Page 1

PORTFOLIO :

design & research

ANDREW YIT


ANDREW YIT

SELECTED WORKS: 2007-2012

ARCHITECTURE URBANISM DESIGN PHOTOGRAPHY

www.whoischarlesmaxwell.com


CURRICULUM VITAE ACADEMIC EXPERIENCE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

2012

Conferred the degree of Master of Architecture

2012

2012

Attended Technical University of Delft, the Netherlands

Melbourne School of Design, the University of Melbourne, Australia

Master of Architecture student exchange program Public Building Dept. chaired by Michiel Riedijk

2011

Conducted research, discourse and design exercises on informal settlements and slum upgrading Conferred the degree of Bachelor of Architectural Studies

2009

Collaborative studio on new informal learning environments

2012

Timber Furniture Workshop Exhibition

2011

Dharavi: Informal Settlements and Slum Upgrading

2011

Shelter International Architectural Design Competition

2009

New Informal Learning Environments

2007

EYES Exhibition

The University of Melbourne, Australia

The University of Melbourne with University of Virginia

SCHOLARSHIPS & AWARDS 2012

Melbourne Global Mobility Grant

2007

Architect Michael Kaufman Scholarship

Funding to pursue knowledge exchange in Europe

Award for high achieving student commencing architecture at the University of Melbourne

4

Shortlisted and exhibited at RMIT Design Hub and Latrobe Regional Gallery

Mumbai, India: MSD in collaboration with SPARC and NSDF

2009

Transiting Cities: Low Carbon Futures International Design Ideas Competition

Craft was exhibited at the Architecture Building

Curated and participated in the exhibition at the Wunderlich Gallery Produced a publication of the same title

Participant

Work exhibited at the Wunderlich Gallery

Best student work, first year, exhibited at the Architecture Building


WORK EXPERIENCE

VOLUNTEERING

Mar’10 till Jan ’11

2011 till present 2012 2011 2009 2008

Archicentre Sdn Bhd, Subang Jaya, Malaysia Design Architect Worked on a wide range of project types, budget and scale which included commercial, institutional, retail, alteration and competition prpjects. Responsibilities included design, documentation, tender preparations, project administration and management, attend and lead client and consultant coordination meetings and site inspections. Projects that I had worked on and completed went on to win PAM Awards. Projects: Bakita Bar, Kuala Lumpur (F&B ateration) PJ Exchange, Petaling Jaya (33 storey mixed use commercial tower) Glad Tidings Vision Centre, Petaling Jaya (multipurpose religious complex) SUEN Galleries, Kuala Lumpur (retail alteration) Ara Damansara complex (mixed-used commercial & residential) A series of custom made steel and timber furniture Competition entry for PAM Centre

2011 till present

BARK Studio, Melbourne, Australia

Jan ’10 till Mar ’10 Jan ’09 till Feb ’09

Volunteer for Kechara Soup Kitchen, Kuala Lumpur Facilitator for Robin Boyd Foundation Open House, Melbourne Facilitator for Melbourne Open House, Melbourne Facilitator for Melbourne Open House, Melbourne Tutor for UNESCO Australia-China Cultural Exchange Program, Melbourne

SKILL SET Traits & skills

Good leadership, sociable and get along well with colleagues

Passionate attitude with a quick and eager learning attitude

Able to work under high pressure and tight deadlines

Denton Corker Marshall, Melbourne, Australia

Possess critical mindset in understanding and evaluating situations

Student Architect

Great sense of curiosity and constantly looking for better outcomes

Prepared presentation drawings and project documentation. Other duties include project filing and archiving.

Great passion for photography and have developed a personal style

Have good understanding and passion for architectonics and craft

Projects: Australian Embassy, Jakarta Proposed automobile infrastructural project, Perth

Possess excellent graphic abilities

Founder & photographer Event and architectural photography studio

Archicentre Sdn Bhd, Subang Jaya, Malaysia Student Architect Project documentation Projects: PJ Exchange, Petaling Jaya (33 storey mixed use commercial tower) Repetitive housing, Hanoi

Softwares •

Rhinoceros 3D

Google Sketchup

Graphisoft ArchiCAD

Autodesk Autocad

Adobe Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign and Lightroom

Microsoft Office

Willing and able to learn new softwares quickly


6


CONTENTS

4

CURRICULUM VITAE

8 10 16 24 30

ACADEMIC WORK

38 40 42

COMPETITIONS

44 46 48

PROFESSIONAL WORK

50 52 54

DESIGN

56

PHOTOGRAPHY

Architecture of Certain Uncertainty Panier as Mediatheque Dharavi Gospel: Word on the Street

Hearth of Consciousness Paving the Yellow Brick Road

Bakita PJ Exchange

Sail Me Home Design Work


8


ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK ACADEMIC WORK


ARCHITECTURE OF CERTAIN UNCERTAINTY REJUVENATING SOUTHBANK

10


components of the mediatheque

multi-functional public space

The desire to exert forceful authority upon others will eventually face opposition and rejection. Society is demonstrating against the authoritarian ways acted upon it by the self-proclaimed elites. Political and social governance can lead to dissatisfaction and frustration when done poorly. It is by self

empowerment that people can liberate themselves from unwanted governance. It is not anarchy, but controlled freedom. Society must be allowed to function based on the needs of the people within it, not decisions made by the elite minority. The basic right to choose must form the core of society.

This project envisions architecture that de-authorises the architect and empowers the users of the space. The architecture will be characterised by the ever changing usage pattern, function and orientation. The nature of the space will be non-static and of constant variability.

This is a platform that operates on the ability to actively accommodate changing functions. It also engages both the river banks by being able to dock on various locations along the banks. The varying location affects the orientation of the plaza and hence the focal points and usage patterns.

Major civic spaces align themselves along the Swanston Street axis and terminate at Yarra River. Parliament, the main political symbol situates itself on a cross axis along with other justice and civic facilities. Yarra River has effectively formed a physical, civic and symbolic boundary to the southern

edge of the Melbourne CBD, restricting civic spaces from bleeding to the south. A major civic space is needed to the south of the river which will bleed its influence southwards. There exist an opportunity to activate the river and make it the heart of the city (CBD + Southbank), rather than a physical boundary.

The plaza is the main program and the ground plane forms the main language. Instead of a plaza sitting amongst a succession of buildings extruded from the ground, a continuous ground surface flows on the plaza and takes priority, not the volumes it wraps around.

Movement and usage pattern take centre stage on this ground surface. The slopes and varying degrees of steps allow for a dynamic amphitheatre setting which not only compliments the event spaces but also function as event spaces themselves.


12


view from the river bank

Iteration study model

view from the river bank

study of river bank edge conditions


14


view of the mediatheque interior

view of mediatheque and roof podium from the river bank

spatial variation based on programs

|PLAZA The plaza can dock at various locations along the river banks but is designed to specifically dock at 4 cardinal positions. Height difference of the plaza is informed by the edge condition of the river banks. The slope and the steps form an amphitheatre setting that clusters the flat event space at the low point of the plaza. The flow of movement continues up the steps and onto the roof and back down into the plaza again via another set of steps from the roof. A series of breakout spaces are created to allow for smaller event spaces can support the main event space as required.

By not creating a front face, the floating plaza docks variably. Different orientations create different approaches to the site, forming unique spatial & programmatic experience as the plaza shifts location.

made electronically while old print media will have digital versions. This is a centre where the vast database of electronic media will be made available to the public through wired computers and wireless connection to the catalogues.

|MEDIA LIBRARY The key to self empowerment is through knowledge. A library allows for self education and intellectual discourse to occur. This will be a hub for exchange of ideas and information to better society.

|GALLERY SPACE

As we progress in the digital age, all information will gradually made digital. New publications will be

|Cafe

The open plan gallery space allows thinkers and artists to express their thoughts in physical form.

Patrons can dine alfresco style on the plaza or on the steps.


PANIER AS MEDIATHEQUE MARSEILLE

For more than 2000 years, Marseille’s city limits only consisted of Saint Jean & Panier District, where the later is the site of this intervention. She was set up as a portcity by the Romans and has flourished through the trade and maritime industries. In 1649, the city walls were finally demolished to make way for expansions. A large thoroughfare emancipated from the centre and led the

16

tangential urban expansion. As the city grew, so did the maritime traffic. The old port was shortly superseded by a new modern port North of the old city. Henceforth, the symbolic and economic importance of the old quarter slowly diminished. Since the 19th century, proposals have been made to reinvigorate the old quarter without success. Now that Marseille will be the capital of culture in Europe

for 2013, many proposals are in the works to return the old quarter to its former glory. Our intervention seeks to revitalise its status in Marseille through education, arts and culture- a mediatheque that is spread throughout the district.

20132013201320132013201320132013201320132013201320132013201320132013201201320132013201320

19201920192019201920192019201920192019201920192019201920192019201920192019201920192019201

18701870 1870187018701870187018701870187018701870

6

-

16491618271827182718271827182718271827182718271827

CITY AS PUBLIC BUILDING

-

1649164916491649164916491649164916491649164916491649164916491649164916491649164916491649

in collaboration with: Tadeáš Ríha & Milou Joosten at TU Delft Public Building Department

historical figure ground of Marseille

11415141514151415141514151415141514151415141514151415141514151415141514151415141514151415

II

600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC600BC

temporal pavilion in context

II

?

diagrammatic site model

7


INTERMEDIATE

Intermediate

Narrative

18+X x

2x

Fixed Elements To complete each stripes, we have introduced smaller interventions that are adaptable to the urban needs of the quarter: tourist centres, toilets, police booths, rest stops. Temporary Elements These pavilions, similar in scale with the fixed components, are however more programmatically, structurally and aesthetically coherent with the parent elements. On each stripe, several of these pavilions will be erected and programmed according to the parent element. In other words, the parent elements can extend their functions to the larger part of the quarter through these smaller pavilions. They can be moved according to the needs of current events.

STRIPES

Parent

3x

Parent Elements These principal elements of the system are distilled, individual components of the mediatheque: library, gallery and a performing arts centre. Instead of compressing these components into a single building, they are placed on each stripe, creating a distinct programmatic boulevard, referred to as urban markers. All of these buildings are of the same dimensions, materiality, orientation and construction system. Narrative Elements In order to weave a coherent system, 3 parallel stripes are then intersected by a perpendicular line, created by 2 narrative components. They are both museums and information centres about the Panier Quarter where one ties the quarter to the rest of the city while the other brings the Mediterranean Sea closer to Marseille.

GRID A geometric grid is imposed onto the quarter which is made up of 3 different morphologies, from 3 different time period. The system is made up of 3 hypothetical parallel boulevards or stripes and a line running perpendicular to it, where all of the interventions are placed on and oriented against it. Through the dialogue between the grid and the quarter’s morphology, we seek to find unity and harmony. Quarter The importance of the Panier Quater in Marseille has slowly withered away through the centuries. Once the heart of the city, it has lost its charisma and energy. By intervening on a large urban scale, instead of a singular architectural artefact, the objective was to revive the spirit of the old quarter and rcreate a cultural centre for the city.


section and plans of new cultural centre

Theatre Ground Plan

Theatre Basement Plan

Theatre Section


new cultural centre


new cultural centre 6

150

6

16

8

42 20

42

aluminium profile for sash-window

fiber cement board 18mm mineral wool 100mm mineral wool 280mm drainage system double glazed profiled glass

screed composite slab steel truss air duct

7 7

30 20 100 20 20

280

20 42

42


temporal pavilion as a catalyst for gentrification

temporal pavilion as a gallery

information centre at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea

INTERMEDIATE ELEMENTS The intermediate scale interventions have the ability to adapt to programmatic and location change due to its generic yet flexible structure. Like the parent buildings, the structure defines the main space and programs are adapted to it.

22

The fixed pavilions will give the quarters more utilitarian programs while the temporal pavilions reflect the cultural programs of the mediatheque. These are placed accordingly on the 3 parallel stripes. The sheer curtain facade wraps the pavilion to give it a mysterious yet sleek counterpoint to the traditional stone and masonry buildings in the vicinity.

fixed pavilion

temporal pavilion as library

temporal pavilion

temporal pavilion as cultural hub

information centre


library in context

interior of library

interior of gallery

PARENT ELEMENTS The parent buildings are made up of singular program spaces: library, gallery and cultural centre. It’s form contrasts against its surrounding to create an urban marker. Because each of the 3 parent buildings are visually similar, they become landmarks within the quarter and help people to oriented themselves within the system.

Each of these parent building is made up of a plinth (connection to existing plane), a void (cushion) and a mass (program). It responds strongly to the public realm and create new kinds of urban environments. Its translucent facade gives the city a hint of the spatial qualities and activities within. Each of them are public buildings and public spaces for the quarter.

library

library ground plan

library typical floor plan

gallery

gallery section

gallery section


DHARAVI

INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS & SLUM UPGRADING

Melbourne School of Design collective work of Mumbai Traveling Studio with partners: SPARC (Society for Promotion of Area Resource Centre) National Slum Dwellers Federation

Narvang Neighborhood

24


view of a typical main street in Dharavi

At about 223 hectares and housing around 600,000 people, Dharavi is one of the world’s largest, oldest and most famous informal settlements. It has grown over the past 50 years from a fishing village on a swampy and unused patch of land well north of the city centre of Bombay to currently occupy a much sought after location at the heart of the expanded metropolitan area. The standard mode of upgrading in the past has been to demolish sites of about a hectare and construct eight-storey housing (known

as a G+7) generally enclosed within a compound wall. The planning backdrop is the Dharavi Redevelopment Project (DRP) wherein private developers were invited to bid for redevelopment rights and required to provide eligible households with replacement housing (of 30 sq metres). This market-led framework has not been successful and following community resistance led by the National Slum Dwellers Federation, a commitment has been made to communityled redevelopment. We were invited by SPARC to think outside the confines of existing proposals and to imagine

alternatives to those proposals in terms of both planning process and urban design outcomes. This research-analysis-critiquedesign project was more of a steep learning experience more so than a problemsolving initiative. In the end, we produced propositions in areas of planning, urban design, architecture and construction that instead of being definitive solutions, are catalyst for rethinking the problem of slum upgrading in Dharavi and around the world.


main streets

Main Streets Typically 6-8m wide Flanked by 2-3 storey buildings High commercial activity High vehicular traffic Greater male pressence

Typical urban sections of Narvang

26

vibrancy of the larger laneways

Larger Laneways 2-3m wide or more else where Lined with residential doorways Raised plinths provide seating High vehicular traffic Often vibrant community spaces Balanced gender distribution

life in small laneways

Small Laneways 0.7-2m wide Some are throughfare without social life Some structures come so close together that they obstruct sunlight


standard building typology in Dharavi

G+7 development internal courtyard

Construction & Typology Single room increament betwen 2-4 stories high Sizes vary from 300sqft per unit upwards Ground floor generally made with r. concrete but with lightweight materials as it gets higher Minimal natural light and ventilation

G+7 Slum Upgrading Project Ground + 7 story towers 300 sqft basic units with utilities & sanitation facilities Houses are purely residential due to hard boundaries Better living quality but lower social interaction Shared by 2 or 3 generations

Typical building construction

Typical G+7 unit layout

G+7 unit facade extensions

Typical G+7 unit with mezzanine layout


proposed new building typology

industries (textile, food, leather, recycling and heavy industries) operating within the dwelling units of Dharavi

COMBINE ADJOINING HOUSES The most significant problems with the current typology are where the houses are adjoined on three sides without cross-ventilation and where the entry adjoins a narrow laneway that lacks light and air. The significant number of such units could be simply adapted by opening up of walls to provide cross ventilation and double the floor area to about 30 square metres. POST & BEAM INFILL Since all apartments need cross ventilation, a plan-type with long narrow apartments produces a higher FSI and reduces the amount of laneway space required. A 6 metre grid of post and beam construction could create new spatial types to the left.

28

Scheme 1

Scheme 2

Various housing allotment schemes based on residents land tenure & financial rights


typical street scape of Dharavi

Redevelopment Scenario A: Subtract & Insert

Redevelopment Scenario B: Cluster-based Replacement (20% for profit)


GOSPEL: WORD ON THE STREET ROMAN CATHOLIC CATHEDRAL FOR HAITI

Design Thesis

Reconciling the informality in the urban condition of Port-au-Prince with the formality of the traditional Roman Catholic cathedral typology 30


The project studied the subjects of: typology, hierarchy & edge condition in both the city of Port-au-Prince and pre-modern cathedral case studies, which the former cathedral was based upon. By considering almost totally opposite conditions,

I managed to juxtapose, mediate and reconcile contrasting architectural strategies onto each other. The result produced a condition of tension and harmony between the order and formality of the Roman Catholic church and the rhizomatic city which this church belongs to. Typical street section in Port-au-Prince

Pope Papacy

College of Cardinals

Roman Curia

Advises & elects the Pope

Church administrative body

Patriarches or Major Archbishops

Autonomous Particular Churches

Archibishops or Bishops or Archdioceses

Dioceses

An Archdiocese is more significant than a Diocese and is led by an Archbishop. The Diocese of Rome is led by the Bishop of Rome who is also the Pope.

or

(Local Particular Churches)

Divided in the Latin Church & 22 Eastern Churches that reflect cultural & historical differences in worship instead of doctrine. All of which accepts paramountcy of the pope on the doctrine of the church.

Eparchies

Parish Priests

Parish Churches Parish Churches

These are also called individual communities, led by one or more priests and assisted by deacons or lay ecclesial ministers.

Parish Churches

Vatican

17% of 2010 World Population

Organisation struction of Roman Catholic Church

Double Hard Edge • Cathedral • Offices • Schools • Private buildings Urban edges in Port-au-Prince

Hard Edge • Offices • Schools • Private buildings

Semi-hard Edge • Offices • Shops • Hotels • Flats

Soft Edge • Street vendors • Tent cities


CATHEDRAL CASE STUDIES

40m

0

40m

0

20m

0

pti Ba

Secrecy of illegal Christian congregations led to residences being converted into housechurches. Raised pedestal at east wall of church used as chair for bishop or head of congregation

32

During Constantine’s During rule, Constantine’s large chuches rule, were large chuches were erected throughout erected Rome.throughout They took Rome. the form They took the form of the secular basilica of theor secular marketbasilica hall. These or market hall. These became the common became typology the common for largetypology church for large church buildings in Romebuildings during the in Rome 4th & 5th during century. the 4th & 5th century.

20m

Apse Apse

Aisle

Aisle Aisle

Apse Apse

0

20m

0

Aisle Aisle

North Transept

20m

Aisle

Aisle

Apse

Nave

Apse

0

20m

0

20m

South Chapels Transept

Narthe

Nave

Apse Aisle

South Transept

Nave

Choir

Aisle

Aisle

Aisle

Nave

Apse

South Transe pt

Chapels

0

North Transe pt

Altar

Portico

Papal Altar Portico

Apse

Altar of the Chair

Shrine

Altar of the Chair

Choir

Papal Altar

x

Chapels

Aisle

x

Chapels

Narthe

North Transept Shrine

Ambulatory

Nave Choir

Altar

Altar

Narthex

Nave

Apse

North Transept

Ambulatory

North Transept

Aisle

South Transept

Nave under dome

Apse

South Transept

art he

x

y

0

str

10m

rth e

on

Aisle

0

Na

Ex

Nave under dome

Aisle

x

x art he

x

Apse

Aisle

Narthex

Apse

y

Aisle

str

Aisle

Aisle

Aisle

Cathedral of Our Lady of theCathedral Angels of Our Lady of the Angels Los Angeles, 2002 Los Angeles, 2002

20m

Chapels

North Transe pt

Nave Altar

Choir

Aisle

Apse

20m

Plaza

Chapels

South Transe pt

0

Chapels

Nave Altar

0

25m

Altar

Plaza

Chapels

Entrance

0

Entrance

25m

pti

Aisle

Aisle

Atrium

Aisle

Notre Dame de l’AssomptionNotre Cathedral Dame de l’Assomption Cathedral St Peter’s Cathedral St Peter’s Cathedral Port-au-Prince, 1928 Port-au-Prince, 1928 Vatican, 1607 Vatican, 1607

Cologne Cathedral Cologne Cathedral Cologne, 1322 Cologne, 1322

Ba

Church

Nave

Atrium

Outdoor Atrium

on

Nave

Hagia Sophia Hagia Sophia Constantinople, 537 Constantinople, 537

Ex

Aisle Outdoor Atrium

Narthex

Aisle

Aisle Apse

Sunday School

Aisle

High Altar

Courtyard

High Altar

Apse

Baptistry

Narthex

Old St Peter’s Basilica Old St Peter’s Basilica Vatican, circa 320 Vatican, circa 320

design after the Second Vatican Council saw more dynamism and flexibility in spatial planning and architectural expression. The destroyed cathedral continued the lineage of medieval style designs which was selfenclosed spaces with large solid walls.

rth e

House-Church Dura Europos, 232/233

to renewed church principles to reflect the challenges driven by political, social, economic and technological changes in contemporary society. One outcome is the shift from the typical axial and mono-directional congregation to a more centralised and participatory mass. Cathedrals

Na

The development of cathedral architecture has closely reflected the changes and reforms that were made by the Vatican. Nevertheless, before Modernism, the designs of cathedral space have not seen drastic changes in its evolution. The Second Vatican Council held in the 1960s led

Hagia Sophia’s configuration Hagia Sophia’s is more configuration circular and is more circular Cologneand Cathedral’s Cologne radial Cathedral’s & axial organisation radial & axial organisation centripetal rather centripetal than longitudinal. rather than The longitudinal. nave is reflected The nave is conflict is reflected highlighted conflictby is highlighted the longitudinal by the longitudinal under the dome &under two half-cupolas the dome & to twothe half-cupolas northwest &to orientation the northwest & of the orientation nave & the of the centripetal nave & the nature centripetal of nature of southeast of the dome. southeast of the dome. both the altar and boththe thearrangment altar and the of arrangment the 7 of the 7 During the 4th & 5th During century, the 4th centralised & 5th century, churches centralised werechapels churches were around chapels the Shrine around of the theThree Shrine Kings. of the Three Kings. also built in Romealso but built wereinnot Rome common but were for communal not common for communal worship.The centralised worship.The plan is centralised more widespread plan is more in thewidespread in the Eastern Roman &Eastern Byzantine Roman Empire. & Byzantine Empire.

1928, the cathedral was Infinally 1928,consecrated the cathedral was finally consecrated The rebuilding The of Strebuilding Peter’s involved of St Peter’s lengthy involved battleIn between lengthy battle different between different after 48 years since theThe initialisation after 48 years of the since the initialisation of the architects on the architects form and onconfiguration the form andofconfiguration the cathedral. of The the cathedral. project. neo-romaneseque project. styleIt’s is neo-romaneseque adapted style is adapted choice between choice Latin between & Greek Cross Latin &form Greek & between Cross form axial &It’s & between radial axial & radial with local featuring abundance context,offeaturing an abundance of orientation being orientation a few of being the main a few topics. of the The main final topics. design The iscontext, afinal design is with a anlocal stained & openings stained for light glass & ventilation. & openings for light & ventilation. modification tomodification Michangelo’stocentralised Michangelo’s plan centralised capped by plan aglass large capped by a large features a Latin form It features with anaaxial Latin Cross form with an axial dome in the middle domeofinthe thecrossing. middle ofThe the emphasis crossing.ItThe on the emphasis dome onCross the dome planning. internal planning. creates a strong creates centripetal a strong force centripetal in the plan. force ininternal the plan.

This Catholic Cathedral is This one of Catholic the largest Cathedral in the is one of the largest in the world, with a capacity of 3000 world, worshipers with a capacity in its 101 of 3000 worshipers in its 101 metre long nave. Visitors accend metre long the plaza nave. and Visitors make accend the plaza and mak their way into the cathedraltheir through way into the sides the cathedral before through the sides before turning into and enter the nave turning space. into and Theenter side the nave space. The side chapels face away from the chapels nave, thus face allowing away from it to the nave, thus allowing it to receive the centre of attention. receive It mediates the centre between of attention. a It mediates between centralised and axial congregation centralised plan. and axial congregation plan.


Change

Political Hierarchical Self enclosured Exclusiveness

(left) view looking out towards market in forecourt (right) site plan

Emulate

Transparency Openess Inclusiveness

Transparency Openess Inclusiveness

Socially responsive Public-minded


(left top) view of worship space (left bottom) view of underground memorial (bottom) sectional models

The new cathedral is a highly permeable one, with the intention to extend the street life into the cathedral and to have the cathedral embrace the city. Sets of timber portal frames outline the reconciliation of the city and the cathedral.

This long and commanding rectangular form is an elongated abstraction of the former structure. It attempts to emphasize its axiality and mass in relation to the low-rise city. Yet it is axiality is contradicted by its permeability from all directions. This is also an interplay between the commanding form of the

cathedral with the anti-form of the informal streetscape. What was previously tall walls and a plinth was replaced by a stepped forecourt which extends the informal market place across the street into the cathedral. The steps and slopes on the north and south sides rises up to a platform, which is the highest level in the

cathedral. From there, one can overlook the activities in the forecourt, worship space and the cityscape beyond it.


38


COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS COMPETITIONS


40


HEARTH OF CONSCIOUSNESS COMPETITION ENTRY


PAVING THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD COMPETITION ENTRY

42

PAVING THE YELLOW BRICK ROAD

RETHINK AND REGENERATE

This proposal seeks to rethink Latrobe City as a network of satellite townships that participate in a continuous exchange of knowledge, resources and opportunities. A new exchange spine is introduced - the Yellow Brick Road, running north-south through Morwell. It is both a metaphorical and literal spine. The Yellow Brick Road proposes a gradient of industrial-based economies and research hubs to the north of Morwell and leisure based economies to the south, capped by the Morwell National Park. Morwell is reimaged as the centre of Latrobe City, with the Yellow Brick Road has its celebrated highway where new economies and activities radiate from, taking advantage of what is existing and unique in the region, and turning those into a catalyst for a low carbon future.

This project embraces the challenge, or unfeasibility of closing and replacing the coal mines and power stations altogether in one go. Replacing the economies that the communities are dependent upon is unreasonable, and socially and financially unrealistic. As a result, we seek to flip the negativities surrounding the coal industry into something positive. Instead of masking the reality of the coal industry, this scheme draws our attention towards it in order to harness the awareness of its impact on the environment and find ways for the dichotomy of the coal industry and the natural wonders in the region to coexist in harmony.

Borrowing the image of the Yellow Brick Road in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz that guides Dorothy to the Emerald Castle, Latrobe City’s Yellow Brick Road is conceived as a north-south spine, connecting the two anchors of the industrial north to the natural and recreational south. It is an infrastructural and a catalytic spine that will promote new ways of living in a the low carbon city. There are 4 major components that the spine promotes education, new economies, sustainable urban development and appreciation of nature.


industrial

urban

nature


44


PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSINOAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK PROFESSIONAL WORK


BAKITA ARCHICENTRE


Addition & Alteration Bar, lounge & restaurant 33 Jalan Berangan Award: PAM AWARD 2012 Interior Design: Commendation Involvements include: • concept design • design development • project management • documentation • submission • furniture & joinery design

photo by Lin Ho with permission by Archicentre Sdn Bhd


PJ EXCHANGE ARCHICENTRE


33-storey commercial tower including 8-storey car park complex, recreational podium and retail centre

Involvements include: • design development • documentation • submission • project management

photo by Lin Ho with permission by Archicentre Sdn Bhd


50


DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN DESIGN


SAIL ME HOME TIMBER FURNITURE

52

2012 bench with storage eastern mahogany, Victorian ash, Burmese rosewood, plywood 105.5 x 36 x 134.6 cms photographs by Akshay Rajan


This piece of furniture is an outdoor bench, primarily meant to ease the wearing and taking off of footwear. It consist of 2 storage compartments, one with a secret lid and one with an open top. A large mass is punctuated by a 3 dimensional lattice structure, that completes the piece structurally and aesthetically. It is made up for 2 main timbers types, eastern mahogany from Malaysian and Victorian ash from Australia. Both of which are from places that bear great significance in the upbringing of my young adult life and education as an architect. The former makes up

the large mass, masculine and complex in construction; the latter forms a delicate lattice, encompassing the mass and becoming the back bone of the bench.The story of my upbringing is reflected in the concept design of the bench. The form was inspired by the surroundings of its home, the porch of my house in Kuala Lumpur. Its lattice is derived from the steel grills that are repeated throughout the windows of the house, in fact, in most houses in the city. It will replace the ad-hoc seatings as a permanent feature of the porch.


DESIGN WORK VARIOUS PROJECTS

54


(top) custom made steel frame and plate tables (bottom) custom made timber tables & benches

(top) mail room (bottom) bottom shelves

curated Dharavi Exhibition at Wundelich Gallery


56


PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOGRAPHY


58


NOT THE END


Profile for Andrew Yit

Architecture & Design Portfolio by Andrew Yit  

Selected works by Andrew Yit, 2007-2012 Includes work in the field of architecture, urbanism, design & photography. Andrew was conferred th...

Architecture & Design Portfolio by Andrew Yit  

Selected works by Andrew Yit, 2007-2012 Includes work in the field of architecture, urbanism, design & photography. Andrew was conferred th...

Profile for andrewyit
Advertisement