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2017


an–dro–POH–gone \ N: a common field grass, is one of nature’s remarkable adaptations to stress and change in the landscape. Wherever the landscape has been disturbed, andropogon is one of the first field grasses to colonize the ground and provide a self-sustaining cover for the gradual return of our native forests. The economy and elegance with which these grassy meadows heal the wounded landscape aptly describes Andropogon’s goal in ecological planning and design,


our firm Founded nearly forty years ago, Andropogon is committed to the principle of “designing with nature,” creating beautiful and evocative landscapes inspired by the careful observation of natural processes and informed by the best environmental science. The elegance and economy of natural form and process continues to be the benchmark by which we measure the success of our work—from the smallest construction detail to the multi-layered patterns of regional sites. As a certified minority business enterprise (MBE), Andropogon is committed to diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace. Our multicultural staff is dedicated to the successful maturing of each project, from initial concept designs to construction review and long-term landscape management. Our body of national and international work includes early examples of innovative green strategies that have withstood the test of time as well as a broad range of landscape, site planning, environmental projects, ecological restoration and innovative stormwater management techniques. Our clients often tell us that we combine integrated design with a depth of ecological understanding in synergistic ways. With every project we embody our mission... “to weave together the landscapes of humans and nature for the benefit of both.”


the design principles place first Our goal is to understand and express the essential character of a place. We tell the story of a site by learning what it was, understanding what it is, and realizing what it can become.

creating high-performance / multi-functioning landscapes Creative problem-solving shapes our landscapes making them interactive. We are committed to synergistic designs where roles are inter-dependent and mutually supporting.

harmonize people and place

Our designs find opportunities for a dynamic and relevant future in the fundamentals of the place and the aspirations of the community.

heal ecosystems Our core approach is to build dynamic, holistic systems and establish a healthy web of relationships.

economy of intervention We protect the integrity of ecological and social systems through non-invasive and carefully targeted solutions; maximum impact with minimal invasion.

beauty is more than skin deep Our landscapes are not only artistic and aesthetically beautiful; they create evocative experiences with lasting impressions while serving as essential organizing elements of a site.


services landscape architecture

Site Analysis Site and Landscape Design Landscape Management Permit and Regulatory Preparation Construction Documentation and Observation Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse

regional planning Environmental and Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment Feasibility Studies Natural Resource Management Open Space and Trail Systems Community Planning and Facilitation

sustainability strategies

Site Selection Environmental Assessment Site Planning and Design Stormwater Management Brownfield Redevelopment LEED / SITES / Living Building Challenge Documentation

master planning Program Analysis and Development Mixed-use AND Residential Development Institutional Visioning and Development Stormwater Management Ecological Restoration Brownfield Redevelopment Funding Strategies

research

Post-Occupancy Evaluations Case Studies Environmental Monitoring Soil Biology Analysis Social Monitoring Experimental Design Monitoring Protocols Adaptive Landscape Management Programs Public Outreach and Presentations Grant Writing and Technical Writing


recent awards 2017 ROUSE AWARD FOR EXCELLENCE from the Urban Land Institute Philadelphia for Bartram’s Mile

2015 PRESERVATION AWARD from the New Jersey Historic Preservation Office for Duke Farms, with VITETTA

2016 GSA DESIGN AWARD from the U.S. General Service Administration for the United States Coast Guard Headquarters, with Perkins + Will

2014 HONOR AWARD from the AIA NY Committee on the Environment for the Kohler Environmental Center at Choate Rosemary Hall, with Robert A.M. Stern Architects

2016 ASLA HONOR AWARD in the Research Category for Shoemaker Green at the University of Pennsylvania 2016 AIA COTE TOP TEN AWARD from AIA Committee on the Environment for the Center for Sustainable Landscapes at Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens, with The Design Alliance

2014 HONOR AWARD from AIA Philadelphia for the Karabots Pavilion at the Franklin Institute, with SaylorGregg Architects, now a Studio of JacobsWyper 2014 ASLA HONOR AWARD in the General Design Category for Shoemaker Green at the University of Pennsylvania

2016 AIA COTE TOP TEN AWARD from the AIA Committee on the Environment for the J. Craig Venter Institute, with ZGF Architects

2014 GROUNDBREAKER AWARD FINALIST from the Delaware Valley Green Building Council for Shoemaker Green at the University of Pennsylvania

2016 MERIT AWARD for Excellence in Planning for an Existing Campus from the Society for College and University Planning for the Temple University Health Sciences Campus Framework Plan, with Payette

2014 AIA NYS AWARDS including a Design Award Citation and an Excelsior Award for Public Architecture for the SUNY ESF Gateway Center, with Architerra, Inc.

2016 LAND ETHICS AWARD OF MERIT from Bowman’s Hill Wildflower Preserve for the green roof at the SUNY ESF Gateway Center, with Architerra, Inc. 2015 GROUNDBREAKER AWARD FINALIST from the Delaware Valley Green Building Council for Lower Venice Island Recreation Center, with Buell Kratzer Powell 2015 MERIT AWARD for Excellence in Architecture for Building Additions from the Society for College and University Planning for Kline Fitness and Squash Center at Dickinson College with Cannon Design

2014 HONOR AWARD for Excellence in Architecture for a New Building rom the Society for College and University Planning/AIA-CAE for the SUNY ESF Gateway Center, with Architerra, Inc. 2014 AIA COTE TOP TEN AWARD from AIA Committee on the Environment for the SUNY ESF Gateway Center, with Architerra, Inc. 2014 HONOR AWARD in General Design from the Tri-State ASLA for the Clemson University ICAR Technology Neighborhood 1 Plaza, with Seamon Whiteside 2014 MERIT AWARD in General Design from ASLA NY for the SUNY ESF Gateway Center Green Roof, with Architerra


LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE + ECO COMMONS


beyond sustainability integrating building and site

for fundamentally regenerative development


LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE + ECO COMMONS GEORGIA TECH / ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Georgia Tech is advancing sustainable design by transforming the heart of its campus through a fully regenerative design that gives back to the environment more than it takes. By promoting the stringent, netpositive standards of the Living Building Challenge, the University hopes that the project will become a catalyst for innovative sustainable design throughout the region. Georgia Tech aims to create a living laboratory where both the university and urban community can learn, through first-hand experience, how innovative water, energy, and food management solutions within the built environment can contribute to health and wellbeing. Andropogon is working with two teams at Georgia Tech, one led by Lord Aeck Sargent and the The Miller Hull Partnership for the Living Building Challenge project, and another by HGOR for the Eco Commons. These two projects seamlessly integrate the landscape with the architecture for optimal performance and design. The overall design of the Eco Commons provides a clear, yet layered landscape experience through moments of openness and enclosure, and diversity in plant height and texture when moving through the site. Changes in canopy density create many different spaces for site exploration, while providing opportunities for the meadow to flourish. A comprehensive rainwater management strategy is imperative to mitigating runoff across the site. The multi-faceted approach emphasizes managing rainwater where it falls while maximizing the collection, storage, and re-use of that water. In addition to managing rainwater from the Eco Commons, the site has the ability to become part of a larger regional green infrastructure system by feeding the Eco-Stream from multiple sources. The Eco-Stream is designed to accommodate varying influx conditions by mimicking natural stream systems.

The Georgia Tech Living Building Challenge project’s design strategy will provide social benefits (e.g. shade, food, beauty) and ecological services (stormwater management, carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, pollinator foraging) while taking cues from the region’s local ecology. The Living Building Challenge project is fully integrated with the adjacent landscape in order to meet the requirements to be net-positive for water, energy, and waste. The building and site work together to maximize performance of both: •

The building works with the site’s topography with its split building levels that accommodate the site’s slope, while allowing for ADA accessible entries at the building’s front, back, and along the Porch. This minimizes the need for cut and fill operations during construction while allowing equitable access to the building.

Water use and management for the building and site are intimately connected. Rainwater swales manage roof runoff and constructed wetlands treat graywater, while providing important didactic opportunities. A mostly drought-tolerant native plant palette will be used to avoid the need for permanent irrigation.

Building shading to increase energy efficiency is achieved through a combination of a large PV array, which shades the landscape within the Porch area, and trees at the edge of the Porch, which shade the building, helping the project to achieve net-positive energy.


BAKER CENTER STREET APARTMENTS

DEMONSTRATION PLAZA

ECO-STREAM

FOREST RIBBON LAWN

L

IL

PH

M

HE E AV

THE LIVING BUILDING AT GEORGIA TECH

DISCOVERY HILL

FERS

T DR

IVE

STATE STREET

DALNEY DECK


LEGEND

A

SITE HYDROLOGY N

GRADING PLAN

SECTION A


UNIVERSITY CITY SCIENCE CENTER


hubs of activity

connecting and collaborating outside the classroom


INNOVATORS WALK OF FAME

UNIVERSITY CITY SCIENCE CENTER / PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

As part of its commitment to gather together the best and brightest minds in the world of STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math), The University City Science Center embarked to create a new campus core. At the heart of the remodel is the Innovators Walk of Fame, a sculptural set of recognition pieces paying homage to the Center’s great figures and supporters throughout the years. The site on two blocks between Market Street and Chestnut Street in West Philadelphia, and as the former site of 37th steet, is a major thoroughfare connection Drexel, Upenn, and the rest of the University City community. Andropogon teamed with Exit to create a dynamic, mixed space that turns this throughway into a destination, enticing users to sit and relax, mixing casually the melting pot of University City. The space can accomodate a range of activities, from day to day lunches through large-scale science fairs and fundraising events. Overhead, catenary lights will reduce the vertical clutter of the space, allowing the sculptural elements to hold sway. A series of large, custom social benches will allow for a variety of uses, and loose tables and chairs will scatter throughout the site, encouraging flexibility and site ownership. Electricity and water will be integrated at specific sites around the space, allowing for a wide set of arrangements for food trucks and other events to be supplied and changed as needed.


UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI


living laboratories engaging

students in real world sustainability challenges


STEM BUILDING + GERTRUDE FORD WALK UNIVERSITY OF MISSISSIPPI / OXFORD, MISSISSIPPI

Recognized as an R-1 post-doctoral research university by the Carnegie Classification, the University of Mississippi is dedicated to increasing STEM literacy for all students on campus. Key to this effort is the new 200,000GSF STEM building and its landscape, which integrates the existing buildings and circulation system on campus to create a distinct Engineering, Science, and Technology precinct. The building and its site are designed to foster interdisciplinary programs and collaboration by providing environments for student-centered learning through a series of labs, classrooms, and outdoor learning spaces where students and faculty can meet and engage with the built environment to learn about STEM fields in both formal and informal ways. Andropogon is serving as Landscape Architect of Record for the STEM building, working with Ellenzweig, Design Architect and Lab Planner, in collaboration with McCarty Architects as Architect of Record. Andropogon’s site design is critical to connecting the STEM building to the existing campus elements and creating a distinct character for the district. Plaza spaces reinforce primary building entrances and provide informal meeting areas. Interstitial spaces are transformed into teaching gardens. Walkways connect a network of outdoor rooms of varying scale to accommodate both intimate gatherings and large assemblies. Educational opportunities are maximized throughout the site by revealing geology, stormwater management systems, and native plant communities of the Northern Hilly Gulf Coastal Plan ecoregion, while managing water runoff and providing habitat. The new Gertrude C. Ford Way will act as an extension of the major pedestrian artery that serves as both daily circulation, as well as a celebratory promenade during football games, and must support time honored traditions such as the Walk of Champions.


FASER HALL

SHOEMAKER HALL

HUME HALL

STEM GARDEN

WEST PLAZA

STEM BUILDING

EAST PLAZA

GERTRUDE FORD WALK

CARRIER HALL


FLOODPLAIN GARDEN

STEM GARDEN

TERRACE SEATING

UPLAND GARDEN


GERTRUDE FORD WALK

PLANTING

GERTRUDE FORD WALK

MIXED STORY PLANTING

LOADING DOCK


EACH PERSON HAS A DOMAIN

PROXEMICS OBSERVATIONS OF THE USE OF SPACE RELATED TO THE SPACING BETWEEN PEOPLE. RATHER THAN STRICT GUIDELINES, PROXEMICS SERVE AS A SYSTEM FOR GAUGING SOCIAL INTERACTIONS

INTIMATE DISTANCE (0 - 1.5’)

40 SF

PERSONAL DISTANCE (1.5’ - 4’)

80 SF

SOCIAL DISTANCE (4’ - 12’)

PUBLIC DISTANCE (12’ - 25’)

450 SF 2400 SF

SOCIAL PROXIMITY


DAILY USE

SMALL EVENT

GAME DAY


BARTRAM’S MILE


urban transformations reconnecting

urban neighborhoods to nature


BARTRAM’S MILE

CITY OF PHILADELPHIA / PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

Bartram’s Mile is a one-mile stretch of currently vacant river frontage along the western banks of the Tidal Schuylkill between Grays Ferry Avenue and 56th Street. This section of frontage is intended to be a public trail that will eventually be part of a larger 130mile long Schuylkill River Trail network. Once realized, the trail will take users from Pottsville, Pennsylvania, down to the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers while linking to several other trail networks, including connections to the Appalachian Trail. The trail will also connect to the planned redevelopment of industrial portions of the Lower Schuylkill, currently in the construction phase. The development of Bartram’s Mile provides a great opportunity to convert publicly-owned vacant land into public green space. Once complete, the project will provide riverfront access and recreational opportunities to an underserved neighborhood, while also informing future waterfront development opportunities. The Concept Design and Visioning Phase, completed in December 2012, was the first step in an accelerated process to reimagine the Mile. This rapid civic engagement and public planning process brought together community representatives from the

immediate neighborhoods, as well as key stakeholders from across the city and region to determine the preferred design alternatives for Bartram’s Mile. The concept design, produced as a culmination of the public engagement process, included trail alignment, community connections, integration with the Bartram’s Garden trail, site programming, and park space improvements. Design features focused on reconnecting people to the outdoors and the Schuylkill River, while celebrating and enhancing the history and horticulture of Bartram’s Garden and connecting up to the Schuylkill Banks Trail, which currently terminates at the Grays Ferry Crescent. The Bartram’s Mile Implementation Phase 1: Design Documentation involved intensive work with multiple stakeholders, from oil companies to non-profit advocates, along with site-specific challenges such as environmental remediation and historic preservation issues that provide a framework for design. Design documents and cost estimates were produced to help prioritize implementation of key elements and identify permits to be obtained. Implementation Phase 2: Construction, is currently underway.


WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL - MEDICALCENTER CENTER


restorative spaces greening structures

to maximize opportunities for urban green space


ST. LOUIS CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL + BARNES JEWISH HOSPITAL

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER / ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI The Washington University Medical Center is inaugurating its Campus Renewal Project with the expansion of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the construction of a new medical tower for the Barnes Jewish Hospital. The new healthcare facility is designed with patients and families in mind with the goal of providing a holistic approach to patient care. The half-billion dollar project, led by program construction manager Jacobs and executive architect HOK, is being executed using an Integrated Project Delivery development system. The Campus Renewal Project includes the design of therapeutic landscapes to provide restorative green spaces for patients, their care-givers, and families. Andropogon led the design of four accessible, intensive, therapeutic green roof gardens for both hospitals. Each therapeutic green roof was designed for a specific patient group including: •

A place for bone marrow transplant and other cancer patients;

A private, unoccupied green roof exclusively for active labor and delivery;

A garden for new mothers and their immediate families, as part of the maternity floor;

A children’s garden for patients, family, and friends.

Each green roof carefully balances the rare and enlivening experience of the outdoors with the need to avoid medical and physical sensitivities, such as allergens, light exposure, and skin and bone frailties.


AVALON PARK AND PRESERVE


resilient sanctuaries planning for change

to preserve biodiversity in our parks


SHORE FARM

AVALON PARK AND PRESERVE / STONY BROOK HARBOR, NEW YORK

As part of our ongoing collaboration with Avalon Park and Preserve, Andropogon is helping to expand the acreage of the park in keeping with its mission to protect not only the unique natural habitat of Long Island, but to restore and maintain its ecological heritage. The acquisition of the adjacent Shore Farm property significantly increases the area protected and managed by the park and provides a direct link to the water’s edge at Stony Brook Harbor. The initial master plan phase identified the key character of the expanded park to encourage visitor exploration and marry permanent and ephemeral elements within a dynamic landscape, all while enhancing habitat. Mowed meadow paths will provide informal walkways through a seasonally changing landscape. Raised boardwalks will encourage investigation of areas with tidal flooding. Pavilions will be integrated into the woods using salvaged materials from the site. In more formal areas, terraced wetlands will integrate water features to entice visitors to engage. Raised walkways will bring visitors into the tree tops to experience the habitat in a new way. The existing farm buildings will be enhanced with terraces and new outbuildings to expand programming for group events.


CROSBY ARBORETUM


legacy landscapes

transformation

that stands the test of time


CROSBY ARBORETUM PICAYUNE, MISSISSIPPI

Andropogon recently revisited the Crosby Arboretum to see how this place has grown and changed since our initial involvement over 30 years ago. We found a remarkably beautiful and diverse landscape, much loved by both the local community and its dedicated staff. The innovative master plan was developed for the country’s first ecological arboretum—a living museum where plants are studied, protected, and displayed outdoors in their native habitats. Originally an abandoned strawberry field, the site was initially uniform and undistinguished. Andropogon designed the arboretum’s new Piney Woods Lake to bring life to the site to foster the arboretum’s habitat exhibits. Design goals focused on synthesizing art (drama, beauty, and expression) and science (correct relationships between plant and plant, and plant and place). All master planning for the arboretum—the site plan, interpretive paths, plant displays, architecture, and site management techniques—revealed the natural processes of the Piney Woods and expressed their evocative qualities. The Piney Woods Lake, although not originally on-site, was created to make a uniform lowland more dramatic and interesting to the public. The new lake evokes a southern, rain-fed swamp under a canopy of trees with a foreground of rushes, sedges, and aquatic wildflowers. A rich array of native plant communities of the region is presented to visitors. The long-term monitoring and management of the recreated plant communities has provided invaluable information for habitat restoration.


weaving together the landscapes of humans and nature for the benefit of both www.andropogon.com

Andropogon Recent Work  

Recently completed work and projects on the boards

Andropogon Recent Work  

Recently completed work and projects on the boards