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points and staging areas identified. The pathways which are effected would be closed to public park access during construction -mid-November 1986 through January 1987. The existing pat.hways would be replaced and additional plantings installed in the spring of 1987.

REVISING THE CONSTRUCTION ZONE The establishment of 21 34-foot construction zone along existing pathways is the most important modification of the construction process. Of this width, approximately 12 feet is already disturbed as path and shoulder and only the 12 additional feet required for the trench will be SUbject to major soil disturbance from grading operations. An acJditional ten feet of the corridor is required to accommodate the swing of the backhoe or for temporary stockpil ing of subsoi I in deSignated areas, and requires the clearance of obstructing tl'ees and major shrubs. Most of the subsoil can be stockpiled on the path surface itself and the machinery will work on top of it. Additional selected stockpile and phasing areas, if required, will be deSignated. In order to minimize disturbance of the ground layer at these sites, we recommend that 2 inches of sand be spread over the work area. The sand should be sufficient to protect the ground layer during stockpi Ie covering, and once the stockpiles are removed, the sand will clearly identify the pre-existing ground level so that the surface root mat can be preserved. The sand can easily be integrated into the final backfill. To minimize excessive compaction of ground surfaces, a minimum layer of one-foot of stockpiled subsoils will be in place prior to operating any heavy equipment over the area. A second major modification of the construction process involves the site clearance and subsequent restorat ion. I t is clear that conventional revegetation practices are completely inadequate to address the complex natural environments traversed by the pipeline. Forests habitats, for example, simply cannot be reseeded, and a complet.ely replanted forest is very costly to both install and maintain. The site does offel' a feasible alternative, however. There is an abundance of young woody vegetation wl,ich could be harvested from the site and an abundance of herbaceous plants, woody root stocks, seeds, and organiC soils which could be used for effective habitat reestablishment. The largest problem with reusing site resources which are disturbed to restore the site is that living materials,

19 June 1986 PRELIMINARY REPORT I 3

1986 Design Criteria Loantaka Brook  

The purpose of this report is to recommend measures that minimize habitat disturbance during construction of the pipeline as well as maximiz...

1986 Design Criteria Loantaka Brook  

The purpose of this report is to recommend measures that minimize habitat disturbance during construction of the pipeline as well as maximiz...