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ENTERTAINMENT 1) Speaking: Which of these activities do you like doing in your leisure time?

2) Complete the sentences with the words in the box. PROF. ANDREA FERNANDEZ


ENTERTAINMENT awful over-the-top

commercial weird

dull

gripping hilarious

disturbing uplifting

catchy

1. It left me cold. It was typical big-budget Hollywood – very……………………….. 2. It’s very easy to sing along to – very ……………………………. 3. It’s………………………- just really, really funny. 4. It does nothing for me. It’s quite boring, quite……………………… 5. I can’t explain it. It’s just strange, really………………………………….. 6. It’s just too much for my liking – just really……………………….. 7. You can’t stop reading. It’s just so exciting, so………………………….. 8. It’s good, but quite upsetting – quite………………………………. 9. It’s a really inspiring story, really………………………….. 10. Don’t go and see it! It’s dreadful, absolutely…………………………………

Words for Entertainment in English What do you like doing in your spare time? Do you go somewhere with your friends or your family? Here is some useful English vocabulary for talking about entertainment.

The cinema Many people regularly go to the cinema (or the pictures). Most towns have a multiplex (= multi-screen) cinema which shows a wide range of films, from feature films to family films. Films are classified in Britain, with U suitable for all ages, PG(parental guidance) suitable for everyone over the age of 8, 12 (where no children can watch unless they are with an adult), 15 (where no one under the age of 15 can watch) and 18 (only suitable for adults).

The theatre Large towns as well as the major cities have theatres, where you can see plays, musicals or pantomimes (a comedy play performed over Christmas). You can choose to go in the afternoon, for the matinee (pronounced "mat – in – ay") performance, or in the evening. Generally, the more you pay, the better seat you get. The stalls are the seats at ground level in front of the stage, and these have the best views. Then there are the seats in the Dress Circle (or Royal Circle), which are in the firstbalcony. They also have good views of the stage. Then there are the seats in the Upper Circle, which are in the second balcony. Above this are cheaper seats in the Balcony or the Gallery, which are so high up that it's often difficult to see the actors. There are also seats in the Boxes, which are private rooms built into the side walls of the theatre.

PROF. ANDREA FERNANDEZ


ENTERTAINMENT Live music Large cities can offer you a huge range of musical performances, from opera to classical concerts to jazz, folk, rock and pop gigs (= concerts). In summer there are often music festivals, with Glastonbury Festival being one of the most popular.

Family entertainment Bank holidays and weekends are favourite times to go out with your family. Some things, such as circuses, zoos and water parks can be quite expensive. But other events, such as fundays, parades and carnivals are much cheaper. Children often like to go by themselves to funfairs, where they can go on the rides and eat candyfloss.

A cheap night out There are also plenty of cheap activities available in English towns and cities. Bingo is popular, and in London, people still go to the dogs, to see and bet on dog racing. You can often find a leisure centre in towns, which offer sport facilities. Many English people go to their local (= pub) where they can play darts or pool (= a type of snooker), as well as have a drink with friends. At the weekend, younger people often go clubbing (= night clubs) or to a disco with their friends.

NATIVE SPEAKER ENGLISH We often say stuff when we are being vague. It means things. Stuff is uncountable. All kinds of stuff as well – rock, pop, even some classical I downloaded quite a lot of stuff too. I like their more recent stuff.

Developing conversations: Disagreeing politely. When we disagree with someone’s tastes, we often soften our responses using not really, not that and a bit. For example: It’s not really my kind of thing.

3) Match 1- 8 with the responses a – h. Notice the expressions that use not really, not that and a bit. 1. I love 60’s music. The Beatles, The Stones, stuff like that. 2. Have you seen Saw? I love that film. It’s so scary. 3. I love fantasy – Harry Potter and that kind of thing. 4. I love that film. He’s hilarious in it – really, really funny. 5. Don’t you like Opera? I love it. 6. I tend to read stuff on history or politics. PROF. ANDREA FERNANDEZ


ENTERTAINMENT 7. Have you hear any Dover? I love their music. 8. Have you ever read Mona? It’s so moving. I love it.

a) Oh right. I’m not that keen on horror films. I don’t really like films with a lot of blood and stuff in them. b) Oh right. I’m not really interested in serious stuff like that. I prefer something a bit lighter, something easier to read. c) Really? I’m not that keen on that kind of stuff, to be honest. I prefer something more realistic, more true-to-life. d) No, not really. I’m not that keen on classical music and I certainly can’t be bothered to sit through 4 hours of it! e) Really? It didn’t really do anything for me. I guess it’s just not my kind of humour. f)

Really? That’s the kind of thing my dad listens to! I prefer something a bit more modern.

g) Really? It left me cold. I just found it a bit dull, a bit boring. I didn’t even finish it. h) Yeah, I like some of their earlier stuff, but they’ve gone a bit too poppy for my liking – a bit too commercial.

Further vocabulary and other activities.

Vocabulary: quiz about movies. http://www.roadtogrammar.com/movies/

Vocabulary: books http://esl.fis.edu/vocab/q7v/book_2.htm

Dictation (Cézanne) http://eolf.univ-fcomte.fr/uploads/ressources/listening/herethere/12.htm

Photography (matching) http://elt.oup.com/student/naturalenglish/int/b_vocabulary/unit11/neint_vocabulary11_exp?cc=global&selLanguag e=en

Television and media quiz http://www.world-english.org/media_vocabulary.htm

PROF. ANDREA FERNANDEZ

9 entertainment 2  

entertainment

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