorre and Dr. Rebecca Wanzo—and Dr. Cynthia Burack was promoted to Professor. With these promotions, the Department now has a majority of faculty (11 out of 17) in the tenured ranks. Another Women’s Studies doctoral student, Sarah Smith, graduated this summer. She is the fifth Ph.D. to obtain the degree since the doctoral program was established in 2002. Her dissertation was nominated for the Council of Graduate Schools Dissertation Award. See more about her scholarship, her new job, and the fund she started on p.4. The MA students who graduated in spring and summer 2009 are profiled here as well, and please note the accomplishments of other graduate and undergraduate students on the following pages. I am always looking for more effective ways to keep our alumni informed and involved with the Department. Women’s Studies now has an extensive alumni data base and I have recently convened a Friends of Women’s Studies group that is working on ways to connect the Department better with our various constituents. We are eager to know what our alumni are doing, and especially if you’ve been out of touch for a while, please send us your news. We would like to include information about our alumni in future Newsletters. In these turbulent times, we are faced with uncertainty about the future but rapid change also offers us opportunities for creative responses to transformation. I wish all of our colleagues and friends around the country and the world a productive and peaceful academic year full of new possibilities. -Jill Bystydzienski

SCHOLARSHIPS FOR UNDERGRADUATE STUDY Mildred Munday Scholarship (645073)

Give online at giveto.osu.edu. 10/9/09 4:23:29 PM


2009 WS Newsletter