Kiwanis magazine April/May 2022

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SHARE IT WITH YOUR NEIGHBOR • MAKE SURE YOUR FIRE CHIEF HAS A COPY • LEAVE IT WITH YOUR DOCTOR • GIVE IT TO YOUR ACCOUNTANT • SHARE IT WITH YOUR CHILD’S TEACHER • REMEMBER WHEN YOUR CLUB DONATED TO A LOCAL CHARITY? GIVE THIS MAGAZINE TO THE PERSON WHO ACCEPTED THE CHECK • GIVE IT TO THE MAYOR • HAVE YOU THOUGHT ABOUT THE BUTCHER, BAKER OR CANDLESTICK MAKER? • SHARE IT WITH YOUR VET • TAKE IT TO YOUR CLUB MEETING • SHARE IT WITH HIM • SHARE IT WITH HER • SEND IT TO YOUR COUSIN IN PITTSBURGH • GIVE IT TO YOUR BABYSITTER • TAKE IT TO TEMPLE WITH YOU • DON’T FORGET YOUR BOSS • PASS IT TO YOUR BANKER • HAND IT OVER TO THE CHEF AT YOUR FAVORITE RESTAURANT • MAKE SURE YOUR FINANCIAL ADVISOR HAS A COPY • SHOW IT TO A SCOUT LEADER • SHARE IT WITH YOUR BEST FRIEND • SHARE IT WITH A RETIRING JCI MEMBER • DROP BY THAT NEW BUSINESS DOWN THE STREET AND GIVE THIS TO THE OWNER • DELIVER IT TO A IBRARIAN • PRESENT IT TO THE MOST SELFLESS PERSON YOU KNOW • SHARE IT WITH THE NEX PERSON WHO INTRODUCES HIMSELF • GIVE IT TO YOUR SON • GIVE IT TO YOUR DAUGHTER • GIVE IT TO MOM AND DAD • AS AN ACT OF INTERVENTION, SHARE IT WITH A COUCH POTATO • PASS IT ON TO THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB MANAGER • PRESENT IT TO YOUR FAVORITE CUSTOMER • ALLOW YOUR PRINTER SALESPERSON TO KEEP IT • YOUR INSURANCE AGENT SHOULD HAVE A COPY • DOES YOUR ATTORNEY HAVE A COPY? • GIVE IT TO A TREE HUGGER • LET A SINGER KEEP IT • TAKE IT WITH YOU TO THE HAIR SALON AND LEAVE IT BEHIND • SHARE IT WITH THE 14TH NAME ON YOUR FACEBOOK FRIENDS LIST • DON’T FORGET YOUR MECHANIC, CHIROPRACTOR OR ELECTRICIAN • PLANT A SEED BY GIVING IT TO A FARMER • EVERY CLUB NEEDS PR; SHARE IT WITH A MARKETING EXPERT • HAND IT TO A FORMER KIWANIAN • GIVE IT TO THE HOSPITAL ADMINISTRATOR • PUT A COPY IN YOUR MINISTER’S PALMS • GIVE IT TO A PERSON OF A DIFFERENT GENERATION, GENDER, RACE, CULTURE, BELIEF OR POLITICAL PARTY • HAND IT TO A JOURNALIST • SHARE IT WITH SOMEONE WHO SHARES SOMETHING WITH YOU • RENEW AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE AND GIVE WHAT’S-HER-NAME THIS MAGAZINE • DON’T FORGET YOUR FAVORITE FUNERAL HOME DIRECTOR • PRESENT ONE TO THE STAR OF YOUR COMMUNITY THEATER’S NEXT PRODUCTION • YOUR HOMETOWN SOCCER COACH SHOULD GET ONE • SHARE ONE WITH A LANDSCAPER • SHARE WITH YOUR PHARMACIST • A FORMER KEY CLUB OR CKI MEMBER SHOULD DEFINITELY SEE THIS MAGAZINE • GIVE IT TO A POLITICIAN • GIVE IT TO A VETERAN • SHARE IT WITH SOMEONE WHO HAS AN INTERESTING HOBBY LIKE FALCONING OR MOUNTAIN CLIMBING • HAND IT BACK TO YOUR POSTAL CARRIER • SHARE IT WITH A SPECIAL ED TEACHER • GIVE IT TO THE PERSON YOU JUST BEAT IN EUCHRE • SHARE IT WITH A PILOT OR SAILOR • HAND IT TO A HANDYMAN • OFFER IT TO AN IT GEEK • JUST TAKE IT TO A JUDGE • OR A JEWELER • CHOOSE ONE OF THE MEDICAL TECHNICIANS AT YOUR LOCAL HOSPITAL • LEAVE IT WITH A PEDIATRICIAN, BECAUSE THEY CARE ABOUT KIDS TOO • SHARE IT WITH A CIVIL SERVAN • GIVE IT TO THE MOST FAMOUS PERSON IN TOWN • DROP IT OFF WITH THE TOWN HISTORIAN • SHARE IT WITH A SOCIAL MEDIA EXPERT BECAUSE YOUR CLUB NEEDS TO UPGRADE ITS COMMUNICATIONS • SHARE IT WITH YOUR NEIGHBOR • SHARE IT WITH YOUR OTHER NEIGHBOR • GIVE ONE TO THE COACH • HAND ONE TO YOUR AUNT MARGARET • DON'T FORGET THE CHURCH SECRETARY • THE SCHOOL BOARD PRESIDENT NEEDS TO READ THIS FOR SURE • DROP ONE OFF AT THE FIREHOUSE • LEAVE ONE AT A BUS STOP SHELTER • GIVE ONE TO A POLICEMAN • AND POLICEWOMAN

WHAT IF YOU CHOOSE TO CHANGE THE WORLD?

HERE'S WHERE TO START


SEE THE NEED

WHAT IF YOU’RE THE ONE? If you’re holding this magazine in your hands right now, you ARE the one. You’re the one who knows the importance of a strong education. You value your environment. You hold doors open for people and offer a smile when someone holds one open for you. You know people deserve to be happy, healthy and safe. We know how you feel because we feel that way too. And we know you’re the one. You’re the one who can change the world. Right now. Right this moment. How do we know? Because we know that everyone has that power within them. Really. You do. One simple act of kindness toward another changes the world. Can you imagine the power you’d have if you joined forces with others who are also the one? You are the one. It’s you. This is an amazing world. Let’s continue to make it better by helping children and families live their greatest lives. 2 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G


INSIDE

KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL KIWANIS MAGAZINE STAFF PUBLISHER CHIEF COMMUNICATIONS OFFICER EXECUTIVE EDITOR MANAGING EDITOR ART DIRECTOR ASSISTANT EDITOR MULTIMEDIA PROJECTS EDITOR

Stan D. Soderstrom Ben Hendricks Kasey Jackson Tony Knoderer Andy Austin Julie Saetre Curtis Billue

2021–22 KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OFFICERS PRESIDENT Peter J. Mancuso North Bellmore, New York, USA PRESIDENT-ELECT Bert West Divide, Colorado, USA IMMEDIATE Arthur N. Riley PAST PRESIDENT Westminster, Maryland, USA VICE PRESIDENT Katrina J. Baranko Albany, Georgia, USA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Stan D. Soderstrom Indianapolis, Indiana, USA TRUSTEES Wilfredo Aguilar, Koronadal City, South Cotabato, Philippines; Gunnsteinn Björnsson, Sauðárkrókur, Iceland; Gary Cooper, Fayetteville, North Carolina, USA; Kip Crain, Wooster, Ohio, USA; Chuck Fletcher, Frankfort, Kentucky, USA; Michel Fongue, Noumea, South Province, New Caledonia; Buheita Fujiwara, Kita-ku, Tokyo, Japan; Gary Graham, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, USA; David W. Hurrelbrink, Kansas City, Kansas, USA; Linda Lawther, Ypsilanti, Michigan, USA; Daniel Leikvold, Lead, South Dakota, USA; Hope Markes, Hanover, Jamaica; Michael Mulhaul, Interlaken, New Jersey, USA; Éliane Ott-Scheffer, Ohnenheim, France; Cathy Szymanski, Erie, Pennsylvania, USA 2021–22 KIWANIS CHILDREN’S FUND OFFICERS PRESIDENT Robert M. Garretson Fort Collins, Colorado, USA PRESIDENT-ELECT Filip Delanote Koksijde, Belgium IMMEDIATE Norman A. Velnes PAST PRESIDENT Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada TREASURER Amy Zimmerman Cincinnati, Ohio, USA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Stan D. Soderstrom Indianapolis, Indiana, USA CHIEF PHILANTHROPY Pam Norman OFFICER Zionsville, Indiana, USA TRUSTEES Katrina J. Baranko, Albany, Georgia, USA; Matthew Cantrall, Lakeland, Florida, USA; Juanita F. Edwards, Cherry Log, Georgia, USA; Mark G. Esposito, Sicklerville, New Jersey, USA; Lenora J. Hanna, Ashland, Nebraska, USA; Robert S. Maxwell, Topeka, Kansas, USA; Arthur N. Riley, Westminster, Maryland, USA; Armand B. St. Raymond, Birmingham, Alabama, USA; Elizabeth M. Tezza, Sullivans Island, South Carolina, USA; John Tyner II, Rockville, Maryland, USA; Francesco Valenti, Lentini, Italy; Yang Chien-Kung “C.K.,” Hsinchu City, Taiwan KIWANIS INTERNATIONAL OFFICE 3636 Woodview Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46268-3196 1-800-KIWANIS (in U.S./Canada), +1-317-875-8755 Fax: +1-317-879-0204 Email: magazine@kiwanis.org Website: kiwanis.org Magazine website: kiwanismagazine.org ADVERTISING SALES Fox Associates Inc. 116 West Kinzie Street, Chicago, IL 60654-4655 1-800-440-0231 (U.S./Canada), +1-312-644-3888 Fax: +1-312-644-8718 Email: adinfo.kiwanis@foxrep.com FUTURE CONVENTIONS Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, June 8-11, 2022 Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA, June 21-24, 2023 Denver, Colorado, USA, July 3-7, 2024 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, June 25-28, 2025 KIWANIS (ISSN 0162-5276) is published six times a year in January, April, August, September, October and December by Kiwanis International. Postmaster: Send address changes to Kiwanis, 3636 Woodview Trace, Indianapolis, IN 46268-3196. Periodicals postage paid at Indianapolis, IN and additional mailing offices. (CPC Pub Agreement #40030511) Return undeliverable Canadian addresses to Kiwanis, 2835 Kew Drive, Windsor, ON N8T 3B7. Member’s annual subscription is US$8. Nonmembers may subscribe for US$12 per year. The information in this magazine is for illustrative and discussion purposes only. It is intended to provide general information about the subject matter covered and is provided with the understanding that Kiwanis is not rendering legal, accounting or tax advice. You should consult with appropriate counsel or other advisors on all matters pertaining to legal, tax or accounting obligations and requirements. Copyright ©2022 Kiwanis International

CONTENTS

APRIL/MAY 2022 • VOLUME 107, NUMBER 3

FEATURES 6 EXECUTIVE PERSPECTIVE Stan Soderstrom, Kiwanis International executive director 8 BY THE NUMBERS Kiwanis is a worldwide service organization with members and service projects touching millions. 10 DOING THE MOST GOOD What if you’re the one to recognize a problem and figure out the best way to solve it? 26 LEGACY OF SERVICE These three service projects offer an example of the lifechanging work Kiwanis members do around the world. 42 HOW & WHY TO SERVE Giving your time and talent to a worthy cause benefits children and families. But it benefits you as well.

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VOICES

EXECUTIVE PERSPECTIVE STAN SODERSTROM • KIWANIS EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

How to know if Kiwanis is for you

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f you’re reading this, I hope it’s because a member of your community’s Kiwanis club handed it to you and invited you to learn more about Kiwanis. If so, I’d like to take a few moments to tell you about us. First, the basics: We are a 107-year-old organization with clubs in almost 90 nations and territories around the world. Our focus is children — because happy, healthy children are an important part of creating stronger communities everywhere. Perhaps our greatest contribution to communities has been our youth leadership programs. In high schools, for example, Key Clubs have developed youth leadership skills in millions of students since 1925. I know, because Key Club was my first taste of leadership — and my chance to make a difference in my school and in my home city of Amarillo, Texas. All along, Kiwanis club members were behind my growth and development. That’s a crucial part of Kiwanis membership: the opportunity to serve as advisors and mentors. For me, Kiwanians weren’t just early influences — they were the reason I joined a Kiwanis club as an adult. The man who extended that invitation to me was a Dallas Kiwanian named Art Swanberg. Art 4 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

told me that we’re all about trying to “have a little fun while we do a lot of good.” Sometimes, he acknowledged, we do a little good and have a lot of fun — but either way, members make good things happen while working with their neighbors in the community. This brings me to you. If you want to make a positive impact in your community and get to know more of the people who live there, a Kiwanis club just might be right for you. On the other hand, your first response might be to ask, “What’s in it for me?” In that case, I have to be honest: Kiwanis might not be a good match for you. Our members want to make their communities better — and they tend not to worry about contributing time, talent and treasure. More important, they realize that the best way to invest in our future is to invest in our youth. What I can’t tell you is what your Kiwanis club experience will be like. Every Kiwanis club is different. Every club chooses its own service activities, where to spend its money and with whom to partner. And every club can be as large or as small as it chooses. Some clubs have hundreds of

members, and some have fewer than a couple dozen. Some meet weekly, some meet monthly, and some meet online. And when clubs raise money from the community, it’s to support club service activities — we don’t expect the community to pay for the cost of membership. Members pay annual dues to Kiwanis International, which cover the club’s and organization’s administrative expenses, a magazine subscription and liability insurance for you and your club. Those are some of the basics about who we are and what we do. The next step is yours. I encourage you to visit a Kiwanis club meeting. Better yet, volunteer at a Kiwanis service project. That’s the best way to get a real taste of the service, fellowship and community impact that Kiwanis is all about.


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BY THE NUMBERS

WHO WE ARE

KIWANIS IS A WORLDWIDE SERVICE ORGANIZATION WITH MEMBERS AND SERVICE PROJECTS TOUCHING MILLIONS. HERE ARE SOME STATS:

8,386

Number of Kiwanis clubs around the world.

19

Number — in millions — of hours Kiwanis family members dedicate to service annually.

8,268

Number of clubs worldwide in our service programs for youth, college students and adults with disabilities.

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85

Number of nations and geographic areas where Kiwanis has clubs.

537,830 Number of adult and youth members in the Kiwanis family.

13 3

Amount raised — in millions — each year by Kiwanis clubs around the world.

152,000

Number of service projects Kiwanis clubs conduct each year. AP RI L/MAY 2022 7


CHANGE THE WORLD

DOING THE MOST GOOD WHAT IF YOU WERE ABLE TO RECOGNIZE A PROBLEM AND FIGURE OUT THE BEST WAY TO SOLVE IT?

T

here are countless headlines about events that make us want to reach out and help. The pandemic. Natural disasters. Hunger. Homelessness. The list goes on and on. But there’s good news in there: We can do something about it. No matter how small a step we take, we can go in the right direction to make this world happier, safer and healthier for everyone. The first step is recognizing what needs to happen. Then we do the work. Sounds hard, right? Well, it doesn’t have to be. Every act of service puts us closer to a better world. The photos on the following pages show acts of service by members of Kiwanis from all over the world. You’ll see service in every form — from life-changing

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medical, educational and disaster-relief support to community fundraisers and cultural events that bring people from all walks of life together for fun. Helping others goes beyond building a home or funding a scholarship — though many members have done just that. Helping others can also create experiences that leave positive memories for a lifetime. We hope you find the inspiration to make a difference. Just ask yourself: What if?

In times of a pandemic Many Kiwanis members played key roles in the fight against COVID-19, including personal support worker and nursing student Angelo Ciardella, a member of the Kiwanis Club of Windsor, Ontario, Canada.


CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could reach children wherever they are? Kids need help at home, at school, in sports, in hospitals ... all over and everywhere. Members of Kiwanis clubs help children and families in all areas of the world, be it during a Kiwanis One Day event in Japan (opposite page), teaching music at the Institute for Blind Children in Owinska, Poland (left) or providing bicycles to children in Lesotho, Africa (below). There are children who need help right now, even in your own backyard. Reaching them through a Kiwanis club offers you a friendly environment for providing all types of much-needed service.

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could help when it’s needed most? Emergencies are unpredictable and almost always require immediate attention. Kiwanis clubs have been at the ready for more than 100 years, providing help when the unforeseen strikes. When children need special braces in Mongolia, Kiwanis is there.

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When hurricanes leave destruction and devastation in their paths, Kiwanis members are there to stock shelves with much-needed food and health supplies. When a struggling family needs somewhere safe to call home, the Kiwanis family is there

with hammers and nails. And when refugees need everything to start their lives anew, Kiwanis is there to offer clothing, food, supplies, help and a warm welcome. Kids need Kiwanis. Families need Kiwanis. And Kiwanis is there when needed most.


CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could give children a safe place to play and learn? Every kid has a job to do, and that’s to play and learn. As adults, our job is to keep them safe and make sure they have somewhere to do their best work. Kiwanis clubs often

have just the project — whether building playgrounds, play spaces and ballparks or providing funds for school supplies and class projects. In Ankara, Turkey (top photo),

Kiwanians helped make a creative learning environment and studio at a progressive school, where students use drama and art to complement their education. AP RI L/MAY 2022 15


CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could help today’s teens become tomorrow’s leaders? Is anything better than helping kids grow and succeed? Kiwanis members don’t think so. That’s why they dedicate countless hours to working alongside youth. In fact, Kiwanis clubs sponsor the organization’s Service Leadership Programs (K-Kids, Builders Club, Key Club and Circle K International) to give young people the opportunity to lead through service. Many people credit their time in Kiwanis youth programs with making them who they are today, providing them opportunities they wouldn’t have had otherwise and opening doors that might have remained closed. For example, CKI

members tackle projects both large and small to make positive change happen in communities — such as the Large Scale Service Projects (left) conducted during many of their annual conventions. Harold Ekah (below) was a Key Club member. He credits a strong support system for his achievement of getting accepted to all eight Ivy League schools. “I want to be able to say I made a difference in my community and made a difference in my world, and that’s what Key Club really inspired me to do,” Ekah says. “If you see something wrong in your community, you have the power to change that.”

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could help people help themselves? It’s one thing to give a house to someone who doesn’t have a home. It’s another to work alongside them to build one. But that’s what many Kiwanis members do, for instance, when their clubs work with Habitat For Humanity on projects that change countless lives. And Kiwanians in Nevada (below) don’t just hand out bicycles — they teach people of all ages how to fix and maintain them. In Basel, Switzerland, Kiwanis members support a refugee-run kitchen that provides more than a hot meal and training. It also provides community and hope.

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CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

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CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could offer tools for healthier living? Not everyone has access to healthy foods or the vitamins and minerals people need on a daily basis — or even to clean water. But Kiwanis clubs around the world are there to help when and where they can. In Japan (left),

Kiwanians sponsored a Healthy Cooking Expo. In Calgary (top left), the Apple Festival creates an opportunity for kids to develop a lifelong love for apples. Around the world, Kiwanis members raise funds to ensure salt is iodized as

part of the global campaign to end iodine deficiency disorders (top right). And in Guatemala (above), Key Club members teach children proper handwashing techniques while building a water station at the school there. AP RI L/MAY 2022 21


CHANGE THE WORLD

What if you could give children the tools to become lifelong readers? Here are some facts that might surprise you: Children who are read to for at least 20 minutes a day are exposed to almost 2 million words per year. (India leads the world in amount of time spent reading.) The global literacy rate for all people ages 15 and older is right around 86%. But it’s important to point out that about 775 million people can’t read, and the poorest countries still have large segments of the population who are illiterate. Kiwanis knows the importance of literacy and learning. Through countless projects, clubs around the world focus on reading to children, donating books and ensuring that books are available to kids and their families.

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CHANGE THE WORLD

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A LEGACY OF SERVICE

Greetings from Camp Sweyolakan!

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Thanks for the Memories AN IDAHO CAMP TURNS 100 AND CELEBRATES A CENTURY OF SUPPORT FROM KIWANIS.

Story by Katie Cantrell

I

cried every summer, starting when I was 9 years old. Sometimes the tears came in June, other years in August. But every single time I boarded the boat to leave Camp Sweyolakan, the lump in my throat would rise again. I loved that camp so fiercely, it broke my heart to think I’d have to wait an entire year before I’d be on the boat again. Sweyolakan is a rambling, idyllic summer camp tucked among the pine-forested hills on Lake Coeur d’Alene in northern Idaho. One of the many things that made it magical was that it wasn’t accessible by car. The land went so steeply uphill from the camp into the wilderness that no one had ever bothered to build more than a logging road anywhere in the vicinity, so everything from campers to kitchen supplies arrived by boat. I’d wait by the railing for the moment we would round the final corner and see the main dock come into view, packed as always with counselors singing the

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A LEGACY OF SERVICE

traditional welcome song: “We welcome you to Sweyolakan/ Mighty glad you’re here/We’ll send the air reverberating/With a mighty cheer…” I’m a little ashamed to say that my younger self had no idea that I had Kiwanis to thank for the best memories of my childhood. Sure, I’d paddled the bright blue wooden war canoe named “Kiwanis” around the bay, but it lined up on the beach next to the Wacatawani and the Pequod — just another exotic-sounding name to me. I knew the high schoolers’ section of camp, which was on its own bay up and over the hill from main camp, was called Ki26 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

wan-Echo. But no one ever said, “You know, that’s because in 1927 the Spokane Kiwanis Club bought those 64 acres and donated them to Camp Fire Girls, just as they helped buy the original camp land in 1922.” Or maybe someone did say it, but I was too busy learning how to build a tarp shelter, make sand candles and shoot a bull’s-eye to pay attention to the history lesson. Camp Sweyolakan turns 100 this summer and is the most enduring legacy of the Kiwanis Club of Downtown Spokane. Camp Fire Girls began in Maine in 1910 as an outdoor-oriented youth development organization. (Now

known as Camp Fire, it’s open to all children.) When the Spokane council was chartered in March 1922, they made a presentation to the Kiwanis Club of Downtown Spokane. The Kiwanians adopted the Camp Fire Girls as the club’s second major activity, alongside their work for the Washington Children’s Home Finding Society. The club immediately began raising funds to help Camp Fire Girls purchase a summer camp, presenting them with US$1,000 in June of that year — almost a quarter of the money needed to buy the original 16.5 acres. That generous gift was just the beginning of a century-long rela-


In the beginning, Kiwanians helped build Camp Sweyolakan with their time and talents as well as their checkbooks. tionship during which Kiwanians put both of Kiwanis International’s mottos — the original, “We Build,” and “Serving the Children of the World,” adopted in 2005 — to work year after year. In the beginning, Kiwanians helped build Camp Sweyolakan with their time and talents as well as their checkbooks. The lakefront parcel had a dock and a few existing buildings when Camp Fire Girls took ownership, enough to house 55 girls at a time, but most of the land was still an untouched forest. The first boatload of campers arrived on July 2, 1922, with the Kiwanians — and their hands-on support — hot on their heels. Eleven days later, 75 Kiwanians took an early morning train from Spokane, Washington, to Coeur d’Alene, where they met 30 members from the Coeur d’Alene Kiwanis club and loaded both themselves and one member’s tractor onto barges for the

trip. At the camp, they graded an athletic field, cut trails, built steps from rock slabs and reconfigured the main building into a dining hall that served 475 campers over the course of the first summer. The Kiwanis Clean-Up Day quickly became an annual tradition. As the camp continued to grow and take shape over the years, Kiwanians built a tennis court, donated and installed a 75foot flagpole, cleared stumps and debris, painted, tore down old buildings and helped build new

ones — whatever needed to be done. Their Sweyolakan workday was never complete without an evening of fun with the campers and counselors: Newspaper clippings from the early years recount boat races, sing-alongs and challenges between Camp Fire Girls and Kiwanians, including a “hotly-contested one-legged race” in 1925 that the Kiwanians narrowly won. The Camp Fire counselors later responded with back-to-back canoe race victories in 1932 and 1933.

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A LEGACY OF SERVICE

Nearly a century may have passed since Kiwanian Elmer Hill loaded his Cleveland Tractor onto a barge at the Coeur d’Alene dock, but the Kiwanians’ support of Camp Sweyolakan has never waned. In 1947, they made another gift of 147 acres of land, a huge buffer extending up and out from the main camp that forever ensured Sweyolakan would feel like an island set apart, even on a world-class lake teeming with private homes. Over the years, they have consistently helped open and close the camp each spring and fall. “The last time I was out there, a tree fell across the trail during the winter,” remembers Chuck Young, who has been a member of the Downtown Spokane club since 1991 and is a past club president, past district lieutenant governor

and the current president of Spokane Kiwanis Charities. “They’d already cleared the tree and the stump, but we had to repair the trail. There were four or five of us with shovels and picks, moving rocks and dirt to make the trail safe to walk on.” In addition to dealing with the surprises from the North Idaho winters, a major focus of the work days is moving the camp’s boats in and out of their winter storage. That’s no small task, considering that some of the canoes weigh 180 pounds and have to be lifted eight feet in the air to reach the

Writer Katie Cantrell (left) at camp.

doors on the dining hall porch. “Those humongous war canoes, they’re heavy,” Young says. “You’ve got to get about a dozen people to get them off the sawhorses and up to the dining hall porch. I’ve learned to be nowhere near the canoes when that takes place.” Young chuckles, adding that he’d rather spend his time with a shovel or a paintbrush. Tracy Taitch is another Kiwanian intimately familiar with both sides of this longstanding relationship. She was a camper and counselor at Sweyolakan in the 1970s and ‘80s, followed by 20 years as the director of Camp Fire Camp Dart-Lo, Sweyolakan’s sister camp in North Spokane — which the local Kiwanis clubs have also steadfastly supported since 1945. Taitch’s appreciation for the clubs’ involvement with Camp Fire led her to join the Downtown Spokane Kiwanis Club in 1994. Now a past president,


she has seen firsthand how the important the longtime bond is to both organizations. “Kiwanis is a service club that supports its community with time and money. Kiwanians are not afraid to get their hands dirty and do the hard work,” Taitch says. “It’s very comforting for Camp Fire to know that Kiwanis will always be there, to provide financial support and actual labor at the camp.” At the same time, Taitch adds, Sweyolakan and Camp Fire projects are a foundational piece of the Downtown Club. “It’s part of the commitment you make when you join, even if you have your own passion.” In fact, the club has expanded its service to other local organizations. But members make sure it’s never at the expense of Camp Fire. “We’ll pick up your passion too,” Taitch says, “but we won’t lose this one.” Kiwanis has served tens of thousands of Sweyolakan campers over the last 100 years. Many attend Sweyolakan or DartLo on a Kiwanis scholarship, a tradition that dates back to at least the Great Depression. In a 1932 letter to the Spokane Kiwanis Club president, the executive

director of Camp Fire Girls wrote: “We are especially appreciative of your gift of campships to needy Camp Fire Girls whose fathers in many instances had not been employed for months.” After noting other joint projects between the organizations, the letter concludes: “There are so many things for which we feel grateful to Kiwanis! May the warmth of Camp Fire ever reach out to include Kiwanis in its friendship circle.” That feeling of gratitude continues today. On behalf of everyone who is instantly transported back to the best days of our childhood by the smell of pine trees on a hot day or the hummed refrain of a favorite camp song: Thank you,

Kiwanis International. We are indeed grateful for the enduring legacy you have endowed on Camp Sweyolakan. You have served the children of the Inland Northwest so well. K

Katie Cantrell is a freelance writer and journalist based in northwest Montana. Her years as a camper and counselor at Camp Sweyolakan taught her how to paddle a canoe in a straight line and not to panic when a roasted marshmallow catches on fire. She is especially proud of her ability to build a one-match fire without using any paper.

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A LEGACY OF SERVICE

Everyone

M O M ’S D R E A M F O R D AU G H T E R CO M E S T R U E , T H A N K S TO K I WA N I S A N D CO M M U N I T Y.

W

hen members of the Kiwanis Club of Pella, Iowa, decided to build a playground, they knew they wanted one thing above all else: to create a place where everyone could play. A place where kids who used walkers or wheelchairs could 30 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

swing next to kids who didn’t. They wanted to build a playground that fostered unity and equality. A place where moms and dads could feel proud to bring their kids no matter their physical abilities. And that’s exactly what they did.


can play

By teaming up with experts and parents of children with special needs, the Kiwanis club was able to create a safe space for all families. And Sarah Turnbull was there to help along the way. Turnbull, who has a daughter with spinal muscu-

lar atrophy, was part of the advisory committee that helped the Kiwanis club determine the wants and needs for the community’s all-inclusive playground, Wonder Spelen. Here she shares her personal story with Kiwanis magazine. AP RI L/MAY 2022 31


A LEGACY OF SERVICE

By Sarah Turnbull

M

y daughter Stella was with my older son on a beautiful diagnosed with spinal afternoon when it was just the two muscular atrophy, the child of us. I wanted to load up the kids form of ALS, when she was just an and head to the park to play. infant. After receiving Stella’s terrifying prognosis, our world was turned upside down. So many medical appointments, medications, equipment, IEP (individualized education program) meetings, needing an adapted van and entry into our house and living with lots of unknowns. There was such Sarah Turnbull a learning curve and so many adaptations to be made in life. And That image was far from my you know what I craved more than reality, however. My boys would anything? A sense of normalcy. I play and Stella and I would sit on so badly wanted to do what I did the sidelines. Instead of enjoying 32 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

our time at the park together, the boys would play while Stella and I waited for them to expend their energy. And then we’d go home for nap time. I was torn as to what to do when one of the boys would ask me to push them on the swing while I needed to be tending to Stella. Sometimes I would tend to the boys and run back to Stella, not ever able to live in that moment with my kids. It was one more thing that was hard. I didn’t want one more hard thing right then. Why was going to a park even difficult? I wanted nothing more than to live in the


“I wanted nothing more than to live in the moment with my kids, all three of them.” moment with my kids, all three of them. I’m thankful for my boys, who have always taken the initiative to include their sister in their everyday activities. They always do their best to make sure Stella gets to experience life right alongside them. When something isn’t accessible, it frustrates them as well. They knew the importance of inclusion at a young age and wanted her in the mix right there with

them. Now I see them growing into young men who will go the extra mile to help others like their sister when the need arises. I’m blown away by the generosity and coordination that has taken place in such a short time to make Wonder Spelen a reality. I appreciate that Kiwanis decided to implement an advisory committee that included parents with special-needs kids as well as occupational/physical therapists to consult with regarding

structural design and selection of playground equipment. Often during planning, we’d mention a need for something, such as a certain design of bathroom, and the Kiwanis members would positively respond with, “I never thought of that! Let’s do it!” As a parent of a child with special needs, that isn’t always the response we receive when we indicate a need for our children, since that need often requires thinking outside the box and

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“This beautiful dream is an amazing reality, and I can’t thank Kiwanis enough for the devotion to this project. I truly feel it’s similar to the movie Field of Dreams, where ‘if you build it, they will come.’” 34 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G


A LEGACY OF SERVICE

often costs more than the typical items the typical child uses at a playground. The project leaders demonstrated to us as parents that they echoed our belief that everyone should be able to enjoy the playground. Everyone is important in that equation. This beautiful dream is an amazing reality, and I can’t thank Kiwanis enough for the devotion to this project. I truly feel it’s similar to the movie Field of Dreams, where “if you build it, they will come.” I didn’t feel for one moment that the Kiwanis members doubted that it would happen. They believed it would, and incredible people from the Pella community

LEARN MORE

Travis, Stella and Sarah Turnbull

showed up to support it and made it happen. I’m so excited to know that Wonder Spelen is

where many memories are about to be made for generations to come. K

about the Kiwanis Club of Pella’s all-inclusive playground Wonder Spelen by visiting kiwanis.org/magazine.

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36 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G


A LEGACY OF SERVICE

LIFE-CHANGING SKILLS

A KIWANIS MEMBER FROM NEW ZEALAND TRAINS WOMEN IN VANUATU TO SEW, LEADING MANY TO MAKE THEIR OWN MONEY FOR THE FIRST TIME.

I

n March 2015, Severe Tropical Cyclone Pam devastated the island nation of Vanuatu — and started Caroline Mason on a path that would change countless lives. When Mason heard the news of the destruction, she wanted to help Vanuatu’s population, known as Ni-Vanuatu, or Ni-Van. She started taking up a collection of quilts for families on the islands. She ended up with 750 quilts in all. “When I was delivering some of these quilts, a woman took me into her little home and showed me how the salty, muddy river had swept through her house and destroyed the hand-driven sewing machine she had,” Mason (above, left) recalls. “The image of that muddy, rusty machine stayed with me after I returned home.” That’s when Mason got an opportunity to do something more. She learned that New Zealand Kiwa-

nians had been shipping containers of supplies to Vanuatu for more than 20 years — everything from schoolbooks to furniture. So she joined the Kiwanis Club of Matamata, New Zealand, in January 2016. Now those Kiwanis-shipped containers also include the sewing machines, equipment and gear that Mason collects. It’s all headed nearly 2,000 miles across the sea to Vanuatu, as part of a project she named Threads Across the Pacific. “New Zealand Kiwanis members have been wonderfully generous in providing the Threads project with as much container space as we need,” Mason says. “And the Port Vila (Vanuatu) Kiwanis Club has been marvelously supportive too. They process everything through port and customs and then store the machines and boxes until we arrive for the workshops.” AP RI L/MAY 2022 37


A LEGACY OF SERVICE

Those workshops are another crucial component of the program: Once in Vanuatu, the equipment is unloaded and delivered to a school building that has been chosen for a class headed by Mason and some of her friends. Ni-Van women are seated at school desks inside, ready to learn a skill that could change everything. They’re here to learn to sew. It’s a special skill in a place like Vanuatu, where many people — tourists in particular — are ready to spend cash for handmade island products. If the women can sew well enough, they’ll earn more than money. They’ll earn

38 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

independence and pride. “The main goal of our workshops,” Mason says, “is to get electric sewing machines and sewing skills into the hands of Vanuatu women and schoolgirls — so they can either sew for themselves and their families or sell to other villagers or visitors arriving in cruise ships on the island. Secondly, we want to identify women who can go a step further and become sewing tutors to other women and girls.” Johanna Taravaky (below, far left) may have the loveliest sewing machine in the room. In fact, she’s one of the few women in the workshop who owns her

own — a hand-cranked, black and gold Singer with a distinct sound. Johanna laughs and asks others to listen. She’ll tell you it sings. Hers is one of only two manual machines — the others are newer electric versions that Mason has helped bring from New Zealand. (Mason then reveals a surprise: Each of the Ni-Van women will take a sewing machine home to keep after the workshop.) Taravaky is soft-spoken, but she will speak. Along with her spot-on sewing skills, that makes her something of a spokeswoman for this group of women who are generally very shy. “I’m talking on behalf of many of us, and we’re very happy,” Taravaky says. “For visitors to come and make workshops for us, this is our first time ever. For local mamas and their villages, we are very fortunate. We’re going to sew things for tourists. We’ll all work together. I’m very proud and very fortunate.” At that, classmate Lina Willie (left) speaks up in agreement. “I’ve been sewing a lot, but most of it was not quality work like I’ve learned here,” Willie says. “I’m so excited to maybe sew things to sell and make money. I’m so excited because I’ve learned a lot.” K


AP RI L/MAY 2022 39


BE THE CHANGE

HOW & WHY TO SERVE GIVING YOUR TIME AND TALENT TO A WORTHY CAUSE CAN BENEFIT YOU AS WELL AS OTHERS.

S

crolling through social media, you see a post from the local high school. You see that some teens traveled to Central America during spring break to work on a sanitation project. The images show they did a lot of hard work. And their smiling faces show it must have been worth every drop of sweat to be there, surrounded by happy children and thankful teachers. You wonder what that must be like, to give to a community so far away. It seems like they had a life-changing experience, from what you can tell in the photos. Then you go on with your day. Later that afternoon, you read a story on a national news website about several families a few time zones away. They have started to collect household and personal items for families displaced by catastrophic flooding. The image of a shoeless toddler in her mom’s arms, weeping, sticks with you as

40 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

you head out to pick up your own kids at school. After dinner, you settle in to watch the news on television. There’s a story about a group that organizes a successful 15K run every year. They’re looking for more volunteers. Now you’re asking yourself: Why am I not doing stuff like this? Well, you should be doing stuff exactly like this. And here’s one compelling reason: Study after study shows that volunteering does more than just make you feel good. In fact, volunteering with a group like your local Kiwanis club multiplies these benefits. For example: • Volunteering enhances social networks, which buffer people against stress and disease and ease pressure on health systems. • Volunteering improves mental health and contributes to


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42 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G


BE THE CHANGE

higher levels of happiness, self-esteem, self-worth and life satisfaction.

WHY I SERVE

• Service organizations galvanize communities in times of need. • Service organizations contribute to economic growth via community investment. • Areas with higher volunteer rates are more likely to have lower mortality rates and lower incidence of heart disease. • Volunteering develops life skills and leadership abilities and can lead to employment opportunities. • Volunteering increases awareness and understanding of public issues. • Students who participate in community service-learning tend to do better in school and are more likely to become future voters.

Colonel Chris Hadfield

• Service-learning enhances understanding of diverse cultures and communities, and binds people through shared experiences.

“Impossible things happen. And they don’t just happen ran-

More important, children thrive and survive when you volunteer. Your community becomes safer, cleaner, friendlier and kinder when you volunteer. And the world becomes a better place to live when you volunteer. But don’t be intimidated. The world needs all types of volunteers. When you read about or see these types of stories on television,

stuff of space flight. It’s what allows us to start to understand

domly. They happen as the direct result of a huge amount of work by people who’ve changed who they are to have the skills and then have collected together to do something that enables us to reach a level we have never reached before. It’s the very the rest of everything around our planet. But it’s also the stuff that allows the people who are part of Kiwanis to raise the huge amount of money you do and accomplish the wonderful things that you folks are doing around the world.” ~ Excerpt from a speech given at the 2016 Kiwanis International Convention in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

AP RI L/MAY 2022 43


BE THE CHANGE

how do you see yourself in that scenario? Does your personality sway you toward hands-on service? Maybe you’re more of a behind-the-scenes planner. That’s great. The world needs those as well. Or maybe you know people who know people and can line up other people for fundraising and marketing. That’s fantastic too. The world needs you, no matter what kind of help you can give. With a few questions, we can help you figure out how to give it. WHAT CAN YOU DO? There are countless ways and places to volunteer. You can go out on your own. Read to children at a laundromat. Pick up trash in a park. Donate blood. You can offer to help associations such as Meals

on Wheels, homeless shelters or Red Cross/Red Crescent. You can walk, bike, swim and teeter-totter to raise funds and awareness for a cause. These are all good options. But we think you should consider volunteering with a group, possibly at a place of worship, a community-service club or, of course, Kiwanis. Through the bonds of friendships and the leadership experiences they’ve gained in our clubs, many of our members have discovered a deeper passion to serve. WHAT IS KIWANIS? Kiwanis is a global organization of volunteers dedicated to improving the world one child and one community at a time. Schools, hospi-

WHY I SERVE Jamie Lee Curtis “Newborns die of maternal and neonatal tetanus each year. Global change is happening because human beings are working to eradicate maternal and neonatal tetanus. I believe that what you are doing every day is great work.” ~ Excerpt from a speech given at the 2011 Kiwanis International Convention in Geneva, Switzerland, speaking about Kiwanis’ role in helping eliminate maternal and neonatal tetanus.

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tals, governments, other nonprofits, corporations, foundations and more have reaped the benefits of collaborating with Kiwanis clubs. Our clubs are involved in more than 150,000 community-service projects each year and annually raise more than US$133 million. Together we dedicate more than 19 million service hours to strengthen communities and help children. The Kiwanis Children’s Fund provides grants to support projects related to the Kiwanis causes of childhood health and nutrition, education and literacy, and youth leadership development. Kiwanis clubs are the heart of the organization. In our 8,000plus clubs worldwide, children are served and communities are improved. We hope you consider


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membership in one of them. But first, let’s introduce the rest of our Kiwanis family, the Service Leadership Programs: • Aktion Club is the only service club for adults with disabilities (aktionclub.org). • Circle K International is the world’s largest student-led collegiate service organization (circlek.org). • Key Club provides high schoolage members with opportunities to serve, build character and develop leadership (keyclub. org). • Key Leader is a weekend program for high school-age students with a mission to inspire young people to achieve their personal best through service leadership (key-leader.org). • Builders Club is the largest service club program for middle school and junior high school students (buildersclub.org). • K-Kids is the largest service club program for elementary school students (kkids.org). WE WORK WITH THE BEST When people work together, they reach more children and families in need. That’s why Kiwanis teams up with partners who share our values, our collaborative mindset and our desire to make the world a better place for children. Thanks to partnerships, we collaborate with UNICEF, Landscape Structures Inc., Nickelodeon, Sister Cities 46 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G


BE THE CHANGE

International, JCI, March of Dimes, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, National League of Cities, Reading is Fundamental, Office Depot, Children’s Miracle Network, Up with People, The Thirst Project, ShopWithScrip, PerkSpot, eHealth, Emergency Assistance Plus, ID Resolve, Cruise & Vacation Desk, Collette, Colonial Flag Foundation and Hilton to make a difference.

WHY I SERVE

FINDING THE RIGHT FIT The first step to joining a Kiwanis club is deciding what type of club you’d like to join. Whether you’re young or retired, single or have a family, seeking professional networking opportunities or looking for fun and friends, Kiwanis likely has a club for you. That’s because all clubs have something in common: a commitment to improving communities and serving children. Kiwanis offers different types of clubs to consider: • Traditional clubs, the most common kind, meet weekly or twice a month. Some may recite a pledge, pray and sing. Others don’t. Some may write checks while others prefer hands-on action. Some may offer opportunities for career networking. • Internet clubs offer flexibility for those who travel often or cannot attend traditional meetings. They operate in much the same way as traditional clubs, but their meetings are generally conducted in online chat rooms, meeting face-to-face at service projects and fundraisers.

Dr. Jane Goodall “There is still so much in the world worth fighting for. So much that is beautiful, so many wonderful people working to reverse the harm, to help alleviate the suffering. And so many young people dedicated to making this a better world. All conspiring to inspire us and to give us hope that it is not too late to turn things around, if we all do our part.” ~ Excerpt from a speech given at the 2011 Kiwanis International Convention in Geneva, Switzerland.

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BE THE CHANGE

• Young professional clubs meet the needs of younger members with busy lifestyles. They offer flexible meeting schedules and an emphasis on hands-on service, often paired with social activities for members and their families. • Golden K clubs consist of retired men and women who maintain busy lifestyles and a strong desire to make a difference in their communities. These clubs generally operate much like traditional clubs. • 3-2-1 clubs put a strong emphasis on serving more and meeting less, with a monthly schedule of three hours of service, two hours of social activity and one hour for meetings. Within these categories, clubs may have adopted variations: Family clubs attract adults who want to socialize and serve with their spouses or children along with other families. Cause-focused clubs identify a specific cause to serve, such as literacy, a camp or LGBTQ issues. Interest-focused clubs consist of members who have a united interest, such as knitting, motorcycling or golf. HOW TO FIND A KIWANIS CLUB The quickest way to identify clubs in your community is to visit kiwanis.org/findaclub. This club locator will provide a list of clubs in the area and the place and time of their meetings. Some clubs include information about their 48 KI WA NI SMAGA ZI NE.O R G

signature projects. There’s even a box to click if you’d like someone to contact you with more information about a club. Once you’ve identified a possible club, visit a meeting and a service project. Your attendance will help you get to know the members, and you’ll witness the club’s impact on the community. Once you’re there, ask these questions:

• What are its plans for the future?

• What is the club’s signature project? (What are they known for in the community?)

Make friends. Whether you’re outgoing or shy, Kiwanis members are welcoming, friendly people. They’ll suggest some great ways to explore further opportunities when you’re ready, such as joining a committee or helping with Kiwanis youth clubs. Whatever kind of Kiwanis club you join, you’ll find a unique opportunity to have fun while doing good. K

• What are the dues and fees? And beyond dues and fees, what other financial and time commitments are expected or suggested from members? • Is the club more involved in fundraising or hands-on service?

If you don’t find your kind of club or one that fits your schedule, consider gathering some friends and opening a Kiwanis club that meets your needs and interests. Call +1 317-875-8755, ext. 411, or email membership@kiwanis.org for more information. WHAT TO DO WHEN YOU JOIN


JOIN US! BE THE CHANGE

HERE’S WHAT YOU CAN DO NEXT

SO YOU’VE BEEN INSPIRED BY THE AMAZING WORK GOING ON AROUND THE WORLD. AND NOW YOU’RE READY TO JOIN A KIWANIS CLUB IN YOUR AREA. IT’S AS EASY AS 1, 2, 3 …

123

Find the club that’s right for you. Think about what type of Kiwanis club would fit your personality, schedule and interests. Depending on the size of your community, there may be several options. You can start your search by using the Club Locator at kiwanis.org/findaclub.

Visit a club meeting. Look around for the club that’s right for you. Ask questions. Learn what type of service projects the club does each year. Offer ideas and suggestions.

Join! Once you find the club that fits you best, get involved! Make friends. Consider joining a committee for a project close to your heart. Invite friends to participate in a service project. Have fun while doing good!

kiwanis.org/clubs AP RI L/MAY 2022 49


AN INVITATION

PLEASE JOIN ME K

ids need people to mentor and care for them. Kids are curious and lovable and innocent. They also can be wild, impatient and vulnerable. Kids need people to look out for them, so Kiwanis is there for them around the world.

At Kiwanis, we are generous with our time, creative with our ideas, passionate about making a difference — and we have fun along the way. I joined Kiwanis to make a positive difference and I want you to be part of this wonderful organization too.

____________. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Hello, my name is nis Club of a iw K e th f o er b em m a and I’m _________. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ in _ _____________ e at You can reach out to m you’ll e p _ o _ h _ I . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________ eeting at m is n a iw K t ex n r u o g in consider attend ________. _ _ _ _ t _ a _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________ on

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SAVE THE RAINFOREST • FEED HUNGRY KIDS • BUILD A PLAYGROUND IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SUPPLY BOOKS TO STUDENTS • ELIMINATE MATERNAL AND NEONATAL TETANUS • MAKE SURE ALL CHILDREN HAVE SHOES TO WEAR • END POVERTY • TEACH READING TO ADULTS • MAKE URE PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES HAVE ACCESS TO BUILDINGS, SIDEWALKS AND PLAYGROUNDS MENTOR • KIWANIS • HELP THE ELDERLY • PROTECT THE ENVIRONMENT • RESPOND TO DISASTERS • HELP BURN VICTIMS HEAL • OPEN THE WORLD TO KIDS WITH AUTISM • TEACH A 30-YEAR-OLD WOMAN WITH DOWN SYNDROME HOW TO FISH • PUT SNOW SKIS BENEATH A PARALYZED VET • WELCOME IMMIGRANTS TO THEIR NEW HOME • RESTORE A BIT OF NORMALCY FOR CHILDREN N WAR-TORN COUNTRIES • COUNSEL REFUGEES • TEACH SOMEONE HOW TO HELP THEMSELVES • SHELTER AND FEED THE HOMELESS • GIVE A CHILD OF THE CITY A DAY ON A FARM • CURE ALS • READ A BOOK TO A 5-YEAR-OLD • CHANGE A LIFE • CHANGE THOUSANDS OF LIVES • EQUIP A SCHOOL THAT HAS NO BOOKS, NO DESKS, NO PENCILS AND PAPER • KIWANIS • INSPIRE 12-YEAROLD GIRLS AND BOYS TO SERVE OTHERS • NURTURE THE TALENTS OF A PROTÉGÉ • ARRANGE FACE-TO-FACE MEETINGS FOR KIDS AND THEIR HEROES • HELP TEENS BECOME TOMORROW’S LEADERS • LET IT SNOW FOR FAMILIES IN A WARM CLIMATE • TAKE STUDENTS AWAY FROM THEIR MONITORS AND PUT THEM IN FRONT OF A CHESSBOARD • SUPPORT DOCTORS SO THEY CAN CURE LUCY’S CANCER • KIWANIS • MAKE FITNESS A LIFETIME GOAL FOR CHILDREN • PLANT A GARDEN TO STOCK A FOOD PANTRY • PAINT A SENIOR CITIZEN’S HOME • GRILL PANCAKES TO RAISE MONEY FOR AN ANIMAL SHELTER • PROMOTE KINDNESS • PROTECT A POLICE DOG WITH TS OWN BULLETPROOF VEST • KEEP CULTURAL TRADITIONS ALIVE • HELP END WAR • RECOGNIZ MOTHERS • RECOGNIZE FATHERS • CELEBRATE CHILDHOOD • BRING THE CIRCUS TO TOWN • STO BULLYING • GET THE WHOLE TOWN SWINGING TO SOME LIVE JAZZ • STOP GLOBAL WARMING • ELIMINATE THE WORLD’S LEADING CAUSE OF MENTAL DISABILITY • ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO PURSUE STEM CAREERS • REACH FAMILIES IN THE REMOTE HONDURAN CLOUD FOREST WITH MEDICAL SUPPLIES • BRING TROUBLED YOUTH AND POLICE TOGETHER AS A DRAGON BOAT RACING TEAM • SHOW TEENS HOW TO PLANT TOMATOES • BUILD A BOCCE COURT FOR YOUR OMMUNITY • KIWANIS • RUN A WAREHOUSE OF SUPPLIES FOR TEACHERS • SERVE THE BEST ROC SHRIMP, BARBECUE, SPAGHETTI, CHOCOLATES, MULL WINE, SEAFOOD, STRAWBERRY SUNDAES, ICE CAKES FOR MILES AROUND • TEACH CHILDREN TO READ • KIWANIS • RESTORE A COMMUNIT ICON • BURN AWAY PEOPLE’S GLOOM • STOP HUMAN TRAFFICKING • PLANT A PEACEFUL PARK N THE MIDDLE OF A BUSTLING NEW SUBURB • ARRANGE FOR A CHEF TO TEACH ORPHAN TEENS HOW TO PREPARE GINGER PORK AND MISO SOUP • GIVE A BASEBALL BAT TO A FRECKLE-FACED WHEELCHAIR ATHLETE • OPEN NEW WORLDS FOR STUDENTS AT A BLIND SCHOOL • KIWANIS • NURTURE THE TALENTS OF A YOUNG TUBIST WITH A MENTAL DISABILITY • MAKE KIDS FEEL LIKE TERRIFIC KIDS • INSPIRE STUDENTS TO BRING UP GRADES • REMODEL A DESERVING CHILD’S BEDROOM • SAVE THE WHALES • AWARD LIFE-CHANGING SCHOLARSHIPS TO GRADUATES WHO HAVE OVERCOME DIFFICULTIES IN THEIR YOUNG LIVES • ARRANGE A CHRISTMAS PARTY ON A LATIN AMERICAN RESERVATION WHERE CHILDREN HAVE NEVER SEEN SANTA • PROVIDE CLEAN 3636 Woodview Trace • Indianapolis, IN 46268 • +1-317-217-6254 • kiwanis.org WATER FOR EVERYONE • FOUND A COMMUNITY’S AMBULANCE SERVICE • RESTORE A FORGOTTEN CEMETERY • TRANSPORT CHILDREN TO THE NORTH POLE ON THE POLAR EXPRESS • WORK WITH PRISONERS TO RESTORE BICYCLES FOR NEEDY FAMILIES • DONATE BOATS TO IMPOVERISHED