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Departdment of Interior Architecture, Decorative Arts and Design Supervisor professor: ELENI ΤΑΤLΑ ANDRONIKIDOU GEORGIA Presentation Date: 11-03-2011


Not fenced nature Processing by humans It belongs in the realm of architecture Nature as the best of it, art 14/6/2010

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Wabi • Promotion of pure and simple beauty of natural materials without tricks and exaggerations.

Sabi • The beauty that offers the passage of time to the objects and structures is at its peak, when it reaches the threshold.

Suki • Anything charming attractive and different, beyond the conventional standards and rules. 14/6/2010

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Incidental physical form and the right angle Each of it loses its vibrancy if perceived separately from the others garden in Japan can not be considered independently of the architecture

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The "gap" this space, or ma ku, defines the elements around it, and also determined by the elements that surround it in and yo, without nothing, you can not have something

the concept of wabi, sabi and the suki, space / materials, time 4 seasons, subtlety of nature - go shintai

In practice will get the perfect outcome only after a combinational thinking The combination of all these concepts in complete harmony

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Shinto: sacred archetypes - beliefs • "The nature of Shinto» - «Temple of Shinto» • respect for territorial rights, the worship of nature, a sense of purity and the cultivation of rice.

Territorial archetype: shime • The art of binding and engagement • identify a personal claim of the land or other property • The Shime literally means a "related artifact," which then defines "possession, cohesion" • shime-nawa, “occupation rope “described the ropes which demarcate the holy sites, or a holy object in the temples of Shinto

Archetype of rock: iwakura and iwasaka • natural beauty and symbolic • literally means "rock for a seat" and "delineation rock " • tied with shime-nawa to indicate the holy character, defined as a go-shintai

The agricultural model: shinden

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• offerings of rice and sake to the Gods of the Sun • made from rice, was cultivated in so-called "heavenly fields" • The geomantic relationship from the one side is a mountain, whence the water falls below the fields, the other is the torii, the standard gate mark the entrance to sacred space had a square shape, 3 on 3 squares which gave a big magic square • shiki no himorigi scattered pebbles display hallowed ground of the Epiphany of the Shinto 8


The Hindu cosmology: the mountain as axis mundi •The arrival of Buddhism led to the adoption of Mount Meru (Shumi-sen) residence of Buddha •7 golden mountain ranges, home of the apostles and an eighth from the iron cakravala •the disk is believed to rest on a foundation of golden earth which in turn floats on water •the layout of the kingdom has the shape of eight leaf lotus flower ,the Holy Mountain rises to the center •lotus is the symbol of the heart chakra, the seat of the soul, the home of the great Teacher •denoted by a, towering rock, sometimes surrounded by stones

Taoist legend: the Isles of blest • Fear of old age and death • somewhere in the far east "5" islands inhabited by immortals who lived harmoniously • flying over the mountains proud over the backs of cranes, giant sea turtles carried on their backs the islands. • the first century BC, Emperor Wu decided to tempt the immortals in his palace creating gardens which looked as much as possible in the mythical islands

Buddhist faith: The paradise of Amida Buddha • The Mahayana Buddha's speculates that space is divided into 10 kingdoms that contain countless secular systems • One of these systems is sukhavati jodo or in Japanese, a "pure land" under the influence of Amida, a Buddha of infinite light and eternal life ,revealed to Shakyamuni in that those who faithfully devote their lives to him will enjoy his paradise • vision of paradise man trying to overcome nature with nature itself to making

Triadic compositions

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• The sakutei-ki, the oldest text in the Japanese garden architecture distinguishes two different types of formations: the hibunseki-gumi and sanzonseki-gumi. a device based on chinese rocks ideogram for articles, a horizontal project Recalls sculptures of Buddhist 9 Trinity, vertical design ten, chi, jin(sky, earth and man) dynamic trio


Hill and Lake(chisen-Kaiyu-Skiki) • originates from China • A lake with a view to a hill • real lake or symbolic from pebbles and sand gathered with raking gravel

Flat Garden (Hiraniwa) • comes from the use of open, flat spaces in front of temples and palaces for ceremonies • has a strong Zen style and is representative of the courtyards of coastal areas • is always flat.

Tea Garden (Rojiniwa) • functionality ignores the form • Roji (wooded path), brings in harmony the garden with the water cistern and the gates • The plants are frugal to the point to be considered incomplete During the design process we examine the formality of the garden has big significant and it differs in three levels: shin (formal), gyo (medium) and so (informal). 14/6/2010

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Water (Mizu): •Japan, has abundant rainfall, so water is inextricably linked to any garden. •garden karesansui, the cuddly with raking gravel represents water •In the tea garden, the visitor stops to perform a ritual cleansing in chozubachi •The water fills and empties from the shishi-odoki, which means the terror of the deer. Clicking the bamboo on the rock symbolizes the passage of time. The Rock (Ishi): • The rocks are the backbone of Japanese garden •The stones used to construct paths, bridges and walkways of the garden but individually or as components of admiration or symbolism •The established groups Sakuteiki stone, concrete formations, each designed with a specific meaning •The basic rocks: the tall vertical stone, the low vertical stone, arched stone, the lying stone and the horizontally stone •We must avoid the weak-sick, dead and destitute stone 14/6/2010

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Plants (Shokobutsu): •trees, shrubs, and foliage highlight the passing of each season •used native plants in the garden and is considered bad taste to use the attractive exotic plants

Decorations (Tenkebutsu): • It is very important to remember that decorating is subordinated to the garden and not vice versa. •The lanterns, stupas and cisterns used as architectural accents only when they serve a visual point of interest which is essential to the overall design

Teahouse : •designed for Japanese tea ceremonies. •the room, which is performed the tea ceremony called chashitsu (茶室). •The tea gardens were always informal style so.

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Garden Fencing: •isolated, bounded away from the outside world •Torii gates •concept, miegakure,

A bridge to the island, or a stone walkway into the water: • moon bridge • bridge composed of stone steps • flat bridges

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Borrowed landscape (Shakkei): •Remote - the remote mountain •Close - a tree just outside the fence •High - over the fence •Low - looking down from a fence or through a window on the fence

Types of traditional Japanese gardens Gardens Tsukiyama, from China. • attempted a small garden appear more spacious • directs the gaze of the spectators in the nearby mountains

Dry Gardens - Rock gardens, karesansui • there is no water in these gardens • Rocks and moss used to represent the lakes, islands, seas and mountains with an abstract

Gardens very defined style, Chaniwa • coming from the tradition of craftsmanship of tea with the main feature of the challenging agricultural simplicity. 14/6/2010

It can also fall into one of these forms: • Gardens kanshoh style encountered by a dwelling. • Lake Gardens, for the examination through a boat. • Walk Gardens (kaiyūshiki), to examine a sequence of data through a course that circumnavigate the garden. 14


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KENZO TANGE 11-03-2011

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SHIGERU BAN

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TOYO ITO 14/6/2010

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TADAO ANDO

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KENGO KUMA

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GREEN ROOFS

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SOLAR SYSTEMS

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ĺœ° Chi (sometimes ji) or tsuchi, meaning "Earth", represents the hard, solid objects of the world. The most basic example of chi is in a stone. In people, the bones, muscles and tissues are represented by chi.Emotionally, chi is predominantly associated with stubbornness, stability, physicality, and gravity. It is a desire to have things remain as they are; a resistance to change. In the mind, it is confidence. In twodimensional world is represented by the square and in threedimensional by cube.

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ć°´ Sui or mizu, meaning "Water", represents the fluid, flowing, formless things in the world. Outside of the obvious example of rivers and the like, plants are also categorized under sui, as they adapt to their environment, growing and changing according to the direction of the sun and the changing seasons. Blood and other bodily fluids are represented by sui, as are mental or emotional tendencies towards adaptation and change. In two-dimensional world is represented by the circle and in threedimensional by sphere.

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ç Ť Ka or hi, meaning "Fire", represents the energetic, forceful, moving things in the world. Animals, capable of movement and full of forceful energy, are primary examples of ka objects. Bodily, ka represents our metabolism and body heat, and in the mental and emotional realms, it represents drive and passion. ka can be associated with motivation, desire, intention, and an outgoing spirit. In two-dimensional world is represented by the triangle and in threedimensional by pyramid. 14/6/2010

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TOMH A-A'


風 Fū or kaze, meaning "Wind", represents things that grow, expand, and enjoy freedom of movement. Aside from air and smoke, fū can be also represented by the human mind. As we grow physically, we learn and expand mentally as well, in terms of our knowledge, our experiences, and our personalities. Fū represents breathing, and the internal processes associated with respiration. Mentally and emotionally, it represents an "open-minded" attitude and carefree feeling. In two-dimensional world is represented by the curves and in threedimensional by half sphere.

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犺 Kō or sora, most often translated as "Void", but also meaning "sky" or "Heaven", represents those things beyond our everyday experience, particularly those things composed of pure energy. Bodily, kō represents spirit, thought, and creative energy. It can also be associated with power, creativity, spontaneity, and inventiveness. In twodimensional and in three-dimensional world is represented by the drop: amorphous, colorless, and constantly changing. 14/6/2010

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Thesis