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recent work

winter 2017


an–dro–POH–gone \ N: a common field grass, is one of nature’s remarkable adaptations to stress and change in the landscape. Wherever the landscape has been disturbed, andropogon is one of the first field grasses to colonize the ground and provide a self-sustaining cover for the gradual return of our native forests. The economy and elegance with which these grassy meadows heal the wounded landscape aptly describes Andropogon’s goal in ecological planning and design,

“to weave together the landscapes of people and nature for the benefit of both.”


firm profile Founded nearly forty years ago, Andropogon is committed to the principle of “designing with nature,” creating beautiful and evocative landscapes inspired by the careful observation of natural processes and informed by the best environmental science. The elegance and economy of natural form and process continues to be the benchmark by which we measure the success of our work—from the smallest construction detail to the multi-layered patterns of regional sites. As a certified minority business enterprise (MBE), Andropogon is committed to diversity and inclusiveness in the workplace. Our multi-cultural staff is dedicated to the successful maturing of each project, from initial concept designs to construction review and longterm landscape management. Our body of national and international work includes early examples of innovative green strategies that have withstood the test of time as well as a broad range of landscape, site planning, environmental projects, ecological restoration and innovative stormwater management techniques. Our clients often tell us that we combine integrated design with a depth of ecological understanding in synergistic ways. With every project we embody our mission... “to weave together the landscapes of people and nature for the benefit of both.”

services LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE Site Analysis Site & Landscape Design Landscape Management Permit and Regulatory Preparation Construction Documentation and Observation Historic Preservation and Adaptive Reuse

MASTER PLANNING Program Analysis and Development Mixed-use & Residential Development Institutional Visioning and Development Stormwater Management Ecological Restoration Brownfield Redevelopment Funding Strategies

REGIONAL PLANNING Environmental and Land Use Planning Environmental Assessment Feasibility Studies Natural Resource Management Open Space and Trail Systems Community Planning and Facilitation

RESEARCH Post-Occupancy Evaluations Case Studies Environmental Monitoring Soil Biology Analysis Social Monitoring Experimental Design Monitoring Protocols Adaptive Landscape Management Programs Public Outreach and Presentations Grant Writing and Technical Writing SITES Documentation

SUSTAINABILITY STRATEGIES Site Selection Environmental Assessment Site Planning and Design Stormwater Management Brownfield Redevelopment


design principles PLACE FIRST Our goal is to understand and express the essential character of a place. We tell the story of a site by learning what it was, understanding what it is, and realizing what it can become.

CR E A T I N G H I G H - P ERF ORM ANCE / MU L T I - F U N C T I O N I NG L ANDSCAPES Creative problem-solving shapes our landscapes making them interactive. We are committed to synergistic designs where roles are inter-dependent and mutually supporting.

HA R M O N I Z E P E O P LE AND PL ACE Our designs find opportunities for a dynamic and relevant future in the fundamentals of the place and the aspirations of the community.

HEA L E C O S Y S T E M S Our core approach is to build dynamic, holistic systems and establish a healthy web of relationships .

E C O N O M Y O F I N T ERVENT ION We protect the integrity of ecological and social systems through noninvasive and carefully targeted solutions; maximum impact with minimal invasion.

BEA U T Y I S M O R E T HAN SKIN DEEP Our landscapes are not only artistic and aesthetically beautiful; they create evocative experiences with lasting impressions while serving as essential organizing elements of a site.


PERELMAN PLAZA - DREXEL UNIVERSITY


hubs of activity

connecting and collaborating outside the classroom


PERELMAN PLAZA - DREXEL UNIVERSITY PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

Andropogon has designed a new “center of gravity� for Drexel University along the former 32nd Street between Chestnut and Market Streets. The new campus hub, known as The Raymond G. Perelman Plaza, has become a destination for the campus and neighboring communities, providing an outdoor social and event space that is surrounded by the LeBow College of Business and a new residential and retail center. Following the completion of the award-winning Master Plan, Andropogon was selected to create this public space to inspire connection, collaboration, and community. The plaza provides a variety of spaces where thousands of people can meet, eat, study, and attend large outdoor gatherings. The design features an improved flow for pedestrian traffic, seamless integration with existing building entrances, well-planned seating and increased shade and natural beauty. The landscape also manages stormwater runoff and collects and reuses rainwater.


ACADEMIC RESEARCH BUILDING + QUADRANGLE - SUNY ESF


living laboratories engaging

students in real world sustainability challenges


ACADEMIC RESEARCH BUILDING + QUADRANGLE SUNY SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND FORESTRY SYRACUSE, NEW YORK

The SUNY School of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY ESF) saw an opportunity to improve its existing Main Quad as part of the construction of a new, adjacent Academic Research Building. Andropogon, working with EllenZweig Architects, was challenged with enhancing a much-beloved campus green to serve as both gathering space and research opportunity. While improving the function, circulation, and gateways to the Quad, Andropogon is also extending academic research into the landscape by designing the Quad as a living laboratory for students and faculty. After close collaboration with researchers, the Quad will be equipped to handle long-term, customizable experiments with built-in controls. The framework of the site plan is based on preserving the general patterns of the existing Quad circulation, and making subtle adjustments to improve functionality. Spaces were formed around significant intersections, thoroughfares, and gateways. These resulting forms emphasize the importance of connective corridors and modest courts, as opposed to grand plazas. The Quad landscape is inspired by freshwater, salt, and brackish marsh communities, which provide both crucial habitat value and stormwater management function. The underlay of planting and stormwater management is intended to create a contrasting juxtaposition of free flowing lines associated with a natural system, and the more rigid circulation of a formal campus Quad. This strong physical interplay maximizes accessibility, and fosters the notion of immersive learning for students, faculty, and visitors through the observation of the site systems that are managing water and building habitat.


ACADEMIC RESEARCH BUILDING

ILLICK HALL

13 12

12

8

13 8

4

14

9

10

11 4

3

4

MOON LIBRARY

7

2

BRAY HALL

6

9

4 3

4

1

10

5

12

15 12

16 4

MARSHAL HALL

LEGEND: 1 SALTWATER MARSH SYSTEM

9 PAVED ASSEMBLY SPACE

2 FRESHWATER MARSH SYSTEM

10 RUNNEL

3 BRACKISH MARSH SYSTEM 4 OAK-HICKORY-CHESTNUT FOREST

11 OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

5 SNOW STOCKPILE AREA 6 UPLAND MEADOW 7 TURF LAWN 8 BOG

12 BIKE STORAGE 13 GREEN ROOF 14 ABE LINCOLN STATUE 15 911 MEMORIAL 16 MEMORIAL TREES


ELEV. 578 ELEV. 569

ELEV. 554

ELEV. 559

ELEV. 561


BRACKISH MARSH

FRESHWATER MARSH

BOG

GREEN ROOF

WINTER GARDEN

CHESTNUT-OAKHICKORY FOREST

PLANT COMMUNITIES

INLAND SALT MARSH

UPLAND MEADOW


BARTRAM’S MILE


urban transformations reconnecting

urban neighborhoods to nature


BARTRAM’S MILE

CITY OF PHILADELPHIA / PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

Bartram’s Mile is a one-mile stretch of currently vacant river frontage along the western banks of the Tidal Schuylkill between Grays Ferry Avenue and 56th Street. This section of frontage is intended to be a public trail that will eventually be part of a larger 130mile long Schuylkill River Trail network. Once realized, the trail will take users from Pottsville, Pennsylvania, down to the confluence of the Schuylkill and Delaware Rivers while linking to several other trail networks, including connections to the Appalachian Trail. The trail will also connect to the planned redevelopment of industrial portions of the Lower Schuylkill, currently in the construction phase. The development of Bartram’s Mile provides a great opportunity to convert publicly-owned vacant land into public green space. Once complete, the project will provide riverfront access and recreational opportunities to an underserved neighborhood, while also informing future waterfront development opportunities. The Concept Design and Visioning Phase, completed in December 2012, was the first step in an accelerated process to reimagine the Mile. This rapid civic engagement and public planning process brought together community representatives from the

immediate neighborhoods, as well as key stakeholders from across the city and region to determine the preferred design alternatives for Bartram’s Mile. The concept design, produced as a culmination of the public engagement process, included trail alignment, community connections, integration with the Bartram’s Garden trail, site programming, and park space improvements. Design features focused on reconnecting people to the outdoors and the Schuylkill River, while celebrating and enhancing the history and horticulture of Bartram’s Garden and connecting up to the Schuylkill Banks Trail, which currently terminates at the Grays Ferry Crescent. The Bartram’s Mile Implementation Phase 1: Design Documentation involved intensive work with multiple stakeholders, from oil companies to non-profit advocates, along with site-specific challenges such as environmental remediation and historic preservation issues that provide a framework for design. Design documents and cost estimates were produced to help prioritize implementation of key elements and identify permits to be obtained. Implementation Phase 2: Construction, is currently underway.


existing conditions

rendering

construction

construction


existing conditions

rendering

construction


40TH STREET TROLLEY PORTAL GARDENS


rethinking infrastructure

transforming

public transit into public green space


40TH ST. TROLLEY PORTAL GARDENS PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA

The 40th Street Trolley Portal is one of the busiest public transit hubs in Philadelphia. Through a collaborative effort led by Andropogon, and coordinated by the University City District, the design seeks to improve pedestrian and rider safety, reduce the urban heat island effect, and mitigate combined sewer outfall discharges. This unsafe, concrete-paved plaza will be transformed into an engaging, pedestrian-friendly, social gathering place with extensive new native, meadow-like landscaping, movable seating, and a new restaurant. Features of the design include the retrofit of existing catenary poles with high-efficiency, motion-activated LED lighting, the installation of new pavement, and construction of planted zones that create habitat, provide seating opportunities, and reduce stormwater runoff. Consulting on the plan were representatives of the Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority, the Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Utilities, higher education institutions, and members of the surrounding community.


WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL - MEDICALCENTER CENTER


restorative spaces greening structures

to maximize opportunities for urban green space


WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI

The Washington University Medical Center is inaugurating its Campus Renewal Project with the expansion of the St. Louis Children’s Hospital and the construction of a new medical tower for the Barnes Jewish Hospital. The new healthcare facility is designed with patients and families in mind with the goal of providing a holistic approach to patient care. The half-billion dollar project, led by program construction manager Jacobs and executive architect HOK, is being executed using an Integrated Project Delivery development system. The Campus Renewal Project includes the design of therapeutic landscapes to provide restorative green spaces for patients, their care-givers, and families. Andropogon led the design of four accessible, intensive, therapeutic green roof gardens for both hospitals. Each therapeutic green roof was designed for a specific patient group including: •

A place for bone marrow transplant and other cancer patients;

A private, unoccupied green roof exclusively for active labor and delivery;

A garden for new mothers and their immediate families, as part of the maternity floor;

A children’s garden for patients, family, and friends.

Each green roof carefully balances the rare and enlivening experience of the outdoors with the need to avoid medical and physical sensitivities, such as allergens, light exposure, and skin and bone frailties.


ANS WOODEND NATURE SANCTUARY


resilient sanctuaries planning for change

to preserve biodiversity in our parks


ANS WOODEND NATURE SANCTUARY CHEVY CHASE, MARYLAND

Andropogon is working with the Audubon Naturalist Society (ANS) in Maryland to renew the Woodend Sanctuary and, together, revive this socially and ecologically-rich place for the benefit of the community. Woodend’s boardwalk trail abuts Rock Creek Park’s multiuse trail, and provides an access point to the thousands of walkers, joggers, and cyclists who traverse Rock Creek Park each year. Woodend is also within walking distance of two proposed Purple Line Metro Rail stops. Through the Master Plan, Andropogon has helped ANS set the stage to revive biodiversity at Woodend and create a vibrant living classroom that welcomes learners of all ages and abilities and serves as a flagship model for habitat restoration. The Master Plan not only strengthens the site’s habitat and improves the visitor experience, but also tackles the external and internal forces affecting the sanctuary, which will lead to restorative, regenerative, and transformational strategies. Addressing dynamic issues such as climate change, air pollution, canopy changes, shifts in hydrological processes, landscape succession, and habitat evolution, for example, was integral to our master planning approach.


WATERSHED WATERSHED RESTORATION RESTORATION LEGEND LEGEND

GREEN ROOF GREEN ROOF PERMEABLE VEHICULAR PERMEABLE PAVEMENT VEHICULAR PAVEMENT PERMEABLE PEDESTRIAN PERMEABLE PAVEMENT PEDESTRIAN PAVEMENT RAIN GARDEN / WETLAND RAIN GARDEN / WETLAND MEADOW RESTORATION MEADOW RESTORATION LAWN RESTORATION LAWN RESTORATION HIGH PRIORITY FOREST HIGH PRIORITY RESTORATION FOREST RESTORATION UNDERGROUND CISTERN UNDERGROUND CISTERN SLOW-RELEASE BASIN SLOW-RELEASE BASIN STREAM BANK AND POND STREAM BANK RESTORATION AND POND RESTORATION GREEN TRAILS GREEN TRAILS RETENTIVE GRADING RETENTIVE GRADING DIRECTION OF SURFACE FLOW DIRECTION OF SURFACE FLOW

N N.T.S.

N.T

19

HABITAT HABITAT RESTORATION RESTORATION LEGEND LEGEND HIGH PRIORITY HIGH PRIORITY FOREST FOREST RESTORATION RESTORATION FOREST FOREST RESTORATION RESTORATION MEADOW MEADOW RESTORATION RESTORATION POND POND RESTORATION RESTORATION STREAM STREAM RESTORATION RESTORATION TRAIL

TRAIL

BOARDWALK BOARDWALK DEER FENCE DEER FENCE

N N.T.S.

N.

17


SECRET FERN GLADE

N N.T.S.

17


CENTER STREET APARTMENTS

L

IL

PH

M

HE E AV LAWN

FOREST RIBBON

LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE + ECO COMMONS - GEORGIA TECH


beyond sustainability integrating building and site

for fundamentally regenerative development

BAKER DEMONSTRATION PLAZA

STATE STREET

DALNEY DECK

FOREST RIBBON

ECO-STREAM

FOREST RIBBON

THE LIVING BUILDING AT GEORGIA TECH

DISCOVERY HILL

FERS

T DR

IVE


LIVING BUILDING CHALLENGE + ECO COMMONS GEORGIA TECH ATLANTA, GEORGIA

Georgia Tech is advancing sustainable design by transforming the heart of its campus through a fully regenerative design that gives back to the environment more than it takes. By promoting the stringent, netpositive standards of the Living Building Challenge, the University hopes that the project will become a catalyst for innovative sustainable design throughout the region. Georgia Tech aims to create a living laboratory where both the university and urban community can learn, through first-hand experience, how innovative water, energy, and food management solutions within the built environment can contribute to health and wellbeing. Andropogon is working with two teams at Georgia Tech, one led by Lord Aeck Sargent and the The Miller Hull Partnership for the Living Building Challenge project, and another by HGOR for the Eco Commons. These two projects seamlessly integrate the landscape with the architecture for optimal performance and design. The overall design of the Eco Commons provides a clear, yet layered landscape experience through moments of openness and enclosure, and diversity in plant height and texture when moving through the site. Changes in canopy density create many different spaces for site exploration, while providing opportunities for the meadow to flourish. A comprehensive rainwater management strategy is imperative to mitigating runoff across the site. The multi-faceted approach emphasizes managing rainwater where it falls while maximizing the collection, storage, and re-use of that water. In addition to managing rainwater from the Eco Commons, the site has the ability to become part of a larger regional green infrastructure system by feeding the Eco-Stream from multiple sources. The Eco-Stream is designed to accommodate varying influx conditions by mimicking natural stream systems.

The Georgia Tech Living Building Challenge project’s design strategy will provide social benefits (e.g. shade, food, beauty) and ecological services (stormwater management, carbon sequestration, wildlife habitat, pollinator foraging) while taking cues from the region’s local ecology. The Living Building Challenge project is fully integrated with the adjacent landscape in order to meet the requirements to be net-positive for water, energy, and waste. The building and site work together to maximize performance of both: •

The building works with the site’s topography with its split building levels that accommodate the site’s slope, while allowing for ADA accessible entries at the building’s front, back, and along the Porch. This minimizes the need for cut and fill operations during construction while allowing equitable access to the building.

Water use and management for the building and site are intimately connected. Rainwater swales manage roof runoff and constructed wetlands treat graywater, while providing important didactic opportunities. A mostly drought-tolerant native plant palette will be used to avoid the need for permanent irrigation.

Building shading to increase energy efficiency is achieved through a combination of a large PV array, which shades the landscape within the Porch area, and trees at the edge of the Porch, which shade the building, helping the project to achieve net-positive energy.


SITE HYDROLOGY

926.00+ +914.50

A B

926.50+

928.50+

930.50+ 932.50+

N

GRADING GRADING PLAN

LEGEND


SECTION A

SECTION B


SITE PLANTING PLAN

N

PLANTING GRADING PLAN

LEGEND FORAGING LANDSCAPE

CANOPY TREE

MESIC WOODLAND

UNDERSTORY TREE

SEEPAGE WETLAND

EXISTING TREE


MESIC WOODLAND - shedding

SEEPAGE WETLAND - collecting


weaving together the landscapes of people and nature for the benefit of both

www.andropogon.com

Andropogon Recent Work  

Recently completed work and projects on the boards

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