An Unprecedented Opportunity

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AN UNPRECEDENTED OPPORTUNITY: ORGANIZING NEXT GENERATION DONORS AND TRUSTEES TO PRACTICE EFFECTIVE CHANGE PHILANTHROPY

NITIKA RAJ & AMADEO GUIAO



ABOUT THIS REPORT This report was commissioned by the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund to better understand the ecosystem of next generation philanthropic engagement. This report focuses on the interest in social justice philanthropy and alternative models to engage the next generation of donors in philanthropy. While the Surdna Foundation and the Andrus Family Fund have been leaders in engaging the next generation of philanthropists, the report is meant to supplement their decades of family engagement and to better understand the evolving field at this critical juncture in American philanthropic history.

ABOUT THE AUTHORS Nitika Raj of Moksh Consulting was hired to research and write this report based on qualitative interviews with social justice philanthropy leaders and experts. Nitika’s years of experience in resource mobilization and donor organizing, especially next generation donors of color, were important in helping the Surdna Foundation and Andrus Family Fund understand the landscape and the opportunities at hand. Principal at Moksh Consulting, Nitika offers organizational consulting, facilitation and coaching. Nitika has previously worked at Resource Generation, ChangeLab and API Chaya and is a former board member of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. She is currently based in New York. Amadeo Guiao brings over 20 years of experience supporting organizations to affect transformative social change, both in the U.S. and in the Philippines. Her intersectional, community-based approach is informed by her lived experience as a queer, gendernonconforming Filipino-American and as a child of immigrants. She currently manages the Capacity Building Program at the Potlatch Fund—a Native-run foundation that supports social change organization in Pacific Northwest Indian Country—as well as consults for nonprofits, foundations and mission-driven businesses.

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ABOUT THE SURDNA FOUNDATION AND THE ANDRUS FAMILY FUND: The Surdna Foundation supports social justice reform, healthy environments, inclusive economies and thriving cultures across the U.S. The Andrus Family Fund is a next generation funder that seeks to foster just and sustainable change in the U.S. They do this by supporting organizations that advance social and racial justice and improve the outcomes for vulnerable youth. The Andrus Family Fund envisions a just society in which vulnerable youth have more opportunities for a good life. This report was made possible by the time and candor that interviewed staff, board and consultants generously shared with the author. Additionally, this project would not exist without the vision and leadership of Leticia Peguero, outgoing Executive Director of the Andrus Family Fund and the infinite programmatic support provided by Jennifer Kaizer, the Senior Program Associate for the AFF team.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

6

SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION – DEFINITIONS – HISTORICAL CONTEXT

13 15 18

SECTION 2: THE NEXT GENERATION PHILANTHROPIC ECOSYSTEM

22

SECTION 3: KEY THEMES FROM INTERVIEWS

40

SECTION 4: TAKING ACTION

55

APPENDIX A: METHODOLOGY

64

APPENDIX B: RESOURCES

71


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY As a 100-year-old, multigenerational national family foundation, the Surdna Foundation, along with its next-generation-led Andrus Family Fund (AFF), are uniquely committed to nurturing the engagement and involvement of the next generation’s philanthropy. A leader in the field of family philanthropy, the foundation’s mission is to foster the development of just and sustainable communities in the U.S. AFF was launched by Surdna to engage more than 400 extended family members and has “demonstrated how the principles and values of a family can be embodied and expressed across many generations and family branches.” When Surdna celebrated its centennial anniversary in 2017, it provided Andrus with a timely opportunity to further build on its storied history by disseminating a model for next generation family philanthropy that was centered on race, privilege and equity. As part of this strategy, Andrus Family Fund commissioned this report to not only inform its own strategies, but also to catalyze dialogue amongst family foundations, donors, and the organizations that support them on social justice philanthropy and next generation engagement.

This report relied on intensive interviews conducted between June 2017 and June 2018 with high-level staff from over 35 leading organizations on: a) family philanthropy b) next generation philanthropy and donor organizations and c) social change philanthropy. Questions focused on what organizations do, best practices in the field, as well as gaps and challenges. These conversations revealed five main clusters of organizations, categorized by the approach and objectives of the organization: 1) direct engagement and organizing of young people with high net wealth, 2) moving money through social justice philanthropy, 3) training programs and organizing partners, and 4) innovation, research and development.

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AN UNPRECEDENTED OPPORTUNITY The next 30 years will see a unique confluence of social factors that will undoubtedly transform the field of philanthropy and the work of social change. In the span of only a single generation, the U.S. will see the largest ever intergenerational transfer of wealth. Researchers estimate that around $59 trillion will be bequeathed to inheritors and charities. Simultaneously, the racial makeup of the U.S. will radically transform. It is predicted that people of color will make up the majority of the U.S. population by 2040. With this massive influx of new wealth to the next generation, how does the field of philanthropy ensure that the unjust and inherent legacies of racial inequality cease? How does philanthropy further capitalize upon the increasingly progressive political mindsets of the next generation of major donors? This report explores how philanthropy is already working to ensure that the next generation is empowered with the skills, tools and consciousness to bring about lasting social change, greater equity and the elimination of the racial wealth divide.

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KEY THEMES FROM FIELD RESEARCH There is a readiness and excitement for social change philanthropy. Almost every organization interviewed expressed at least openness, if not excitement, about social justice philanthropy and the importance of centering issues of equity. Many point to the 2016 election as a factor commanding greater urgency and bolder action. However, the term racial equity elicited a mixture of reactions. Many of the respondents talked about social justice philanthropy as an easier entry point to talking about racial equity issues. People were not opposed to racial equity, but the term itself produced a reaction that indicated organizations and their members had difficulty grappling with the concept, knowing how to begin and towards what outcomes. Next generation trustees and donors crave practical skills and deep knowledge about how to best practice social justice philanthropy. As new practitioners, they want to take back concrete skills and frameworks to their family foundations on issues such as financial literacy, impact investing, implementing a racial equity lens in grantmaking, and navigating family power dynamics. Field research unveiled many current practices that have been powerful and effective in engaging next generation donors. Next generation donors are interested in making an impact in the most efficient way possible, and are often looking for collaborative, cross-class, and cross-race methods of practicing social change philanthropy. Interviewees noted that many of their members are looking for new, innovative ways to mobilize resources, such as adapting family giving vehicles for rapid response, establishing new foundations or organizations, or leveraging their brand or family name to a cause they are passionate about. While this new sense of urgency is welcomed, interviewees also mentioned that they think it should occur within the guiding principles of social justice philanthropy. New avenues for resource mobilizations must remain grounded in the longterm shift of power to those most historically disenfranchised in order to rebalance the scales.

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In addition to theory, next generation donors need and want communities of practice with peers who are learning and experiencing similar things. Newer practitioners want to be able to troubleshoot problems in real time with others who may be dealing with similar dynamics within their own family foundations. There is a desire for community building in person as well as in virtual spaces to share resources and connect across geography. These emerging communities of intentional practice contrast starkly to the traditional paradigm of conferences, which are still instrumental in the dissemination of information and practical skills, especially in the philanthropic circles. Institutional change demands deep internal work. Individual and organizational clarity around values and practices is needed to maximize impact. Unless organizations do the internal work of identifying their values, beliefs, desired impact, required change, and barriers to change, then external impact remains limited and ad hoc at best. At worst, this change can cause harm to historically oppressed people and communities. Within family foundations, transferring power to the next generation will require tremendous openness, authentic listening and strengths-based approaches. The approach of looking back to move forward can encourage families to take a strengths-based approach that builds upon previous efforts while creating the spirit of collaboration that facilitates trust and open communication. Change is an uncomfortable, chaotic, long-term process with surprising growth spurts. The process of transformation also necessitates patience, trust, a deep values-based commitment and the resources to follow through fully. Several organizations interviewed discussed the discomfort and chaos of change, even when that change is desired and intentional and when people have adequate support. Transferring power to the next generation within family foundations reveals similar tensions and opportunities.

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TAKING ACTION: RECOMMENDATIONS Invest in next generation donor organizing as an important political project. The immense transfer of wealth to the next generation will be channeled to a small minority of overwhelmingly white, wealthy inheritors. It is incumbent upon the field of philanthropy to ensure that this next generation follows the leadership and voices of communities most impacted by historically unjust structures. Programs such as giving projects like the ones outlined on page 25 provide next generation leaders with targeted training, mentoring and substantive relationship-building opportunities, and a cohort of peers they might interact with throughout their lives. This broader collective process fosters an ideal atmosphere to learn and grow. Institutional transformations for racial justice need to be holistic. Invest the time, energy, money and resources in all necessary forms to complete this cycle of transformation. Organizations need to have internal clarity on values and mission, and understand the “how and why� of their work. Do the work to change from the inside out. Funders should not only be willing to change practices and policies within their institutions, but should also be simultaneously working on transforming their organizational culture. This change must move towards one that is more inclusive and equitable, one grounded in a strong racial justice framework. This deep internal work requires a rigorous examination not just of grant-making strategies and impact, but also of personal and organizational values, norms, behaviors, and perceptions. Research on organizational change processes has shown that if institutional structures change, but the values and beliefs of the individuals within the organization do not, then those efforts will ultimately fail.1 Act quickly and more responsively. While we need to remain thoughtful about strategy, as a field we need to be more responsive to our changing context. Funders need to move with greater speed from intentions to ideas, from discussions to decisions, from collaboration to impact.

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Collaboration is more impactful than acting alone. If funders can build shared understandings on how to support social movements holistically, social change will be better supported. A good example of this is the funders table led by the Association of Black Foundation Executives to resource the Movement for Black Lives. Formal and informal partnerships are fundamental to the success of any movement work. Lean into what is working well and build on it. Partner with other organizations on complementary content, and share your work more widely so others can learn and adopt effective models that work in their contexts. Organize and partner with financial advisors. The financial advising and wealth management communities in banks and private firms provide an opportunity for those with social change education and influence. Many people of color within these communities are leading with frameworks of asset-building and wealth building for historically disenfranchised communities.2 For family foundations, listen to what the next generation is saying, and be prepared to change. Identify common values and common goals across generations, but remain open to strategies and structures being different from what has worked in the past. Invest in outside training and get support to create an atmosphere of openness, where older leaders and younger leaders can communicate across generations and across values and ideas to build on the strengths of the foundation and grow its social justice impact. Next generation family philanthropy leaders greatly benefit from one-onone coaching. In order to practice social justice philanthropy as well as advocate within their family institutions, young donors need a lot of support. While a certain amount of learning can and should happen in a community-based space, turning the ideas into action often requires breaking through the layers of isolation that wealth can create. These breakthroughs are more likely to occur during one-onone conversations with young people who are grappling with contradicting belief systems or ideas about money, saving, investing and giving.

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Drawing on 37 interviews with leaders in social justice philanthropy, this paper unveils a robust and thriving ecosystem that supports the next generation of young people in the U.S. to engage in impactful, social change philanthropy. Our hope is that the insights and wisdom garnered from respected leaders in the field will spark important conversations that lead to committed action. In the span of a single generation, the most immense transfer of wealth in this country’s history will change hands. The field of philanthropy should do all it can to ensure that this process is facilitated with greater equity, and with the intention of eradicating the racial wealth divide that has plagued this country since its inception. Organizing next generation donors and trustees to practice effective social change philanthropy is an important step in that direction.

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SECTION 1: INTRODUCTION

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As Surdna Foundation marked its centennial anniversary in 2017, it was a ripe opportunity to reflect as well as celebrate. To honor the foundation’s history and impact, a Centennial Working Group was created with members of Surdna’s Board and staff from both Surdna and the Andrus Family Fund. After careful thought and discussion, the committee decided on a 3-part strategy to mark this legacy moment.

1. Family philanthropy grant-making 2. Impact investing 3. Grantmaking to highlight Surdna’s collaborative grantmaking – Amplify Fund Within this context and backdrop the Centennial Working Group finalized the strategy for the family philanthropy grant-making component of the Centennial grants. The goals of the Family Grantmaking portfolio are to disseminate a model for next generation family philanthropy that centers issues of race, privilege, and equity. To achieve this, Surdna: 1) sparked dialogue among family foundations, donors, and the organizations that support them on social justice philanthropy and next generation engagement, and 2) offered resources and training. What started as a series of conversations to learn about the latest thinking in next generation philanthropic practice resulted in the realization that a written landscape analysis could be useful to this emerging field. The purpose of this paper is to: a) identify strengths and current best practices b) highlight needs, gaps and opportunities, and c) share recommendations to catalyze strategic action, attention and mobilization of resources.

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DEFINITIONS NEXT GENERATION DONORS AND TRUSTEES For the purposes of this paper, the next generation is defined as people under the age of 40 within the U.S. and who: — have high net wealth or family foundations — are current or future donors to organizations — are trustees of foundations

SOCIAL CHANGE PHILANTHROPY Social change philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, economic and environmental injustices. It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decisionmakers. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social change philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources, but also their time, knowledge, skills and access. Social change philanthropy is also sometimes called social justice philanthropy, social movement philanthropy, and community-based philanthropy.3

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DONOR ORGANIZING Donor organizing4 is the concept and practice of using community organizing principles to engage donors deeply in social justice issues they care about, with the goal of having them contribute their time, talent, resources, connections, and various kinds of privilege and access. The key to donor organizing is: a) building deep relationships and trust between donors, community organizers and grassroots organizations, b) educating donors on the history and impact of the racial wealth divide, c) teaching and practicing social change philanthropy.

RESOURCE ORGANIZING Resource organizing refers to a practice of grassroots fundraising that applies communityorganizing principles, base-building, leadership development, political education and challenging systems of oppression.5 This concept is effectively practiced in the Giving Projects model.

STRUCTURAL RACISM6 Structural racism is racial bias across institutions and society. It is the cumulative and compounded effects of an array of factors that systemically privilege white people and disadvantage people of color. The racial wealth divide in the U.S. is a direct result and evidence of structural racism in this country—a product of its history.

DIVERSITY A diversity framework refers to expanding the types of identities and experiences represented in a workplace, including race, ethnicity, gender, socioeconomic class, sexual orientation, age, religious background, dis/ability, immigration status and more. The focus is on diversifying a team via hiring or recruitment and having individuals represent their communities’ voices. However, a diversity-only approach has the potential pitfall of tokenization. It assumes one person can represent a whole community, and it attempts to address a structural problem with an individualized solution.

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INCLUSION Focusing on inclusion means a workplace wants to not just hire a diverse team, but also listen to and incorporate those experiences into all aspects of the organizational structure and culture. People of color, women, transgender and genderqueer people, working class people, and other people whose experiences are marginalized are consulted and can give input into processes that shape organizations' decisions. The potential pitfall of an inclusion-only approach is that it places the burden on people of color, women and other marginalized groups to make the organization more equitable, when in fact, those are the individuals who already must do additional work to survive and succeed within such institutions. This approach does not address the work that needs to be done with people who hold most of the power and privilege in institutions, and the changes they need to make.

EQUITY An equity-focused approach is about putting attention and resources towards ensuring fair outcomes for groups who have historically been disadvantaged systemically through policies, practices, access, cultural norms and attitudes. This approach often requires creating unique ways to move through barriers which cannot be addressed by a one-size-fits-all solution. Equitable institutions are invested in examining the organization and making changes that create more equitable pathways to success for all people, considering structural racism, classism, sexism, homophobia and other oppressions. People with power and privilege within the institution—often white, wealthy, male and heterosexual—are willing to look at themselves and make changes to share power in more equitable ways with other qualified and underrepresented people.

RACIAL EQUITY OR RACIAL JUSTICE A racial equity lens examines an institution with explicit attention on race and looking at the impact of structural racism. “Racial justice is the creation and proactive reinforcement of policies, practices, attitudes and actions that produce equitable power, access, treatment, opportunities and outcomes for all. Equitable outcomes across race are the evidence of success.”7

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HISTORICAL CONTEXT In the past 100 years, as traditions of philanthropy evolved, so too have concepts of family in response to changing political, socio-cultural and economic norms. Together, the country’s approximately 77,000 private family foundations, 200,000 donor-advised funds and thousands of charitable trusts represent more than $685 billion in private capital dedicated to philanthropic causes. In the next 30 years, we will see the largest intergenerational wealth transfer to ever take place in the U.S.—approximately $59 trillion. Researchers estimate that inheritors will receive $36 trillion of this total, while charities will get $27 trillion. There is an opportunity to influence the ways that the $27 trillion gets distributed and—if we are bold in our imaginations and visions for the future—to influence the use of $36 trillion in inheritance as well. This data is particularly relevant considering the change in the country’s racial makeup and demographic changes. The current “next generation” refers mostly to millennials and Generation X born between the early 1970’s to 2000’s. This generation has been the focus of a lot of attention for at least two significant reasons. They are the first generation in the U.S. to contain a numerical majority of people of color. This is already the case in states like California and is estimated to be true of the entire U.S. by 2040.8 Yet, despite the truth of the previous two statements, there is no guarantee that the previously discussed wealth transfer will increase equity. Due to a history of racially discriminatory policies and institutions in the U.S., the dynamics of wealth and racial inequality continue to appear in grantmaking. Legacies of wealth mean philanthropic decisions are made predominantly by white leaders. In the U.S. today, less than 10 percent of philanthropic dollars go to communities of color. Less than one percent goes to immigrants and refugees. Less than one percent goes to LGBTQ communities.9 In fact, the growing inequality in the U.S. and the deep growth in the racial wealth divide have significant consequences for philanthropy and for broader democratic stability.10

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The gap between decision making power by the wealthiest inheritors and its impact on vulnerable and historically underserved marginalized populations is particularly problematic for organizations and donors that believe in more fair and strategic philanthropy. A philanthropic practice that is about transformational change. Investing in next generation of social change philanthropy is one key intervention towards reversing these trends. The next generation of family philanthropy is overwhelmingly white. Of the top one percent of wealth owners in the U.S., 96 percent are white and four percent are people of color. Of the top 10 percent of wealth owners, 88 percent are white.11 Families of color with enough wealth to start foundations are few and far between, but there are increasing numbers of families of color with the potential to give at significant levels, regardless of giving vehicle or having an institution in their name. “Data modeling by analyst group TargetSmart allows us to look at projections for net worth by race based on commercial datasets. This modeled data projects 1.3 million African-American, Asian and Hispanic individuals across the U.S. with a net worth of over $1 million,” stated Urvashi Vaid and Ashindi Maxton in a new report titled “The Apparitional Donor: Understanding and Engaging High Net Worth Donors of Color.” That estimate for white individuals is over 8.1 million people with over $1 million in net assets.12 Today’s next generation of major donors—Generation Xers and Millennials—are often interested in a different form of philanthropy: a philanthropic practice that is higher touch and of closer proximity.13 There are concerted efforts by these younger donors to give away their earned and inherited wealth while they are young and still earning. Many are interested in righting social wrongs. Research shows that among these younger donors there is a recognition of their wealth, race and class privilege, and a desire for cross-class and cross-race opportunities to impact change in the U.S. and around the world.14

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We have seen a generational shift in attitudes about philanthropy, and with it an increased recognition of wealth and racial inequity. According to a report by the Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy and 21/64, next generation donors are very likely to be conscious of their privilege, to make values-driven giving choices, and to consider supporting advocacy efforts. Younger people want to be engaged in solutions and in demonstrating best practice in grantmaking. Models and practices have already emerged in these areas: professionalization of board members, inclusion of non-family board members, next generation engagement, mission-related investing, applying systems change strategies and social justice grantmaking. Surdna and the Andrus Family Philanthropy Program (AFPP) have credible experience on next generation philanthropy and on social justice philanthropy. These institutions have the experience and capacity to be at the forefront of this shift. An increasing number of family foundations have expressed interest in learning about promising and best practices in next generation engagement and social justice philanthropy. Most family foundation boards and professionals, however, lack the tools, relationships and expertise to implement these practices. True social change takes many actors and stakeholders, and will continue to come from grassroots organizing by those most directly impacted. That said, there are roles for all to play, including those with wealth and those who have decision-making power within philanthropic institutions. While there is a great desire to engage next generation donors and family members, we have found that there seems to be insufficient knowledge or experience to meet the growing demand for next generation engagement and social justice philanthropy. Through this centennial grantmaking portfolio, as well as this report, the Surdna foundation and Andrus Family Philanthropy Program can provide important leadership in supporting the dissemination and uptake of social change philanthropic practices in the next generation.

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The National Center for Family Philanthropy (NCFP), the Johnson Center and Exponent Philanthropy are core resources for family foundations that are currently beginning their work on diversity, equity and inclusion. While important resources, they have not always led with the next generation as a core focus. Community foundations have been funding and hosting some of the country’s leading equity initiatives for some time and have been successful at effectively engaging local donors and philanthropic families. To augment and document these efforts, there is a growing and significant body of work on best practices in social justice philanthropy, including from the Andrus Family Fund, the National Center for Responsive Philanthropy and Grantmakers for Effective Organizations.

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SECTION 2: THE NEXT GENERATION PHILANTHROPIC ECOSYSTEM

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There is a robust and growing ecosystem that supports the next generation of young people in the U.S. to engage in impactful social change philanthropy. There is a wide range of organizations and strategies that are both distinct and interwoven which support this development. Between May 2017 and January 2018, Nitika Raj spoke with staff at more than 37 organizations leading on: a) family philanthropy, b) next generation philanthropy and donor organizing and c) social change philanthropy. (List of organizations, individuals and questions asked are in Appendix A). These conversations revealed a trove of information about the current status of the field: what was inspiring, what was challenging and where there seemed to be gaps in the field.

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Conversations and research in the field revealed four main clusters of organizations and work taking place. The clusters are categorized by what the organizations do overall, and the impact they are trying to achieve in the work.

Training Programs and Organizing Programs • 21/64 • Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training (GIFT) • Class Action Network • Exponent Philanthropy Next Gen Fellows Program • Thousand Currents Thousand Currents Academy

Innovation, Research and Development • Faces of Giving Projects Inc. People of Color Donor Collaborative • Bay Area Justice Funders Network Giving Side App • Association of Black Foundation Executives Black Next Generation High Net Worth Program • Movement NetLab

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Moving Money through Social Justice Philanthropy GIVING CIRCLES • Astrea Foundation Funding Queerly Giving Circle • Third Wave Fund • Solidaire Giving Projects • Giving Projects Learning Community • Chinook Fund • Bread and Roses Community Fund • Crossroads Fund • Headwaters Foundation for Justice • North Star Fund • Social Justice Fund Northwest

Next Generation Philanthropic Ecosystem

Direct Engagement and Organizing of High Net Wealth Young People • Resource Generation • NEXUS Global

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CLUSTER 1: DIRECT ENGAGEMENT AND ORGANIZING OF HIGH NET WEALTH YOUNG PEOPLE Resource Generation emerged as an anchor institution in the field of engaging next generation donors and trustees. Resource Generation (RG) was created as a political home for young donors ages 18-35 who wanted to use their money and privilege to find a meaningful role in supporting social change movements. Almost every organization interviewed either mentioned Resource Generation, had formally or informally partnered with them, had an audience that was fed by RG’s base, or spawned RG members who then went on to found new organizations relevant to next generation donor organizing (Solidaire and Nexus). RG's signature conference, Making Money Make Change, (which AFF/AFPP has supported) was started by Third Wave Foundation (now the Third Wave Fund), Funding Exchange (now closed) and Tides Foundation. These are (or were) all social justice foundations that were founded and led by people of color, women and LGBTQ folks, as well as by many next generation leaders. This was a cross-class, intergenerational, multiracial effort to create an organizing home for young donors to plug into movements for social change that paid specific attention to their ability to mobilize resources and to their passion for creating change in the world. Resource Generation began its work with many questions: Who were these young donors? Why were they not interested in traditional philanthropy? And what was it about traditional philanthropy that made them want to create something new? Many of them believed that traditional philanthropy did not serve their interest in social justice and was a barrier to real progress. They were also facing paternalism at home and from financial advisors who did not take the young adults seriously, and were not transparent about their full financial pictures or about the choices available to these young donors.

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Now in its 20th year, Resource Generation’s work has infused the entire ecosystem in ways they may not have imagined. RG is in fact the only group organizing next generation donors and family philanthropy trustees with the explicit lens and strategy of social change philanthropy. In addition to their annual conference, they host a smaller biannual retreat/ conference that targets the next generation of family philanthropy or family giving in varied ways. They also host several leadership development institutes for their member leaders and have 17 chapters throughout the country. These chapters are creating entire cohorts of donor organizers who are joining the staff and boards of foundations across the country. RG has effectively transformed its role from creating important spaces where young donors came to find a community, to an external-facing fully-participating movement building organization. In a relatively young ecosystem, RG may already be an elder. This is reflected in their updated mission:

“To organize young people with wealth and class privilege in the U.S. to become transformative leaders working towards the equitable distribution of land, wealth and power.”15

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NEXUS Global was founded in 2011 by Jonah Wittkamper, former RG member, and Rachel Cohen Gerrol. A relatively new organization, their mission is to "Bridge global communities of wealth and social entrepreneurship. We work to unite young investors, social entrepreneurs and allies to catalyze new leadership and accelerate global solutions." They want to support young people with wealth to become strategic donors and impact investors. With members in over 70 countries, Nexus Global has hosted over 25 summits since their inception to convene millennial wealth holders seeking to “make the greatest impact with their social, political and philanthropic capital.” They also organize local salons to bring together people who are interested in a particular issue area. For example: responding to organizing and protests in Ferguson after the shooting of a young Black teenager, Michael Brown, in 2014 by white police officer Darren Wilson. Christina Hollenback from NEXUS Global says the organization focuses “on a basic organizing principle: meet people where they are at. We also encourage our members to use all the influence they have at their disposal—political, social, economic capital across asset classes. What good is your philanthropy if it has to fight your business practices with 1/1,000th of the resources? Align it all towards justice and let’s win together!” Resource Generation and NEXUS Global are the two organizations in this ecosystem that are most directly and exclusively engaging next generation wealth holders to make a strategic impact in addressing societal problems.

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CLUSTER 2: MOVING MONEY THROUGH SOCIAL JUSTICE PHILANTHROPY This is an exciting cluster of organizations, mostly foundations that have created effective mechanisms to engage next generation donors in social change philanthropy. The first group of organizations within this cluster are all social justice community foundations or funds organizing one or more Giving Projects (GPs) as part of their regular grant-making. Giving Projects are an innovative structure for next generation donor organizing, leadership development and social justice philanthropy. At their core, they aim to organize resources and create donors who begin to see themselves as organizers in the process. While 70 percent or more of GP participants are under the age of 35, the groups are multiracial, cross-class and intergenerational, creating a rich learning environment for all participants across identity and experience. Regardless of their background, most participants make their largest gift to date through this process.16 During a 6–9 month engagement, members: •

Participate in political education and personal reflection on race and class identity

Learn directly from grassroots social justice organizations

Engage in personal giving (no minimum or maximum contribution)

Engage in grassroots fundraising, including training and personal support on how to engage family members and networks

Get training in social justice philanthropy, principles of funding community organizing and advocacy, and systems change

• Take part in democratic grantmaking including reviewing applications and site visits •

Receive 1:1 coaching around personal giving and fundraising

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The first Giving Project was started by Social Justice Fund Northwest in 2010 in Seattle, in partnership with the local chapter of Resource Generation.17 RG members had been tackling their wealth acquisition stories through a tool called “money stories,” which grounds this work in the history of the racial wealth divide.18 The first Giving Project convened 18 people under the age of 40 in the Next Generation Giving Project. Since then, the model has taken off and has been replicated throughout the country. An important aspect of this model is the creation of a cross-class, cross-race community giving structure. Studies have long shown people with wealth give proportionally lower percentages of their income or wealth, whereas working and middle-class people tend to give more generously.19 With a range of class backgrounds in the group, participants engage thoughtfully in facilitated discussions about having and giving money. This cross-class dialogue is vital to pushing next generation wealthy donors to understand their role in the philanthropic infrastructure; to confront, acknowledge and accept their privilege; and to give at fuller potential based on their access to wealth. Interestingly, five of the six community foundations who have started organizing Giving Projects are former members of the Funding Exchange: Chinook Fund, Crossroads Fund, Bread and Roses Community Fund, Headwaters Foundation for Justice and North Star Fund. Each foundation is in partnership, formal or informal, with a local RG chapter that funnels members to act collectively through the GPs. A National Giving Project Learning Community has developed, which helps these foundations share curriculum, train staff who lead the GPs and tackle the challenges that arise along the way. The other groups in this cluster are Astraea Foundation’s Funding Queerly Giving Circle, Third Wave Fund and Solidaire.

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Funding Queerly, a project of the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, was started at RG’s Making Money Make Change conference in 2012 by a collaboration of Astraea staff and RG members. Spaces that convene and politicize young donors are often fertile grounds for inspiration towards collective action and resource organizing. While Funding Queerly does not just engage people under 40, the idea is to engage “people who see themselves as donors for life, to become politicized donors for a long time,” says Miabi Chatterji, Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice. Third Wave Fund is an activist fund led entirely by and for women of color, as well as intersex, queer and trans people under the age of 35. “We work to ensure that young people are at the cutting edge of philanthropy where they are commonly absent.” The Third Wave Foundation was created in the late 1990’s, and morphed into Third Wave Fund about five years ago and recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. Donor organizing has long been a part of the fabric of Third Wave. Additionally, Third Wave launched a giving circle in 2018. “All these efforts are trying to recognize that these communities [communities of color, lowincome] have been funding their own work for a while… Millennials have biggest wealth gap of any generation in history of America. There is barely a class lens in this work, that’s a place we try to take up space and be a bridge. Create openness for next generation who have direct experience with activism and oppression and bring those agendas to the reality they’re facing.” - Rye Young, Third Wave Fund

"Millennials have the biggest wealth gap of any generation in history of America."

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— Rye Young


"We are surprised the next gen is really focused on impact."

— Sharna Goldseker

Solidaire is a membership community of individual donors and foundations, officially launched in 2013 by former RG member, Leah Hunt-Hendrix. “We started out as a donor community very influenced by existing donor communities like Resource Generation and Democracy Alliance. A lot of people in their 30s were aging out of RG and thinking about a place to move money and have strategic impact together,” - Leah Hunt-Hendrix, Solidaire The membership structure requires people to give away at least $50,000 a year, and pay annual dues to Solidaire of $15,000, two-thirds of which go into a pooled fund. Solidaire’s community gives collectively in 3 primary ways: 1) Pooled fund for Movement Research and Development (R&D), 2) Rapid Response Fund for movement moments, and 3) Aligned Giving for movement infrastructure. The Movement R&D Fund is a cross-class group of decision-makers, including Solidaire members and former grantees who make decisions together about investing capital into innovative strategies. The rapid response strategy is member-initiated, and based on relationships with organizations and knowledge of critical needs. This channel moves up to $200,000 a month without a grant application process, and teaches Solidaire members to become organizational allies, advocates and fundraisers. This model exemplifies donor organizing in action. The first of the aligned giving strategies is focused on developing longterm infrastructure for the Movement for Black Lives (M4BL). The goal is to move $25 million over five years to anchor organizations within the M4BL. Increasingly, this community is funding 501(c)(4) groups involved with electoral politics, especially after the 2016 election.

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CLUSTER 3: TRAINING PROGRAMS AND ORGANIZING PARTNERS 21/64, founded in 2002, is a consulting, coaching, advising and training non-profit. They serve a multigenerational audience in family philanthropy including a focus on next generation engagement, and they also work closely with wealth and philanthropy advisors. In 2012 and 2013 they partnered with the Dorothy A. Johnson Center at Grand Valley State University to study the giving stories and motivations of the next generation with wealth. Results from that study were recently compiled and launched in their latest book, "Generation Impact: How Next Gen Donors are Revolutionizing Giving," by authors Sharna Goldseker and Michael Moody. 21/64 has produced multiple books and over 20 tools that serve families to find their values around giving and wealth. “We are surprised the next gen is really focused on impact. They are not motivated by responsibility or obligation or relationship, but [rather], what’s the change I can make in the world?” - Sharna Goldseker, Executive Director of 21/64 The Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training (GIFT) is a leader in fundraising training for people with wealth. They see this as an entry point to mobilize resources. GIFT was started in 1996 by two robust training centers; the Center for Third World Organizing and the Southern Empowerment Project. RG and GIFT have partnered over multiple years to co-present workshops on fundraising; tailoring a grassroots fundraising curriculum to young people with wealth who are poised to unlock resources in their families, networks and foundations. Class Action Network is a national network of trainers, writers, and experts whose goal is to end classism. Although officially incorporated in 2004, the work was launched 10 years prior by Felice Yeskel and Jennifer Ladd in cross-class groups that met regularly to dialogue about the impacts of class and money on people, relationships and culture. “Working for social justice goes better when you understand class cultures,” reads the tagline that introduces a Class Cultures toolkit on their website. They have programs specifically on the intersection of race and class, philanthropy, and social change. The curriculum, tools and trainings developed by Class Action are built into the race and class political education components of every Giving Project.

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Exponent Philanthropy (formerly the Association of Small Foundations) celebrated its 20th anniversary in 2016. Having changed their name in 2014 to include a wider range of members who were making a great impact with their philanthropy, they are currently flourishing with over 2,000 members. Their Next Gen Fellows Program is a 6-month annual cohort which brings together 25-26 people for a crash course on various issues, including operational management, leadership development, the basics of grant-making, finding your voice within your family and becoming a leader within a non-family board. This program helps bridge gaps in understanding between how things are traditionally done and how the next generation is redesigning the passionate impact they want to make. Thousand Currents (formerly the International Development Exchange) is a grant-making organization that has been funding grassroots efforts in the Global South for over 30 years, with an emphasis on empowering the next generation with the skills to be effective lifelong donors. The Thousand Currents Academy is a week-long training institute taught by social change leaders and grassroots community organizers. The training is primarily attended by a next generation audience interested in doing philanthropy “the right way,” as advocates and allies to social change. “Participants develop skills to be advocates as well as grant-makers and donors. The program compels donors in the U.S. to act in solidarity, advocating within philanthropy in ways that grassroots partners in other countries don’t always have access to.” - Jessie Spector, Donor Organizing Director of Thousand Currents

“Participants develop skills to be advocates as well as grant-makers and donors.”

— Jessie Spector

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CLUSTER 4: INNOVATION, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Faces of Giving is a new non-profit organization that promotes giving circles within communities of color and offers philanthropic advising services to high net wealth individuals. Faces of Giving is one-half of the partnership known as the People of Color Donor Collaborative, along with The Vaid Group LLC. The Collaborative has four core members, all women of color who have worked in philanthropic institutions, as well as a larger advisory group. This project emerged in response to the consistent and conspicuous absence of high net wealth individuals of color in most donor networks and convenings in philanthropy. Urvashi Vaid and Ashindi Maxton are co-authors of a recently released report, “The Apparitional Donor: Understanding and Engaging High Net Worth Donors of Color.” “The project set out to understand what was known about high net worth people of color through research, an extensive literature review, interviews, and discussion with an advisory team of experts in philanthropy.”20

"Generational differences exist among HNW donors of color, both immigrant and non-immigrant, with younger donors more willing to think and link across ethnicity and race, and to collaborate as donors."

— Urvashi Vaid and Ashindi Maxton

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Phase one of this project was a landscape analysis reviewing all the existing research data from the last twenty years that documented giving by high net wealth (HNW) people of color (POC). Phase one also included a case study of previous efforts to organize donors of color in the U.S., and lessons learned from those attempts. Phase two consisted of 100 interviews in 2017-2018 with HNW POC across the U.S. to identify the giving trends and motivations of these donors, as well as their values and personal stories. Future work includes building a donor network centered on the needs and priorities of donors of color who have at least $1 million in liquid assets of which they are able to give at least 5 percent or more annually. Giving Side is a new technology platform and project that seeks to help young donors find a political home using a technological platform that is familiar to Generation X and Millennials. By allowing users to track their giving (both money and time), set giving goals, and opportunities for reflection, the Giving Side resembles modern-day social media platforms that offer users a sense of belonging and an identity. Over time, it will allow groups to give collectively, to raise money in collaboration with like-minded people and to find organizations that are doing work on issues that the donor cares about. It was started by Mario Lugay, formerly at the Mitchell Kapor Foundation/Kapor Center for Social Impact, which brings together technology and social entrepreneurship with equity at the center. Mario, also a former board member of Resource Generation, saw the need for the philanthropic and non-profit sector to better engage donors in a time of hyper-connectivity and increased choice, working with RG members as initial users. Currently housed at the Justice Funders Network (formerly Bay Area Justice Funders Network) and incubated in an innovation lab called "Movement Commons," the project has its roots in Lugay’s recent civic engagement fellowship at Stanford's Hasso Plattner Institute of Design. He has also been awarded an entrepreneur in residence role at Guidestar. This platform and project will be used to drive collaborations in giving and social change philanthropy networks, making the ecosystem even more robust, since the power and relevance of technology in the millennial generation cannot be overstated.

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"Giving Side provides a tool and experience designed to support young people's individual political journeys. By reflecting to them and celebrating all the good that they do—beyond any one donation or action to a single organization—we allow individuals to see, if not discover, their agency to affect change when they're ready and via the means that they are afforded. For next gen users, it's both a particularly useful tool to explore and experiment their giving privately, but in a manner that we've designed to generate both pride and language as ingredients for eventual collective action. In service to the larger organizing ecosystem, we intervene at the hardest part of organizing, which is not in fact convincing a person of the importance of an issue, but instead of their agency to impact that issue and, most importantly, to think about doing so over a full lifetime."

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— Mario Lugay


The Association for Black Foundation Executives (ABFE) was founded in 1971 and has a mission of promoting effective and responsive philanthropy in Black communities. ABFE’s Catalyzing Community Giving Institute (CCGI) trains fundraising staff from Black-led non-profits to increase their sustainability via individual donor fundraising and other strategies. CCGI is an initiative funded by the W.H. Kellogg Foundation to increase giving by people of color to communities of color. While ABFE has historically attracted professional staff working in philanthropic institutions, it is now starting a new initiative to engage Black HNW individuals in entertainment, sports or entrepreneurship. This new strategy is important and timely to not only “uplift Black communities, but also secure a progressive agenda for our nation,” says Susan Batten, President and CEO of ABFE. Organizing HNW individuals complements their work on aligning funders around strategic co-investment in certain regions, including the Midwest but primarily in the South. The Movement NetLab is a “think-make-and-do” tank, focused on developing effective tools for practical application in movement building. Some of their core programs include the Old Money, New Systems retreat, Resource Mobilization for Movement Building retreat and a working group on Funding Movement Networks. Movement NetLab has been working in partnership with GIFT for the last few years to organize and facilitate the network gathering on Resourcing and Sustaining Our Movements at conferences where next generation donors gather, such as the Allied Media Conference. Conferences are one of the most effective spaces for sharing new tools and methodologies with organizations working on social change across various sectors and issues, and Movement NetLab is emerging as a thought leader and training practitioner across the field of resource organizing. The wide spectrum of the organizations operating in this cluster exhibits a field that is both young and emerging, yet has within it a few decades of expertise and experience.

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SECTION 3: KEY THEMES FROM INTERVIEWS

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37 organizational interviews in the field of next generation engagement with social change philanthropy yielded illuminating insights grouped into three main themes. The theme categories are: 1. Readiness for social change philanthropy 2. Current practices that are powerful and effective 3. Institutional change


READINESS FOR SOCIAL CHANGE PHILANTHROPY 1. SOCIAL JUSTICE: People are aligned with and open to social justice philanthropy. Almost every organization interviewed expressed at least openness, if not excitement, about social justice philanthropy and the importance of centering issues of equity. Many people mentioned the 2016 election as a compelling factor that primed the current moment as one of greater urgency and bolder action. “The entire philanthropic sector is paying more attention to diversity, equity and inclusion, both within their own organizations and externally with their members. Some of this is catalyzed by funders giving large sums to organizations on this issue, to build their capacity to take this journey. Discussions of social justice and broadening foundation focus are coming from the next gen. There is a drive to have foundations more focused on advocacy. We are hearing this anecdotally, a greater demand for resources and attention to these issues.” - Cynthia Schaal, Exponent Philanthropy “Next gen donors want to give in ways that address root causes of problems…they want to change systems, not just treat symptoms." 21

2. RACE: However, the term racial equity produced a mixture of responses. Many of the respondents talked about social justice philanthropy as an easier entry point to talking about racial equity issues. People were not opposed to racial equity, but the term itself produced a reaction that indicated organizations and their members had difficulty grappling with the concept, knowing how to begin, and towards what outcomes. “Social justice feels more 101, and racial equity feels more advanced” one interviewee said. When racial equity work was ongoing in an organization, it was catalyzed at the behest of members who wanted support and training for their own organizations. “We’ve heard our members say they want their organizations to change, and grant-making to be more racially equitable. They want to know how. They’re on board, but don’t know how to start those steps.” - Kathryn O’Neal Dunham, Philanthropy New York

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Philanthropy New York has a Committee for Equitable and Inclusive Philanthropy,22 and has been working with Race Forward to integrate an institutional framework on equity.23 As part of this work, Race Forward will train a cohort of diverse philanthropic practitioners over a yearlong process that includes staff from member organizations from both the operations and programmatic (grantmaking) member institutions. Philanthropy New York reports some high demand topics including implicit bias, how to address micro-aggressions, and that their members continue to seek more tools as they keep learning.24 This process demonstrates some key ingredients for successful institutional change: investing the time and committing to a longterm process, involving stakeholders at all levels (members, staff, boards) and engaging outside experts on equity who can hold the overall process as well as provide the necessary training and support change at an institutional level.

3. TOOLS/SKILLS: People want concrete tools and hard skills in social justice philanthropy in order to take skillful actions. Next generation trustees and donors crave practical skills and deep knowledge about how best to practice social justice philanthropy. As new practitioners, they want to take back concrete skills to their family foundations about financial literacy, impact investing, historical and present information on the racial wealth divide, racial equity lens in grant-making, how to navigate family power dynamics, and more. “It’s about practice, not just theory. Create opportunities for young people in particular to practice the ideas they’re being introduced to.” - Helen Stillman, Donor Program Director at North Star Fund Popular resources include Resource Generation’s giving guide and workbook, 21/64’s cards on Money Messages and Exploring Giving and many more.

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"It's about practice, not just theory. Create opportunities for young people in particular to practice the ideas they're being introduced to." — Helen Stillman North Star Fund started the Springboard Giving Circle over five years ago in partnership with the New York chapter of Resource Generation. This Giving Circle was the first step towards what became the foundation’s initial foray into Giving Projects, and attracted many participants who have family foundations and were seeking practical skills to take back to their respective foundations. “Participants report feeling equipped to be leaders, they say that they feel skillful with their own families, their family giving and foundations. And most importantly, they knew how to talk about the issues that they cared about,” - Helen Stillman, Donor Program Director at North Star Fund The Giving Circle and Giving Project model is one tool to educate and empower next generation members and help them think about giving within the historical context of the philanthropy in the U.S. It provides them the skills sought by members of interviewed organizations, empowering members with the language and confidence to effectively discuss issues that can often be difficult and emotionally charged. The process guides grant making that addresses the root causes of systemic inequality, and allows participants to learn about organizations doing work that the members care about but might not be aware of. Many of the next generation participants report that after going through the giving project program, they are better able to contribute meaningfully to their families’ legacies of creating positive change, and soon came to be regarded by their elders as experts who were connected to social movements. Giving Circle participants become a bridge between families with wealth eager to make a difference and impacted communities whose solutions are informed by experiences of injustice and inequity.

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4. MESSAGING: Messaging is strategic and values-based. There is a wide range of nuance and intention in how organizations talk about social justice and equity issues. Some organizations were very explicit about having a social justice framework, as well as having racial equity as an important goal and framework. A prime example of this is ABFE’s framework of Responsive Philanthropy in Black Communities, as well as Resource Generation’s work. “We are training our members to be spokespeople and have media skills, moving members to taking powerful and visible public actions,” says Limay Ho, Executive Director of Resource Generation. Some other organizations were values-neutral on social justice, with their key focus being skills-building for the next generation around grant-making, running a foundation, and other technical and operational expertise. An example of this part of the spectrum is Exponent Philanthropy’s Next Gen Fellows Program. A few organizations were intentionally in the gray zone. Though they had a deep understanding and practice of social justice philanthropy embedded in their work, they were implicit or neutral about it in their external communication. They followed a “big tent” approach to appeal to a wider audience. Once people walked in, they use the opportunity to inform, educate and get people involved. “We don’t talk that much about racial justice as a framework, it’s a part of our process and built in. To white donors, we talk about people most impacted. We are good at creating systems that enact racial justice, rather than talking about it,” shared one interviewee.

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CURRENT PRACTICES THAT ARE POWERFUL AND EFFECTIVE 5. EMERGING PATHWAYS: New forms of resource mobilization are already in place, and more are emerging. The next generation is interested in making an impact in the most efficient way possible, and is often looking for collaborative, cross-class and cross-race ways of practicing social change philanthropy. The hard lines distinguishing vehicles of philanthropy and opportunities for social entrepreneurship are blurring. The leading institutions on this front are social justice community foundations/funds and social entrepreneurship firms. “We are hearing our members say they want new skills since the [2016 presidential] election. How to adapt family giving vehicles for rapid response. How to pivot funding quickly. There is an urgency now to affect change and move more funds. People are also interested in C4 funding.” - Iris Brilliant from Resource Generation Similarly, when asked about folks under the age of 40 looking to use their resources for positive change, Dwayne Marshall from the Southeastern Council of Foundations shares that “some want to start foundations, while some may establish other organizations to conduct their charitable giving and social impact. In addition, they can give by leveraging their brand or name to a cause or organization they are passionate about. It’s non-traditional and is emerging as a national trend.” In this context it is important to state that innovation can and should occur within the guiding principles of social justice philanthropy, which include following the leadership of communities most impacted by unjust systems, while building the power of poor and working class people and people of color. New avenues for resource mobilization must remain grounded in this longterm shift of power to those most historically disenfranchised in order to re-balance the scales.

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6. COMMUNITIES OF PRACTICE: The next generation thrives on communities of practice. In addition to theory and practice, people need and want a community of peers who are learning and experiencing similar things. Newer practitioners want to be able to troubleshoot problems in real time with others who may be dealing with the same dynamics within their own family foundations. There is a desire for community building in person as well as in virtual spaces to share resources and connect across geography. “People learn through practice, in community. Our theory of change is to build a community that makes new practices a norm, and enable ways for people to do this. We build relationships. People will take more risks when they know and trust each other.� - Lea Hunt-Hendrix, Executive Director of Solidaire These emerging communities of intentional practice are in contrast to the traditional paradigm of conferences. In conferences, wonderfully talented and passionate advocates for justice may be in the same session, but may never connect. Conferences are a useful model for the dissemination of information and learning new content or skills. However, they can be limited in providing spaces that foster deeper connection and long-term relationship building that build trust and collaboration. This is a key reason why retreats, fellowships, training academies, and giving circles are so powerful and necessary. Participants are often supported by ongoing cohorts, building and retaining emotional connection while simultaneously encouraging peer learning and information exchange.

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7. ENTRY POINTS: Almost every organization has a next generation entry point. Look for it. When initially asked if the organization had a significant next generation audience in their base, or a program or strategy for engaging them, the interviewee often said no. However, upon deeper conversation, we found the presence of next generation members in their base in various ways. For Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders in philanthropy, it was the technology entrepreneurs in Silicon Valley or Toyota’s employee giving circles. For ABFE, it was the sports and entertainment celebrities who were rising up to speak out in response to the murders of young unarmed Black men by the police. For Women Donors Network, there was a clear audience in the daughters of their historic base, but those daughters experienced resistance to joining an organization seen as an organizing space for their mothers or aunts. For Thousand Currents, it is the young professionals group who throws fundraisers for the foundation’s international work. All these opportunities point to the existence of next generation members everywhere, and their passion and interests as an organize-able energy that can be channeled to fuel social change.

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INSTITUTIONAL CHANGE 8. INTERNAL WORK: To maximize impact for all stakeholders within foundations and philanthropy serving organizations, internal work at an individual and organizational level is required. “If a family is not talking about power, race, equity and money in the family… you can’t show up authentically externally (in social change/philanthropy) and not cause harm.” - Andrea Hernandez from Youth Philanthropy Connect When organizations attempt to create equity outcomes but have not done the internal work to sort through their values, beliefs, desired impact, required change, and barriers to change, then external impact remains limited and ad hoc at best. In this case, there is no comprehensive frame holding the full picture. When organizations take the time to do internal organizational work, they often find that they need to go slow enough to bring everyone (staff, boards, members) along and fast enough to make a concrete difference to people most affected. At the same time, they must allow space for the messy chaos inherent in real learning. This is also true for staff members who are not family members in the foundation. They also must have time and space to deal with race and power dynamics in professional philanthropy. “What am I vulnerable to that’s not allowing me to show up as strongly as I want to?” one interviewee wondered. “People often go back and do the inner work when they run into challenges with external work, then they realize how they crafted the process doesn’t necessarily represent the equity values and principles needed. What would it take for us to do that work before causing harm in the community, or relationship harm? People have to understand the history of the places we are in, and what your people have done and not done in that history. It also informs where you fund and how you fund.” - Raquel Gutierrez, Hispanics in Philanthropy

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9. OPENNESS AND LISTENING: Within family foundations, transferring power to the next generation will require tremendous openness, authentic listening and a strengths-based approach. Older generations are eager to engage the next generation in their family’s giving and to continue their legacies, whether it is institutionalized or informal. Younger generations are keen to learn the most effective ways to practice philanthropy and move the needle on significant current problems like climate change, poverty, public education, homelessness, hunger, mass incarceration, state violence, healthcare, civil liberties, living wage issues, migrant justice, reproductive justice, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia and LGBTQ equality. Edgar Villanueva of Native Americans in Philanthropy asks a guiding question for taking action in the current political environment: "The concept of seven generations is very important and a core value in Native communities. How is everything we do now going to support the next seven generations?"

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Cynthia Shaal from Exponent Philanthropy captured this tension and opportunity very poignantly: “We want to prepare older generations to fully tap into the power of what younger generations are passionate about accomplishing. Not ‘Here’s how you, younger person, will fit into what we’re doing.’ It’s the ‘old guard’ that needs to be better prepared to listen and understand how to evolve. How do we provide more resources and support to foundations these young leaders are moving into? It’s not a light switch that gets turned on when the next gen staff member or trustee gets back home. We need to better educate their home base on how they might need to change and adapt based on what the next generation is learning from external programs. We need to extend the learning period both for the next generation trustee and the foundation, to build on the momentum coming out of next gen educational programming, and for foundations to understand fully what’s at stake when they engage the next gen.” Older generations also need to see their work and legacies recognized by their younger family members in order to feel mutual recognition and respect for hard work in difficult times, especially that of the early work of starting foundations. "Older generations are saying ‘you’re not giving us credit for what we did back then.’ And younger generations are saying ‘you’re not giving us credit for what we’re doing right now.’ There can be resentments emerging this way." - Lori Villarosa of Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity This approach of looking back to move forward can encourage families to take a strengthsbased approach that builds upon previous efforts, while creating the spirit of collaboration that facilitates trust and open communication.

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10. MANAGING CHANGE: Change is uncomfortable. It can be chaotic, and it may be a long process with surprising growth spurts. It requires a deep values-based commitment and the resources to follow through fully. A few organizations talked about the discomfort and chaos of change, even when the change is desired and intentional and people have adequate support. “It’s going to feel like standing in mud for a while,” one interviewee shared. In organizational change processes, whether the change is towards next generation leadership or an equity framework (or both), it requires the buy-in of all the people who are a part of the institution as members, staff and board. People need space to air their concerns about loss or fear of the unknown. People need to be able to ask questions about what to expect. They need patience to be messy enough to unlearn things and try new things, and they need deep trust throughout the process. “We live at the intersection of the push and pull happening in our country right now. Wealthy white people are also having their own push-pull around power and redistribution of resources in our respective families,” another interviewee shared.

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11. INTENTIONAL PAUSES: Transitions and transformations are underway, and many organizations are pausing to reflect and evolve intentionally, or to end some work in its current form. There are quite a few significant changes to philanthropic infrastructure in the last five years, which is part of the context in which next generation philanthropy is evolving. The former Joint Affinity Groups refined their purpose and vision after 25 years to be a more external facing leader on equity in philanthropy and re-emerged as Change Philanthropy under new leadership in 2016. Undergoing a similar process, the former Forum of Regional Associations of Grantmakers transformed after almost 20 years into United Philanthropy Forum, with a new clarity of vision and expansion of their membership to include 27 national Philanthropy Serving Organizations (PSOs) along with the former membership of 33 regional PSOs. The Association of Small Foundations re-launched in 2014 as Exponent Philanthropy to reflect and include members who had a range of giving vehicles besides foundations. And finally, the Youth Engagement Fund spun off from Democracy Alliance to form an independent entity. The D5 Coalition completed its five-year arc of work on Diversity Equity and Inclusion in 2016, and released its final State of the Work report. Youth Philanthropy Connect closed its doors in 2017 after making significant contributions for over a decade. After 35 years of impact, the Funding Exchange closed its doors in 2014. Kelly Brown of the D5 coalition reflects by saying, “there is an old beautiful building, which doesn’t have heating, electricity, etc. As much as you want to keep it, sometimes you must tear it down. Some things go away, and have to go away, to be replaced by something that is not that different, but is new and even better.” The new Giving Projects are certainly a continuation of the groundwork laid down in the 1970’s, bringing fresh energy and momentum to social justice foundations and resource mobilization efforts today, with 75 percent of GP participants coming from the next generation.

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To summarize, next generation donors need political education, theories of change and impact, issue-based expertise, best practices of social change philanthropy, support and accountability to take transformational action. Young donors also need communities of practice, political homes, teachers and mentors, peers to learn with and from, and connection in order to reduce the isolation, guilt and inexperience that many young donors report feeling. At best, donors can become donor organizers, which increases their own impact exponentially. Because social networks are often similar in race and class, people with wealth have the most direct access to and influence over other people with wealth. Next gen trustees who have found the right political homes can become examples of how to live materially rich lives that are in alignment with values of justice and social transformation.

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SECTION 4: TAKING ACTION

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The political, social and ecological spheres we inhabit are in rapid demise while simultaneously being (re)constructed by various forces. Over a year and a half ago, we saw a series of world changing decisions come into effect. Donald Trump was elected the 45th president of the U.S., unexpectedly triumphing over one of the most qualified candidates the country had ever seen. The United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union (in a move commonly known as Brexit), the latest in a wave of nationalist and anti-immigrant policies sweeping the Western world. We continue to brace ourselves against the increasing onslaught of climate change on all aspects of our lives. We continue to grapple with the impacts of 40 years of the overincarceration of black and brown people and its pervasive impacts on society. We are just beginning to understand the role that automation will play in the lives of workers. The #MeToo movement has made abuses of power more visible, and brought to the forefront how these abuses are deeply intersectional with issues of race, class and gender. We imagine that this is just the tip of the iceberg that shapes the increasingly complex context that next generation donors are currently living in and which is shaping their futures. Many of the organizations and the models we researched tell us that facing these issues and engaging in transformational philanthropy will require a massive paradigm shift. Traditional models of charity philanthropy do not resonate with the next generation. The consequences of this political moment will unfold for many years to come, and so will the consequences of our interventions (or lack thereof) for racial, economic and gender justice. “Are we going to continue this work? What should it look like? This is a critical moment for a conversation about what’s next, and where you place your bets.� - Cora Mirikitani of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy

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RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ACTION In the next 30 years, we are expecting a transfer of $59 trillion to a few individuals in the next generation of the U.S. who will be expected to steward this money. Because this flow of wealth is currently poised to continue through inheritance, without political education or intervention, it will continue to favor white wealthy families and reinforce structural oppression at a previously unimaginable scale. We cannot afford to continue operating as we have, with a vast gap between the wealth-holders who are decision-makers and those who are most impacted by those decisions. If philanthropy is to disrupt these deeply entrenched patterns of inequity, the time for change is now.

GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS 1. INVEST: Invest in next generation donor organizing as an important political project. This paper calls for the development of next generation donors who are prepared to respond to the needs of a rapidly changing world, who follow the leadership and voices of communities most impacted by these changes, and the foundation of structural inequality and injustice. “Social change philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, economic and environmental injustices. It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decisionmakers. It also aims to make the field of philanthropy more accessible and diverse. In social change philanthropy, foundations are accountable, transparent and responsive in their grantmaking. Donors and foundations act as allies to social justice movements by contributing not only monetary resources but their time, knowledge, skills and access.�25 This framework of leadership development must be grounded in political education on the racial wealth divide, social justice philanthropy, a holistic perspective on current global challenges and how they manifest in the U.S. and community-based solutions led by those most impacted by historically unjust structures.

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2. HOLISTIC TRANSFORMATION: Racial justice institutional transformations need to be holistic. Invest the time, energy, money and all resources necessary to complete this cycle of transformation. Organizations need to have internal clarity on values and mission. Do you understand the “how and why” of your organization’s work? While external messaging can and should be strategic to attract a wider range of people, internal frameworks and practices need to be in alignment with the organization’s values and mission, and within an equitycentered framework.

"Social change philanthropy focuses on the root causes of social, economic and environmental injustices. It strives to include the people who are impacted by those injustices as decision-makers."

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RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ALL FUNDERS 3. WORK!: Do the work. Racial justice work, like all organizational change processes, requires that all members of an institution personalize the process in order to engage in the work. This includes honestly and rigorously reflecting on identity, power and privilege, both individually and organizationally. This work can be especially challenging for white families and white foundation leaders who have not had to think critically about race before. Creating an organizational culture in which individuals feel safe enough to explore and work through their own unconscious biases is as critical as developing the necessary knowledge and framework to see the work through. “The primary folks in those positions [CEOs and boards of foundations] are often not people of color. Internal work has to happen on their own. That is a scary process regardless of race, but more vulnerable for white people. People of color have had to work that way forever; inner outer work has been around in movement work for a long time. You can’t have a healthy movement if you don’t have healthy people.” - Raquel Gutierrez of Hispanics in Philanthropy

4. RESPONSIVENESS: Act quickly and more responsively. While we need to remain thoughtful about strategy, as a field we need to be more responsive to our changing context. Funders need to move with greater speed from intentions to ideas, from discussions to decisions, from collaboration to impact. Austin Belali formerly of Youth Engagement Fund (formerly part of the Democracy Alliance) says “to do something bold, you have to do it quickly and with speed and be decisive.” The urgency of the current moment requires a change of pace, which is more possible when relationships are strong and trust has already been built. Raquel Gutierrez urges organizations to “take time to build the relationships because the work moves at the speed of trust."

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5. COLLABORATE: Collaboration is more impactful than acting alone. Some promising work happening in this realm is the recently launched JustFund portal by Solidaire Network in collaboration with over 20 foundations, several donor networks, funders and individual donors. This portal is an entry point for organizations’ proposals to be reviewed simultaneously and proactively by multiple potential funders, thereby reducing the time an organizing group has to spend on fundraising while increasing their capacity for responding on the ground. Another example is the Association of Black Foundation Executives bringing together 15 foundations and donor networks to a funders table for the Movement for Black Lives, which is supported by Solidaire Aligned Giving for Black Lives strategy. Formal and informal partnerships are fundamental to the success of any movement work. This helps networks to thrive and grow together, like the Giving Projects ecosystem.

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RECOMMENDATIONS FOR DONOR ORGANIZERS, DONOR NETWORKS AND ORGANIZING PARTNERS 6. LEARN AND BUILD: Lean into what’s working well and build on it. As one can see from the clusters identified above, there is plenty of great work happening that is precise and impactful. The growth of the Giving Projects into a national learning community that helps to replicate the model is just one example. Resource Generation’s annual Making Money Make Change conference and 21/64’s money messages toolkits are a few examples of programs that have continued for a decade or more, and continue to draw new audiences. This work has been a solid organizing ground for the next generation to engage with social justice, family philanthropy, or a combination of the two. The more we can continue to support and learn from this work, the better equipped we will be to partner with new leaders of the next generation. Partner with each other on complementary content, and share your work more widely so others can learn and adopt effective models that work in their contexts.

7. ENGAGE FINANCIAL ADVISORS: Organize and partner with financial advisors. The financial advising and wealth management communities in banks and private firms provide an opportunity for those with social change education and influence, and one where many people of color are leading with frameworks of asset-building and wealth building for historically disenfranchised communities. “We have to meet those under 40 people where they are. We must go to them, instead of relying on them to approach us. For folks with inherited wealth, they have created different platforms such as family office operations, funds at trust departments within banks or other financial institutions. We need to build relationships in some of these spaces - people who advise and support educational opportunities for people with wealth who want to make a philanthropic impact.” - Dwayne Marshall of the Southeastern Council on Federations

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RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FAMILY FOUNDATIONS 8. LISTEN AND CHANGE: Listen to what the next generation is saying. Be ready and open to change. Identify common values and common goals across generations, but remain open to strategies and structures which are different from what has worked in the past. Are you ready for the next generation to have an authentic voice in your organization? If you are going to engage the next generation, be prepared to change your organization based on their input and leadership. Invest in outside training and get support to create an atmosphere of openness, where older leaders and younger leaders can communicate across generations and across values and ideas in order to build on the strengths of the foundation and grow its social justice impact.

9. ONE-ON-ONE COACHING: Next generation family philanthropy leaders greatly benefit from one-on-one coaching. In order to practice social justice philanthropy as well as advocate within their family institutions, young donors need a lot of support. Iris Brilliant of Resource Generation knows this well: “We do a lot of emotional coaching asking young donors ‘what are the blocks for you to actualize your values?’ These one-on-one conversations are deeply transformative.” While a certain amount of learning can and should happen in a community based space, taking the ideas into action often requires breaking through the layers of isolation that wealth can create. These breakthroughs are more likely to occur during one-on-one conversations where young people are grappling with contradicting belief systems or ideas about money, saving, investing and giving. “A lot of the next gen work happens in one-on-one coaching,” shares Helen Stillman from North Star Fund. One of the essential components of the giving projects are the one-one conversations with staff members throughout the process. These conversations are essential to the development of a next generation donor’s philanthropic practice and leadership development in resource organizing.

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Next generation donors and trustees are primarily motivated by making an impact. They are looking for the greatest positive change possible from the investments they are willing to make. Many young donors are excited by how far their dollar and time can go, which is what makes the gift and the act of giving feel significant. They want to see evidence of impact but also evidence of how their gift mattered. They want to contribute time, connections, skills, space and ideas and be more holistically involved with causes they deeply care about. They are willing and excited to learn. While one of the current priorities is to protect communities on the frontlines of attack, we must simultaneously balance that urgent need with building the future we want—one that has ample opportunity for the next generation of people with wealth and resources to contribute to positive and transformative social change. How do we begin to reflect on the importance of impacts—not intentions—in family philanthropy? The racial wealth divide is profoundly embedded in U.S. foundations and has been generations in the making. Addressing it will not be a one-year, or even onedecade solution. Part of the task ahead is to educate young and new donors on what social movements are and how they work, invest in teaching young donors how social change philanthropy works. Why it matters is important to creating an America that reflects what will soon be the new American majority. Create the conditions for them to learn and practice well while causing as little harm and doing as much good as possible. Our investment in next generation donors must be consistent, well-rounded and well-resourced. Transformational change must take a multifaceted approach where next generation education is but one spoke of a very large wheel. If our focus is true equity, we must remain dedicated, which will require immense and focused collective action.

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APPENDIX A: METHODOLOGY

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This landscape analysis draws from 37 intensive interviews with high-level staff at leading foundations and donor networks focused on social justice philanthropy and next generation engagement. We are grateful to the following organizations and individuals who generously shared their experiences and insights. 21/64 Sharna Goldseker, Executive Director Danielle Oristian York, Managing Director Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in Philanthropy Cora Mirikitani, President and CEO Association of Black Foundation Executives Susan Taylor Batten, President and CEO Seitu Jemel Hart, Vice President of Development and Membership Change Philanthropy Carly Hare, National Director/Coalition Catalyst D5 Coalition Kelly Brown, Director Emerging Practitioners in Philanthropy Tamir Novotny, Executive Director Exponent Philanthropy Cynthia Schaal, Chief Program Officer Fellowships by ProInspire Monisha Kapila, Founder and CEO

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Frieda C. Fox Family Foundation Annie Hernandez, Executive Director Katherine Westlund Scott, Director of Youth Philanthropy Connect Generative Somatics Danielle Feris, Resource Development Director Grantmakers for Effective Organizations Heather Peeler, Vice President of Member and Partner Engagement Stephanie Chan, Program Specialist Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training Crystal Middlestadt, Resource Development Director Grantmakers for Southern Progress LaTosha Brown, Project Director Hispanics in Philanthropy Dr. Raquel Gutierrez, Director of Leadership and Learning Advancement Dorothy A. Johnson Center for Philanthropy at Grand Valley State University Michael Moody, Frey Foundation Chair for Family Philanthropy Jason Franklin, W.K. Kellogg Community Philanthropy Chair Marga Inc. Faith Bynoe, Consultant Giving Projects Learning Community Zeke Spier, Consultant National Center for Family Philanthropy Jason Born, Vice President for Programs Katherine Westlund Scott, Program Director

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National Center for Responsive Philanthropy Lisa Ranghelli, Senior Director of Assessment and Special Projects Ryan Schlegel, Director of Research Neighborhood Funders Group Adriana Rocha, Vice President of Programs Lorraine Ramirez, Senior Program Manager, Funders for Justice Native Americans in Philanthropy Edgar Villaneuva, Chair of the Board of Directors NEXUS Global Christina Hollenback, Working Group Chair on Equal Justice North Star Fund Helen Stillman, Donor Program Director Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity Lori Villarosa, Executive Director Philanthropy New York Yi-Ching Lin, Director of Learning Services Kathryn O'Neal-Dunham, Chief Operating Officer Regenerative Finance Leah Fury and Kate Poole Resource Generation Limay Ho, Executive Director Iris Brilliant, National Organizer and Family Philanthropy Program Coordinator Solidaire Network Leah Hunt-Hendrix, Executive Director

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Southeastern Council of Foundations Dwayne Marshall, Senior Director of Programs and Partnerships Surdna Foundation Kelly Davenport Nowlin, Board Member, Chair of the Andrus Family Program Third Wave Fund Rye Young, Executive Director Thousand Currents Jessie Spector, Donor Organizing Director Threshold Foundation Reid Williams, President of the Board of Directors United Philanthropy Forum David Biemesderfer, President and CEO Women Donors Network Jenifer Fernandez Ancona, Vice President of Strategy and Member Engagement Tamara Chao, Community Engagement Director Women’s Funding Network Cynthia Nimmo, CEO Youth Engagement Fund Austin Belali, Director

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INTERVIEW QUESTIONS: 1. Who are your constituents? Do they have family foundations? Do they participate in giving circles? Do they want to? What’s the age group and race/ethnicity? 2. What are the latest developments inside your current work on: next gen philanthropy? Social justice philanthropy? Equity within the philanthropic sector? • Recent successes • Challenges / Gaps • Opportunities / Ideas

3. Do you think there is a need for this work? What are you hearing from your constituents? 4. Do you have access to a core curriculum (workshop or webinar) for best practices on the following? • Next gen philanthropy • Social justice philanthropy • Combining the two

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5. Who are the primary audiences for the content/curriculum that you currently have access to on these topics? 6. What strategies have been effective for you? 7. Who else would you like to reach? 8. As you push on the outer edges of social justice and racial equity in philanthropy, what's your vision of what this work could look like? 9. Who are the primary partners you work with? Who else needs to thrive in this ecosystem for everyone’s work to be stronger?

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APPENDIX B: RESOURCES

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RESOURCES FOR NEXT GENERATION DONOR ORGANIZING • Generation Impact: How Next Gen Donors are Revolutionizing – Sharna Goldseker (21/64) and Michael Moody (Johnson Center) https://2164.net/generation-impact/ • Resource Generation’s Giving Guide https://resourcegeneration.org/give-big-give-now-keep-giving-for-social-justice/ • Foundation Center’s Youth Giving movement http://youthgiving.org/ • Frieda C. Fox Family Foundation, Youth Philanthropy Connect http://www.fcfox.org/ypc-story/ • Exponent Philanthropy, Next Gen Fellows Program http://www.exponentphilanthropy.org/event/next-gen-fellows-program/ • Hispanics in Philanthropy, Next Generation Latino Leaders (NGEN) program https://hiponline.org/announcing-our-new-class-of-emerging-lideres/

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RESOURCES ON SOCIAL CHANGE PHILANTHROPY, DEI AND RACIAL EQUITY • Philanthropic Initiative for Racial Equity http://www.racialequity.org/ • Andrus Family Philanthropy Program’s Social Justice Philanthropy Toolkit http://curriculum.affund.org/ • Change Philanthropy’s Resources on Diversity, Equity, Inclusion http://changephilanthropy.org/resource-hub/ • D5 Coalition’s Self-Assessment tool for Foundations http://www.d5coalition.org/tools/dei-self-assessment-survey/ • Racial Equity Tools offers tools, research, tips, curricula and ideas for people who want to increase their own understanding and to help those working toward justice at every level – in systems, organizations, communities and the culture at large: https://www.racialequitytools.org/home • Western States Center’s Dismantling Racism toolkit http://www.westernstatescenter.org/tools-and-resources/Tools/Dismantling%20Racism

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RESOURCES ON WEALTH AND COMMUNITIES OF COLOR • The Apparitional Donor: Understanding and Engaging High Net Worth Donors of Color – Ashindi Maxton and Urvashi Vaid (2017). http://thevaidgroup.com/initiatives/hnwdonorsofcolorreport/ • Decolonizing Wealth: Indigenous Wisdom to Heal Divides and Restore Balance – Edgar Villaneuva

RESOURCES ON CLASS • Class Action’s Activist Class Cultures Kit http://www.activistclasscultures.org/#about-marquee

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ANNOTATIONS 1. Gass, Robert. Transforming Organizations: A Guide to Creating Effective Social Change Organizations. Social Transformation Project, 2014. http://stproject.org/resources/publications/transforming-organizations 2. Vaid, Urvashi & Maxton, Ashindi. The Apparitional Donor: Understanding and Engaging High Net Worth Donors of Color. The Vaid Group, 2017. http://thevaidgroup.com/initiatives/hnwdonorsofcolorreport/ 3. Resource Generation. https://resourcegeneration.org/resources/resource-library/social-justice-philanthropy-and-giving/ 4. Adapted from Spector, Jessie. “What is Donor Organizing Anyway?” May 4, 2017. Thousand Currents. https://thousandcurrents.org/what-is-donor-organizing-anyway 5. FIERCE. Resource Organizing: A Toolkit on Member-Led Community Based Grassroots Fundraising https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3C8qgZDW_asWU1ybFI3RzBJTkk/view The term Resource Organizing was coined by Yasmeen Perez in 2010, as a former Leadership Development Director at FIERCE. 6. Definitions of structural racism, diversity, inclusion, equity, and racial equity/racial justice are all informed by and adapted from concepts in Western States Center’s Dismantling Racism toolkit (2003). http://www.westernstatescenter.org/tools-and-resources/Tools/Dismantling%20Racism and www.raceforward.org 7. Race Forward. https://www.raceforward.org/ 8. For further information see: http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2014/01/24/in-2014-latinos-will-surpass-whites-as-largest-racialethnicgroup-in-california/ http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-census-latinos-20150708-story.html 9. Foundation Center. 2017. www.foundationcenter.org National Committee for Responsible Philanthropy. Pennies for Progress: A Decade of Boom for Philanthropy, a Bust for Social Justice. 2016. https://www.ncrp.org/publication/pennies-for-progress

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10. There is a wealth of data that demonstrates the extent of the racial wealth divide/gap- Of the top 1% of wealth owners in the U.S., 96% are white and 4% are people of color. Of the top 10% of wealth owners, 88% are white. Median income for White families is $110,000, for Asian (needs to be disaggregated) families is $79,000, for Hispanic (as defined by the census) families is $7,500 and for Black families is below $5,000. While the goal is not to reverse these number by race, wealth inequality is severely racialized and affects people's life possibilities significantly. Closing this gap is an essential outcome of achieving true equity. For more information please see: Kraus Michael W, Rucker Julian M, Richeson Jennifer A, (2017) “Americans Misperceive Racial Economic Inequality” PNAS.org 11. Moore, Antonio. “America’s financial divide: the racial breakdown of U.S. wealth in black and white.” Huffington Post, Dec 6, 2017. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/antonio-moore/americas-financial-divide_b_7013330.html 12. Vaid & Maxton, 2017. 13. Generation X is generally defined as those born between 1965-1984, millennials as those born between 19822004 14. For more, please see Goldseker, Sharna, and Michael Moody. Generation Impact: How Next Gen Donors Are Revolutionizing Giving. John Wiley & Sons, 2017. 15. Resource Generation website: https://resourcegeneration.org/ 16. AFF Board Member Megan Marion Kelly is currently participating in the Headwaters Fund giving project. She joined without knowing that the organization was being considered as part of the cohort. She shared that “…the model was intriguing to me. The idea that I could do this in my own community and learn how to organize for change with people that shared my passion and yet were different from me and my background was exciting.” 17. It is important to acknowledge the contributions of the Funding Exchange to the formation of giving circles. “The Funding Exchange was a national network of social justice foundations created in 1979 by young activists with inherited wealth who had a “change, not charity” vision of how they felt their money could make a difference. The founding members pioneered a new approach to philanthropy that sought to redefine the power dynamics of giving” – Funding Exchange history website. “This group of foundations (several of whom preceded the Exchange itself) tested cutting edge efforts to address the power imbalance between donors and communities by sharing decision-making power with them and in the process, grappling head on with issues of inequities, race, gender, and more” – Kelly Brown, D5 Coalition.

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18. For more information on Money Stories: https://resourcegeneration.org/category/money-stories/ 19. Savchuk, Katia. “Wealth Americans are giving less of their incomes to charity, while poor are donating more.” Oct 6, 2014. Forbes. https://www.forbes.com/sites/katiasavchuk/2014/10/06/wealthy-americans-are-giving-less-of-their-incomes-tocharity-while-poor-are-donating-more/#55fda5121264 20. Vaid & Maxton, 2017. 21. Goldseker & Moody, 2017. 22. Leticia Peguero, former Executive Director of the Andrus Family Fund is a trustee of Philanthropy New York and co-chairs the Committee for Equitable and Inclusive Philanthropy. 23. Race Forward is a current grantee of the Andrus Family Fund and is a former grantee of the Surdna Foundation. 24. A micro aggression is defined by Merriam Webster as “a comment or action that subtly and often unconsciously or unintentionally expresses a prejudiced attitude toward a member of a marginalized group (such as a racial minority).” https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/microaggression 25. Resource Generation. 2010. Social Change Philanthropy Info Sheet. http://www.resourcegeneration.org/images/PDFs/social_change_phil_info_sheet_2010.pdf

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www.affund.org @affund @affund @AndrusFamFund