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A Splendid Vision chatham university // Eden Hall Campus master Plan

BNIM + Andropogon Revised 03 May 2011


Sometimes I lose sight of my goal, then again it flashes into view, filling me with a new determination to keep the vision splendid before my eyes. RACHEL CARSON // CHATHAM UNIVERSITY, CLASS OF 1929


A Splendid Vision chatham university // Eden Hall Campus master Plan

INTRODUCTION 01: Executive Summary 02: Context

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PLAN PRINCIPLES 03: Community 04: Academics 05: Natural Environment 06: Built Environment

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PHASING 07: Phasing Plan

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Front and Back Cover: Omega Center for Sustainable Living, Rhinebeck, New York. Designed by BNIM. Opposite: Existing View South from Stanford Hill, Eden Hall Campus.

30 December 2010 Revised 03 May 2011


ACKNOWLEDGMENT Chatham University gratefully acknowledges the generous support of the Richard King Mellon Foundation and PNC Foundation, which made possible the vision for a sustainable future described in the Eden Hall Campus Master Plan.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY


01. Executive Summary Introduction 3 Context 4 The Vision 6 Genius of the Land: Realizing Eden Hall 7 The Potential 8 Phasing 11 Eden Hall Campus Plan Principles 14 Academic Excellence Community Building Robust Natural Environment High Performance Built Environment Climate Positive Plan 23

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We stand now where two roads diverge. But unlike the roads in Robert Frost’s familiar poem, they are not equally fair. The road we have long been traveling is deceptively easy, a smooth superhighway on which we progress with great speed, but at its end lies disaster. The other fork of the road - the one less traveled by offers our last, our only chance to reach a destination that assures the preservation of the earth. RACHEL CARSON // CHATHAM UNIVERSITY CLASS OF 1929

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INTRODUCTION

This changes everything…

Chatham University’s new Eden Hall Campus offers unprecedented opportunities for transformative change—the kind of change that will affect the behavior of our global society and the way we interact with the environments we inhabit. As a living and learning community, Eden Hall Campus will encourage students and faculty to immerse themselves in a setting that promotes the study and advancement of sustainable development based on restorative principles. This is a dynamic, exciting place—a living laboratory in which to explore fundamentally different approaches to how we manage resources, both physical and intellectual. It will inspire us to model development and behavior, changing the way we occupy the land, design buildings, interact with our communities, fuel our economies, and design systems for energy, waste, water, transportation, and food. The new Eden Hall Campus will enable us to learn, act and progress in a way that corrects our course and encourages us to choose and forge a new path into the 22nd Century.

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CONTEXT

Since the early 19th Century, Eden Hall Farm has served as a place for focused connection with nature. As a farm, a resort, a preserve, and now a laboratory, the genius of the land continues to inspire generations of bodies and minds to explore, discover, learn, and renew.

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Eden Hall Campus

Upon his death in 1938, Sebastian Mueller, Senior Vice President of the H.J. Heinz Company and charitable humanitarian, left his farm to be used as a resort where women in the region could revitalize through nature. Serving this purpose until 2008, the land remained largely untouched amidst booming neighboring development and is now one of the largest undeveloped tracts of land in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

Ohio River Allegheny River

Across the river from Eden Hall Farm, Chatham University has nurtured a mission since 1869 that parallels that of Mr. Mueller’s, focusing on environmental research and promoting educated female leaders. The university is home to the Rachel Carson Institute, which was formed in 1989 to promote the awareness and understanding of significant and current environmental issues.

Shadyside Campus

Downtown Pittsburgh

In 2008, Eden Hall Foundation donated the 388-acre farm to Chatham University to further the university’s educational objectives and, in doing so, created an extraordinary opportunity for immersive research and advancement in the arena of environmental study. This gift marks a new trajectory in our society’s course to a sustainable future. The new Eden Hall Campus is our vehicle to take us there.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Monogahela River

REGIONAL MAP Eden Hall Campus is located approximately 25 miles north of Chatham University’s Shadyside Campus and Downtown Pittsburgh. It is in the midst of some of the region’s fastest growing communities. This location presents a unique opportunity by virtue of its proximity to the city and the suburbs. It is much closer to a major city than forest and nature preserves affiliated with other universities. Access to diverse local and regional amenities will be attractive to prospective students.

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EXISTING BARNS

EXISTING LODGE & MUELLER HOUSE

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Midwest Retreat Barn, Rural Iowa. Designed by BNIM.

THE VISION Serving the needs of current and future generations, Chatham University at Eden Hall will serve as a beacon to those who wish to imagine and model sustainable learning and living. Through scholarly training and research, Eden Hall Campus will create entrepreneurs and advocates capable of implementing sustainable ideas and sharing them with a global community. In so doing, Chatham will proudly advance the legacy of Rachel Carson, class of 1929. EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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GENIUS OF THE LAND: REALIZING EDEN HALL

It all begins with the land. The vision for Eden Hall Campus is founded on the lessons that emerge from the soil. The beauty of the place. The natural systems that sustain growth and renewal. The rooted culture and timeless character that permeate the grounds. These elements—the “genius of the land”—make up the heart of this new living laboratory. Upon completion, Eden Hall Campus will exist as a self-reliant ecosystem. The genius of the land—at first just a source of inspiration—will absorb the built environment, sustaining it as part of the natural system and, most importantly, serving as the primary teaching and learning tool for future generations of environmental pioneers.

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THE POTENTIAL

NOW IS THE TIME FOR LEADERSHIP

Rapid global changes demand new ways of thinking about wellbeing, economic development and social justice, as well as fundamentally different approaches to managing environmental, agricultural, intellectual, cultural, energy, and material resources. At Eden Hall Campus, sustainable development will be modeled, researched, and advanced, fostering the knowledge, wisdom, and practices necessary to meet these challenges. Chatham University’s dedication to experiential, multidisciplinary education will inspire generations of leaders in sustainable thought and practices. Through this new campus, Rachel Carson’s vision and legacy will be furthered, bringing it to current and future generations. Eden Hall Campus will establish Chatham University as a global leader in applied sustainability. A MODEL CAMPUS

Eden Hall Campus will be the first academic institution designed from the beginning to integrate sustainable development, learning, and living. Housing the new School of Sustainability and the Environment and a re-envisioned Rachel Carson Institute, the campus will weave together broad issues of sustainability to inform decision-making and the marketplace. Over time, it will evolve into a comprehensive campus that, linked with Chatham’s Shadyside Campus, connects physically and virtually to students, faculty, professionals, and leaders around the world. Members of Eden Hall Campus will engage in immersive learning, rooted in the place but looking out to the world. Eden Hall Campus will thus serve as a living laboratory where students and faculty analyze, reflect, create and live sustainably, inspired by each other and their unique natural, technological, and social surroundings.

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Conceptual Rendering of Proposed EcoCenter Including Existing Barns REVISED 05/03/2011

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PHASING

Unfolding over time, Eden Hall Campus will develop in phases: Immediate, Short Term, Mid Term and Long Term. Building and site designs will take a cue from nature and will evolve through each phase, serving as progressive prototypes that will inform future phases. IMMEDIATE – PHASE 1

(2-3 years) The Immediate Phase includes existing facility renovation/preservation, the construction of academic and residential facilities in Mueller Center Campus and the Elsalma Center and intensive landscape restoration. SHORT TERM – PHASE 2

(3-5 years) Learning from Phase 1 prototypes, the Short Term Phase will continue the development of two initial precincts, begin expansion to Elizabeth Meadows and continue major landscape and infrastructure improvements. MID TERM – PHASE 3

(5-10 years) Informed by the two previous phases, the Mid Term Phase will conclude the development of the two initial precincts, continue expansion to two additional precincts, and resume ongoing efforts to restore landscape and infrastructure. LONG TERM – PHASE 4

(10+ years) The Long Term Phase will expand the academic campus to Stanford Hill and conclude the development of Eden Hall Campus.

View of Proposed Pedestrian Bridge from EcoCenter Looking Toward Stanford Hill REVISED 05/03/2011

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PROPOSED SITE PLAN - ALL PHASES 1. EcoCenter 2. Greenhouse 3. Academic Building 4. Residential Building 5. Commons Building 6. Constructed Wetlands 7. Amphitheaters 8. Mueller House 9. Lodge

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10. Sports Complex 11. Studio Arts Building 12. Facilities Management 13. Pedestrian Bridge 14. ADA Parking 15. Thoreau Cottages 16. Townhouse Community 17. Springhouse 18. General Parking

A. Orchard and Guest Facility B. University Meeting Center, Dining Facility, Classrooms C. Aquaponics and Living Machine D. Academic Building E. Guest Facility F. Bunkhouse and Common Building G. Wellness Center H. High Tunnels, Greenhouses, Market I. Animal Barn and Pasture (rotating acreage)

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PHASE 1 A Giant Leap: The First Phase in Developing Eden Hall Campus As the first campus in this century to be designed from the earth up, Eden Hall Campus embodies a powerful message. As it evolves, the campus will take the form of a natural system — striving to be selfsustaining and in balance with its environment. Though all phases of development will be uniquely critical to the success of the whole, the initial phase will serve as a foundation for all future phases, establishing benchmarks, informing design, and laying groundwork for important cultural traditions. This phase, more so than any other, will seek inspiration from the land.

Elsalma Center

Mueller Center Campus

Thoreau Cottages

Stanford Hill

This first, or “immediate,” phase focuses on development within the Mueller Center Campus and the Elsalma Center, and intensive landscape restoration.

Elizabeth Meadows

The EcoCenter in the Mueller Center Campus will initially serve primarily academic functions. The two barns will be renovated and will serve as anchors for a new building addition that will include classroom space, faculty and administrative offices, and student services. This addition will be designed as a highly flexible facility allowing for adaptable classroom and office spaces that can accommodate other uses in future phases. The Main Barn will be renovated into a Great Hall for student use and conference needs. The Dairy Barn will be renovated into a kitchen that will serve the EcoCenter and initially function as the Food Studies teaching kitchen. A dining hall will connect the two barn structures and will accommodate campus dinners and meeting functions. The renovated Lodge will serve as guest lodging and will also support the meeting needs.

Campus Precincts Eden Hall Campus is organized into campus precincts. The Mueller Center Campus and Stanford Hill precincts make up the academic core of the campus. The Elsalma Center is a mixed-use district that includes outreach and academic functions. Faculty housing and the main campus parking lot are located in Elizabeth Meadows. The Thoreau Cottages give students and guests access to nature and solitude.

Phase 1 will include the construction of two student residence buildings, each housing 22 students. These buildings will be designed and built as prototypes and will inform, evaluate, and optimize the design of student residences in later phases. The main teaching facilities of the Elsalma Center, an Academic Building and Aquaponics facility, are also included in this phase. A greenhouse is also planned in both the Elsalma Center and the Mueller Center Campus.

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EDEN HALL CAMPUS PLAN PRINCIPLES

The following plan describes the ways Eden Hall Campus will evolve as a center of knowledge and practice for the expanding field of sustainability and will advance the mission of Chatham University. A brief orientation to this document’s context precedes more detailed explorations of four fundamental components of Eden Hall Campus: ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Eden Hall Campus will offer a model curriculum, focusing on systems thinking, interdisciplinary research, sustainability, and hands-on learning. COMMUNITY BUILDING

Strong relationships that develop across the campus and through global outreach via a “virtual campus” will enhance lifelong collaboration, leadership, and activism. ROBUST NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

Restored natural systems, healthy streams and forests, and a focus on the “genius of the land” will inspire and nurture a regenerative relationship with nature and its bounty. HIGH PERFORMANCE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Demonstrating the principles of high performance design, Eden Hall Campus’ elegant and efficient buildings will provide a laboratory for testing best practices. A section for each of these components summarizes the analysis and recommendations that emerged from the planning process. Following these major areas is a proposed phasing of the campus development. To improve readability, detailed documentation is found in the Technical Reports companion document.

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CAMPUS COMMUNITY

LIVING LEARNING LABORATORY

GLOBAL COMMUNITY

INTEGRATED ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES

TECHNOLOGY

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CLIMATE POSITIVE

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SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

FOREST LAND

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AMENITIES

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ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Big Thinking for a Big World. College students today are increasingly asked to “think big,� as it is their charge to define and design a future that is resilient under conditions of rapid societal, resource, and environmental changes. In this spirit, Eden Hall Campus is designed to facilitate the growth of thought leaders, promoting individual self-reflection, and providing students with the skills, insights, and confidence to improve the world around them. Academics at Eden Hall Campus will draw inspiration from the natural wonder of the site and couple new interdisciplinary programs with the traditions of Chatham University. From arts, to science, to history, to business, to communication, interdisciplinary students at Eden Hall Campus will collaborate to address the challenges of an increasingly complex world. Like Rachel Carson, they will be inspired to understand the interconnectedness of humans and nature and advocate for a sustainable future. All students aspire to create better lives for themselves and later generations. To do that, they will seek sustainable learning, and academic opportunities at Eden Hall Campus will respond to this need with a new blend of traditional and experiential learning.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

PLAN GOALS

Approach Eden Hall Campus as a living laboratory The act of developing and living on Eden Hall Campus will be a subject of study unto itself. Students will use their surroundings as a laboratory to explore sustainable land management, food production and delivery, architecture, energy generation and more. Integrate a diversity of academic disciplines Issues of sustainability and the environment are central to our lives and livelihoods. Academic programs at Eden Hall Campus will be deeply interdisciplinary, engaging a range of subjects to inform choices for a sustainable future. Seamlessly integrate the physical and the virtual Students today incorporate virtual technology into their daily lives. The Eden Hall Campus philosophy will be to capitalize on the advantages of rapid, global, fluid interactions, while at the same time understanding and mitigating their downsides. Translate research into practice Academic programs at Eden Hall Campus will pursue new understandings and develop practical applications of that knowledge. Such efforts will be guided by a commitment to improving life for current and future generations.

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Anita B. Gorman Conservation Discovery Center, Kansas City, Missouri. Designed by BNIM. REVISED 05/03/2011

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COMMUNITY BUILDING

People, community interactions, and social programs will transform Eden Hall Campus from a collection of high performance green buildings and landscapes into a premier living and learning campus. University stakeholders envision a campus that fosters strong academic and personal relationships while instilling a sense of the greater global community for which Rachel Carson advocated so passionately.

PLAN GOALS

Foster a culture of learning Eden Hall Campus will unite a diverse community engaged in an interdisciplinary pursuit of knowledge and lifelong learning. Promote the campus community The spaces, programs, and amenities at Eden Hall Campus will foster a strong sense of belonging and collaboration for students and faculty. Engage the global community Eden Hall Campus will engage others around the world in education, conversation, and experimentation that will improve social, economic, and environmental conditions. Provide programs for the regional community Through outreach programs and community education, students and faculty at Eden Hall Campus will model and demonstrate environmental leadership and sustainability.

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Existing Garden at Eden Hall Farm REVISED 05/03/2011

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ROBUST NATURAL ENVIRONMENT

Eden Hall Campus’ natural beauty impresses anyone who encounters it. The area conveys a sense of deep heritage as a working farm and retreat. As scenic and peaceful as the campus appears, the ecosystems on Eden Hall Campus are currently in a state of stress and imbalance. An analysis of the existing environmental systems has identified opportunities and constraints for development and environmental restoration. The design for Eden Hall Campus restores the surrounding farm and forest. The programs on campus offer exciting opportunities for agricultural research and the study of ecosystems, which could, in turn, help restore ecological balance to the land.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

PLAN GOALS

Create a Climate Positive Development The new campus is proposed to generate all energy on site and treat all wastewater on site. The goal for on-site carbon emissions will be net-zero. Protect Streams and Waterways The development plan will maintain appropriate stream buffers to protect water resources. Regenerate Forest Lands The plan will protect and restore nearly 200 acres of the forest for teaching, research and demonstration. Protect Arable Land The development plan for the campus will preserve productive landscapes and scenic views.

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Elsalma Center

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Elizabeth Meadows

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HIGH PERFORMANCE BUILT ENVIRONMENT

Community goals, academic goals, and the vision for the natural environment play a fundamental role in the design of new Eden Hall Campus. It is this deep understanding and culmination of pedagogy, community, and ecology that will enable the campus to function sustainably.

PLAN GOALS

Structures on campus are envisioned as living buildings, proposed to generate all of their own energy with renewable resources, capture and treat all of their water on site, and use resources efficiently and for maximum beauty. The design of each building, site and the campus overall will focus on transportation, views, materials, water systems, and energy systems to elevate the campus to the highest levels of sustainable performance.

Use state-of-the-art sustainable building solutions Eden Hall Campus will use sustainable development practices to construct a campus that aims to restore the environment.

By widely adopting the design concept of biophilia, the campus will become an interactive learning environment where the landscape and each building serve as a living laboratory. Made popular by E.O. Wilson in his discussion on “The Nature of Human Nature,” biophilia proposes that, as humans, we have an innate emotional and intellectual connection to natural systems. Not only do we find them beautiful and awe inspiring, but we can understand them and use them to guide our own uniquely human challenges.

Provide abundant campus amenities The campus design will provide for the needs of the students, faculty, and staff that use and live on Eden Hall Campus.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Design a flexible and inspiring learning environment Learning is not confined to the classroom. Eden Hall Campus will provide flexible communal spaces, coordinated with building circulation, to maximize formal and informal learning.

Repurpose existing facilities The plan repurposes existing facilities when possible to preserve Eden Hall Campus’ heritage and reduce the environmental impact of construction.

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CLIMATE POSITIVE PLAN

The Omega Center for Sustainable Living, Rhinebeck, New York. Designed by BNIM.

Mahatma Gandhi said, “Be the change you want to see in the world.” Eden Hall Campus is envisioned as a true response to this challenge. Aspiring to be a climate positive campus—where onsite greenhouse gas emissions are actually less than zero—the precincts, buildings, sites, and infrastructure will employ integrated high-performance solutions and renewable energy resources to produce more energy than they utilize. Developing Eden Hall Campus with climate positive goals presents a unique opportunity to demonstrate the best emerging technologies for efficiency and renewable energy. Integrating these technologies into the campus’ built environment provides the greatest opportunity to reduce the overall campus energy footprint. With this approach, the campus can meet all energy needs through efficient building and systems designs plus on-site renewable energy generation using a cost effective, replicable approach.

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02. Context The Context 26 Background 28 Process 30

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THE CONTEXT

Regional and Local Context Eden Hall Campus is located approximately 25 miles north of Chatham University’s Shadyside Campus and Downtown Pittsburgh. It is in the midst of some of the region’s fastest growing communities and is one of the largest pieces of undeveloped private property in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.

preserves affiliated with universities. Prospective students will find the access to diverse local and regional amenities attractive.

The proximity of Eden Hall Campus to Chatham’s Shadyside Campus presents an opportunity to establish a sustainable method of transportation to link the two This location presents a unique opportunity by virtue campuses. Communication technology, virtual campus of its proximity to the city and the suburbs. It is much environments, and other emerging tools will also closer to a major city than other forest and nature connect students and faculty in a sustainable manner.

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Eden Hall Campus Industrial Area

Tree Nursery

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Regional Context EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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EXISTING BARNS

EXISTING LODGE & MUELLER HOUSE

Aerial View of Existing Site (2007) REVISED 05/03/2011

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BACKGROUND

History of Eden Hall Campus On May 1, 2008, the Eden Hall Foundation marked history with an extraordinary donation of nearly 400 acres of undeveloped farmland and woodland in northern Allegheny County, Pennsylvania to Chatham University. This farm, located 25 miles from Chatham’s historic Pittsburgh campus, is rich with potential; it offers fertile farmland, abundant forests, and distinctive buildings. More importantly, however, it offers a new trajectory in our society’s course to a sustainable future. Originally, Eden Hall Farm belonged to Sebastian Mueller (1860-1938), a senior vice president of the H.J. Heinz Company and generous philanthropist. Under his ownership, the farm served as a place of rest and respite for women who worked for the Heinz Company. In his will, Mr. Mueller directed that the farm be used as a retreat, where working women from Pittsburgh could renew themselves and benefit from a healing connection to nature. Eden Hall Farm served that purpose from Mr. Mueller’s death until 2008, when it was transferred to the Eden Hall Foundation and then gifted to the University. Under the terms of the transfer, Chatham can use the property for any purpose related to the University’s educational mission. Chatham has pledged to preserve a portion of no less than 170 acres as undeveloped green or open space and to offer programs and activities at Eden Hall Campus that embody “a special focus on women.”

Top: Existing Dairy Barn, Proposed Future Kitchen Bottom: Heinz Employees Arriving at the Farm for Vacation

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A Progressive Tradition The gift of Eden Hall Campus presents Chatham University with an unprecedented opportunity to further its forward-thinking philosophy and deepen its commitment to the environment. Since its establishment in 1869, Chatham University has followed a progressive agenda centered on women’s issues and education. In 1929, Rachel Carson graduated from Chatham and went on to start the modern environmental movement with the publication of her book Silent Spring. Carson’s ethics and philosophy influenced Chatham’s path and led to the school’s emphasis on environmental education. In 1989, Chatham established the Rachel Carson Institute to continue her legacy of environmental awareness. In 2007, Chatham signed the American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment and in 2009 developed a Climate Action Plan. Early Users Before this planning process began, Chatham used Eden Hall Campus for various teaching purposes. The landscape architecture department held soil survey classes there, an interdisciplinary group of students, faculty, and staff participated in growing a garden, and creative writing courses met on site. Excitement about the possibilities for this resource spread through the faculty and student body, and in 2010 Chatham initiated this master planning process to create a vision and road map for developing the land into a second campus—one centered on an immersive learning experience for students of sustainable and environmental study.

Existing Gardens and Dairy Barn

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PROCESS

Eden Hall Campus Master Plan is a result of an inspiring and collaborative process between Chatham University and the planning team, which included an interdisciplinary group of experts whose involvement provided the project a variety of informed perspectives. A diverse team of university stakeholders contributed to ensure that the design will meet Chatham’s goals. Representatives from the President’s office, project team leaders from various disciplines, administrative leadership, faculty, and representatives from the Board of Trustees also provided input. Participating departments included: • • • • • • • •

Science Landscape Architecture English Creative Writing Food Studies Health Sciences Environmental Studies Interior Architecture

User groups, designers and technical specialists worked with Chatham representatives to define and refine the vision and goals for the campus, analyze the opportunities and challenges, and collaborate on the final Master Plan for Eden Hall Campus.

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Members of the planning team meet with Chatham University project team leaders and students.

Members of the planning team meet with Chatham University Board of Trustees.

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03. Community Community Goals Campus Community Campus Life Regional and Global Community Learning

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COMMUNITY GOALS

People, community interactions, and social programs will transform Eden Hall Campus from a collection of high performance green buildings and landscapes to a premier living and learning campus. University stakeholders envision a campus that fosters strong academic and personal relationships while instilling a sense of the greater global community for which Rachel Carson so passionately advocated.

Foster a culture of learning

Promote the campus community

Eden Hall Campus will unite a diverse community engaged in an interdisciplinary pursuit of knowledge and lifelong learning.

The spaces, programs, and amenities at Eden Hall Campus will foster a strong sense of belonging and collaboration for students and faculty.

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Provide programs for the regional community Through outreach programs and community education, students and faculty at Eden Hall Campus will model and demonstrate environmental leadership and sustainability.

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Engage the global community Eden Hall Campus will engage others around the world in education, conversation, and experimentation that will improve social, economic, and environmental conditions.

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School of Nursing and Student Community Center at the University of Texas Health Science Center. Designed by BNIM | Lake Flato. REVISED 05/03/2011

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CAMPUS COMMUNITY

Envisioned as a thriving community of students and faculty, Eden Hall Campus will be a mixed-use development—a place where residents, commuters and visitors will have opportunities to engage in an active campus and the broader community. Approximately eighty percent of students at Eden Hall Campus will reside on site; faculty housing is also planned. The campus will offer continuing education programs and will host community outreach and university-wide events. Eden Hall Campus will comprise a number of small scale “villages,” built in phases, whose design will catalyze a robust campus community. In addition to academic spaces, the developments will include student housing, student services, sports and recreational facilities, and university meeting/outreach facilities. Eden Hall Campus will pioneer a new transformative era of information technology and learning through the development of a virtual campus. Learning and living within this virtual platform will create an interactive forum that will unite a global academic community: students and faculty on Eden Hall Campus, researchers in Texas, sustainability advocates in Asia, or any number of other collaborators. At any moment of campus life, students and faculty may integrate with the virtual platform to collaborate with colleagues on or off campus. With the help of current and emerging mobile technology, the virtual campus will serve as a ubiquitous outlet to all corners of the world.

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN SKETCHES Top: EcoCenter (looking west from the ridge) Bottom: EcoCenter (looking north)

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General Reference Images of Healthy Campus Communities

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CAMPUS LIFE

Within any campus community, students look for: • • • • • • • •

Access to technology Social and recreation spaces Group study areas Grocery/convenience store Dining and cooking options Access to outdoor spaces and community gardens Residence options including family accommodations Affordability

Students on Eden Hall Campus will have access to all of these amenities, creating a complete campus experience. In addition to academics, the campus will incorporate social and recreational spaces. Campus buildings will include flexible commons facilities with dining and meeting areas. Each development phase will also include indoor fitness and recreational facilities. The Elsalma Center will also serve as a community outreach hub and will provide students with both academic and community engagement opportunities. The most important and distinctive campus amenity is the land itself. Eden Hall Campus will continue to serve its historic role as a place for focused connection to nature. Outdoor amenities will include a campus-wide trail system connecting villages and formal and informal outdoor spaces; amphitheaters to supplement indoor classrooms and provide venues for special outdoor events; open areas for picnics and gatherings (i.e., graduations); unique rooftop sculpture gardens; and vast acres of undeveloped, restored natural Pennsylvania forests, streams and land.

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Building Amenities

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ECOCENTER

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Student Lounge Outfitter (outdoor recreation equipment) Cafe Bookstore / Trading Post Health / Fitness Center Assembly Space (concerts, performances, lectures) Dining Hall

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WELLNESS CENTER

COMMONS

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Fitness Room Dining Hall Student Lounge

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Performances Campfires Informal Gatherings Lectures

Bowling Billiards Assembly Space Swimming (initial phases)

Yoga

Sustainable Living Classes

ROOFTOP SCULPTURE GARDEN

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Art Viewing Outdoor Event Space

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DINING FACILITY

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UNIVERSITY MEETING CENTER

12

ACADEMIC BUILDING

13

AQUAPONICS

PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

• •

Canopy Viewing Informal Gatherings

• • •

Dining Cooking Center for Food Studies

Assembly Space

SPORTS COMPLEX

• • • • •

Basketball Court Natatorium Weight Room and Aerobic Studio Indoor Track Large Ballroom / Gathering Space

DECKS

• •

University Meeting Center Adjunct

Food Production

Cookouts Informal Gatherings

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11 12

10 13 9

5 6

9

3 2

4 2

1

7

6 7 8

Diagram of Proposed Building Amenities

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Open Space Amenities

Aq

ACADEMIC QUAD

Ca

COMMONS - ATHLETICS

Ce

COMMONS - EVENT SPACE

Rg

RESIDENTIAL GREENS & GARDENS

• •

• • •

• • •

• • •

Informal Student Gathering Outdoor Seating / Study

Competitive Sports Intermural/Intramural Sports Informal Recreation within Academic Campuses

Performances Informal Gatherings Lectures

Student Gardens Picnicking Informal Gatherings

BREAKNECK FOREST

• • • •

Hiking Nature Observation Writing Painting and Drawing

GLADE RUN FOREST

• •

Jogging Mountain Biking

POND

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40


Ce

Ce

Ce

Ca

Ca Rg

Ca Aq Aq

Ce

Ca Ce

Rg

Glade Run Forest is for Active Uses

Breakneck Forest is for Passive Uses Ca Pond Rg

Diagram of Proposed Open Space Amenities

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REGIONAL AND GLOBAL COMMUNITY LEARNING

Eden Hall Campus will foster a culture of learning far beyond the university community. An homage to Rachel Carson, the new campus will become a global resource for sustainable research, methodology, and practice. The last century has revealed the catastrophic potential of our behaviors, lifestyles, and industries. Only by educating global communities about the benefits and importance of sustainable choices and by providing realistic vehicles for change can we alter our course. Recognizing the opportunities embodied in an interactive dialogue, Chatham envisions the Elsalma Center as serving two distinct but symbiotic functions: a hub for large-scale public outreach and a new home for the Rachel Carson Institute (RCI). The RCI has promoted Rachel Carson’s legacy since 1989 and continues to elevate Chatham’s commitment to applied sustainable stewardship and leadership. The RCI is Chatham’s outreach arm for sustainability, and, as such, its integration with regional and global communities continues to influence international topics related to sustainable practice and policy. The Elsalma Center will bring the global public to the RCI and will establish a dedicated channel through which the Institute can communicate with an increasingly invested populace. Located in the high, northwest point of the property, the Elsalma Center will include a teaching kitchen and dining facility that serves locally produced foods; accommodations for university meetings and other public events; a Wellness Center that encourages visitors to explore the deep connections between mind, body, and nature; and spaces designed to support student and faculty interactions with the global community through seminars and public classes. Beyond the Elsalma Center, Eden Hall Campus will present other new opportunities for regional and global outreach and an expanded role for the RCI. Initiatives will include centers devoted to sustainable agriculture, human wellness, green economic development, and international environmental policy, as well as other topics and trends that will emerge in coming years.

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Virtual Immersion, Global Reach Virtual and physical interactions have grown increasingly inseparable. Communication technologies can bring people together at the local as well as global scale. But individuals can be isolated virtually as certainly as they can be physically, and access to technology can divide people by cultural, economic and other distinctions. Consequently, exploring and modeling sustainability in virtual interactions will be as vital to the mission of Eden Hall Campus as ensuring sustainability of the physical.

courtesy: Global Institute of Sustainability, ASU

The Eden Hall Campus community will practice, research and share approaches that attend to the social, economic and environmental implications of virtual communities. Technology will be appropriately scaled and located to support personal use, learning, research, and creativity. Eden Hall will seek to advance appropriate technology, with installations ranging from combined virtual/physical art to decision support and modeling venues.

General Reference Images of Virtual Immersion Environments

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04. Academics Academics Goals Approach to Learning Academic Environment Academic Programs

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ACADEMICS GOALS “Big Thinking for a Big World” College students today are increasingly asked to “think big,” as it is their charge to define and design a future that is resilient under conditions of rapid societal, resource, and environmental changes. In this spirit and tradition, Eden Hall Campus is designed to facilitate the growth of thought leaders, promoting individual self reflection, and providing students with the skills, insights, and confidence to improve the world around them. Academics at Eden Hall Campus will draw inspiration from the natural wonder of the site and couple new interdisciplinary programs with the traditions of Chatham University. From arts, to science, to history, to business, to communication, students at Eden Hall Campus will collaborate to face the challenges of an increasingly complex world. Like Rachel Carson, they will be inspired to understand the interconnectedness of humans and nature and advocate for a sustainable future. All students aspire to create better lives for themselves and later generations. To do that, they will seek sustainable learning, and academic opportunities at Eden Hall Campus will respond to this need with a new blend of traditional and experiential learning.

Approach Eden Hall Campus as a living laboratory

Integrate a diversity of academic and artistic disciplines

Seamlessly integrate the physical and the virtual

Translate research into practice

The act of developing and living on Eden Hall Campus will be a subject of study unto itself. Students will use their surroundings as a laboratory to explore sustainable land management, food production and delivery, architecture, energy generation and more.

Issues of sustainability and the environment are central to our lives and livelihoods. Academic programs at Eden Hall Campus will be deeply interdisciplinary, engaging a range of subjects to inform choices for a sustainable future.

Students today incorporate virtual technology into their daily lives. The Eden Hall Campus philosophy will be to capitalize on the advantages of rapid, global, fluid interactions, while at the same time understanding and mitigating their downsides.

Academic programs at Eden Hall Campus will pursue new understandings and develop practical applications of that knowledge. Such efforts will be guided by a commitment to improving life for current and future generations.

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APPROACH TO LEARNING

Research, Development, and Applications Advancing the science and technology necessary to sustainable development will be central to the Eden Hall Campus mission. Research will be conducted indoors and out. It will span the typical--basic and applied sciences, and development of applications. It will also go beyond the traditional, as the science and technology developed on campus will be put into use on the campus, supporting research across time as well as space. Projects undertaken at the campus will span multiple academic generations. Among the core tenets of sustainability is that bridging the advances of many divergent disciplines is necessary to advancing knowledge. At the Eden Hall Campus, science will follow the philosophy of Louis Pasteur, who insisted on simultaneous excellence and rigor in intellectual fundamentals, appropriate sources of knowledge, and contributions of value to humanity. With this academic framework, the Eden Hall Campus will advance fundamental knowledge, share that knowledge broadly, and put into practice the lessons learned. Immersion The idea of a living and learning campus is seminal to the academic approach on Eden Hall Campus. The goal is to provide a place that offers a continuously inspirational and thought-provoking environment, a place for students and faculty to be completely immersed in the pursuit of new ideas and solutions to future challenges. Imagine a creative writing class studying the works of Walt Whitman gathered in a dense forest where they will experience the sounds, smells, and textures that inspired the poet himself. Or walk through the site with the Symposium on Sustainability and Business and see how the students are taught to translate the efficiencies and adaptability of natural systems into strategies for future Fortune-500 endeavors. This is the type of immersive learning that the academics at Eden Hall Campus will provide.

“Those who dwell among the beauties and mysteries of the earth are never alone or weary of life.�

Eden Hall Campus offers another significant benefit through this approach: applied research. Within this living laboratory, students and faculty will have unprecedented opportunities to put their findings into practice. They can integrate new methods, behavior, and technology into their own community and experience first-hand how their research can affect the environment.

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ACADEMIC ENVIRONMENT

Learning can happen anywhere and at any time. Eden Hall Campus will provide untold avenues for individual and communal learning, as well as opportunities to reflect and reinvigorate. Research and learning at Eden Hall Campus will draw on all appropriate ways of knowing the world. A model sustainable campus, every aspect of the environment will encourage discovery, inform by example, and support diverse learning styles and patterns.

The Buildings Buildings of Eden Hall Campus will provide far more than shelter and climate control; at their core, they will be pedagogical tools. Flexible spaces will support collaboration and innovation, and healthy materials and building practices will create environments that foster health, focus, and clarity of thought to those studying and learning within them. The buildings will also offer simultaneous interactions with natural and virtual worlds. Access to daylight, air, and visual connections to the forests means that even in the comfort of a residential building or library, students can find inspiration from the lessons of nature. Crafting buildings and landscapes that promote the vision and mission of Eden Hall Campus will allow the “place” to serve as a living laboratory for discovering what is possible in the realm of a sustainable human society.

The Land The gift of Eden Hall Campus to Chatham provides a rare opportunity to incorporate biophilia into the educational experience. Made popular by E.O. Wilson in his discussion on “The Nature of Human Nature,” biophilia proposes that as humans we have an innate emotional and intellectual connection to natural systems. Not only do we find them beautiful and awe inspiring, but we can understand them and use them to guide our own, uniquely human challenges. Through restoring the ecosystems of Eden Hall, students and faculty have a laboratory of natural phenomena that can be studied, mimicked, and translated into any field of study or practice.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Commons Perhaps some of the most important places on any campus are the common areas; these are the spaces where art, science, and technology come together to stimulate insight and innovation. This is where individuals and groups share, contest, and create ideas. Historically, commons have been a physical space; today’s commons are increasingly virtual, and Eden Hall Campus will embrace this trend. While person-toperson interactions are invaluable, the Eden Hall Campus community will be amplified by integration with the global virtual commons.

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Technology To integrate the physical and virtual at Eden Hall Campus, technology will exist as a ubiquitous and unobtrusive tool. Virtual interaction will become a common component to every classroom environment, every seminar, every field day, and every huddle窶馬ot in separate rooms or at specified times. Individuals will chose the extent to which they engage in virtual aspects of campus life, just as they will chose among physical activities and interactions. The integration of technology will be thoughtfully planned to further society, development, and environment. To that end, the Eden Hall community will actively explore how and when technology can support the pursuit of more sustainable lives.

General Reference Images of Academic Environments

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Art Chatham University has a history of cultivating learning environments that inspire and enrich. This role has the potential to be advanced at Eden Hall Campus through a commitment to integrate art, both academically and physically, into the campus environment. Envisioned as an arts destination, the campus will attract academic, public and artistic communities alike. Art Programs on Campus Eden Hall Campus will serve as a source of inspiration, a flexible teaching tool, and a wellequipped setting to host the various visual, performing, literary, and other creative arts programs offered by the university. In this way, students of painting can benefit from inspiring views and illuminating daylight; students of dance and theater can train with state-of-the art equipment and in highly-flexible settings; students of literature can find focus, solitude, and stimulation to spur their words. The entire site will become a canvas for art—visual and performance. In addition to outdoor venues, specialized facilities will include a Studio Arts Building, additional studio spaces within the academic campus and the Elsalma Center, and artist-in-residence accommodations. Art in the Environment While nature will serve as the primary source of inspiration throughout Eden Hall Campus, the landscape and buildings provide a perfect backdrop for integrated art experiences that will add beauty and stimulate creativity. Students, faculty, and visitors will encounter sculptures as they walk or bike through campus. They will live, learn, and interact among paintings, and they will gaze out upon framed views of landscapes dotted with art. They will see art existing as a part of nature, and they will come to know it as a way of life.

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General Reference Images of Art in the Environment

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ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

The Chatham Academic Mission In addition to the compelling synergy between the academic facilities on the site and the School of Sustainability and the Environment, Eden Hall Campus will also be a place where all of Chatham’s departments and schools can engage in interdisciplinary academic programming. Whether supporting the teaching needs for business, visual arts, physician assistant studies, accounting, landscape architecture, or psychology, Eden Hall Campus will provide unparalleled opportunities for learning. The presence of a broad set of academic pursuits at Eden Hall Campus will enhance the interdisciplinary nature of the learning environment.

Eden Hall Campus will serve the academic mission of Chatham University in a variety of ways. Just as robust natural systems evolve to accommodate changing needs and conditions, so will Eden Hall Campus evolve in its role to support the needs and growth of the various programs that reside there. The School of Sustainability and the Environment Eden Hall Campus will house Chatham University’s new School of Sustainability and the Environment (SSE). The academic programs, primarily graduate level, will prepare students to envision and create policies and practices that improve economic, environmental, and social well-being for current and future generations. Coursework will reinforce the interdependent and systemic nature of sustainable development. Academic programs at Eden Hall Campus will draw upon appropriate disciplinary knowledge and methods to serve local, regional, and global needs. Students and faculty will model sustainable practices in a community that celebrates the campus’ unique physical location.

At Eden Hall Campus, Chatham University will offer continuing education courses for professionals, students, and the public. Through night and weekend academic classes, lifestyle education, and youth summer camps, Eden Hall Campus will share its curriculum with students of all ages and life stages. This will ensure that the lessons and ideals of Eden Hall Campus will be shared broadly through the local, regional, and global communities.

The SSE will grow together with Eden Hall Campus to cultivate the next generation of thought leaders in sustainable science, social science, business, and humanities, focusing on topics such as water, agriculture, health and wellness, resource management, and energy. To serve current and future generations, food systems will need to require less input yet yield more product. As a learning experience, students and faculty will discover new solutions to our worldwide challenge of sustainable food sources. Whether in the classroom or in the field, students will use the land, the technology, and the built environment as powerful tools with which to explore possibilities and challenges of the future.

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General Reference Images from Other Campus Environments REVISED 05/03/2011

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EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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05. Natural Environment Natural Environment Goals Climate Positive Campus Environmental Analysis Environmental Zones

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NATURAL ENVIRONMENT GOALS

Eden Hall Campus’ beauty impresses anyone who encounters it. The area conveys a sense of deep heritage as a working farm and retreat. As scenic and peaceful as the campus appears, the ecosystems on Eden Hall Campus are currently in a state of stress and imbalance. This plan analyzes the existing environmental systems and identifies opportunities and constraints for development and environmental restoration. The design for Eden Hall Campus restores the surrounding farm and forest. The programs on campus offer exciting opportunities for agricultural research and the study of ecosystems, which could, in turn, restore ecological balance to the land.

Create a Climate Positive Development

Protect Streams and Waterways

Regenerate Forest Lands

Protect Arable Land

The new campus is proposed to generate all energy on site and treat all wastewater on site. The goal for on-site carbon emissions will be net-zero.

The development plan will maintain appropriate stream buffers to protect water resources.

The plan will protect and restore nearly 200 acres of the forest for teaching, research, and demonstration.

The development plan for the campus will preserve productive landscapes and scenic views.

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CLIMATE POSITIVE CAMPUS

Eden Hall Campus is envisioned as a climate positive campus—where on-site greenhouse gas emissions are actually less than zero. As such, the precincts, buildings, sites, and infrastructure will employ integrated high-performance solutions and renewable energy resources to produce more energy than they utilize. Additionally, buildings and landscapes are planned to manage all rain and wastewater on-site and will serve as pedagogical tools for students, faculty, and visitors. Developing Eden Hall Campus with climate positive goals presents a unique opportunity to demonstrate the best emerging technologies for efficiency, renewable energy, and water management. By integrating these technologies into the campus’ natural and built environments, the buildings and landscapes themselves can become a self-reliant ecosystem.

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Omega Center for Sustainable Living, Rhinebeck, New York. Designed by BNIM.

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ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

Elsalma Center Actively Farmed 20Acres +/-

EXISTING ECOLOGY - VEGETATION AND HABITAT

Eden Hall Campus has approximately 288 acres of existing deciduous and coniferous forest and approximately half an acre of existing wetlands. The forests west of Ridge Road are developed around a nucleus of remnant deciduous forest that has been in existence since 1900 or earlier. The forests on the eastern half of the site are less than 50 years old and are less connected to the surrounding forests in the region; these forests are more fragmented and are highly invaded by vines and deer-resistant shrubs.

Mueller Center Campus Actively Farmed

Stanford Hill Actively Farmed

The forests have several conifer stands that are approximately 30 years old; they appear to have been planted, possibly, as a wood pulp crop for the paper or cardboard industry. The forested areas on Eden Hall Campus have a tenuous connection to a large network of forest interior extending nearly to the Allegheny River; however, this network of forests is severed by highways. The adjacent map illustrates the existing plant communities.

Elizabeth Meadows Actively Farmed Former Potato Patch 11.5 acres Existing Land Use and Plant Communities Map

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STREAM CORRIDOR PROTECTION

y and zards

AGRICULTURAL SOILS

site boundary

site boundary

slope

prime farmland

ways

buffer: uality protection

All areas are prime farmland

0 - 2%

Farmland of statewide importance

2 - 5%

Not prime farmland

5 - 10% 10 - 15%

m buffer: protection

0

SLOPE

slope

agricultural soils

¸

Breakneck Creek Watershed

0

255

510

15 - 25% 25% +

Glade Run Watershed

Feet 1,100

streams 75’ stream buffer (water quality)

300’ stream buffer (wildlife) watershed boundary

¸

Feet 1,020

0

prime

270

540

Feet 1,080

n/a

statewide Importance

0 - 2%

10 - 15%

2 - 5%

15 - 25%

5 - 10%

25%+

HYDROLOGY

SOILS AND TOPOGRAPHY

Eden Hall Campus sits at the top of the Connoquenessing Subbasin, making it a primary source of clean water for two watersheds. The campus is divided into the Breakneck Creek Watershed to the west and Glade Run Watershed to the east. Ridge Road marks the watershed divide. Because Eden Hall Campus sits at the headwaters of these two watersheds, actions taken on this campus are especially critical for downstream conditions. The area has several springs and perennial and intermittent streams. Water quality improvement is a high priority due to impaired streams, wetlands, and wells downstream.

Eden Hall Campus has rolling hills and rich, loamy soils that are ideal for cultivation. The soils in the flatter areas are prime for agricultural use. The site also contains soils that possess useful properties for wastewater and stormwater infiltration. Some of the soils on the site have freeze/thaw cycles that make them unsuitable for development. The area has some steep slopes (greater than twelve percent) that are also unsuitable for development.

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ENVIRONMENTAL ZONES

The master plan divides Eden Hall Campus into three environmental zones based on the hydrology, slopes, and soil analysis. The “Green Zone” represents areas that provide valuable environmental services that should be preserved and restored to pre-development conditions. The “Orange Zone” identifies areas with the best agricultural soils, and the “Grey Zone” delineates the connections between preservation areas and prime agricultural areas.

GREEN ZONE – PRESERVATION

ORANGE ZONE – ARABLE LAND

GREY ZONE - CONNECTIONS

Conservation is Survival

Existing Assets of Eden Hall Campus

Connect Campus Residents to Their Environment

• Preserve the campus’ existing forest and the wildlife habitats. • Enhance the campus’ existing forest through effective forest management and restoration. Reconnect isolated patches through the creation of woodland corridors. • Preserve, restore, and expand existing riparian corridors and wetlands.

• Manage agricultural soils as a non-renewable

• Balance arable land and slope constraints by developing with “one foot in the highland and one in the forest.” • Situate campus development near soils that are suitable for wastewater treatment and groundwater infiltration. • Avoid developing on slopes and areas susceptible to landslides. • Maximize the use of on-site materials for construction. • Uncover wastewater and stormwater systems and incorporate them within the civic space of the campus. • Integrate food and energy systems with campus life. • Create movement in the campus landscape.

• • • •

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resource. Maintain pre-development hydrological conditions. Focus campus development in current areas of disturbance. Cluster development along existing roads and infrastructure. Capitalize on the heritage and identity of Eden Hall Campus to preserve its existing sense of place. Create meadows in zones that will be developed in future phases and as buffers to forest.

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ORANGE ZONE (ARABLE LAND) GREY ZONE (CONNECTIONS) GREEN ZONE (PRESERVATION)

Elsalma Center

RRIDOR

Stanford Hill

CO NN

Mueller Center Campus

ECT IVE COR RID OR

CONNECTIVE CO

CON NE C

TIV E

CO RR ID O R

CO

E C T IV NNE

IDO CORR

R

Elizabeth Meadows

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Green Zone The following recommendations will protect the health of the site ecosystem and waterways. PRESERVE FOREST

Eden Hall Campus’ existing deciduous and coniferous forest represents a valuable asset to Chatham University and the region. Human settlement in this region has been focused predominantly on agriculture, resulting in a patchwork of the original forest. Preservation of the existing forest in the Breakneck Creek Watershed west of Ridge Road will be of particular importance because it contains the healthiest and largest nucleus of relatively old growth forest on Eden Hall Campus (older than 100 years). This forest is connected to a network of forests extending nearly to the Allegheny River. The campus’ forest is related to the site’s ecosystem services— like water management, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat—and it is a source of the site’s identity, character, and heritage.

Areas of Conifer Thinning

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RESTORE FOREST

The Glade Run Forest east of Ridge Road is younger (largely less than 40 years old) than the Breakneck Creek Forest. It is highly invaded by vines and deer-resistant shrubs and is largely isolated from the region’s network of forest patches. Both the Breakneck Creek and Glade Run Forests have patches of conifers, which were deliberately planted at unhealthy, commercial-grade densities for pulp purposes. These should be thinned and replanted with deciduous trees. The resultant wood from selective thinning may be reused for construction purposes or energy production. MAINTAIN RESTORED FOREST

Maintaining a native forest involves active management. A hands-off, “leave it to nature” approach leaves native forests extremely vulnerable to invasion by weedy exotic plant species that ultimately degrade the ecological and aesthetic quality of the forest and reduce its ability to support site and regional environmental health. Forest management is an iterative, adaptive process, in which stewardship efforts are monitored and assessed in order to compare their relative successes and provide direction for subsequent efforts. The specific details of management activities will change over time. It is critical that Eden Hall Campus maintain continuity of staff and contractors to oversee this process. It is also important to keep an on-going record of management activities to document trends, yearly changes, effective actions, and new concerns. New Planting Areas

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Forest management requires more than replanting desirable species. Actions to reduce negative impacts include: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Further reduction of the deer herd Removal of invasive exotic plant species Reduction of groundhog population Thinning of conifer stands Daylighting portions of stream that have been “tiled”

CREATE WOODLAND CORRIDORS

Creating woodland corridors to breach the watershed divide will create a healthy forest network that will connect previously isolated patches. The Glade Run Forest is currently disconnected from the regional forest network that almost reaches the Allegheny River. These corridors, different in character from forest communities, will create the necessary tree canopy and shelter to encourage wildlife movement and biological communication necessary for healthy ecosystems. The woodland corridors that connect forest habitat across the watershed divide of Ridge Road will serve multiple purposes. They will create a sequence of spaces or ‘rooms’ in the campus landscape along Ridge Road. These woodlands would not include the understory typically found in forest plant communities. Low-growing species will make up the majority of the groundcover, and the trees will be planted in a geometric, nursery-like pattern. This will create a rhythm in the woodland landscape that is semi-transparent, ensuring long sight-lines for campus safety and optimized views.

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Woodland connectors will link habitat and create outdoor rooms at ridges.

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ENHANCE AND EXPAND RIPARIAN CORRIDORS AND WETLANDS

Wetlands and riparian corridors represent the most biodiverse plant communities in the region. The Breakneck Creek Forest has the highest land area of wetlands and riparian plant communities because it is less disturbed by agriculture than the Glade Run Forest. The Breakneck Creek Forest’s wetlands can be connected to form a larger wetland and riparian complex. This will expand the reach of their ecosystem services in terms of water quality and habitat value. The bulk of wetland and riparian restoration will occur in the Glade Run Forest. The stream that separates Mueller Center Campus and Elizabeth Meadows is in particular need of restoration efforts, as it will take on the bulk of additional water produced by these two major development zones and become a highly visible and well-travelled forested stream valley.

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Orange Zone Orange zone areas have the best agricultural land. The following recommendations aim to preserve this valuable asset. FOCUS CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT IN PREVIOUSLY DISTURBED AREAS

Development will cluster along Ridge Road in the previously disturbed areas. Currently, this part of the campus houses the Eden Hall Barn, Lodge and other facilities, and it makes up much of the site’s iconic rural character. While there are several fields under cultivation, much of this part of the campus consists of lawn and meadow. The primary campus core should develop in these areas with later phases of development occurring on Stanford Hill, Elizabeth Meadows, and Elsalma Center. CLUSTER DEVELOPMENT ALONG EXISTING ROADS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

New development will require a significant amount of infrastructure such as water, gas, electrical, and communication utilities. Ridge Road and Glasgow Road already tie into available infrastructure. Tight clusters of buildings along these corridors will enable service by a single utility spur from the existing infrastructure. This strategy will minimize the cost for new infrastructure.

RAINWATER CAPTURE The utilization of rainwater captured from buildings will enable the campus to reduce its use of valuable potable water. This clean water source may be reused for campus landscape, agriculture irrigation, and toilets. This illustration demonstrates that capturing the 1-year/24-hour storm in cisterns can water nearly all of campus lawns once each week.

CAPITALIZE ON THE HERITAGE AND IDENTITY OF EDEN HALL FARM

The historic core of Eden Hall Campus also lies along Ridge Road. The Lodge, existing residential structures, and the barn represent opportunities for adaptive reuse. Recycling these buildings will incur a lower environmental cost than that of demolition and new construction. This strategy will retain structural footprints and maintains the cultural heritage of the place.

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ALTERNATIVES TO LAWN Left to Right: Meadow, Greensward, Groundcover (shade dependent)

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MANAGE AGRICULTURAL SOILS AS A NON-RENEWABLE RESOURCE

CREATE AND ENHANCE MEADOWS

The United States Department of Agriculture’s National Resource Conservation Service identifies the vast majority of developable land on Eden Hall Campus as either prime agricultural soils or agricultural soils of statewide importance. The American Farmland Trust ranks Pennsylvania as sixth in the amount of prime farmland lost to development. As an environmental steward to the region, as well as for the maintenance of the site’s agricultural heritage, Eden Hall Campus has a crucial responsibility to conserve these soils.

Meadows represent a significant opportunity to meet the goals of the orange zone restoration. This sturdy ecosystem is historic to the site and low-maintenance to manage over time. Meadows provide a number of ecosystem services including wastewater treatment, wildlife habitat, and a seed bank. Meadows also produce less stormwater runoff than lawns and hardscapes due to their surface roughness and capacity for transpiration. New meadows take several growing seasons to come to full maturity but are well worth the wait. Meadows will create an aesthetically pleasing foreground to the campus’ developed precincts.

MAINTAIN PRE-DEVELOPMENT HYDROLOGICAL CONDITIONS

A healthy site hydrology emphasizes rainwater as a resource by harvesting runoff for reuse, letting it soak into the ground, or detaining water for transpiration by plants. Eden Hall Campus lies at the top of the Breakneck Creek and Glade Run Watersheds, as well as the larger Connoquenessing Subbasin. This campus is a significant source of clean water for the impaired waterways downstream. Green roofs, porous pavements, rainwater harvesting systems, rain gardens, and the strategic conversion of lawn to alternate planting types will reduce the burden on down-stream waterways. Water management practices, including wastewater management, should emphasize infiltration over detention and other mechanized means of management. These techniques will aid in maintaining pre-development base flow and preserve water quality for submerged, emergent, and riparian habitats.

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Grey Zone The grey zone indicates future development and campus growth. Although the zone does not provide the simplest condition for construction (slopes range from five to fifteen percent), it is the area that is least critical to ecosystem preservation and will allow for a learning and living environment that is at once in the forest and connected to the agricultural land. BALANCE ARABLE LAND AND SLOPE CONSTRAINTS “ONE FOOT IN THE HIGHLAND AND ONE IN THE FOREST�

A number of conflicts emerge when considering where to place buildings. Agricultural soils are a non-renewable resource; steep slopes are not ideal for construction; and the plan aims to preserve forestlands. These conflicts present a unique opportunity in that buildings can be placed in the grey zone between the green and orange zones. Structures in the grey zone will lie at the edges of both the forest and the highland and will provide campus residents the opportunity to experience both environments in their daily lives. FOCUS CAMPUS DEVELOPMENT ON SOILS SUITABLE FOR WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Eden Hall Campus is planned to employ natural systems to treat wastewater. These systems use a settling tank to filter solid waste, and then they treat the greywater with constructed wetlands and sand filters. Where possible, the systems will be gravity-driven. Wastewater will flow out of buildings, into constructed wetlands, and out to drip areas at meadows or forest restoration areas.

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DRIP ZONES Drip zones, highlighted in green, are wastewater disposal sites. They are to be implemented in meadows and reforestation areas where potential human contact and earth moving disturbance is minimal.

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AVOID DEVELOPMENT ON SLOPES AND AREAS SUSCEPTIBLE TO LANDSLIDES

UNCOVER WASTEWATER AND STORMWATER SYSTEMS AND INCORPORATE

Eden Hall Campus has a significant amount of shallow slope land area ideal for development and construction. Along the steeper slopes, the preliminary geotechnical report indicates that redbeds—geological zones with weak clays—underlie the loamy soil material and are susceptible to landslides. Buildings in this zone incorporate design strategies that address redbed geology.

THEM WITHIN THE CIVIC SPACE OF THE CAMPUS

The living systems used to treat wastewater consist of settling tanks for primary treatment, constructed wetlands, sand filters, and disinfection/ filtration systems for reuse applications. Often, these systems are kept below ground and are largely unknown to those that use them on a daily basis. This disconnects us from our environment and disguises our impact on the natural environment. Eden Hall Campus will integrate these infrastructure elements within the civic space of the campus as a teaching tool and to raise awareness of the relationship between our behavior and the health of our environment.

MAXIMIZE THE USE OF ON-SITE MATERIALS FOR CONSTRUCTION

The conifer stands in the Breakneck Creek and Glade Run Forests should be thinned for ecological purposes. This resource can provide sustainable and low cost construction materials for new structures. Employing this strategy will lower the carbon footprint of campus construction by reducing the need to transport material from offsite sources. Waste recycling and on-site reuse will create a selfsufficient campus, help meet camps sustainability goals, and lower the environmental impact of development.

INTEGRATE FOOD AND ENERGY SYSTEMS WITH CAMPUS LIFE

Similar to the proposed wastewater systems, Eden Hall Campus will integrate food and energy systems within public spaces and into daily activities of campus life. Every residential area within the campus will include land designated for community-led cultivation. Community gardens will be interwoven into the campus experience and will enable students to grow their own food, furthering the understanding of the connections we share with our environment. Photovoltaic solar panels will also be part of the campus experience, both on building rooftops and as a canopy over southern facing portions of parking lots.

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Agricultural Calendar vs. Traditional Academic Calendar

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Agricultural Calendar vs. Traditional Academic Calendar Early in the master planning effort, the core needs of a truly selfsufficient campus with a focus on sustainable agriculture were considered. It was determined that the basic limits on a self-sufficient population with agricultural capacities were primarily energy, food, water, and the labor needed to grow and harvest food. It was assumed that students would need to live on campus in the growing seasons to grow all or a portion of their own food while also attending traditional classes. It was found that timing academics along with agricultural needs has a number of advantages: 1. The growing season runs opposite to the heating season, thereby reducing campus energy needs. 2. The growing season coincides with longer days (daylight greater than 12-hours/day), further reducing campus energy needs; 3. Running a residential campus during the growing season allows a campus to maximize its consumption of locally grown fresh produce and other agricultural products, thereby reducing the need for importing the same at greater cost. 4. The growing season runs opposite to winter snow falls, nearly eliminating the need for costly and environmentally damaging snow plowing and salting of campus parking lots, pathways, etc.

The graphic called Agricultural Calendar illustrates and supposes that there could be several different student populations on an agricultural campus: a group of traditional students attending classes in the typical semester cycle, and a group of farm and agriculture students who are on campus during and between spring and fall semesters. The second graphic called Agriculture Energy Calendar is located in the Technical Reports and shows how the same populations could utilize biofuels and solar power to counter their peak demands in spring and fall. This graphic also shows how energy consumption is reduced in the middle of the growing season as heating and lighting energy demands more closely approximate what the climate provides. The campus is then closed from December to January (some of the coldest months of the year) when the needs for energy and imported food are highest.

It’s important to note that our current academic calendar is in direct response to the demands of the growing season; just fifty years ago, students could go to school only after farm work was completed at home. Of course, this is no longer the case for most modern students. The nation’s renewed interest in ecologically sensitive agriculture and food security is creating a marketplace that could re-adjust old conventions of the semester system to current and future needs.

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06. Built Environment Built Environmental Goals Existing Facilities Design Concepts Campus Overview Campus Entrance Mueller Center Campus Stanford Hill Elsalma Center Elizabeth Meadows Thoreau Cottages Transportation Views Materials Water Systems Energy Systems Building Energy Use and Performance Targets Environmental Performance Guidelines

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BUILT ENVIRONMENT GOALS

Community goals, academic goals, and the vision for the natural environment play a fundamental role in the design of the new Eden Hall Campus. It is this deep understanding of pedagogy, community, and ecology that will enable the campus to function sustainably. The built environment encompasses the buildings and constructed systems on Eden Hall Campus. This chapter summarizes the existing facilities on Eden Hall Campus, the design of the new campus, transportation systems, water, infrastructure, building materials, and performance on Eden Hall Campus.

Design a flexible and inspiring learning environment Learning is not confined to the classroom. Eden Hall Campus will provide flexible communal spaces, coordinated with building circulation, to maximize formal and informal learning.

Use state-of-theart sustainable building solutions Eden Hall Campus will use sustainable development practices to construct a campus that aims to restore the environment.

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Repurpose existing facilities

Provide abundant campus amenities

The plan repurposes existing facilities when possible to preserve Eden Hall Campus’ heritage and reduce the environmental impact of construction.

The campus design will provide for the needs of the students, faculty, and staff who use and reside at Eden Hall Campus.

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Existing Mueller House at Proposed Mueller Center Campus REVISED 05/03/2011

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EXISTING FACILITIES

1. Lodge 2. Mueller House 3. Garage 4. Horse Barns 5. Dairy Barn 6. Storage Building

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Existing facilities at Eden Hall Campus will accommodate most of the initial program requirements including student housing, classrooms, meeting rooms, dining facilities, and common areas. This plan analyzes the existing facilities to determine their current condition and reuse potential. A detailed report is located within the Technical Reports companion document.

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Top: The Mueller House is in remarkable condition for its age. Bottom: The main barn is one of the distinctive buildings on Eden Hall Campus.

Top and Bottom: The Lodge, constructed in 1951, is in good condition and includes recreation amenities and large common areas.

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DESIGN CONCEPTS

A primary design objective is to create a flexible and inspiring environment that allows for new modes of teaching, learning, researching, and living. The campus will promote an immersive, communal sense of student life—where studying, working and living are not separate activities in specialized spaces but are spontaneous activities that take place in numerous locations. By widely adopting the design concept of biophilia—an understanding of and connection to the natural systems that exist in nature—the campus will become an interactive learning environment where the landscape and each building serves as a living laboratory.

COMMUNAL LIVING SPACE

Student residences are at the heart of communal life. Each residential building will function as a large house with centralized common spaces including a dining room, kitchen, and lounge spaces. Each will accommodate 22 students, which is an optimal size to mediate the topography, site density restrictions, and residential group density preferences. Though they will be stand-alone structures, the housing buildings will connect via decks and breezeways, Outdoor landscaping and student gardens will enclose and define the residences. LIVING IN THE LANDSCAPE

By interfacing with topography and its natural attributes, the campus is conceived as a series of unique experiences at each precinct: Mueller Center Campus, Stanford Hill, Elizabeth Meadows, Elsalma Center, the Bridge. Students will inhabit the campus by continuously moving through the places and “living in the landscape.” Interpreting the lay of the land and reading into it reveals opportunities to construct and stage programmatic events: an amphitheater in the inflection of the hillside, the narrowing of the ravine to nest the bridge, etc. This further influences the design vision for the buildings themselves, which will be transitional spaces, transparent, and easy to enter; they will depart from multiple points, offer sheltering porches, overhangs, and breezeways, and will be grounded in, and continuous with, the flow of the land.

PRESERVING & REPURPOSING OF EXISTING FACILITIES

To connect the campus to its “place” and enable the possibility of a zero carbon footprint, the campus will preserve and repurpose all viable existing structures, particularly those that embody strong architectural character and are identifiable to the place, such as the Lodge, Mueller House, and the Main Barn. FLEXIBLE & INFORMAL LEARNING SPACE

Principles of flexible use and collective spaces will guide the location, program, and design of the academic buildings. Specialized teaching spaces, such as laboratories, will employ design solutions that provide flexibility to accommodate more general teaching needs. Communal spaces and the circulation between buildings will encourage spontaneous encounters, meetings, and gatherings.

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CAMPUS OVERVIEW

The design for Eden Hall Campus reflects the vision, priorities, goals, and programming needs of Chatham University. It creates a physical framework for a model living and learning environment. The planning team designed Eden Hall Campus as a full-featured, comprehensive campus with a significant outreach component. The design responds to the environmental analysis and emphasizes flexibility, adaptability, and replicability. The plan incorporates the idea of building several academic villages, each consisting of a cluster of small-scale buildings to accommodate programmatic needs. This approach maximizes flexibility, as new buildings may be added by demand. To fulfil this vision, the campus will be built in several phases, explored in the chapter entitled Phasing Plan. Larger facilities will act as a nexus for campus community; these spaces are designed to adapt to changing uses as the campus grows and spatial needs evolve. The design incorporates renewable energy generation, high performance buildings, and a natural approach to wastewater treatment. The information gathered from Chatham’s research programs will allow other developments to replicate Eden Hall Campus’ cutting edge systems. Campus Precincts Eden Hall Campus is organized into campus precincts. The Mueller Center Campus and Stanford Hill precincts will make up the academic core of the campus. The Elsalma Center will serve as a multi-use district focusing on public and global outreach. Faculty housing and the main campus parking lot will be located in Elizabeth Meadows. The Thoreau Cottages will give students and others immersive access to nature and solitude.

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Elsalma Center

Mueller Center Campus

Thoreau Cottages

Stanford Hill

Elizabeth Meadows

Proposed Campus Precincts

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CAMPUS ENTRANCE

Ridge Road bisects the campus and Chatham may pursue privatizing the road in the future. Currently, as one enters the campus on Ridge Road, the eye is drawn out to farmlands, forest, and valleys. The view is punctuated with a stately house, the EcoCenter, and open grassy fields. The design for Ridge Road keeps this experience intact. Clusters of orchard trees will line the road. Buildings will sit well away from the road and peak above the ridges, providing views into the valleys. Driving down Ridge Road evokes a compartmentalized experience. Corridors of woodland provide a green backdrop and create three distinct thresholds, or “rooms,” at the Lodge, the Barn, and the intersection with Glasgow Road. The connective corridors enhance the ecological value of Eden Hall Campus and will diminish the visual impact of development. Each “room” along Ridge Road will contain speed tables to slow vehicular traffic. These speed tables will be located at turn-offs to major buildings, will take the form of elevated pavement installations, and will be specially marked to provide safe pedestrian crossing zones.

Proposed Entry Sequence Along Ridge Road

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Proposed Site Plan - All Phases

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MUELLER CENTER CAMPUS

The Mueller Center Campus will serve as a prominent public face for Eden Hall Campus. This portion of the site is an ideal place to begin campus development, with its central location, accessibility, infrastructure, and existing iconic structures. This area also encompasses the landscape that has been most impacted by human development and requires the most significant natural habitat restoration. The Lodge and Mueller House dominate the southern “room” along Ridge Road. These structures will retain their eastern view over the meadow and woods. Across Ridge Road is an open field that will accommodate large outdoor events. The EcoCenter distinguishes the central “room” and will mark the entrance to the heart of Mueller Center Campus. Research fields, largely agricultural in nature, will dominate the view on either side of Ridge Road. The campus center will include new buildings for academics, commons, and student residences all of which will be designed as prototypes that will inform future development phases. The EcoCenter and academic buildings will form an outdoor “academic quad” to accommodate campus gatherings, both formal and informal. The outdoor space drops gently south down the ridge where

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

a procession of residence halls will mingle with woodland thresholds. The woodlands will divide the ridge and the residence halls into groups and reduce the visual impact of development. Between the woodlands, open lawn spaces will provide outdoor environments where students can relax, study, and grow their own food in marked plots. Cisterns from the residence halls will irrigate these plots and lawns. Tucked into the hillsides, residence halls will blend into the landscape. Some of the residence halls will overlook a series of constructed wetlands and provide visual connection to the sustainable technologies on the site. One of these series of constructed wetlands will discharge its overflow through a sand filter that will then trickle down a set of runnels through an amphitheater. Further down the valley, stormwater and constructed wetland discharge will collect at a pond that will provide irrigation water in drought conditions, regulate stormwater discharge into Glade Run, and provide a wetland amenity to campus trail users. North of the EcoCenter, a second set of student residence buildings will partially nest into the hillside and feature green roofs. This strategy will preserve important scenic views.

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Conceptual Design Sketches - Housing

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

The Mueller Center Campus is named for the Mueller family, the original owners of Eden Hall Farm.

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1. ECOCENTER The EcoCenter will reuse the iconic barn structures and serve as the anchor for the Mueller Center Campus. The EcoCenter will house assembly space, dining space, a kitchen, a cafĂŠ, a bookstore/trading post, public restrooms, a student health center, an information center, and an equipment checkout facility.

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2. GREENHOUSE

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The greenhouse will be located near the food studies facilities, laboratories, and classrooms.

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3. ACADEMIC BUILDINGS These buildings will provide laboratory and studio space to aid research occurring outdoors on the site, flexible classroom spaces for a variety of class sizes, and office space for faculty and staff.

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4. COMMONS BUILDING

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The commons building will house the dining hall in addition to group study rooms, lounge space, and roof top gathering space. It will also serve as the connection point for the bridge leading to Stanford Hill, promoting pedestrian flow between the two major campus districts.

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5. RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS Each building will have a small population and a central commons space. Students will

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have access to the outdoors through decks, roof terraces, and patios.

6. AMPHITHEATER

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The amphitheater will host performances, class meetings, and impromptu events.

7. CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS A series of wetlands constructed for each phase of development for the wastewater

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treatment process.

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8. LODGE The renovated Lodge will provide additional housing, guest rooms, and meeting space. 9. MUELLER HOUSE

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The lower level of this house will be suitable to accommodate social events and meetings. The upper levels may serve as guest rooms or additional office space and meeting space during the first phases of development.

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10.SPORTS COMPLEX The sports complex will provide students with a variety of athletic and fitness options. Indoor amenities will include a basketball court, natatorium, weight and aerobic rooms, track, and lockers. The building will also be designed to include a large space for gatherings and commencements. Outdoor competition soccer and field hockey fields and tennis courts will lie adjacent to the sports facility.

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11. STUDIO ARTS BUILDING The existing storage building will provide studio space and gathering space.

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12. FACILITIES MAINTENANCE Proposed Mueller Center Campus Plan REVISED 05/03/2011

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Conceptual Rendering of Proposed Residence Halls (North of EcoCenter) REVISED 05/03/2011

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STANFORD HILL

Stanford Hill is a 22-acre promontory on the campus, offering views of the Glade Run valley and its patchwork of forest and farmland beyond. The entrance, off Glasgow Road, is narrow and set between two forested stream valleys. This stretch of Glasgow Road has many long-time private residences; for this reason, planned development has been shifted to the south. As with Mueller Center Campus, residence halls will be tucked into the hillsides to minimize visual impact and enable the forest to shelter portions of the buildings. The density at the edges will allow for a central commons space that will be divided into lawns for recreation and student agriculture plots. Academic buildings farther south will be located in two east-west rows, each of which will be slightly depressed into the grade, allowing uninterrupted views of the valley from buildings up slope. Meadows and constructed wetlands will provide foreground to the Glade Run Forest views. PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE

As the campus expands from Mueller Center Campus to incorporate Stanford Hill, direct pedestrian access across Glade Run Valley and Stream will become a critical design element. The design, implementation, and use of this bridge must incorporate sensitive strategies to integrate with the regenerating ecosystems in the valley. Once established, this bridge will become an iconic symbol of Eden Hall Campus. EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Top: Conceptual Design Sketches of Academic and Residence Halls Bottom: View of Proposed Pedestrian Bridge from EcoCenter Looking Towards Stanford Hill REVISED 05/03/2011

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1. COMMONS BUILDINGS

The commons building will house the dining hall in addition to group study rooms, lounge space, and roof top gathering space. It will also serve as the connection point for the bridge leading to Stanford Hill, promoting pedestrian flow between the two major campus districts.

2. ACADEMIC BUILDINGS These buildings will provide laboratory and studio space to aid research occurring outdoors on the site, flexible classroom spaces for a variety of class sizes, and office space for faculty and staff.

3. RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS

Each building will have a small population and a central commons space. Students will have access to the outdoors through decks, roof terraces and patios.

4. AMPHITHEATER

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Larger than that of the Mueller Center Campus, the Stanford Hill amphitheater will provide a venue for larger shows and performances.

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5. CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS The series of wetlands constructed for each phase of development for the wastewater treatment process.

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WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Stanford Hill is named for Sebastian Mueller’s son, Stanford Leland Mueller.

Proposed Stanford Hill Plan REVISED 05/03/2011

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ELSALMA CENTER

WHAT’S IN A NAME?

The Elsalma Lodge was the first residence hall built on Eden Hill Farm for visiting women from the Heinz Company. Elsalma is an amalgamation of Elsa and Alma, the names of Sebastian Mueller’s twin daughters.

Engaging a global public through communication of ideas and technology is central to the mission of Chatham’s Eden Hall Campus and the Rachel Carson Institute. Elsalma Center will become the designated site where students, faculty, agro-tourists, and the general public can experience sustainable agriculture, seasonal farm markets, a dining facility featuring locally harvested foods, and artisans at work.

Visitors will enter through the orchard and observe more than 20 acres of actively farmed land before reaching a central parking lot. The parking lot itself will double as market space or work space for the adjacent portable agricultural structures (high-tunnels). As with the rest of Eden Hall Campus, it will be important for visitors to park their cars and experience the campus on foot to reach a destination.

Elsalma Center will be situated near the intersections of Glasgow, Ridge, and State roads. Fronted by orchards, the building complex will be modeled after a working farm with tightly clustered barns, stables, workshops, studios, and greenhouses. The buildings will enclose a paved space for outdoor markets, field and farm work, performances, and dining.

University meetings at Elsalma Center will occur in the general purpose buildings (#1 opposite). Guests can spend the night in one of two guest houses situated in the orchard and in the gardens. At the southern tip of Elsalma Center, a small venue will accommodate intimate gatherings such as dinners. From the building, located at the edge of farmland, the view into the mature Breakneck Forest will afford a secluded, safe, and sacred place.

Blue Hill at Stone Barns, Pocantico Hills, New York

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1. UNIVERSITY MEETING CENTER, DINING FACILITY, TEACHING KITCHEN, CLASSROOMS, STUDIOS, WORKSHOPS, AND SUPPORT BUILDINGS 2. ORCHARD AND GUEST FACILITY 3. GUEST FACILITY 4. AQUAPONICS AND LIVING MACHINE

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5. BUNKHOUSE AND COMMON BUILDING

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6. WELLNESS CENTER

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7. PASTURE 8. HIGH TUNNELS, GREENHOUSES, AND MARKET

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9. ACADEMIC BUILDING

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10. ANIMAL BARN AND EQUIPMENT STORAGE

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Reference Image of Aquaponics Facility

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ELIZABETH MEADOWS

REFERENCE IMAGES Top Left: Vegetated Swale Between Parking Bays Top Right and Bottom: Vegetated Visual Screening at Parking

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1. TOWNHOUSES 2. CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS 3. GENERAL PARKING 4. CLUBHOUSE

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Elizabeth Meadows will be situated on a 14-acre swath of land along the southern parcel boundary; this area will serve as the main parking area for the Mueller Center Campus. Double-loaded parking lots will be tucked into the hillsides to screen them from neighbors along Kim Lane. A wide swath of conifers and deciduous trees will further screen parking from neighbors.

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This relatively remote area of the campus provides an ideal setting for townhomes dedicated to faculty, staff, and married students with families. The clubhouse may include accommodations for childcare, and the location will offer privacy and enable a walkable commute to the central campus.

Enlarged Plan of Proposed Townhouse Community at Elizabeth Meadows

2 WHAT’S IN A NAME?

Elizabeth Meadows is named for Elizabeth Heinz Mueller, Sebastian Mueller’s wife and the sister of Heinz Company founder, H.J. Heinz.

3 Proposed Elizabeth Meadows Plan

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THOREAU COTTAGES

Thoreau Cottages will extend down the ridge line from the existing Storage Building. Envisioned as simple, beautiful structures, these cottages will be the only new construction proposed in the Breakneck Forest. Here, writers, artists, and others may find seclusion in nature. Positioning these structures in the site’s most established habitat will require sensitive methods and means during construction and throughout ongoing operation. The Storage Building will be converted to a Studio Arts Building that will include studio space and an area for group gatherings. Similar to campus buildings, these structures are planned to utilize renewable energy sources and natural wastewater treatment methods. Human habitation in this area will add to the quality of place and the rejuvenation of the land.

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Reference Images for Thoreau Cottages

Proposed Thoreau Cottages Plan

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TRANSPORTATION

realignment at Bakerstown Road and State Road/Grubbs Road. These two improvements are already planned in Richland Township’s capital improvement plan.

Eden Hall Campus strives to be a climate positive community. Transportation, both within the campus and between the Shadyside Campus and Eden Hall Campus, plays an important role in achieving this goal.

SITE CIRCULATION

A campus-wide trail system will connect the major campus districts and accommodate convenient pedestrian and bicycle movement. Students and faculty will be able to traverse the central campus within five minutes and the entire campus in 10-15 minutes. Major trails will be lit to allow safe travel after dark.

As the campus develops over time, the need for transit options to and from Pittsburgh will increase. While shuttles are the most likely short-term solution, longer-term plans for commuter rail, expanded bus service, and car sharing programs are potential options that offer far more efficient solutions than single-occupancy vehicles. Commuter rail operations could be implemented along the rail line, which is situated less than one-half mile west of campus. This line originates in Pittsburgh, 18 miles to the south, and connects to the Allegheny Valley Railroad.

Trail networks will follow old horse trails and logging roads. The trail system will efficiently connect campus precincts and link each of the meadows to create a varied and interesting sequence of experiences. All trails will be designed to accommodate all-terrain vehicles, enabling services to or evacuation of an injured person.

Eden Hall Campus has limited vehicular access. The intent is for visitors and the campus community to leave their cars at the perimeter and experience the site by foot, bicycle, or via a campus-wide shuttle system. ADA accessible parking will be located in all districts. TRAFFIC IMPACT STUDY / RIDGE ROAD

A traffic impact study concluded that Eden Hall Campus at full capacity will have minimal impact on the surrounding road network if appropriate mitigation is provided. The study also projected the vehicle trip generation if the property became a residential development, and it was found that the residential development would exceed the vehicle trip generation associated with Eden Hall Campus. The study recommends that a traffic signal be installed at Bakerstown Road and Ridge Road as it becomes necessary. The study assumed that the township will install a traffic signal at Bakerstown Road and Valenica Road/Hillcrest Drive at some point in campus development. Chatham may also assist the Township in adding a traffic signal and minor

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Campus Shuttle

D

Bike Lane

6’

Paved Trail (ADA compliant)

6’-16’

Paved Trail

6’-16’

Hiking Trail

2’-8’

Pedestrian Plaza

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WALKING TIMES A - B = 10.5 min A - C = 11.5 min B - C = 4.4 min C - D = 13 min

Diagram of Proposed Pedestrian and Shuttle Circulation

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PARKING TOTALS Elsalma Center 111 Mueller Center Campus 208 Stanford Hill 182 Elizabeth Meadows 447 Water Tower 161 1109 stalls

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Elsalma Road Parking 45 Stalls Elsalma Lots 66 Stalls

Secondary Emergency Access Water Tower Lots 111 stalls

Roadway

24’-32’

Service Access / Paved Trail

8’-16’

Parking Lot

Ridge Road Lot 50 stalls

Stanford Hill North Lots 50 stalls

Mueller Campus ADA Lot 15 stalls (ADA)

Stanford Hill Lay-Bys 10 stalls (ADA) Stanford Hill ADA Lot 12 stalls (ADA)

Stanford Hill South Lots 110 stalls

Lodge Lot 24 stalls

Mueller Campus Lay-Bys 8 stalls (ADA)

Elizabeth Meadows Lots 447 stalls

Diagram of Proposed Car and Service Vehicle Circulation REVISED 05/03/2011

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VIEWS

Framing the beauty of the land, countless commanding views permeate Eden Hall Campus, both within the site and beyond. The plan will protect and enhance existing views, construct new views through landscape restoration efforts, and integrate views into the built environment. Designing buildings with views in mind will underline the importance of sight lines that might otherwise be overlooked. By capitalizing on preserved and constructed views, Eden Hall Campus will connect students and faculty to the environment at every opportunity, enabling a truly immersive learning and teaching experience.

Existing Views at Eden Hall Campus

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Diagram of Existing View Corridors at Eden Hall Campus

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MATERIALS

Building materials on Eden Hall Campus will factor heavily into the pursuit of a climate positive campus. Each material will be selected based on performance ratings, durability, aesthetic quality, and environmental impact. Wood and stone are of historic precedent in this region as native building materials and will be sustainably incorporated into building construction and finishing. Eden Hall Campus has a unique opportunity to upcycle and repurpose waste materials from the proposed campus development and forest restoration strategies. Upcycling is the practice of taking something that is disposable and transforming it into something of greater use and value. Timber that otherwise would be dumped in a landfill or made into firewood or mulch will be reinvented to create finished wood products such as flooring, millwork, and furniture. In instances where maintenance severity prevents the sustainable use of site-harvested, upcycled materials, such as building facades, alternative materials of comparable ecological impact value will be used. Cement fiber boards are a low-maintenance, sustainable finish product offering unlimited expressive potential; this product is recommended as a primary building facade material. The combination of material selection and systems in which these materials are used will increase building performance and longevity and provide the most sustainable options for Eden Hall Campus. Metal roofs, for example, are recommended due to their longevity, ability to effectively channel rainwater, and compatibility with integrated photovoltaic panels. Some buildings will also incorporate green roofs, adding beauty and environmental benefits. In order to maximize the collection and reuse of rainwater, Eden Hall Campus buildings should use green roofs sparingly and only when the roof area will be inhabited.

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Top: Cement Fiber Board Bottom: Reused Wood Block Flooring

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Top: Wood siding and stone at Merriam Visitor Center, Merriam, Kansas; Bottom: Metal roof at Camp Naish Boy Scout Camp, Bonner Springs, Kansas

Top: Photovoltaic (solar) array at Omega Center for Sustainable Living, Rhinebeck, New York; Bottom: Glass and wood at Fort Osage Visitor Interpretive Center, Sibley, Missouri

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Top: Green roof and skylights at California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, California; Bottom: Recycled-content plastic lumber sunscreen at Lewis & Clark State Office Building, Jefferson City, Missouri

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WATER SYSTEMS

Water and waste infrastructure are important educational components of Eden Hall Campus. While integrating biophilic water management systems into the built environment will certainly add interest and beauty, this strategy will also expose students, faculty, and visitors to the impacts that our behavior and technology have on the environment. Layering the proposed water systems to serve multiple functions, Eden Hall Campus will far exceed conventional approaches of maintaining “water supply” and “waste disposal” networks. Wastewater treatment, greywater treatment, rainwater harvesting, effluent reuse, effluent dispersal, and nutrient cycling are all components of the proposed infrastructure at Eden Hall Campus.

Rainwater Harvesting Rainwater harvesting can provide non-potable water for irrigation and mechanical systems. Potable water can be produced from rainwater using additional filters and disinfection technology.

Infrastructure must function well at all scales, from small start-up levels to the fully-developed campus level. The goal is to provide a flexible and adaptable framework that grows with the campus community and adapts to meet changing demands. Eden Hall Campus has the potential to use a natural systems approach and a modular, phased, and decentralized concept for water and waste cycling.

Water treatment systems are planned to be dispersed throughout the campus and installed in accordance with phased development at the site. Instead of taking water and waste “away,” these systems will enable residents to have daily interaction with an important natural system. The water systems are physically modeled after forest floor, meadow, wetland, and pond edge habitats. These ecological zones will be incorporated into the proposed technological solutions for managing campus water and waste. Faculty, students and visitors will discover engaging lessons within these water systems and are encouraged to visit, explore, and advance these concepts found at Eden Hall Campus.

Natural Treatment Systems Natural treatment systems, including constructed wetlands and sand filtration, can provide greywater and blackwater treatment. Effluent could be recycled for irrigation and groundwater recharge, and integrated treatment systems would provide beauty, open space, wildlife habitat, and living classrooms.

Composting Toilets Utilizing composting toilets throughout the campus will reduce water consumption for human waste management by more than fifty to sixty percent over conventional systems. Not only will this greatly reduce the need for wastewater management, but it will maximize the potential recycling of nutrients from human waste through a safe, reliable, and efficient composting process. The end result will be ecologically-rich soil, nutrient-rich compost and “compost tea” for enriching soils on campus.

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Primary Treatment

Constructed Wetlands

Sand Filter

Dispersal Field

PROPOSED ON-SITE NATURAL TREATMENT SYSTEM This example of an on-site natural treatment system demonstrates a process that produces effluent suitable for subsurface drip irrigation.

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ENERGY SYSTEMS

Striving to be a climate positive campus, Eden Hall aims to meet all energy needs through efficient building and systems designs and on-site energy generation using a cost-effective, replicable approach. The development of Eden Hall Campus provides an opportunity to demonstrate the best emerging technologies for efficiency and renewable energy. With these goals in place, the planning team analyzed electricity and heating needs for each development phase and determined the potential to meet these needs with renewable energy. Electrical energy needs come from plug, lighting, fan, and other loads served by electricity alone. Heating loads are those that can be served by any heat source such as geothermal, solar, biomass, gas, or even groundsource heat pumps. The following pages outline options for renewable energy sources that could be integrated into buildings and landscapes. Each option was evaluated based on a range of criteria including cost effectiveness, maturity of technology, energy needs, and green house gas emissions. PROJECTED ENERGY USE IN KWH Projected energy use is based on gross square feet of building spaces, assuming that building designs achieves the performance target of 20,000 Btu per square foot per year. In order to achieve zero carbon, an aggressive goal of 20 kBtu/sf/yr for building performance (compared to the regional average of 168 kBtu/sf/yr for a typical building) was established.

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Renewable Energy Sources SOLAR POWER

Solar power could provide 100% of Eden Hall’s electricity needs and meets all evaluation criteria. The following chart summarizes the amount of photovoltaics (PV) required, suitable space needs for PV panels, and anticipated costs of building the solar energy panels. The planning team determined that solar panels are economically as well as physically feasible. The completed campus will require 188,430 square feet of PV panels and will have 203,440 square feet of south facing roof area. PV panels will save the University $565,291 per year on energy costs. It is estimated that the installation would cost $11,260,442*, resulting in a 5% Simple Return on Investment (ROI) for the project. The above ROI is based on current costs and, as such, will change over time as the site is developed. The cost of PV panels is decreasing each month, while the cost of electrical power is expected to rise over time; for these reasons, the ROI referenced above is conservative. If power costs rise from $0.12 to $0.16 per kWh over the next few years, the revised ROI would increase from 5% to 6.7%.

Square Feet of PV

PV Energy Study

* The cost estimates above do not include financial credits gained by avoiding the purchase of conventional boilers and chillers sized to serve higher loads. The costs and ROI referenced above are intended to provide typical unit cost and do not represent a comprehensive cost/benefit analysis, which requires more design development.

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WIND POWER

Initial studies indicate that Eden Hall Campus does not have sufficient wind resources to support wind power generation. Wind Velocities are not adequate to make large scale wind power feasible. Eden Hall Campus experiences average wind velocities of 11 to 12 mph; therefore, use of highly efficient, small, quiet, residentially-sized technology may be appropriate.

GEOTHERMAL

Geothermal energy systems capture heat from deep beneath the earth’s surface and use it to produce electricity and heat. Geothermal energy requires temperatures over 170F. Experience from wells in similar conditions suggests that a geothermal well on Eden Hall Campus will need to reach a depth of 8,000 to 10,000 feet. The cost of a 10,000 foot deep well is approximately four to five million dollars depending on well design.* Assuming an electrical cost of $0.12, the well would offset $63,072 of electrical energy costs per year and $395,704 of heating energy per year. At this rate, it will take 13 years to recover the well and generator costs. (Simple ROI = 7.6%). This is a risky option, as there have been no geothermal projects of this scale attempted in the state. There are also considerable maintenance and operation costs associated with generating heat and electricity in this manner.

* The cost estimates above do not include financial credits gained by avoiding the purchase of conventional boilers and chillers sized to serve higher loads. The costs and ROI referenced above are intended to provide typical unit cost and do not represent a comprehensive cost/benefit analysis, which requires more design development.

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An alternative option is to drill a gas well to produce shale gas. After 10 years of gas production, the well could still be used for geothermal energy if the developer considers this option in the initial design. The well would initially need to be sized to accommodate fluid piping and specified to use only non-toxic gel as the fracturing fluid in lieu of conventional fluids containing toxic compounds.

BIOMASS FUELS

Biomass can be pelletized and burned to produce heat directly, or it can be used to drive an organic Rankine cycle generator. Generally, when biomass is burned, green house gas emissions are released, which was a consideration in the analysis of renewable energy options. Growing switch grass on Eden Hall Campus was considered; however, in that scenario, all arable land on campus would have to be planted with switch grass—an undesirable option. Another consideration was to purchase switch grass pellets from a nearby source; however, this would result in an off-site energy resource.

EARTH TUBE AIR TEMPERING

Earth tube air tempering works by bringing air from below ground, where air remains a constant temperature of 55F, and using it to reduce cooling load in the summer and heating load in the winter.

Emerging technologies using biomass to generate synthesis gas and biochar have been found to result in little or no green house gas emission. The synthesis gas from this process could fire a fuel cell system, such as the Bloom Energy system being tested at Google, Ebay, and other California sites. The key to keeping these systems renewable involves collecting continuous, large quantities of organic matter, such as farm waste, garbage, wood chips, or other fibrous organic matter (non fossil fuel). The value of this technology is that it produces enough heat to offset a significant fraction of the heat energy required at Eden Hall Campus, allowing more appropriate use of power from a PV system.

In the winter, heating air requires a significant amount of energy, approximately twenty percent of the total HVAC operating cost. With an earth tube system, the heating load is reduced by sixty-five percent. The air is heated from 55F to 74F degrees instead of from 20F to 74F degrees. In the summer months, the air supplied through the earth tubes can cool the building spaces with 55F supply air. This “free cooling” can offset all or part of a building’s cooling load. For spaces with concentrated cooling loads or for densely populated rooms, some earth-coupled electric heat pumps may be required for de-humidification and comfort cooling. An earth tube system at the Aldo Leopold Legacy Center in Baraboo, Wisconsin has been a success. This system provides valuable data and should be used as a model for designing a system at Eden Hall Campus. Earth tube systems have the least cost and most benefit when combined with an integrated system of energy generation, heat recovery, and building load reduction.

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BUILDING ENERGY USE AND PERFORMANCE TARGETS

The built environment provides the greatest opportunity to reduce Eden Hall Campus’ energy footprint. High performance buildings can reduce the amount of pollutants entering the atmosphere from the electricity generation and the burning of fossil fuels. Reducing energy waste also reduces building operation and construction costs.

Design strategies that enable high performance buildings include: • Careful inventory and use of natural resources • Ground water constant 55-60F temperature • Stable earth temperature below 4’ deep • Solar 6 W per square meter (Avg. 3 kWh/square meter/day) • Wind speed average 5 meters per second (11 mph) • Biomass (pelletized switch grass) • Rainwater • South facing natural slopes • Geothermal well (generate electricity and heat for buildings) • Natural gas (non-renewable, possibly not available without

In addition, energy-efficient buildings are more conducive to increased learning and productivity because they are quieter and have more natural daylight. Research studies confirming the value of natural light include: • US Post Office, Utah: reduction in mail sorting errors by 23% • California middle school standard test scores rose by 21% • Bass Pro Shops sales in daylit spaces are 20% higher than non-daylit

• • • • •

spaces The planning team identified energy efficiency design strategies that apply to Eden Hall Campus Buildings, created energy benchmarks and performance targets, and explored building energy monitoring systems.

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destroying local environment) Reduce building loads before sizing equipment Rightsize equipment to serve expected loads Select HVAC and lighting equipment for best system efficiency Provide controls to turn equipment off when not being used Provide clear feedback to occupants about how they are using energy with real-time information kiosks Commission completed buildings to ensure systems perform as intended

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Energy Benchmarks The right combination of design strategies can radically reduce the energy needs of buildings on Eden Hall Campus. Before establishing performance targets, the planning team identified several energy benchmarks. One metric that is comparable across all buildings and building types is total energy consumption measured in BTUs per square foot per year (Btu/sf/yr). Some benchmark buildings include: • The Eden Hall Lodge Building (Base Line) performed at 77,485 BTU/

sf/yr in 2009. • Albert Joseph Lewis Center for Conservation Studies building at

Oberlin College operated at 30,000 Btu/sf/yr in 2006. • Compaq Computer headquarters office building operated at 66,000 Btu/sf/yr in 1990. • Aldo Leopold Legacy Center performed at 21,000 Btu/sf /yr. in 2008.

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Dynamic computer modeling can compare competing design solutions to better inform the design process.

Performance Targets From these benchmarks, the planning team established performance targets that provide measurable indices for evaluating success. The design goal for Eden Hall Campus buildings performance is as follows:

Monitoring Systems In the end, we get what we measure, or, to quote W. Edward Deming, author of Total Quality Management, “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it.” Benchmarking, measurement, and commissioning will be vital to the long-term success of Eden Hall Campus.

Each building on Eden Hall Campus should use less than 20,000 Btu/sf/yr. The first step in achieving this goal is to optimize building envelope passive solar attributes, including: • Careful use of glazing systems to harvest daylight and winter heat and to reject heat in summer through the use of exterior shading devices and other means • Proper solar orientation of buildings (Case study: a Sacramento subdivision designer was asked to change the layout of the houses for better solar orientation; this change reduced total energy use by twenty-five percent without reducing the number of houses.) • Good insulation and radiant barriers in walls and roofs • Natural ventilation using earth tubes for tempering outside air entering buildings

With the advent of smart metering, many existing and emerging systems could work for monitoring the energy performance of campus buildings. The Energy Detective (TED) is recommended for its ease of use. Technology will continue to evolve during the design phase, and the planning team will continue to explore the most effective options for evaluating building energy efficiency.

Next, the building design should seek to reduce internal loads by: • Recovering heat and cooling potential from processes like cooking, exhaust air, and wastewater • Reducing power density of lighting systems, computer systems, printers and copiers • Using solar water heaters backed up with electric heat pumps to produce domestic hot water • Minimizing the outside air used for ventilation with the use of green walls and other vegetative air filtering

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Regional Average

Regional RegionalAverage Average

168kBTU/sf/yr

168kBTU/sf/yr 168kBTU/sf/yr Regional Average

Regional Average

151 t CO2/yr

Eden Hall Campus

RegionalAverage Average Regional

Eden HallHall Campus Eden Campus

Eden EdenHall HallCampus Campus

20 kBTU/sf/yr

20 20kBTU/sf/yr kBTU/sf/yr

183 t

183 COt2/yr CO2 / year

Eden Hall Campus

Regional Average

Eden Hall Campus Regional Average

18 t CO2/yr

151 t CO2 / year

18 t CO2 / year CURRENT REGIONAL AVERAGES COMPARED WITH PROPOSED EDEN HALL CAMPUS CONDITIONS FOR:

70 t 70 CO2/yr

t CO2 / year Eden Hall Campus

Eden Hall Campus

ZERO CO2/yr

ZERO CO2 / year

Top Left: Energy Usage / Year Top Right: Carbon Footprint of Electricity from Grid Bottom Left: Carbon Footprint of Natural Gas Bottom Right: Carbon Neutral Condition

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ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE GUIDELINES

A framework for natural and constructed systems has been designed throughout Eden Hall Campus for regenerative capacity. This means that they must be flexible and adaptive and their performance and progress must be easily measured. The following is one example framework for measuring progress toward sustainability that will be explored further for Eden Hall Campus. One Planet Living One Planet Living is a system for sustainable community development. BioRegional, an entrepreneurial charity based in South London at the BedZED eco-village, develops the One Planet Living system and has completed successful projects around the world. One Planet Living communities follow ten basic principles: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Zero carbon: making buildings more energy efficient and delivering all energy with renewable technologies Zero waste: reducing waste, reusing where possible and ultimately sending zero waste to landfill Sustainable transport: encouraging low carbon modes of transport to reduce emissions, reducing the need to travel Local and sustainable materials: using sustainable and healthy products, such as those with low embodied energy, sourced locally, make from renewable or waste resources Local and sustainable food: choosing low impact, local, seasonal and organic diets and reducing food waste Sustainable water: using water more efficiently in buildings and in the products we buy; tackling local flooding and water course pollution Natural habitats and wildlife: protecting and restoring existing biodiversity and natural habitats through appropriate land use and integration into the built environment Culture and heritage: reviving local identity and wisdom; supporting and participating in the arts Equity and fair trade: creating bioregional economies that support fair trade employment, inclusive communities and international fair trade Health and happiness: encouraging active, sociable, meaningful lives for good health and well-being

These principles guide the creation of a one planet action plan. The plan includes rigorous sustainability measurement to ensure goals are being met. Every year, Bioregional re-evaluates the development to ensure it is meeting its goals, and updates the action plan. The One Planet Living principles are particularly relevant in the case of Eden Hall Campus. Eden Hall’s environmental goals are compatible with the zero carbon and zero waste principles. The local and sustainable materials and principles for culture and heritage reinforce the existing facility reuse recommendations. Eden Hall Campus’ natural systems goals are similar to the natural habitats and wildlife principles. The zero carbon principles correspond with campus energy goals. The social systems goals are consistent with the health and happiness principles. The One Planet Living framework is one example of an established system for measuring the progress of Eden Hall Campus’ sustainability goals.

(http://www.oneplanetcommunities.org/about-2/ten-principles/the-10-principles/)

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07. Phasing Plan Phasing Plan Immediate - Phase 1 Short Term - Phase 2 Mid Term - Phase 3 Long Term - Phase 4 Cost Model

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120 122 130 134 138 142

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PHASING PLAN

The phasing plan creates the framework to implement the Eden Hall Campus Master Plan.

An important component to phasing sequences involves creating a sense of campus community in each phase. In the early phases, the sense of community will focus in part on the preservation of existing buildings closely associated with a sense of the place and its heritage. In later phases, the communal organization of campus space will become more complex, allowing for differentiation between relatively formal elements like academic and commons buildings and informal elements primarily associated with student residences and wastewater treatment areas.

The phasing plan is a flexible document to facilitate Eden Hall Campus’ incremental growth and development. The following pages outline four phases that will guide the direction of the complete campus development, including buildings, landscape, and hardscape design. In addition to its primary focus on the academic campus facilities at Mueller Center Campus and Stanford Hill, the phasing plan incorporates comprehensive consideration of all campus elements. There are a number of variables that will affect how phasing unfolds over time, including enrollment ranges, curriculum development and fundraising. In particular, the mixed-use Elsalma Center is shown to be built in Phases 1-3; however, the outreach functions of this precinct are not linked to the development of the academic campus and can be phased differently as funding and needs allow.

The campus as a living laboratory is an important concept that will affect overall phasing. Preceding phases will inform future phases, and, depending on lessons learned, the plan or approach will be modified.

Landscape phasing precedes building phasing and prioritizes development and restoration by aligning with the needs and relationship to building development and campus activities. The phasing of landscape is based on the consecutive need for wastewater treatment facilities, provision for teaching facilities and the restorative interventions in the natural environment.

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Conceptual Design Sketches

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IMMEDIATE - PHASE 1 2-3 YRS RESIDENT STUDENT POPULATION = 40-60

The immediate phase includes existing facility renovation/preservation, the construction of academic facilities in the Mueller Center Campus and the Elsalma Center, and intensive landscape restoration.

Major Phase 1 landscape and infrastructure improvements include: • Establishing a central campus landscape at Mueller Center Campus

requires the physical containment of that space. This means that all three ‘connective corridors’ or ‘woodlands’ are established along with speed tables, lighting, trees and swales.

The EcoCenter in the Mueller Center Campus will initially serve primarily academic and university meeting functions. The two barns will be renovated and will serve as anchors for a new building addition that will include classroom space, faculty and administrative offices, and student services. This addition will be designed as a highly flexible facility allowing for adaptable classroom and office spaces that can accommodate other uses in future phases. The Main Barn will be renovated into a Great Hall for student use and meeting needs. The Dairy Barn will be renovated into a kitchen that will serve the EcoCenter and initially function as the Food Studies teaching kitchen. A dining hall will connect the two barn structures and will accommodate campus dinners and meeting functions. The renovated Lodge will serve as guest lodging and will also support meeting needs.

• The farmlands at Elsalma Center can be utilized today. A trail

connecting to it from Mueller Center Campus and an entry road from the east-west portion of Ridge Road is necessary to capitalize on this early programmatic opportunity. A visual buffer is established along Glasgow Road and adjacent to neighboring property where parking and building development will ultimately occur. • A visual buffer to future parking lots along Elizabeth Meadows is planted

so that vegetation is more fully developed when resultant phases require parking there.

Phase 1 will include the construction of two student residence buildings, each housing 22 students. These buildings will be designed and built as prototypes and will inform, evaluate, and optimize the design of student residences in later phases. The main teaching facilities of the Elsalma Center, an Academic Building and Aquaponics facility are also included in this phase. A greenhouse is also planned in both the Elsalma Center and the Mueller Center Campus.

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• Three batteries of constructed wetlands are placed at Mueller Center

Campus, Elsalma Center, and the Lodge with extra capacity to accommodate future needs. • Trail systems through the Breakneck forest connect to restored wetlands.

The Breakneck forest should be opened for outdoor recreation at the earliest opportunity. Modifications and enhancements to existing wetlands in Breakneck Forest will require PADEP permitting and approvals.

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Site Plan of Proposed Phase 1 Areas GREENHOUSE + HOOP HOUSE

CUTTING GARDEN

PARKING

ACADEMIC BUILDING

AQUAPONICS + LIVING MACHINE RETENTION POND

PARKING BUFFER PLANTING

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS PARKING TRAIL SYSTEM

PARKING

GREENHOUSE STUDIO ARTS BUILDING ECOCENTER

RESIDENCE HALLS RENOVATED LODGE & MUELLER HOUSE REPAVED PARKING LOT

AMPHITHEATER

WETLAND RESTORATION CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

CONNECTIVE CORRIDOR + REFORESTATION PARKING BUFFER PLANTING

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PHASE 1 - IMMEDIATE 40-60 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 2-3 YEARS BLDG # BUILDING NAME/TYPE

# BLDGS IN PHASE

GSF

TOTAL GSF NOTES

STORIES

ROOF AREA / BLDG

ROOF TYPE

PV AREA / BLDG

CAMPUS BUILDINGS 1 EcoCenter 1 16,590 Student Commons 4,200 Renovated Main Barn 3,180 Assembly space 1.5 2,700 new metal Renovated Dairy Barn 840 Kitchen 1 900 new metal Connective Construction (between barns) 3,570 Assembly space to accommodate 150 2 2,900 green Commons (north of connective construct.) 9,000 CafĂŠ, offices, classrooms, library, study rooms, high tech conferencing 1 4,320 / 5,560 green / metal 1 Greenhouse 1 600 Plant Growth 1 840 glass (operable vents) 550 (PV Glass) 2 Residence Hall 2 10,500 21,000 Private room with private bath varies 4,500 metal 2,940 3 Amphitheater 1 150 person capacity Subtotal 38,190 EXISTING BUILDINGS 4 Renovated Lodge 1 19,300 Remains Current use, mechanical upgrade 3 9,000 existing shingles 4 Renovated Mueller House 1 6,000 Remains Current use, mechanical upgrade 3 1,999 existing shingles 5 Studio Arts Building 1 3,000 Renovate Storage Building into Studio Space 1 3,100 existing shingles Subtotal 28,300 ELSALMA BUILDINGS 6 Academic Building 1 8,000 5 flexible 30 person classrooms 1 8,000 slate or similar 5,200 7 Aquaponics + Living Machine 1 3,500 Glass Building, all equipment included 1 3,500 glass (operable vents) 2,200 (PV Glass) 8 Greenhouse 1 2,500 1 9 Hoop house 1 4,800 1 Subtotal 18,800 Total 85,290 LANDSCAPE RESTORATION Deciduous Forest Conifer Removal Meadow Woodland Connective Corridors Existing & Proposed Wetlands & Riparian Corridors Buffer Yards at Kim Lane and Water Tower Parking

Area in Acres 14.6 0.0 7.5 11.7 6.9 8.5

41.3

Total

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9

8

Community Student Housing Academic Commons Constructed Wetlands

6

7

5 1

2 3 4

Diagram of Structures Within Proposed Phase 1

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IMMEDIATE PHASE: ECOCENTER

Conceptual Rendering of Proposed EcoCenter including Existing Barns EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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1. Great Hall Balcony 2. Group Study / Banquet Hall 3. Roof Terrace 4. Green Roof 5. PV / Solar Hot Water 6. Outdoor Court 7. Gardens 8. Great Hall 9. Lounge / Cafe Seating / Banquet Space 10. Kitchen / Interim Teaching Kitchen 11. Cafe 12. Trading Post 13. Bookstore / Interim Classroom 14. Public Restrooms 15. Student Health Center / Interim Faculty Offices 16. Student Rec Room 17. Information Center / Interim Classrooms 18. Equipment Checkout

5 4

1

3 2 6 5

7

Upper Floor of Proposed EcoCenter

15 16 17

14

8

18

13 9

11

12 6 10

7

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Immediate Phase: Residential The residential population of Eden Hall Campus will grow into a thriving community immersed in the principles of sustainable living. Prototypical housing for the first phase of development will be a flexible solution to student housing that will stimulate community interaction and collaboration. The conceptual design includes elements such as a shared kitchen and great room per 22 students. Each residential building will function like a large house with outdoor space for household gardens and common areas (both indoors and outdoors) to facilitate spontaneous interaction and collaboration—a natural condition of the community. Campus residential areas will be developed in parallel with academic and commons facilities to maintain a balance of appropriate housing for graduate students, undergraduate students, and faculty. Renewable energy sources, natural wastewater treatment, and ecological regeneration are proposed to serve all residential areas.

PROPOSED RESIDENCE HALL Section perspective of proposed Residence Hall, illustrating solar access, natural ventilation and green roof / canopy.

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PROPOSED RESIDENCE HALL

South facade of proposed Residence Hall

Dining and Kitchen Space

Living Space

Private Room

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SHORT TERM - PHASE 2 3-5 YRS RESIDENT STUDENT POPULATION = 120-180

The Short Term Phase will continue the development of the Mueller Center Campus and the Elsalma Center. The initial phase of parking in Elizabeth Meadows will also begin.

Major Phase 2 landscape and infrastructure improvements include: • The restoration of the Glade Run riparian corridor is necessary

to protect water quality when development occurs on the upper portions of that watershed. Removing invasive species and planting for higher diversity and deer resistance will also help Glade Run become an important part of the campus experience once Stanford Hill is developed in Phase 4.

The resident student population will require the addition of four student housing buildings in the Mueller Center Campus. This phase also includes the first new building dedicated to academics within the Mueller Center Campus, which will house flexible laboratories, studios, classrooms, and faculty and administrative offices. At this time, the EcoCenter will assume a more dedicated function as a Student Commons/University Meeting Center.

• Further development in Elsalma Center adds bunkhouses, parking,

agricultural facilities, and an orchard. The Elsalma Center will expand its academic capacity through the addition of a dedicated teaching kitchen and two support buildings for academic and agricultural use. A bunkhouse (planned as a modest dwelling) will house 50 students, farm workers, or campus visitors.

• At Elizabeth Meadows parking is installed behind the previously

established vegetation.

Proposed Site Section from Kim Lane Residence through Parking EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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Site Plan of Proposed Phase 2 Areas ORCHARD PLANTING + VISUAL BUFFER

SUPPORT BUILDINGS

GREENHOUSE + HOOP HOUSE TEACHING KITCHEN

ANIMAL BARN

BUNKHOUSE

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

TRAIL SYSTEM

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

ACADEMIC BUILDING

ECOCENTER (STUDENT COMMONS)

RESIDENCE HALLS STREAM RESTORATION + WETLAND RESTORATION

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS PARKING 223 stalls

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PHASE 2 - SHORT TERM 120-180 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 3-5 YEARS BLDG # BUILDING NAME/TYPE#

BLDGS IN PHASE

GSF

Total GSF

NOTES

STORIES

ROOF AREA / BLDG

ROOF TYPE

PV AREA / BLDG

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS 10 Academic Building 1 1 37,900 Classroom, Labs, Offices 2.5 13,800 metal 9,000 11 Residence Hall 4 10,500 42,000 varies 4,500 metal 2,940

Subtotal 79,900

ELSALMA BUILDINGS 13 Teaching Kitchen 1 4,000 4 Kitchens, food storage, classroom, 1.5 3,000 slate or similar 1,950 kiln and bread oven 14 Bunkhouse and Commons Building 1 2,000 Assembly space, warming kitchen 1 2,000 metal 1,300 14 Bunkhouse 1 4,000 50 people, bunk beds, shower facility, restrooms 1 4,000 metal 2,600 15 Animal Barn 1 2,500 1 2,500 metal 500 13 Support Buildings 2 3,500 7,000 general storage, stone buildings 1.5 4,900 slate or similar 3,200 16 Greenhouse 1 4,800 1 16 Hoop house 1 4,800 1 Subtotal 29,100

Total 109,000

LANDSCAPE RESTORATION Area in Acres Deciduous Forest 2.5 Conifer Removal 4.5 Meadow 0.0 Woodland Connective Corridors 0.0 Existing & Proposed Wetlands & Riparian Corridors 7.7 Buffer Yards at Kim Lane and Water Tower Parking 0.0

Total

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Community Student Housing Academic Commons Constructed Wetlands

13 13

16 15

14

10

11

Diagram of Structures Within Proposed Phase 2

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MID TERM - PHASE 3 5-10 YRS RESIDENT STUDENT POPULATION=240-540

The Mid Term Phase will conclude the development of the Mueller Center Campus and the Elsalma Center and will begin expansion to Stanford Hill. In Elizabeth Meadows, the initial townhouse community and additional parking are shown. Phase 3 will bring the development of the Mueller Center Campus to its full academic and residential capacity and will expand academic functions to Stanford Hill with a 600-seat amphitheater. The Mueller Center Campus will expand by three student residence buildings north of the EcoCenter, an indoor Sports Complex, sports field, and tennis courts. This phase will also include the final two academic buildings in the Mueller Center Campus. Situated just south of the initial academic building (Phase 2), one of these buildings and the Phase 2 academic building will connect via a partially buried structure. The connecting structure will be a new Commons Building that will mark the landing place of the future pedestrian bridge that will connect the Mueller Center Campus to Stanford Hill. The Elsalma Center will be completed in this phase through the construction of a University Meeting Center, Dining Facility, Guest Facilities, and two Wellness Center Facilities. A facilities management building will also be constructed near the Studio Arts Building. Initially, storage, receiving and facilities management could all be sited together. If more space is needed eventually, possibilities of locating the storage and receiving components off site may be explored. In Elizabeth Meadows, the first six townhouses and clubhouse are included along with additional parking.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Major Phase 3 landscape and infrastructure improvements include: • Extensive development at Mueller Center Campus completes that

campus node. Athletic facilities, maintenance facilities, and another constructed wetland battery are needed for the growing population there. Meadow and woodland installation around the campus center can occur once construction disturbances are concluded. • A third parking lot is installed behind the previously established

vegetation at Elizabeth Meadows. Employee housing and a commons facility are built there. • Extensive tree cover and meadows are added to Stanford Hill in

preparation for development. These plantings, once established, will play a key role in the sedimentation and erosion control plans for Stanford’s later development. A trail network is established from Elizabeth Meadow to Stanford Hill to enable access to parking from Stanford buildings as they can be occupied. It is presumed that contractors will ‘back out’ of Stanford work sites heading northward and may complete Stanford’s parking lots last. • The demands of student population at Eden Hall now require that a

dedicated University Meeting Center and Guest Facilities be built at Elsalma Center. This, along with more orchard, parking, agricultural and aquaponics facilities, and a Wellness Center, bring Elsalma to completion.

REVISED 05/03/2011

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Site Plan of Proposed Phase 3 Areas

UNIVERSITY MEETING CENTER

DINING FACILITY

GREENHOUSE + HOOP HOUSE

GARDEN GUEST FACILITY UPPER WELLNESS CENTER

INDOOR SPORTS COMPLEX

SPORTS FIELD FACILITY MANAGEMENT

PARKING BUFFER PLANTING

RESIDENCE HALLS STUDENT COMMONS

LOWER WELLNESS CENTER REFORESTATION

AMPHITHEATER

ACADEMIC BUILDING TENNIS COURTS

ACADEMIC BUILDING

TRAIL SYSTEM

RESIDENCE HALLS TOWNHOUSES

PARKING 112 stalls CLUBHOUSE

REVISED 05/03/2011

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PHASE 3 (A+B) - MID TERM

Build A: 240-360 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 5-10 YEARS BLDG # ADD. BUILDING NAME/TYPE # BLDGS IN PHASE GSF Total GSF NOTES STORIES

ROOF AREA / BLDG

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS 20 Academic Building 2 1 49,200 Classroom, Labs, Offices 2.5 20,300 21 Residence Hall 6 10,500 63,000 varies 4,500 Subtotal 112,200

ROOF TYPE

PV AREA / BLDG

metal metal

13,250 2,940

ELSALMA BUILDINGS 22 University Meeting Center 1 15,500 Assembly space, warming kitchen 1.5 10,300 metal 6,720 23 Dining Facility 1 4,000 1.5 2,600 metal 1,700 24 Greenhouse 1 4,800 1 24 Hoop house 1 4,800 1 Subtotal 29,100 Build B: 360-540 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 5-10 YEARS ACADEMIC BUILDINGS 25 Academic Building 3 1 43,200 300 Person auditorium, classrooms 2.5 15,700 metal 10,250 25 Student Commons / Dining 1 17,000 Dining hall, fitness center, lounge varies 17,000 green 0 26 Residence Hall 3 15,000 45,000 2 students/room, shared bathroom 2 7,400 green 0 27 Facilities Managment 25,000 1/3 Indoor storage, 2/3 outdoor yard 28 Indoor Sports Complex 1 40,000 Basketball, natatorium, locker room, track, weight room 2 26,400 green 8,000 34 Amphitheater 1 600 person capacity Subtotal 170,200 ELSALMA BUILDINGS 29 Guest Facility 1 20,000 3 6,600 slate or similar 3,500 30 Guest Facility 1 7,500 2 3,750 slate or similar 2,400 31 Upper Wellness Center 1 2,400 1 2,400 slate or similar 1,560 32 Lower Wellness Center 2 4,500 9,000 2 2,250 slate or similar 1,500 Subtotal 38,900 TOWNHOUSES 33 Townhouse 6 1,600 9,600 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms 2 1,140 metal 740 33 Clubhouse 1 900 Commons, group kitchen, lounge 1 900 metal 590 Subtotal 10,500 Total 360,900

LANDSCAPE RESTORATION

Area in Acres Deciduous Forest 14.0 Conifer Removal 9.2 Meadow 8.0 Woodland Connective Corridors 0.0 Existing & Proposed Wetlands & Riparian Corridors 0.0 Buffer yards at Kim Lane and Water Tower Parking 0.0 Total 31.2

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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Community Student Housing Academic Commons Constructed Wetlands

22 30 23 24 29 31

28

32

27 26 34

B A

25 20

21

33

Diagram of Structures Within Proposed Phase 3

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LONG TERM - PHASE 4 10+ YRS RESIDENT STUDENT POPULATION=480-1,200

The Long Term Phase will conclude the development of the campus.

Major Phase 4 landscape and infrastructure improvements include:

In Phase 4, the Stanford Hill campus node will connect via pedestrian bridge to the Mueller Center Campus. Stanford Hill will be fully developed including academic buildings, student residences, and commons facilities.

• Stanford Hill is developed with academic, student life, and residential

halls. This also entails three new constructed wetland batteries, parking lots, trails, and bridge connections to Mueller Center Campus. Trails previously established through Glade Run enable the construction of a pedestrian bridge with minimal disturbance to hill sides and the stream corridor.

Elizabeth Meadows will be completed with the addition of nine townhouses and the final development of the parking lot (east end). In addition, the Thoreau Cottages will be constructed.

View of Pedestrian Bridge from Stanford Hill Looking Towards Mueller Center Campus EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

REVISED 05/03/2011

138


Site Plan of Proposed Phase 4 Areas

PARKING RESIDENCE HALLS

PARKING

GREENHOUSES CUTTING GARDEN

STUDENT COMMONS / LIBRARY

BRIDGE THOREAU COTTAGES

ACADEMIC BUILDING CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS

TRAIL SYSTEM

TOWNHOUSES

REVISED 05/03/2011

PARKING 112 stalls

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139


PHASE 4 (A+B) - LONG TERM

Build A: 480-720 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 10+ YEARS BLDG #

ADD. BUILDING NAME/TYPE

# BLDGS IN PHASE

GSF

TOTAL GSF NOTES

STORIES

ROOF AREA / BLDG

ROOF TYPE

PV AREA/ BLDG

ACADEMIC BUILDINGS 40 Academic Building 4 1 28,800 Classrooms, studios 12,600 metal 8,230 40 Student Commons / Library 1 20,000 Library, fitness center, lounge 9,100 green 0 41 Residence Hall 8 10,500 84,000 4,500 metal 2,940 42 Greenhouses 2 600 12,000 840 glass (operable vents) 550 (PV Glass) Bridge 1 460 LF Truss Bridge at mid span, guardrails only at end spans Subtotal 134,000 TOWNHOUSES 44 Townhouse 9 1,600 14,400 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms 2 1,140 metal 740

Build B: 800-1,200 RESIDENT STUDENTS, 15 YEARS ACADEMIC BUILDINGS Academic Building 5 1 29,600 Laboratory 10,800 metal 7,050 Academic Building 6 1 33,100 Classrooms, 300 student auditorium 12,200 metal 7,960 Academic Building 7 1 29,600 Classrooms, offices 10,800 metal 7,050 Residence Hall 14 13,000 182,000 4,500 metal 2,940 Subtotal 274,300 THOREAU COTTAGES 45 Cottage 8 1,200 9,600 Architectural gem varies Subtotal 9,600 Total 432,300

GRAND TOTAL - ALL PHASES

979,790

LANDSCAPE RESTORATION Area in Acres Deciduous Forest 2.0 Conifer Removal 2.1 Meadow 0.0 Woodland Connective Corridors 0.0 Existing & Proposed Wetlands & Riparian Corridors 0.0

Total

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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Community Student Housing Academic Commons Constructed Wetlands

A

B

41 42

40 45

44

Diagram of Structures Within Proposed Phase 4

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COST MODEL

The cost model includes all site work and the site’s ecological restoration to enhance the forests, meadows, wetlands and streams. This includes selective conifer removal, restoration of the deciduous forest with new planting, the creation of connective woodland corridors across Ridge Road, and stream restoration to enhance water quality and habitat value.

Cost Model Overview The master plan for Eden Hall Campus is designed as a flexible planning framework where cost effective, sustainable solutions are balanced with other important considerations and demonstrated for others to replicate. The primary cost-related strategies include: • An approach to land use that maintains and enhances existing site features • Placement of buildings in open areas on the most degraded land to minimize site disturbance • Use of passive and natural systems to minimize energy and water use • A flexible approach to building design that allows structures to evolve and change depending on what is discovered in the early phases of campus development • Selective reuse and renovation of existing structures with a long-term view in mind

Building Cost Buildings planned for Eden Hall Campus are not the traditional campus buildings of today, but are highly efficient, high performance buildings designed to last 100 years. Building design strategies include: • Slender building footprint to minimize site disruption and maximize daylight, views and connection to the outdoors. • Building envelope design includes high performance glazing, sunshades, metal roofs, and a rain screen enclosure to dissipate heat and provide a thermal break between outdoors and building structure. • Operable windows to promote natural ventilation and earth tube air tempering to bring air into buildings from below ground to reduce cooling load in summer and heating load in winter. • Water saving features such as composting toilets and on site wastewater treatment. • Roof mounted photovoltaic (PV) panels to provide the campus’ electricity needs.

A cost model was developed for the master plan by phase and is summarized on the opposite page. The complete cost model report can be found in the Technical Reports companion document. Generally, the costs presented are conservative and reflect historical data, available site information, and the conceptual designs in the master plan including the residential buildings that are more elaborate than typical housing. The model includes high performance building design elements - in which a higher percentage of the construction cost is assigned to the building envelope and systems which are designed to result in significantly lower operating costs.

EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

Industry studies have shown that for buildings designed to LEED Platinum standards, the construction cost premium (when compared to a LEED Certified building) is approximately 15%. The studies also show that over a 60-year cost model, the cost to own and operate the Platinum building is approximately one-half the cost to own and operate the Certified building. REVISED 05/03/2011

142


Site Cost The site work has been phased to get restoration efforts underway immediately and establish a beach-head for the development of campus buildings.

Utility Cost Utility systems are included in the cost model by phase and include: • Wastewater Treatment • Domestic Water • Gas • Electrical System Distribution • Telecommunications Systems • Storm Water Systems • On-Site Renewable Energy Generation (including Building Integrated Photovoltaics) – which represents the largest utility cost in each phase.

In the first phase of development, landscape and infrastructure improvements occur along the length of Ridge Road between Kim Lane and Glasgow Road. The connective woodland corridors, that establish the outdoor rooms of Mueller Center Campus and the Lodge area, are an important element to the site’s ecological restoration and occur in Phase 1. Similarly, a vegetated buffer to future parking lots along Elizabeth Meadows and Stanford Hill occurs in Phase 1 so that plants are more developed when parking is needed. Landscape also lays the groundwork for development in three key zones (Mueller Center Campus, Elizabeth Meadows and the Elsalma Center). In addition, roads, infrastructure and vegetation needed for erosion control will be in place before major buildings are constructed. For these reasons, landscape represents 32% of Phase 1 construction costs.

Phase

Forest, wetland, and riparian restoration can occur as part of classroom and research efforts once classrooms and agricultural facilities are operating (as early as the completion of Phase 1). Doing so may reduce landscape restoration costs associated with Phases 2 and 3. Landscape costs diminish to approximately their typical proportion of construction costs in the later three phases (11.5%, 9.75%, and 7.5% respectively).

Type

SF

Const. Cost

Total $ x 1000

Phase 1

Building Site Utility

85,290

22,534 7,904 2,870

28,136 33,313

Phase 2

Building Site Utility

109,000

39,078 1.316 3,830

37,590 44,224

Phase 3

Building Site Utility

360,900

129,712 9,901 7,230

126,647 146,643

Phase 4

Building Site Utility

432,300

169,197 7,509 10,620

143,817 169,197

Total

REVISED 05/03/2011

979,790 sf

$ 306,447 360,526

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EDEN HALL CAMPUS MASTER PLAN CHATHAM UNIVERSITY

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