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Architecture 2018 Year 2

CONSTRUCTING ALTERNATIVES Course Outline and Studio Guidance


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A r c h i t e c t u r e 2 0 1 8 Ye a r 2 | C O N S T R U C T I N G A LT E R N A T I V E S

Contents

Welcome 4 Staff Team 5 Thematic Focus 6 Cornerstone Lectures and Discussions

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Reading and Theory Lineage

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Reading List 12 Communication and Media 14 Technology and Tectonic Investigation

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Humanities 18 Studio 20

Project 1: Material Mutations

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Project 2: Mediating the Social Field

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Project 3: A Space of Appearance

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Analytical Fields and Trips

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Appendices 53 Timetables 54 Module Guides 62

Version: Updated 12 September 2018 Cover images: Fun Palace, Cedric Price, 1961 Plan (front) Perspective (rear)

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Welcome In Year 1 you were introduced to focused observation through the medium of drawing; to spatial organisation of modest-scale buildings; and to the material, tectonic and formal vocabularies of architectural design. You will have gained insight into how architecture is indebted to logics of structure, material and space, along with developing important attitudes to physical contexts within which it might be situated. You will have learned invaluable skills and developed sensitivities in graphical and verbal communication. This year, you will begin to explore how architecture is indebted not only to its own logics and those of its site, but to a multiplicity of processes far beyond itself and its locality - processes both tangible and intangible, to which it is continually indexed. This will involve buiding an understanding of how it is situated in, and continually informed by, history and theory; how it can speculate on and influence a future which we do not yet know; and in particular, how it is part of a critical discourse on our civilisation. You will learn how design and construction can instantiate ideas originating in associated areas such as philosophy, sociology, literature, art and film; how technological processes and techniques can be formative in design but also how design can act as a medium through which technology can be propelled forward into a new future. You will delve deeper into the idea of contexts, gaining understanding of the layers of interconnected physical, cultural, social and temporal issues they can consist of. You will develop an understanding of the design process as something which opens up questions about the world as well as providing answers to its problems. Through continual questioning of architecture’s definition of, and engagement in ,what it means to be public, you will be able to expose and confront paradoxes, inequalities, prejudices and other issues which affect our world. In this way you will begin to synthesise your many findings into propositions which can articulate rigorous arguments with meaningful efficacy. You will discover how design is always an iterative process and you will begin to appreciate drawing and modelling as both representative and generative pursuits. You will continue to accumulate and hone skills in drawing, model making, workshop and digital software, but now with a particular focus on 3d modelling and the use of sophisticated digital workshop tools. You will learn to confidently communicate your work graphically, verbally and textually. Lastly, peer leaning, knowledge-sharing, discussion, debate and self-reflection are as important in your education as tutor-led learning. In architecture, we are privileged to be able to consider our working environment as an essential component in our creative output. The studio is a laboratory for exploration and should always be approached as a collective experience. We hope you will continue to immerse yourselves in the studio, embrace its culture and allow yourselves to be engaged and stimulated by architectural investigation and discovery. Welcome to Year 2. We wish you a fruitful and enjoyable year. Andy Stoane, Year 2 Leader.

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Year 2 Architecture

Andy Stoane. Year Leader. Andy has reciprocated architectural teaching, practice and research over a thirty year career. He has held positions in several UK universities and directs his own practice and research studio in Edinburgh. He joined University of Dundee in 2017 Rowan Mackinnon-Pryde, Studio Tutor. Having gained experience working in Scotland, Italy and Japan, in architectural practice, education, exhibition and publication, Rowan now runs her own architecture and design practice in Edinburgh and teaches in Dundee and Aberdeen. Douglas McCorkell, Studio Tutor. Having worked for award winning design practices in Edinburgh and London for over a decade, Dug currently combines private architectural practice at Mary Arnold-Forster Architects with teaching at the University of Dundee. Tom Hetherington, Studio Tutor. Tom started teaching at Dundee in 2017 while continuing to work in private practice with Richard Murphy Architects on projects across the UK and Ireland. Prior to this he ran his own design studio in Edinburgh and spent time working in New York. Gerry Farquarson, Studio Tutor. Gerry is a practicing architect with over 30 years of experience. Formerly a Senior Associate in a leading Scottish design studio, he currently combines managing his own practice in Dundee with teaching at the University of Dundee. Laurence Wood After working on international disaster relief projects from 2006 to 2015, Laurence established design & build practice, Cabin Scotland. Transitional housing relief and building for vulnerable communities continues to inform his work. He has taught at several schools of architecture, joining Dundee in 2015. Jim Robertson. Jim has over 20 years of experience in architectural design, practice and construction. He joined University of Dundee in 2006 and currently leads Year 4 and the subject area of technology at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Joseph Thurrott. Joseph is a chartered architect and has been practicing for over 25 years, working on projects in Canada and the UK. His interest in the physics of low energy design led him to become a certified Passivhaus consultant in 2012. He is Humanities lead at Dundee. Rich White. After graduating from Dundee in 1992 and qualifying the year after, Rich was a project architect with numerous local practices before eventually becoming a full time lecturer in 2004. His post 2000 specialism has been in visualisation and all things of a CAD nature. Lorens Holm. Lorens is Reader in Architecture and Director of the Geddes Institute for Urban Research. He runs the Rooms+Cities design research unit with Andy Stoane. The unit uses architectural theory to open up a space for designing new forms of city and social life.

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Thematic Focus Constructing Alternatives Year 2 builds on the excellent intellectual foundation of your first year of study, but also represents a transition into exciting new pedagogical territory. Architectural design is marked by a combination of acquired tangible knowledge and the intangible ability to assemble such knowledge into a purposeful synthesis of material, space and form. But perhaps most challenging and perplexing of all is the necessity to do so with critical insight into the world within which you are operating. Such critical insight will help you to imagine, in the words of K.Michael Hays opposite, Alternatives. It is this non-conciliatory view of architecture as an alternate present - as something ‘critical’ - which provides the core of Year 2’s focus. This view is celebrated through the structuring of the year around key themes devised to prompt you to think critically. What is the architecture you are learning to assemble actualy attempting to do? How is it situated intellectually within a broader canon of work? What do you hope to make better? What is your Alternative? This questioning around the efficacy of architecture is something we hope you will continue for the rest of your career. Three projects will operate over two semesters. Each semester and each project will have a particular thematic focus - a focus which brings into play an instrumental piece of theoretical text. You will be expected to demonstrate understanding and engagement with these texts through your projects.

Semester 1 Project 1 Project 2

Thematic Focus: Sub theme: Text: Sub theme: Text:

Multiplicity / Plurality Material, form and space relationships. Gottfried Semper, Style / Gevork Hartoonian, Crisis of the Object Envelope, threshold, environment and social relationships. As above + Beatriz Colomina, Privacy and Publicity.

The first semester explores the position of a singular piece of architecture, first within a landscape of repetition of itself, before then questioning how the resulting collective might connect to the public realm within which it becomes situated. This will be done through detailed tectonic investigation, particularly in relation to the envelope. In this project the public realm will be the student campus, allowing you to analyse collective attributes from a position of familiarity.

Semester 2

Thematic Focus:

Political Economy

Project 3

Text:

Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition.

The second semester expands the analytical field into the city. It will build on semester 1’s understanding of architecture as a collective experience, questioning the responsibilities we have as architects to consider the far-reaching implications of our interventions into an existing public landscape. This analysis involves the understanding of architecture as an essential component in the field of political life (the Polis) and its organisation and management (Oikonomos) as something we are inescapably involved in. Together, this can be understood as the relationship between the individual and society - Political Economy.

Semesters 1&2 are tightly bound together by the study of tectonics. Successful yields of both thematic investigations will rely on your ability to instantiate them through your ever-increasing skills in tectonic thinking ... Constructing Alternatives. Conference. These themes resonate with the subject of an international conference, Architecture and Collective Life, due to be hosted in the Matthew Building in November 2019. We hope this year will provide you with an excellent intellectual foundation from which you can build your capacity to engage in the discourse of this important event, to enjoy its sessions and to contribute to it.

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Year 2 Architecture

“...THE CONSTANT IMAGINATION, SEARCH FOR, AND CONSTRUCTION OF ALTERNATIVES.”

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Cornerstone Lectures and Discussions Taking place every Friday, these sessions are used for lectures, year meetings, discussions and debates. They are devised to demystify and clarify the thematic and theoretical foundations of the year, in doing so increasing the depth, intellectual rigour and critical engagement of your design work. Your work must demonstrate an embedded understanding of the issues discussed.

Semester 1 Lecture 1: Criticality provides an overview of the semester and discusses the importance of critical thinking in architectural design. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 2: Inspiration is for Amateurs discusses architectural design methodology, particularly iterative working and drawing / modelling as a generative process. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 3: What Does Tectonic Mean? examines the etymology of the word, its varied use and relevance within historical techno-cultural paradigms of architectural design. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 4:Superficiality discusses the importance of effective communication. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 6: Appearances and Essences complements project 2 and examines the prevailing question of dialogue between structure and skin in architectural design. Drawing on Gottfried Semper’s nineteenth century writings on ‘revealing and concealing’, the ability of the tectonic articulation of the building envelope to affect the public realm will be examined through case studies. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 5: Media discusses the role of media in promoting architectural manifestos; the ability of architectural design to mediate societal conditions; and finally the role of architecture as a form of media itself. [Andy Stoane] Other sessions will be announced through the semester.

Semester 2 Lecture 7: Political Economy discusses how architecture is bound to the relationship between the individual and society and the built environment’s efficacy in the social field of the city. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 8: Typical! discusses the meaning and interpretation of the words typology and morphology, and the use of typological and morphological thinking in design. Specific analysis of theatre types and their morphological ramifications will be made. [Andy Stoane] Lecture 9: Unprecedented? broadens the discussion on Type and questions how we might analyse and assimilate ‘what has gone before’. [Lorens Holm] Lecture 11: Navigating Scales illustrates a range of plans with varying scalar attributes, examining their graphical technique and the importance of editing in graphical representation. [Andy Stoane] Other sessions will be announced through the semester.

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Year 2 Architecture

“[ARCHITECTURE]... EVALUATES THE BUILT WORLD AND ITS RELATIONSHIPS TO THE SOCIETY IT SERVES. [IT] OFTEN HAS AN EXPRESSED POLITICAL OR ETHICAL ORIENTATION AND INTENDS TO STIMULATE CHANGE” Nesbitt, Kate, Theorising a New Agenda for Architecture : An Anthology of Architectural Theory, 1965-1995, 1996

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Reading and Theory Lineage In Year 2, design is considered as a process of intellect, scholarly endeavour, continual experimentation and shared enquiry. Instinct of course plays a part, however, instincts must be developed and sharpened through rigorous research, investigation and iterative testing of ideas. To this end, reading, and the ability to assimilate knowledge acquired from it, is considered symbiotic with all other methods employed in the design process. Reading relevant texts will help you establish rigour in critical thinking, improve your research skills and will allow you to develop rich narratives for your projects which you can then test tectonically. All of this will of course also help you communicate your work with maximum effectiveness. Several key texts have been extracted from a lineage of theory selected to support the themes of the year as outlined on page 6. This lineage spans nearly one hundred and fifty years and involves the thinking and writing of both architectural and non-architectural theorists. There are no definitive fixed threads connecting the various texts, however their inter connectivity is certainly evident and you should aim to untangle this, map it out, and situate your projects within it.

Gottfried Semper in his nineteenth treatise on style, discusses the relationship between what he considers the core-form and the art-form of a building by invoking the idea of the mask. Here, he draws on centuries of metaphor relating to the theatrical mask and its ability to conceal, reveal and change identities. Notably, sociologist Erving Goffman in his seminal book The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life uses the mask, and theatrical metaphor generally, to illuminate the complex identities we invent and roles we play in social situations. “Choose you self-presentations carefully, for what starts out as a mask may become your face.” 1 For Semper, the building’s masks constitute a means of controlling dialogue between the core-form and the art-form, what he describes as appearances and essences. The building’s envelope is the mediator in this dialogue, in the way that it controls the constant and complex interplay between outside and inside and between what we experience as form and what we experience once immersed. In Privacy and Publicity Beatriz Colomina expands this idea into a consideration of the window and how it relates to subjectivity in architecture. “...the highest form of art is not that which liberates itself from the primitive use of decorative masks, but rather that which perfects this use by masking even the mechanisms of masking.” 2 “Architecture is not simply a platform that accommodates the viewing subject. It is a viewing mechanism that produces the subject.” 3

Gevork Hartoonian, in his book ‘Crisis of the Object’, builds on Semper’s thesis, reflecting on it from a

contemporary perspective and suggesting that our current age of spectacle has brought a “loss of homology” between material, making and form. Prioritisation of surface, Hartoonian says, has led to objectified buildings in which we don’t participate. “if ‘purpose’ is reduced merely to representing values extraneous to those emanating from construction, then the line between atectonic and tectonic is blurred and architecture is relegated to the realm of the scenographic.” 4

Hannah Arendt introduces us to the realm of political theory. In her 1958 book ‘The Human Condition’, she

considers how we have lost our ability to be public. With this in mind, we will be questioning architecture’s place in the formation of the public realm and in what it means to be public. We will be seeking new forms of publicness through propositions devised to instantiate the Arendtian term “a space of [public] appearance”. “To live together in the world means essentially that a world of things is between those who have it in common, as a table is located between those who sit around it.” 5 1 Goffman, Erving (1959). The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Doubleday. 2 Semper, Gottfried (2006). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts: Or, Practical Aesthetics. Getty Publications. 3.Colomina, Beatriz. (1996). Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media. MIT Press. 4 Hartoonian, Gevork. (2006). Crisis of the Object: The Architecture of Theatricality. Routledge. 5 Arendt, Hannah (1958). The Human Condition, The University of Chicago Press.

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Year 2 Architecture

“IT IS PROBABLY NO MERE HISTORICAL ACCIDENT THAT THE WORD PERSON, IN ITS FIRST MEANING, IS A MASK. IT IS RATHER A RECOGNITION OF THE FACT THAT EVERYONE IS ALWAYS AND EVERYWHERE, MORE OR LESS CONSCIOUSLY, PLAYING A ROLE. … IT IS IN THESE ROLES THAT WE KNOW EACH OTHER; IT IS IN THESE ROLES THAT WE KNOW OURSELVES.” Robert Ezra Park (1950) 11


Reading List Theory and General: Goffman, Erving (1959). The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life, Doubleday. * Hartoonian, Gevork. (2006). Crisis of the Object: The Architecture of Theatricality. Routledge. * Semper, Gottfried (2006). Style in the Technical and Tectonic Arts: Or, Practical Aesthetics. Getty Publications. * Colomina, Beatriz. (1996). Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media. MIT Press. ** Arendt, Hannah (1958). The Human Condition, The University of Chicago Press. Hardingham , Samantha (2017). Cedric Price Works 1952–2003: A Forward-Minded Retrospective. Architectural Association (AA) and the Canadian Centre for Architecture (CCA). * Key theoretical text, semester 1. ** Key theoretical text, semester 2. Drawing: Lewis, Paul and Tsurumaki, Marc (2016) Manual of Section. Princeton Architectural Press. Leupen Bernard and Mooij Harald. (2008). Housing Design: A Manual. NAi Publishers. Schneider Dritte, Friederike and Auflage, Heckmann, Oliver and Schneider, Friederike. (2011). Floor Plan Manual, Housing. Birkhäuser. Atelier Bow-Wow (Yoshiharu Tsukamoto and Momoyo Kaijima). (2014). Atelier Bow-Wow - Graphic Anatomy 2. Toto. (and/or Graphic Anatomy 1) Waldheim, Charles, Desimini, Jill, Mostafavi, Mohsen. (2016). Cartographic Grounds: Projecting the Landscape Imaginary. Princeton Architectural Press. Journals and papers: Detail 3.2018, Theatre Structures (including essay by Frank Kaltenbach, The Show before the Show). Michał Murawski & Jane Rendell (2017) The social condenser: a century of revolution through architecture, 1917– 2017, The Journal of Architecture, 22:3, 369-371, DOI: 10.1080/13602365.2017.1326680 Data Art: https://www.informationisbeautifulawards.com/showcase http://www.stefanieposavec.com/ http://benfry.com/

Please note: There is a separate reading list for the humanities modules. Details can be found in the module guides.

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Year 2 Architecture

“[ARCHITECTURE]... IS NOT AN ISOLATED OR AUTONOMOUS MEDIUM, IT IS ACTIVELY ENGAGED BY THE SOCIAL, INTELLECTUAL, AND VISUAL CULTURE WHICH IS OUTSIDE THE DISCIPLINE AND WHICH ENCOMPASSES IT ...IT IS BASED ON A PREMISE THAT ARCHITECTURE IS INEVITABLY INVOLVED WITH QUESTIONS MORE DIFFICULT THAN THOSE OF FORM OR STYLE.” Carol Burns and Robert Taylor, Editors, from Perspecta 21, 1984

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Communication and Media In Privacy and Publicity (see pages 10-12), Beatriz Colomina describes architecture as “a system of representation in the same way we think of drawings, photographs, models, film or television” She tells us this is “not only because architecture is made available to us through these media, but because the built object is itself a system of representation.” Put another way, architecture is a means of representing our world (a form of media through which our civilisation’s achievements, past and present, are communicated to us), while all the time being reliant on modes of representation and media for its own creation. Both parts of this definition are crucial to Year 2 and will be discussed at length in lectures and studio. However, architecture’s use of representational media in its own process of coming to fruition will also be taught through a series of classes and events devised to assist you with communication and representational skills. Communication and representation of a project through various media are the only means by which your projects can be both interpreted by others and continually reflected upon by yourselves. In this way, drawings, models and other experiments are both generative and representational in the design process. Only through engagement in this process - through continual representation, self-reflection and re-representation - can a project develop. There are no shortcuts! It is therefore essential that you keep up to date with, and fluent in, software, physical modelling techniques and graphic design practice. A series of workshops and competitive events have been devised to asist you with this. Semester 1 Digital Communication Skills [Rich White]: A series of workshops / classes devised to develop and improve your representational skills through Autocad, Rhino, 3d Studio Max and Grasshopper. Making an Argument 1 / X-Factor Day [Andy Stoane and Others]: A day of competitive pitches, devised to hone your skills in verbal and graphical communication. You will present a piece of work in a fixed period of time with limited visual resources and will be assessed by a panel of judges. Through a process of shortlisting and further distillation of presentations, a final winner will be selected. Semester 2 Digital Communication Skills [Rich White]: Semester 2 will introduce building information modelling (BIM) (via Autodesk Revit) to allow you to become acquainted with this very different and increasingly ubiquitous approach to design and delivery Making an Argument 2 / X-Factor Day [Andy Stoane and Others]: As semester 1.

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Year 2 Architecture

“OUR AGE OF ANXIETY IS, IN GREAT PART, THE RESULT OF TRYING TO DO TODAY’S JOB WITH YESTERDAY’S TOOLS...” Marshall McLuhan

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Technology and Tectonic Investigation Technology teaching in Year 2 aims to deepen your understanding of the importance of tectonic investigation in architectural design, and to help you further develop your skills in detailed resolution of buildings. In semester 1 you will complete a technology module, Envelope and Environment. While separately assessed as a discreet module, its work will be fully integrated into the studio work, building on a scheme produced in the first part of the semester (by yourself or one of your studio group). The work should demonstrate an understanding of detailed technical resolution consistent with the design ambitions of the project. You will attend a series of workshops and surgeries devised to assist you in your understanding of materials and their associated forms, states and application techniques. These are crucial for both project 1: Material Mutations, and project 2: Mediating the Social Field. In semester 2 your technology assessment is fully integrated into your design project. Lectures in semester 2 are devised to assist you in the specific technical demands of your design project and your continued understanding of how architectural technologies, processes and techniques at the scale of detail can resonate with ideas articulated at the scale of architecture, the city and beyond.

Semester 1 Material Workshops [Jim Robertson / Andy Stoane] Workshop 1: Concrete Workshop 2: Plywood Workshop 3: Bamboo Workshop 4: Plastic Workshop 5: Sheet metal Tutors will work with you on selecting a technique for you to focus on. Examples would be casting, bonding, interlocking, casting, folding

Semester 2 Lectures Jim Robertson. These lectures are intended to cover the following areas: Auditoria design, large span design, acoustics, heating, ventilation, lighting. Final content will be confirmed in semester 2.

Other cornerstone lectures running through both semesters (see page 8) aim to assist you in synthesising and situating your tectonic thinking within a theoretical landscape, helping you to reinforce thorough and intellectually rigorous design arguments. To this end, it is expected that such fully synthesised thinking will be generative in your design work and that it will be able to be evidenced throughout your presentations. This year, the workshop and MakeLab will form an essential part of your design process. Inductions will be provided and attendance is essential. The creative use of the workshop and the experimentation with multiple modes of media will always be encouraged.

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Year 2 Architecture

“IT HAS ALWAYS BEEN AMONG ART’S MOST IMPORTANT FUNCTIONS TO GENERATE A DEMAND FOR WHOSE FULL SATISFACTION THE TIME HAS NOT COME. THE HISTORY OF EVERY ART FORM HAS CRITICAL PERIODS IN WHICH THAT FORM STRIVES FOR EFFECTS THAT ARE ABLE TO FIND EXPRESSION WITHOUT EFFORT ONLY WHEN TECHNOLOGY HAS REACHED A NEW LEVEL – THAT IS TO SAY, IN A NEW ART FORM” Walter Benjamin The Work of Art in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction

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Humanities Architecture is hard to pin down. It exists in a state of in-between. Between art and science, form and function, ideal and the practical, universal and the particular, subjective and objective, earth and sky... Throughout history, architects have concerned themselves with achieving a synthesis of ‘utilitas, firmitas, venustas’ 1 (utility, firmness and beauty). Arguably, the great architectural masterworks of each epoch contain a balance of all three. However, our judgment of most buildings tends to oscillate between how well it functions, if it is fit for purpose (utilitas); how well it stands up, if the structure is appropriate (firmitas) and how it moves us (venustas). Designing a building and having the design constructed is a complex process involving many factors. Reading between the lines of utilitas, firmitas, and venustas, a great building is one which is attuned to the culture, technology and ideals of its place and time. Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context operates across both semesters. Each semester will involve a combination of lectures, empirical observation, analytical work and drawing. Through completion of these modules, you will gain a deeper insight into the relationship between the conceptual aspects of the design process (thinking) and the technologies, techniques and materials which are ultimately responsible for the physical manifestation of the architectural idea (making). Lectures are structured around the analysis of particular ‘cutting edge’ buildings that were at the forefront of thinking and making in the cultural context of its time. The context for exploring the above is the historical period spanning from the Age of Enlightenment (the dawn of the modern era, circa 1750) through the formative decades of International Modernism in architecture (between the two world wars) up to the present day. Lectures are summarised in the appendix to this booklet.

Semester 1 is structured in two parts: Part 1 consists of a series of lectures covering the origins of modern architecture from the Age of Enlightenment up until the closure of the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany. Each lecture is structured around the analysis of a particular ‘cutting edge’ building that was at the forefront of thinking and making in the cultural context of its time. In addition to informal in-class tests at the outset of each lecture, students will have the opportunity to formally articulate their knowledge of the lecture content through a series of essays. Part 2 consists of an elevation drawing (including the plan of the elevation), in pencil, involving detailed observations and measurements of a delegated historic building. Semester 2 is structured in two parts: Part 1 consists of a series of lectures covering the development of modern architecture from the end of the Second World War through the decline of International Modernism and the rise of Pluralism up to the present day. Each lecture is structured around the analysis of a particular ‘cutting edge’ building that was at the forefront of thinking and making in the cultural context of its time. In addition to informal in-class tests at the outset of each lecture, students will have the opportunity to formally articulate their knowledge of the lecture content by sitting a formal exam at the end of the lecture series. Part 2 consists of an exploratory project where each student is asked to read selected excerpts from Colin Rowe’s seminal book, The Mathematics of the Ideal Villa and subsequently design one of their own. The design brief for the villa has but one restriction: the proportions are an exact cube measuring: 9m x 9m x 9m internally. Students will be required to substantiate their design decisions through a comparative analysis of building precedents and Colin Rowe’s text.

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Year 2 Architecture

“THE TASK OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE WAS TO REDISCOVER THE TRUE PATH OF ARCHITECTURE, TO UNEARTH FORMS SUITED TO THE NEEDS AND ASPIRATIONS OF MODERN INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES, AND TO CREATE IMAGES CAPABLE OF EMBODYING THE IDEALS OF A SUPPOSEDLY DISTINCT ‘MODERN AGE’” William J.R. Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900

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Studio

Studio is your core activity and the centre of your academic life. The other components of the course, although discreet, are devised to support your studio projects and should be seen as symbiotic in the path toward outputs which are critical, intellectually rigorous, skilfully orchestrated and effectively communicated. Each semester, you will be allocated a studio group led by one of the studio tutors (see opposite). Studio tutors will be responsible for tutorials and design advice throughout the progress of your projects. Weekly tutorials will normally take place in the studio on Mondays. The group will operate as a team, undertaking collective and individual work but always sharing knowledge and supporting one another intellectually. Please note that the studios will be re-organised for semester 2.

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Year 2 Architecture

Studio 1 Tutor: Rowan MackinnonPryde

Studio 2 Tutor: Dug McCorkell

Studio 3 Tutor: Tom Hetherington

Studio 4 Tutor: Gerry Farquharson

Studio 5 Tutor: Laurence Wood

Chung-Yan Chan

Nik Lagarias

Andrew McKay

Saoirse Stenhouse

Beth Harper

Kenzie Harrison

Ayo Oluwaleimu

Josh Dickson

Alyth Airlie

Laura Connor Greenshields Templeton

Rebekka Dick

Nour Lebbakh

Harriet Smith

Khalil Atchia

Emilia Chegini

Mitchell Harvey

Natasha Whitehall

Lynsey Isles

Pam Sanderson

Bethany Harrison

Robbie Steggles

Anna Moldenaes

Harriet Jamieson

Sofie Malmborg

Freddie Walkden

Remy McLeod

Jordan Snitch

Himat Athwal

Kelly Chan

Andrew Mowatt

Martyna Taylor Przybolewska Ramsay

Matthew Beresford

Magda Kilijanek

Priyanka Sharma

Dory Trifonova

Sofia-Lyn Kouni

Lee Ann McIlroy

Yu Mei

Kieran Lindsay

Rachana Bhor

Kyle Donaghey

Abbie Nelson

Eleanor Scott

Jack Wright

Yavor Nedelchev

Cheryl Hui

Todd Moir

Cara Thom

Quita Hynd

Louise San Luis

Ailie Stuart Maconnochie Waitt

Jade Wilkie

Oliver Boyle

Kirsty Elliot

Kayla Ng

Konrad Tomczyk

Michelle Fernando

Daniel Georgiev

Cameron Quate

Trisha Santos

Oliver Graham

Osman Nasir

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Johanna Alex

Lewis Devaney

Matthew Thomson

Sean O’Tiarnaigh


Studio Project 1 Material Mutations Module Material and Form Credits 20 Timetable Weeks 1 to 5 Overview Material Mutations will build understanding of the importance of two essential tenets in architectural design: Investigation into material qualities, processes and techniques; and iterative design through generative modelling and drawing. It sets out a six stage methodology which requires you to simultaneously be reflective and reflexive in design. An initial design for a single spatial cell must continually reflex as you reflect on its own performance as well as external factors introduced at each stage. Each stage will demand re-articulation of the proposition with increasing resolution and precision. The entire process, across all stages, should be recorded photographically and continually curated into a sequential narrative.

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Year 2 Architecture

“If you wait around for the clouds to part and a bolt of lightening to strike you in the brain, you are not going to make an awful lot of work. All the best ideas come out of the process; they come out of the work itself”

“INSPIRATION IS FOR AMATEURS - THE REST OF US JUST SHOW UP AND GET TO WORK.” Chuck Close

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Stage 1 Material You will be allocated a material with which you will start making tectonic experiments using a range of appropriate techniques. 1. Glass 2. Plastic 3. Plywood 4 Concrete and resin 5. Sheet metal The crucial questions will be what can the material do and what opportunities are latent within it? Your tutors will then work with you on selecting a technique for you to focus on. Examples would be casting, bonding, interlocking, casting, folding ... The first experiments will simply explore potentials for structure and space formation without programmatic specificity. Submission: End of week 2 [Present a minimum of five experimental models with an A2 landscape panel illustrating photos of the models and clearly explaining the yield of the experiments].

Material experiments: Left: growing architecture from fungi. Student: Natalie Piorecka. Right: casting plaster in fabric formwork. Student:Michael Huang.

Stage 2 Response to Programme With the familiar programme of student accommodation and the material opportunities you have discovered from stage 1, you will use a combination of scalar drawing and rapid modelling techniques to iterate through as many steps as possible, continually refining a proposition for a single generic accommodation cell. You will consider how the inherent qualities and techniques of the material can accommodate the formal, spatial and organisational logics necessary for the cell.

Submission: End of week 4 [Present a minimum of five models with an A2 landscape panel illustrating photos of the models and a clear explanation of what each iteration is testing. Also include a 1:50 plan and section of the final iteration].

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Formal and spatial experiments with bubbles. Student: Alice Mears.

Formal and spatial experiments with lamination. Student: Ruotian Wang.

Tectonic mutation. Student: Frixos Petrou.

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Stage 3 Response to Multiplication At this stage you will turn your attention to the multiplication of the cell to form a community. The community will contain ten cells over at least two floors and must contain spaces for use by everyone. Remember, this is not simply a case of putting ten cells together. The act of multiplication will raise questions of access (horizontal and vertical), relationship between private and public spaces, privacy (visual and acoustic), natural lighting and overshadowing. You will allow the original cell to adapt in response to these new constraints. Now you must turn you attention to the multiplication of the cell to form a community. The community must contain ten cells over at least two floors and must contain spaces for use by everyone. Submission: End of week 4 [Present a minimum of five models with an A2 landscape panel illustrating photos of the models and a clear explanation of the multiplication strategy, the challenges raised and how they have been handled].

Housing project. Student: Natalie Lau

Stage 4 Response to the Social Field You will be allocated a site on campus. You will carry out a detailed analysis of the area around this site in groups, considering: - Physical context, which will involve a detailed measured survey of all physical elements around the site and accurate digital drawings for reproduction at 1:100. - Programme, typology and morphology, which will involve recording the uses of buildings and spaces and classifying them into architectural and morphological types. - Social interactions, which will involve monitoring, grading and representing different types of social patterns and social behaviour. - Temporality, which will involve monitoring and representing how the area changes over time, both in cyclical patterns (daily, weekly, seasonally etc) and in linear patterns (continuous processes). Within your groups, the knowledge and methodologies should be fully shared and the data gathered made available to everyone. With the help of your tutor, you will then seek correlations across this analytical spectrum and discuss ways of representing them graphically. This will be taken forward to stage 5..

Submission: End of week 5 [Present four A2 landscape panels illustrating your group’s analysis].

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Material experiments plastic tubes. Student: Mirunda Ilas

Urban / social analysis. Student: Lovisa Lidstrom.

Urban / social analysis. Groupwork.

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Stage 5 Data Art This stage requires you to distil a piece of data-driven graphical art from your stage 4 work. You will distil a piece of data-driven graphical art from your stage 4 work. Drawing on given examples, the work will not be a representation of any physical qualities of your completed proposition. It will be an abstracted infographic, designed to make visual the activity, sociability and temporality of your area of the campus. It may also illuminate the correlations between these phenomena and the existing architecture as well as alluding to how you may wish to mediate or alter the situation with your proposition. Examples of this kind of work are illustrated opposite. 1. Student infographic showing seasonal change in a park, Ruth McNickle. The ‘data visualisations’ of Ben Fry and Stephanie Posavec also provide useful graphical and methodological references for this task. It should be noted, however, that the data being represented in their work is very different to the data that can be extrapolated from our own field of study. However, they do serve as good examples of how graphics can be used to illuminate patterns, trends and changes within complex non-visual fields. 2. In Media Lab Activity, 2001, Ben Fry depicts activity detected on a security camera as “part of a set of experiments to create complex and sophisticated information graphics very rapidly (under four hours)”. http://benfry.com/ 3. In Stephanie Posavec’s project Writing Without Words, a novel is visualised using a graphical language derived from quantifiable hand-gathered data on the structure of the novel and its sentances. The method allows comparison in a visual medium of the writing styles of various books and authors. http://www.stefanieposavec.com/ 4. The subsequent project, (En)tangled Word Bank, analyses Darwin’s The Origin of the Species. “Within the diagram, chapters are divided into sub-chapters as in Darwin’s original text, and these sub-chapters are divided into paragraph ‘leaves’. The small wedge shaped ‘leaflets’ represent sentences. Each sentence is coloured according to whether the sentence will survive to the next edition (blue) or whether it will be deleted and not within the next edition (orange).” http://www.stefanieposavec.com/ On page 30-31, the work of Matthew Daniels (5), Levi Westerveld (6)and Herwig Scherabon (7) visualises lyrical innovation in rap, loss of life through escaping conflict and Income Inequality in Los Angeles and Chicago https://www.informationisbeautifulawards.com/

Submission: End of week 6 [Present your Infographic on one A2 landscape panel].

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1.

2.

3.

4.

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5. 7. 6.

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Stage 6 Curation and Reflection Assemble A2 panels into a printed linear narrative.

Submission: End of week 8 [Review].

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Studio Project 2 Mediating the Social Field

Module Envelope and Environment Credits 20 Timetable Weeks 9 to 12

Overview Mediating the Social Field will build on stages 1 to 6 of Material Mutations. Using your own or a colleague’s proposition, you are now required to focus on detailed articulation of the building envelope and associated structure. You will demonstrate how your tectonic thinking enables mediation of spatial conditions either side of the threshold - ie the external environment and the internal environment. This is bringing into play Semper’s thesis on Appearances and Essences (see p10). To achieve this, you will first have to understand the structural principles of your building. Working with the workshop tutors and your studio tutors, you should consolidate and clarify how the building’s structural principals will operate. While this will likely involve some reconsideration, addition and subtraction from your point of departure from project 1, it is important to stress that this is NOT new, ‘applied’ thinking. It is NOT a question of ‘deciding’ on an appropriate structural solution. The solution should be latent in your project 1 work and should be brought into sharp focus through detailed investigation and further mutation of what Semper calls the ‘core-form’ - the essential structure which the layers of envelope can begin to reveal and conceal. Stage 1. The first task is therefore to produce further iterations of your growing collection of models. However, this time the models will begin to reveal more layers of construction with a view to understanding the details of how the proposition might be constructed. Please note that it is likely your final model will be constructed in tandem with the later drawn stages of this project.

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Year 2 Architecture

“ARCHITECTURE IS NOT SIMPLY A PLATFORM THAT ACCOMMODATES THE VIEWING SUBJECT. IT IS A VIEWING MECHANISM THAT PRODUCES THE SUBJECT.” Beatriz Colomina Privacy and Publicity: Modern Architecture as Mass Media

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Stage 2. You will translate your structural knowledge into a detailed tectonic axonometric or isometric. To this you should begin to add further layers of envelope. The scale of this drawing should be selected to carefully suit the amount of information you can reasonably show relative to the size and scope of the project. However, it must be sufficiently sized to show the layers of construction. It must avoid generic, single layer or highly edited-down floor, wall, roof and envelope articulation. The final scale should be discussed and agreed with your tutor(s). The drawing should be cut-away or exploded as appropriate to show construction information. Drawings must be annotated and must clearly identify any details to be elaborated at a larger scale. Some examples are illustrated opposite.

Stage 3. Once you have a good understanding of the overall structure of the building and its various layers, you will turn your attention to the most Semperean part of the project. For Semper, tectonic is defined as something where ‘core-form’ and ‘art-form’ are related in “a structural-symbolic rather than in a structural-technical sense”.The organisation of the tectonic components of a building are part of a complex and continual interplay between various dialectics: public and private, outside and inside, free and institutional... Such interplay invariably stimulates and affects relationships between the individual and the collective. In this sense, architecture is a stage for Goffman’s dramaturgical performance (p10) - its thresholds are the curtains. As Semper puts it Appearances and Essences - the ACT of Revealing and Concealing.

You are particularly interested in how this act is controlled by the envelope(s). Interesting here is Gevork Hartoonian’s contemporary view of Semper’s thesis. He tells us that the “perceived spatial envelope is, literally, a fabrication: it is a falsehood”. In other words, we can construct an appearance of a building, but that appearance is always related to its essence. The envelope mediates the experience of both and how they inter-relate. For this stage you will therefore produce a spatio-sectional drawing which demonstrates understanding of these ideas. It will be a complex drawing demonstrating how your tectonic thinking resonates with spatial thinking in all contiguous territories, and beyond. In other words, how does the envelope of the building mediate the social field around it. For this stage you must draw carefully on your work from project 1, stage 4. Please note that you should consider all the above stages as part of a holistic process. Development on later stages is likely to mean reconsideration of modelled and drawn work from the earlier stages.

Stage 4 The final task is the calculation and curation of a comparative diagrammatic matrix of cost.

Tectonic section (1:50). Student: Jordan McCrae

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Misc. cutaway and exploded axonometrics.

Perspectival sections, Atelier Bow-Wow.

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Submissions This project will involve detailed siting of your propositions and a detailed understanding of both its external and internal territories. It will also require a detailed response to climate, orientation and cost. It should demonstrate use of analytical work from ‘Response to Social Field’ and ‘Data Art’ to inform the tectonic response. Submissions should include: Previous coursework from project 1+ record of current design development. A typed manifesto (to appear within the graphical presentation). Conclusive 1:20 part model demonstrating envelope, material, form, space and structure. Conclusive 1:50 exploded axonometric demonstrating building assembly and structure. 1:20 (or as directed by your tutor) conclusive scaled spatio-sectional drawing demonstrating the construction of the envelope and structure; the tone of internal space(s) (surface, daylight, shadow); the function / use of both internal and external space. Dates for submissions of specific components will be advised at the start of the project.

Opposite: Threshold study and plan. Student: Jordan McCrae. Below: Envelope mediation. Student: Neil Cunning.

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Studio Project 3 A Space of Appearance

Module Typology and Tectonics Credits 40 Timetable Weeks 15 to 26

Overview In semester 1 you investigated what is involved in the multiplication of a singular spatial entity - an autonomous cell for one person. You hopefully discovered that, with multiplication comes an added dimension of plurality, and that such plurality has a very direct correlation with what we are calling the social field. You then examined the nature of that correlation in detail through the tectonic consideration of the envelope - how it reveals and conceals what lies either side of it. In Semperean terms, ‘Appearances and Essences’. A Space of Appearance builds on the understanding of architectural plurality, specifically its correlation with the social field of the city. The question of such plurality in the public realm is something that continually preoccupied our third theorist, Hannah Arendt. The project draws on her book ‘The Human Condition’ in which she discusses what she considers to be “the loss the world” through our elimination of “the public sphere of action and speech” in favour of the private world of introspection. According to Arendt, the public sphere is contracted to two distinct but interrelated dimensions, the space of appearance and the common world. Both these dimensions are spatial - they involve an understanding of the city, and consequently its architecture, as a field of pluralistic action. Semester 2’s project will therefore locate in an area of intense population and activity, yet an area of little pluralistic action – The City of London. Here, amidst architecture of commodity and spectacle, you will seek potential to reclaim some common world. The yield of your investigations and discoveries will be played out in a detailed proposition for an architecture of public performance. You will focus on two urban anomalies – the estates of Golden Lane (Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, 1952-57) and the Barbican Estate by the same architects (1965-76). You will address public interfaces on their edges, questioning the place of different occupants in the public realm, their interactions, and the avoidance of socio-spatial seclusions. Your ambition will be to devise a truly public building - A Space of Appearance.

A Space of Public Appearance? What is such a space?; What can it be used for?; What are the public interactions that take place in and around it? Here there are fundamental questions of both ‘agency’ and ‘criticality’. Referring to the thematic focuses outlined on page 6, we will be examining the role of architecture and architects in defining a programme for a site, alongside the ongoing relationship between architecture and the society of which it forms part. You will be expected to put together a proposition for a which not only demonstrates your capability to resolve a modest scale building spatially, tectonically and formally, but which further demonstrates a clear attitude toward existing contexts, publicness and future social possibilities. Drawing on your work from semester 1, you will do this by conducting thorough analysis of first typology (stage 1: Typical!), then the various physical and social attributes of site area (stage 2: The Social Field), before eventually developing strategies and detailed propositions (stage 3: The Propositional Field).

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Year 2 Architecture

“WHAT MAKES MASS SOCIETY SO DIFFICULT TO BEAR IS NOT THE NUMBER OF PEOPLE INVOLVED, OR AT LEAST NOT PRIMARILY, BUT THE FACT THAT THE WORLD BETWEEN THEM HAS LOST ITS POWER TO GATHER THEM TOGETHER, TO RELATE AND TO SEPARATE THEM.” Hannah Arendt, The Human Condition

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Programme Louis Kahn said it is the duty of the architect to “not just take the program of the institution but [to] try to develop something which the institution itself can realize is valid”. Here you have an opportunity to embrace this view of the agency of architecture - expanding your enquiry into the broader analytical consideration of what the site needs. This ambiguity does not mean a laissez-faire attitude toward space. Quite the opposite, it will involve extremely well defined and reasoned programmatic ideas which have emerged from rigorous theoretical, typological and local analysis. The only prequesite conditions are that the space must contain an auditorium, it must be public and it must serve as a clear summation of a year’s intellectual enquiry. Model briefs will be provided, which you can adapt to suit your specific focus.

Type You will not find a facsimile of this building type. How can one devise the atypical by means of studying type? Its ambiguity means you must study type with a view toward adaptation. The first exercise is devised to make you consider how you can draw on type as a set of ideas - as a kind of rule-set of thematic and conceptual principles which can guide you in the design process and allow you to position what you are trying to achieve within a broader canon of work.

Stage 1 Typical! Several case studies are listed below, each with their own qualities of unique programmatic and tectonic thinking. In the main, the auditoria in these buildings are on a far larger scale than you will be working with. However, they have been selected to make you consider how auditoria might relate to broader theatrical landscapes, both internal and external. They also range hugely in scale. The larger scale examples should not be any more onerous than the smaller ones, the task being to simply establish a set of organisational principles which can be represented through simple diagrammatic drawings. You will work in pairs. 1. Selgas Cano, Youth Factory, 2. Cedric Price, Fun Palace, 3. Rex, Dallas Theatre 4. Selgas Cano Auditorium / Congress in Plasencia, 5.Barbican (Theatre tba), 6. Denys Lasdun, National Theatre, 7. Norman Foster, Gateshead Sage, 4. Selgas Cano, El B, Cartagena, 2011. Working in your studio groups, your task is twofold: 1. Analysis First, pull apart each case study project and analyse its anatomy. Ask yourself the following questions: Is the building really public? Why have the spaces (including exterior spaces) been assembled in their particular way? What is the organisational strategy in the the relationship between enclosed and open spaces and private and public spaces What social structures and rituals are played out in these spaces. What are their temporal cycles? What part does/do the building envelope(s) play in this?

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Above and right: Student case study analyses’ Below: Comparative matrix. Bernard Tschumi, Strategies of Disjunction. Parc de la Villette, 1984.

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2. Taxonomy Then, within your studio groups, consider how you might make a comparative classification of types - a taxonomy. Each studio group will then curate their findings into a poster and a bound taxonomoligical book entitled: University of Dundee, Year 2 Architecture The Dramaturgical Public: An Analysis of Threshold in Theatrical Buildings. [Names] The book should contain a double page spread on each of the buildings, including an explanation of the analysis, followed by a double page spread illustrating a comparative matrix. Submission: End of week 17 [Taxonomological book and associated poster].

Stage 2 The Social Field In your semester 1 projects, you will have hopefully become aware of the importance of addressing the surrounding collective realm in developing residential propositions. Now, we reverse the situation. You will be required to implant propositions for a public building into an existing, established residential community. There must be a reciprocal understanding between a new implanted building and the territory within which it is implanted. This stage therefore requires you to analyse the surrounding collective realm. You will be allocated a site with particular programmatic potentials derived from its contiguous territories. In stage 3, you will implant propositions for a public building into an established residential community. Such an implant will deliver activity and stimulate its locality, but equally it will be stimulated and informed by its locality. At this stage, you will research in detail the history, social ambition and the architecture of the estate; to analyse how it operates today; to fully understand and map out its existing balance between public and private territories; and to begin to formulate ideas about what the community might need. You will carefully consider how different populations will interact with existing and new programmes and with each other. What are the temporal and cyclical structures of these programmes? How do they connect with existing public and private facilities? Accordingly, you will develop your own brief, derived from well-defined and well-reasoned programmatic ideas which have emerged from rigorous theoretical, typological, social and cultural analysis. Much writing exists on Golden Lane and Barbican and you can rely on published material as a base for most of your drawings of built context. The information must of course be brought to an appropriate scale and re-drawn. You should, however, where possible and without causing annoyance to residents or estate management, measure the area of the site within which your proposition will be centred (see p47). Both estates are also listed and useful information can be found on the following council website: https://www.cityoflondon.gov.uk/services/environment-and-planning/planning/heritage-and-design/listed-buildings/Pages/ Golden-Lane-Listed-Building-Management-Guidelines.aspx Submission: End of week 18 [Detailed graphical presentation of research and analysis, including site models].

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Stage 3 The Propositional Field Within the field of commodity and spectacle in The City, there are a few notable anomalies. We are working across two of those - two adjacent residential estates, each unique in its own way and each somewhat self-contained. They can of course be considered as separate entities. However, more interesting is the consideration of them together - and particularly when not only their contiguous boundaries are dissolved, but their connections with the rest of the surrounding city are examined. In this way, we can begin to consider the area as what might be considered a social condenser. You should investigate the meaning of the term social condenser. As a start, it is described by Michał Murawski & Jane Rendell as “suffused with vivid connotations pertaining to electricity, radiation and magnetism, the social condenser is a concept with an extraordinary, totalising reach. In its very formulation, it encompasses society’s economic and material infrastructure, the humdrum minutiae of everyday life as well as the unruly domains of the transcendental and fantastical. Crucially, it also encompasses the entire domain of architectural endeavour: from dwelling and work to public space and everything in between.”1 This investigation involves the dissolution of boundaries, allowing you to view the area as a continuous social fabric rather than a series of individual buildings. In line with Murawski & Rendell’s definition, your propositions should be considered as an opportunity to exploit the area’s socially condensive capacity, drawing on the surrounding activities and considering infrastructural and programmatic connectivities through and around it. Your projects will deploy architecture “as a way to forge radical new kinds of human collectivities: collectivities of cohabitation, of coproduction, of intellectual work; as well as collectivities of affect, beauty, empathy and passion.”1 Your propositions must demonstrate how they engage the theoretical ideas discovered through Hannah Arendt’s writing. They should be presented in the form of a Social Manifesto - an illustrated textual statement which clearly shows the relationship between your tectonic, conceptual and critical thinking. You will develop detailed architectural propositions, integrating critical insight with contextual, formal, spatial and tectonic strategies. You will put together a highly resolved project which is able to articulate a rigorous argument with meaningful efficacy toward the future. The sites are nuanced according to their contiguous activities: Site 1: Theatre and Concert. Site 2: Fashion and Education. The most likely building plots are given, but you should feel free to discuss with your tutors opportunities for transgressing these boundaries to accord with the specific interests you develop after careful analysis. The plots should be considered as an opportunity to exploit the area’s socially condensive capacity, drawing on the adjacent programmes and considering infrastructural and programmatic connectivities through and around the sites. In this way they can act as key linchpins in bringing the area together socially. You should analyse the physical and social connectivity of the site and how your interventions might engage this. Working with others on this is encouraged.

1 Michał Murawski & Jane Rendell (2017) The social condenser: a century of revolution through architecture, 1917–2017, The Journal of Architecture, 22:3, 369-371, DOI: 10.1080/13602365.2017.1326680

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FASHION / EDUCATION SITE THEATRE SITE

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Submission: End of week 24 (Interim Review) Monday 22 April (Final Review) 1. Social Manifesto and resolved brief. Presentation of social manifesto (textual / illustrated), including discourse on theoretical text(s). The manifesto should resonate with a written accommodation brief. 2. Detailed Drawings Presentation of drawings and models illustrating design process, social, conceptual and tectonic ambition. Final plans, sections, elevations, axono(iso)metrics, digital 3d work and physical models.

Below: Model and axonometric drawing. Students: Jamie Kinghorn and Louisa Butler.

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Below: Three theatrical projects by Selgas Cano: 1. Auditorium in Cartagena, Plasencia, 2. Auditorium and Congress Centre, 3. Merida Factory Youth Movement. In these three projects you can see how the auditorium and surrounding spaces vary in their conceptual and organisational principles. In 1. the auditorium sits at the end of a linear route, which includes ramps, stairs and public spaces. In 2. everything is far more compact and the auditorium sits in the middle of a contained vertical assembly of spaces. In 3. there is no formal auditorium. Instead, a number of spaces operate within forms which themselves support a large canopy. The canopy defines and covers territory between and around the forms, which becomes an informal field of performative events.

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Analytical Fields and Trips Throughout the year you will study three cities, Dundee, Edinburgh and London. You will be invited to visit Edinburgh and London on field trips. Connected by a coastline, important road and rail infrastructures and a shared relationship with water, these cities cross the scalar spectrum of urban environments. It is expected that you will immerse yourselves in these environments, what they share and how they differ. What are the different qualities of urban life brought about by their different scales, densities, morphologies and typologies. You will be asked to make a presentation of this comparative study.

Dundee. Your home city, will be the site for Studio Project 1. The university campus will be your analytical field for a study into environmental, spatial and interpersonal qualities and temporalities It will play host to your proposition for a student accommodation building.

Edinburgh. In the first week of semester 1, as part of the humanities module you will visit Edinburgh. You will study and carry out a measured survey of one of the city’s great urban spaces - the Royal Mile. You will hopefully not only develop skills in measured survey work and drawing, but will critically examine its urban qualities and will draw on the experience as you consider the relationship between architecture and the social field in your design project work.

London. In semester 2, projects will locate in London in and around the socially pioneering Golden Lane Estate. During the field trip our base camp will be the adjacent Barbican Complex, notable for its socially condensive assemblage of different programmes and its fusion of open and contained spaces.

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Year 2 Architecture

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Appendices Timetables contain information on activities and venues for teaching across both semesters.

Module Guides contain important information including assessment information, grading criteria and learning outcomes. They can be viewed as individual documents on myDundee but should always be considered alongside the information contained in the main body of this booklet.

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Wk 0 Mon 03 Sep Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

AR21009 Humanities 2.1 Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context 1

AR21010 Technology 2 Envelope and Environment

Welcome Week

Year2 Semester 01 2018 / 19

Wk 1 Mon 10 Sep

Edinburgh Field Trip 10.00 Meet tutors in Old College Quad

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

10.00-17.00 Materials Workshop 1500 Digital Submission of Measured Drawings (Elevations and Threshold Plans) 09.30 Pin up of Printed Measured Drawings (Elevations and Threshold Plans)

Wk 2 Mon 17 Sep Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

10.00-12.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5013 15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

10.00-17.00 Materials Surgery

Wk 3 Mon 24 Sep Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

10.00-17.00 Materials Surgery

Wk 4 Mon 01 Oct Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

11.00-15.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Wk 5 Mon 08 Oct Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 7 Mon 22 Oct Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 8 Mon 29 Oct Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Reading Week

Wk 6 Mon 15 Oct

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

11.00-15.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018 15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36 10.00 Submission of Measured Drawings Component 2

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

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10.00-11.00 Lecture. J Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36

10.00-11.00 Lecture. J Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36


AR21011 Design Methods 2 Material and Form

Digital Skills

14.00 – 16.00 General Introduction + Lecture (Criticality) + Tutor Groups Allocation + Field Trip Information. Andy Stoane. M5013

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Autocad).

P r o j e c t

:

M a t e r i a l

M u t a t i o n s

14.00-1600 Lecture (Inspiration is for Amateurs). Andy Stoane. MSI LT 10.00-1200 Project Introduction (Material Mutations). Andy Stoane. M5018 / Tutorials

14.00-16.00 Lecture (What Does Tectonic Mean?) + introduction to Material Mutations 2. Andy Stoane. MSI LT Submission of Material Mutations 1 (Material). Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Autocad modelling /Exploded Axos)

14.00-16.00 Year meeting + introduction to Material Mutations 3 (Multiplication). MSI LT Submission of Material Mutations 2 (Programme). Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (3dMax).

14.00-16.00 Year Meeting + introduction to Material Mutations 4 (Social Field). Andy Stoane. MSI LT Submission of Material Mutations 3 (Multiplication). Tutorials / Site analysis 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (3dMax animate).

14.00-16.00 Lecture (Superficiality) + introduction to Material Mutations 5 (Data Art). Andy Stoane. MSI LT Submission of Material Mutations 4 (Social Field). Tutorials Inc Cornerstone Texts Inc Cornerstone Texts Inc Cornerstone Texts Inc Cornerstone Texts Submission of Material Mutations 5 (Data Art). X-FACTOR DAY. 10.00-1200 studio 12.30-16.00 TBC With tutors + guests.

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Acad site model)

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Rhino 1).

14.00-16.00 Year Meeting + introduction to Material Mutations 4 (Social Field). Andy Stoane. MSI LT Tutorials on Representation and Curation.

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Rhino 2).

Final Submission and Project Review.

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Wk 9 Mon 06 Nov

Project Digital Submission 11.00-13.00 Lecture (Appearances and Essences) + Discussion on Project: Mediating the Social Field 1. Andy Stoane. MSI LT

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

Wk 11 Mon 20 Nov Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

M e d i a t i n g

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

P r o j e c t

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

Wk 12 Mon 27 Nov

:

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Wk 13 Mon 04 Dec Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Tutorials

10.00-11.00 Lecture. J Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36 14.00-16.00 Year meeting + Discussion on Project: Mediating the Social Field 2. Andy Stoane. MSI LT Tutorials

10.00-11.00 Lecture. J Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36 10.00-17.00 Workshop on Project: Mediating the Social Field 3. A Stoane / J Roberston. Studio 14.00-16.00 Year meeting. A Stoane. MSI LT Studio Reviews (Structural Models, Tectonic Axonometric and Tectonic Manifesto) + Formative Advice on Semperean Perspectival Section.

11.00-13.00 Lecture. J Robertson / G Adam. MSI LT 10.00-17.00 Workshop on Project: Mediating the Social Field 4 inc cost infographic. Studio. 14.00-16.00 Year meeting. A Stoane. MSI LT Tutorials

10.00-11.00 Lecture. J Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36 14.00-16.00 Year meeting + Communication Workshop. Andy Stoane. MSI LT Final Submission and Project Review (Structural Models, Tectonic Axonometric, Tectonic Manifesto, Semperean Perspectival Section, Cost Infographic)

Examination TBC Examination TBC

Winter Vacation

Mon 18 Dec Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Mon 25 Dec Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Mon 01 Jan Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Mon 08 Jan Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Examinations

Wk 14 Mon 11 Dec Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

t h e

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. Tower Baxter 1.36

S o c i a l

F i e l d

Friday Wk10 Mon 13 Nov Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

10.00-11.00 Lecture and Introduction to Module and Project: Mediating the Social Field. Jim Robertson. Tower Baxter 1.36

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09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Rhion 3).

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Grasshopper 1).

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Grasshopper 2).

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White (Grasshopper 3).

Portfolio Review TBC

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Year2 Semester 02 2018 / 19 Wk 15 Mon 14 Jan

AR22009 Humanities 2.2 Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context 2 Please note that S2 Humanities lectures are subject to confirmation.

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 16 Mon 21 Jan

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 17 Mon 28 Jan Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Wk 18 Mon 4 Feb Tuesday Wednesday Thurs

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Friday

Wk 19 Mon 11 Feb

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Friday

Wk 20 Mon 18 Feb Tuesday Wednesday Thurs

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Friday Wk 21 Mon 25 Feb Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

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AR22008 Integrated Architectural Design Typology and Tectonics

Digital Skills

11.00-13.00 Project 3 (A Space of Appearance) Introduction + Lecture (Political Economy) + Tutor Groups Allocation + Field Trip Information. Andy Stoane. Dalhousie 3F01 LT3. 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White Field Trip – London Field Trip - London Field Trip - London 10.00-12.00 Lecture (Typical!) + Introduction to A Space of Appearance 1 (Typical!) Andy Stoane. MSI LT / Tutorials

09.00-10.00 Lecture. Jim Roberson, M5018 14.00-16.00 Year Meeting. Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White 09.00-10.00 Lecture. Jim Roberson, M5018 14.00-16.00 Year Meeting + Introduction to A Space of Appearance 2 (The Social Field). Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Submission and Project Review for Analysis + Taxonomy. Advice for final book / poster. 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

P r o j e c t

:

A

S p a c e

o f

A p p e a r a n c e

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

09.00-10.00 Lecture. Jim Roberson. M5018 10.00-11.00 Lecture. Tamer Gado. Old Med Sch 2.03 14.00-16.00 Lecture (Unprecedented). Students present Taxonomy book (digital). Lorens Holm / Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 10.00 Submission of A Space of Appearance 2 (The Social Field). X-FACTOR DAY. With tutors + guests. 10.00-12.00 Studio / 12.00-17.00 M5018 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White 09.00-10.00 Lecture. Jim Roberson. M5018 10.00-11.00 Lecture, Tamer Gado, Old Med Sch 2.03 14.00-16.00 Year Meeting + Introduction to A Space of Appearance 3 (The Dramaturgical Social Field). Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White 09.00-10.00 Lecture. Jim Roberson. M5018 10.00-11.00 Lecture. Tamer Gado. Old Med Sch 2.03 14.00-16.00 Year Meeting. Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

14.00-16.00 Lecture (Fun Palace). A Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01

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Wk 22 Mon 4 March Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Wk 23 Mon 11 March Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Wk 24 Mon 18 March Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Wk 25 Mon 25 March Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 27 Mon 29 April Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 28 Mon 06 May Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 29 Mon 13 May Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday

Easter Vacation Examination date TBC

Portfolio Examination + Review TBC – Sem 2 Examination TBC - Moderation of marks, completion +

Examinations

Mon 02 April Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Mon 09 April Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Mon April Tuesday Wednesday Thurs Friday Wk 26 Mon 22 April

15.00-17.00 Lecture. Joe Thurrott. M5018

Project Digital Submission TBC – in

External Exam External Exam Degree S

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Tutorials

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

14.00-16.00 Year Meeting + Lecture (Navigating Scales). Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Tutorials 09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

14.00-16.00 Year Meeting. Submission Guidelines. Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Interim Project Review.

09.30-16.00 CAD Suite. Rich White

14.00-16.00 Year meeting + Communication Advice. Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01

P r o j e c t

:

A

S p a c e

o f

A p p e a r a n c e

14.00-16.00 Year Meeting. Andy Stoane. Scrymgeour 4.01 Tutorials

Final Project Review Post-review drinks + reviewer comments

2 work pinned up, Semester 1 work in folio + compilation of assessment records for all 5 modules

ntegrated design. Marks onto SITS

minations TBC minations TBC Show TBC

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Design Methods 2 (20 Credits)

MArch Year 2

Module Guide

Material and Form: Material Mutations. The descriptions below are a summary of the information contained in the main Course Outline and Studio Guidance booklet. This guide should therefore always be read alongside the main booklet.

Brief Material Mutations will build understanding of the importance of two essential tenets in architectural design: Investigation into material qualities, processes and techniques; and iterative design through generative modelling and drawing. It sets out a six stage methodology which requires you to simultaneously be reflective and reflexive in design. An initial design for a single spatial cell must continually reflex as you reflect on its own performance as well as external factors introduced at each stage. Each stage will demand re-articulation of the proposition with increasing resolution and precision. Each project this year has a particular thematic focus - a focus which brings into play instrumental pieces of interconnected theoretical text. In this project, you will draw on the writings of Gottfried Semper, particularly his treatise on Style, and Gevork Hartoonian’s reflections on these writings from a contemporary perspective in his book Crisis of the Object. Semper discusses how a building engages the public realm through a tectonic dialogue between what he calls its core-form and its art-form – how it is made and how it is perceived. Hartoonian argues that our current age of spectacle has brought about a destruction of such a dialogue – a “loss of homology” between material, making and form. You will be expected to demonstrate understanding and engagement with these texts through your projects. The entire process, across all stages, should be recorded photographically and continually curated into a sequential narrative. Andy Stoane, Module Leader

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Methodology Stage 1 Material. You will be allocated a material with which you will start making tectonic experiments using a range of appropriate techniques. The crucial questions will be what can the material do and what opportunities are latent within it? Your tutors will then work with you on selecting a technique for you to focus on. Examples would be casting, bonding, interlocking, casting, folding ... The first experiments will simply explore potentials for structure and space formation without programmatic specificity. Stage 2 Response to Programme. With the familiar programme of student accommodation and the material opportunities you have discovered from stage 1, you will use a combination of scalar drawing and rapid modelling techniques to iterate through as many steps as possible, continually refining a proposition for a single generic accommodation cell. You will consider how the inherent qualities and techniques of the material can accommodate the formal, spatial and organisational logics necessary for the cell. Stage 3 Response to Multiplication. At this stage you will turn your attention to the multiplication of the cell to form a community. The community will contain ten cells over at least two floors and must contain spaces for use by everyone. The act of multiplication will raise questions of access (horizontal and vertical), relationship between private and public spaces, privacy (visual and acoustic), natural lighting and overshadowing. You will allow the original cell to adapt in response to these new constraints. Stage 4 Response to the Social Field. You will be allocated a site on campus. You will carry out a detailed analysis of the area around this site in groups, considering: - Physical context, which will involve a detailed measured survey of all physical elements around the site and accurate digital drawings for reproduction at 1:100. - Programme, typology and morphology, which will involve recording the uses of buildings and spaces and classifying them into architectural and morphological types. - Social interactions, which will involve monitoring, grading and representing different types of social patterns and social behaviour. - Temporality, which will involve monitoring and representing how the area changes over time, both in cyclical patterns (daily, weekly, seasonally etc) and in linear patterns (continuous processes). With the help of your tutor, you will then seek correlations across this analytical spectrum and discuss ways of representing them graphically. This will be taken forward to stage 5.. Stage 5 Data Art. You will distil a piece of data-driven graphical art from your stage 4 work. Drawing on given examples, the work will not be a representation of any physical qualities of your completed proposition. It will be an abstracted infographic, designed to make visual the activity, sociability and temporality of your area of the campus. It may also illuminate the correlations between these phenomena and the existing architecture as well as alluding to how you may wish to mediate or alter the situation with your proposition. Stage 6 Curation and Reflection. You will reflect on your complete body of work and carefully curate it into a linear exhibition panel.

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Module Timetable See detailed timetable in Course Outline and Studio Guidance booklet.

Aims and Outcomes

The module aims to allow students the opportunity to:

-

Experiment with digital and manual graphic techniques and how these might inform the development of architectural form and space, Consider in more depth and detail the experiential nature of architectural space Consider the role of material and detail in the formation of architectural character Engage with methods, tools and ideas employed in fine-art and related disciplines

Students will demonstrate broad knowledge & understanding of:

-

the scale, proportions and character of architectural space and how this might be experienced by the occupant. The properties and characteristics of materials The relationship between methods used in contemporary fine arts, related disciplines and architecture

Subject-specific practical intellectual skills + attributes. Students will be able to:

-

Utilise an understanding of materials, details, surface and light to inform an architectural design

Transferable, employability enterprise skills & attributes. Students will be able to:

-

creatively apply a range of making techniques, including both manual and digital tools, to conceptualize and communicate complex ideas

Assessment 10% group presentation of analysis of the social field. 90% coursework presented in a comprehensive individual portfolio of drawn, modelled and other materials supported by a critically reflective text. Including assimilation and individual curation of group work. Graded using the University of Dundee Assessment Scales. https://www.dundee.ac.uk/registry/exams/assessmentscales/

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Students must submit & attend all assessments to pass the module & all module outcomes must be passed to pass the module. Summative Assessment AR21011 Design Methods 2 Material and Form: Material Mutations Date: Tutor Group:

Student:

Assessor(s)

Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of: -

the scale, proportions and character of architectural space and how this might be experienced by the occupant. The properties and characteristics of materials. The relationship between methods used in contemporary fine arts, related disciplines and architecture.

Students will be able to: -

utilise an understanding of materials, details, surface and light to inform an architectural design. creatively apply a range of making techniques, including both manual and digital tools, to conceptualize and communicate complex ideas.

Submission Requirements:

complete

incomplete

non-submit

A linear panel incorporating a chronologically organised representation of drawings, models and diagrams from all six project stages and clear textual narrative. Original iterations of physical models through all six stages (minimum 15). Original A2 panels from each stage including Data Art infographic panel with clear demonstration of how it has been informed by stage 4 analysis of the social field. Plans, sections and other drawings of development stages and final iteration. Four A2 panels illustrating stage 4 group analysis of the social field. Fail QF-M1

Satisfactory D3-D1

Good C3-C1

Very Good B3-B1

Excellent A5-A1

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

- Insufficient understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Graphical editing and execution lack appropriate skills.

- Some understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Graphical editing and execution with some potential but lacking some key skills.

- Good understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Generally good graphical editing and execution which may be deficient in some areas.

- Very good understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Very good skills in graphical editing and execution.

- Excellent understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Meticulous graphical editing and execution.

- Limited critical thinking informing the work but there is some attempt to analyse and test the social field, material exploration, material technique and tectonic application. The design response is principally built on recognised method.

- Robust critical thinking informing the work in some areas of: the social field, material exploration, material technique and tectonic application. The design response may contain some original components but is principally built on recognised method.

- Robust critical thinking is informing the work in most, but not necessarily all, areas of: the social field, material exploration, material technique and tectonic application. The design response contains original components which are incorporated with intelligence and intellectual rigour.

- A high level of critical thinking through the work in areas of: the social field, material exploration, material technique and tectonic application. The design response is highly original, intellectually rigorous and well positioned within a fully understood canon of work.

- Little understanding and use of iterative design methods and the project fails to synthesise thinking in areas of theoretical discourse, social analysis, form, spatial organisation and varied contexts.

- An understanding and use of iterative design methods, yet a lack of synthesised thinking in areas of theoretical discourse, social analysis, form, spatial organisation and varied contexts.

- Good understanding and use of iterative design methods and some attempt to develop projects through thinking in areas of theoretical discourse, social analysis, form, spatial organisation and varied contexts. This thinking may not be fully synthesised.

- Good understanding and use of iterative design methods and a good attempt to develop projects through synthesised thinking in areas of theoretical discourse, social analysis, form, spatial organisation and varied contexts.

- Little or no hands-on investigatory engagement with materials, processes and techniques.

- A hands-on investigatory engagement with materials, processes and techniques.

- A hands-on investigatory engagement with materials, processes and techniques.

- A hands-on investigatory engagement with materials, processes and techniques.

- Insufficient critical thinking informing the work and little meaningful analysis or testing of the social field, material exploration, material technique and tectonic application. The design response is not built on any rigorous intellectual enquiry.

Assessor comments (overleaf)

- Excellent understanding and use of iterative design methods to develop projects through fully synthesised thinking in areas of theoretical discourse, social analysis, form, spatial organisation and varied contexts. - An innovative hands-on investigatory engagement with materials, processes and techniques.

Agreed Grade

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AR21010 Architectural l Technology 2.0  (20 Credits) 

MArch Year 2   

 

Module Guide 

                 

Envelope and environment, mediating the social field  

Brief 

In this project we ask you to demonstrate a developing knowledge and understanding of materials  and their properties and their application in the craft of making architectural environments  through the iterative process of drawing and modelling where social concepts and agreements are  as important as technological methodologies.   

The boundaries and thresholds of space mediate the transition from one environment to another,  an architectural façade is one example of a building element which performs this role; such  constructed boundaries function on a technical level providing shelter, light, thermal control and  ventilation however the building envelope may transcend the technical to express ideas and  beliefs which encompass or relate to the cultural and physical context of the building. The latent  potential for the façade to exceed the practical will shape your enquiry and by developing an  understanding of the building envelope as something which mediates between significantly  different environments you will investigate, test and demonstrate your thoughts on how the limits  of constructed space can be assembled and composed to meet the needs of building users  alongside the ambitions and objectives of a shared society. Individuals might inhabit internal space  however they are also part of a greater community who will negotiate the thresholds and places  which begin at the periphery of constructed environments.   

You will continue to build upon previous experimental modelling, reflections and ideas fostered  during earlier Material Mutations stages however the objective of this module is to shift focus  towards the articulation of the architectural envelope and its associated structures. You will  explore the capacity for architectural form to encompass and communicate diverse and complex  influential factors considered by architects in the design and making of buildings.    James E Robertson, module leader

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Methodology The studio programme includes sequential investigative design exercises relating to space,  structural form and the modification of an internal environment and is explored through active  participation in self‐directed and tutored creative exercises in studio.   

Students will also consciously and carefully record their design development and critical thinking  throughout the design process.   

The accompanying lecture programme will introduce students to the basic principles of  environmental design strategies in relation to material specification and structural form.  Students will also begin to study the relationship between construction methods, programme,  materials and cost.   

Physical modelling is an essential component.   

Reading Materials  

 

Materials for Architectural Design by Victoria Ballard Bell published by Laurence King  Publishing, ISBN‐13: 978‐1856694803  Materials for Architectural Design 2 by Victoria Ballard Bell published by Laurence King  Publishing, ISBN‐13: 978‐1780670898  Introduction to Architectural Technology 2nd edition by William McLean, Pete Silver and  Dason Whitsett published by Laurence King Publishing ISBN‐13: 978‐1780672946 

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Assessment

80% of the final grade is attained through coursework presented in a portfolio review of  drawn and modelled materials supported by a verbal presentation    20% of the final grade is attained through examination of knowledge and understanding  through one 1 hour online multiple‐choice examination (closed book)    Students must submit & attend all assessments to pass the module & all module  outcomes must be passed to pass the module.   

Key Assessment / workshop dates     

Demonstrate broad  knowledge &  understanding   

Subject‐specific practical  intellectual skills +  attributes  Transferable,  employability enterprise  skills & attributes 

Friday 23rd November: year meeting and design workshop  Friday 30th November: year meeting and design workshop  Monday 10th December: pin up review and summative assessment  Thursday 13th December: Summative online multiple‐choice assessment 

Outcomes 1. the relationship between architectural form, structure, and the building  envelope,   2. the environmental modification of an internal space or volume and principles  underpinning environmental and sustainable design strategies,  3. the potential financial implications of design decisions including form,  construction and material choices  4. use experimental and investigatory modelling as a representation of critical  thinking;   5. analyse, critically evaluate and communicate how design decisions have been  taken. 

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Summative Assessment 

AR21010 Architectural Technology 2.0 Envelope & Environment

Date:

Tutor Group: 

Student:

Assessor(s)

Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of:   the relationship between architectural form, structure, and the building envelope,    the environmental modification of an internal space or volume and principles underpinning environmental and  sustainable design strategies,  Students will be able to:   Use experimental and investigatory modelling as a representation of critical thinking;    Analyse, critically evaluate and communicate how design decisions have been taken.   

Submission Requirements:  Previous coursework from the 1st design module + record of current design development  A typed manifesto statement (to appear within the graphic presentation) Conclusive 1:20 part model demonstrating envelope material form, space and structure. Conclusive 1:50 exploded axonometric demonstrating building assembly and structure   1:20 (or as directed by your tutor) conclusive scaled spatio‐sectional drawing demonstrating the construction of the envelope and structure; the tone of internal  space(s) (surface, daylight, shadow); the fuction / use of both internal and external space.  Fail  The application of basic  modelling and exploratory  skillsets are largely  absent; analytical and  evaluative skillsets are  largely absent.   

Elements of the  submission requirements  are missing or incomplete  and the presented project  work is inconclusive.   

The presented work fails  to demonstrate a basic  understanding of the  needs and requirements  of building users.   

The presented work fails  to demonstrate a basic  understanding of  supporting structures;  evidence of a developing  understanding of how  building facades are  assembled is vague. 

 

Satisfactory The application of basic  modelling skillsets is  limited and do not fully  contribute to the  exploration of material  properties and form;   the application of basic  analytical are limited and  do not fully contribute to  the exploration of the  building context in  relation to programme   

The presented work  demonstrates a limited  understanding of the  needs and requirements  of building users.   

The presented work  demonstrates a limited  understanding of  structure; a developing  understanding of how  building facades are  assembled is evidenced  however certain aspects  remain unresolved. 

Good The exhibited work is  presented to a good  level of resolution and  the design response is  largely relevant  supported by an  adequate standard of  exploratory modelling,  analysis, testing and  critical thinking.   

The interpretation of  influential factors in the  design and assembly of  the building envelope  are relevant and the  exploration of the  principal project theme  is evidenced to an  adequate resolution.   

The relationship  between building users  and the articulation of  the building façade is  evidenced to an  appropriate level  however some aspects  of evidenced  environmental design  demonstrate a limited  understanding. 

Assessor comments (overleaf) 

complete

Very Good  The exhibited work is  presented to a very good  level of resolution and the  design response is clearly  supported by a convincing  body of exploratory  modelling, interrogative  analysis, testing and critical  thinking.   

The interpretation of  influential factors in the  design and assembly of the  building envelope are  convincing and logical and  the evidenced exploration  of the principal project  theme is very good.   

The relationship between  building users and the  articulation of the building  façade is clearly evidenced;  the work evidences that  the façade is assembled to  actively modify the internal  environment.   

incomplete

non‐submit

       

Excellent The exhibited work is  presented to an excellent  level of resolution and the  design response is  creative and inspirational.    The exploration of the  principal project theme is  evidenced and supported  by a body of creative and  sophisticated materials. 

The investigation of the  building context and  influential factors are  supported by a high  standard of interrogation  and critical thinking.   

The interpretation of  influential factors in the  design and assembly of  the building envelope are  insightful.    The relationship between  the modification of the  internal environment and  the articulation of the  building façade is  excellent. 

Agreed Grade

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University of Dundee – Architecture – Year 2 – Humanities - Module Guide – AR21009 – 03.09.2018

Humanities 2.1 Between Thinking and Making: modern architecture in context Semester 1 Part 1: Lecture series on the origins of modern architecture (1753 – 1933) Part 2: Measured drawing Credit Rating

20 credits

Tutor

Joseph Thurrott

Aims / Objectives The aim of this module is -

To gain an insight into the relationship between the conceptual aspects of the design process (thinking) and the technologies, techniques and materials which are ultimately responsible for the physical manifestation of the architectural idea (making).

-

To further develop observational, analytical and communication skills

-

To allow students an opportunity to study key architectural precedents in-situ

The module is structured in two parts: Part 1 consists of a series of lectures covering the origins of modern architecture from the Age of Enlightenment (the dawn of the modern era, circa 1750) through the formative decades of International Modernism in architecture (between the two world wars) up until the closure of the Bauhaus in Dessau, Germany. Each lecture is structured around the analysis of a particular ‘cutting edge’ building that was at the forefront of thinking and making in the cultural context of its time. In addition to informal in-class tests at the outset of each lecture, students will have the opportunity to formally articulate their knowledge of the lecture content through a series of essays. Part 2 consists of an elevation drawing (including the plan of the elevation), in pencil, involving detailed observations and measurements of a delegated historic building. Intended Learning Outcomes On successful completion of the module students will demonstrate: A knowledge and understanding of: -

The development of modern architecture, from 1753 to 1933 and the theoretical ideas which underpinned this,

The ways that cultural, social, intellectual and technological histories influence the design of buildings in this period,

The progressive abstraction of representation in the fine arts and its relevance and impact on architecture.

Subject-specific practical and intellectual skills and attributes: they will be able to ⋅

Record and document the measurements of an existing building and present them as a measured drawing to a specific scale.

1

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University of Dundee – Architecture – Year 2 – Humanities - Module Guide – AR21009 – 03.09.2018

Transferable, employability and enterprise skills and attributes: they will be able to -

Use a range of methods and media to communicate their analysis clearly and effectively

Preamble Architecture is hard to pin down. It exists in a state of in-between. Between art and science, form and function, ideal and the practical, universal and the particular, subjective and objective, earth and sky. Throughout history, architects have concerned themselves with achieving a synthesis of ‘utilitas, firmitas, venustas’ (utility, solidity and beauty). Arguably, the great architectural masterworks of each epoch contain a balance of all three. However, our judgment of most buildings tends to oscillate between how well it functions, if it is fit for purpose (utilitas); how well it stands up, if the structure is appropriate (firmitas) and how it moves us (venustas). Designing a building and having the design constructed is a complex process involving many factors. Reading between the lines of utilitas, firmitas, and venustas, a great building is one which is attuned to the culture, technology and ideals of its place and time. Curriculum Part 1: Lecture series on the origins of modern architecture (1753 – 1933) •

Unless otherwise noted, lectures are every Thursday from 15:00 to 17:00 in the Tower building, Baxter lecture theatre, first floor, room number 1.36

Lecture 0

(week 1 - 13.09.18) Introduction: overview of the lecture series

Lecture 1

(week 2 - Note: Wednesday lecture: 19.09.18, from 10:00 to 12:00, LT5013)

Lecture 2

(week 2 - 20.09.18) Dawn of the modern era Form, function and the beginnings of abstraction

Lecture 3

(week 4 - Note: Wednesday lecture: 03.10.18, from 10:00 to 12:00, LT5013) Primacy of structure: iron in architecture • selection of first essay question at end of lecture

Lecture 4

(week 7 - Note: Wednesday lecture: 24.10.18, from 11:00 to 13:00, LT5018) Rain, steam and speed: the triumph of industry

Lecture 5

(week 7 - 25.10.18) Architecture + engineering • digital submission of first essay

Lecture 6

(week 8 - 01.11.18) Art and craft in the machine age • selection of second essay question at end of lecture

Lecture 7

(week 9 - 08.11.18) An architectonic conception of space 2

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University of Dundee – Architecture – Year 2 – Humanities - Module Guide – AR21009 – 03.09.2018

Lecture 8

(week 10 - 15.11.18) Towards a new architecture • digital submission of second essay

Lecture 9

(week 11 – 22.11.18) Less is more • selection of third essay question at end of lecture

Lecture 10

(week 12 - 29.11.18) Bauhaus: a new unity of art and technology (week 13 – 06.12.18) • digital submission of third essay

Part 2: Measured drawing •

10am, Monday 10 September 2018: measuring of buildings in Edinburgh.

3pm, Friday 14 September 2018: upload of digital scan of hand-drawing onto MyDundee.

10am, Monday 17 September 2018: pin-up of original hand-drawings.

3

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University of Dundee – Architecture – Year 2 – Humanities - Module Guide – AR21009 – 03.09.2018

Images on preceding page by 2013-2014 year 2 student Alexandre Ronse de Craene. Note the trace of the construction lines in the hand drawing on the left. The proportional accuracy, line weight and attention to detail is exemplary. For the measured drawing exercise, students are required to measure and record the proportions and details that make up the front elevation of an individual building situated in an historic city centre context; this will include measuring the height, width and depth of the façade as well as the plan of the elevation. The aforementioned shall be documented in the student’s sketchbook.

Upon return to Dundee, students are required to transfer the

information from their sketchbooks, by hand, onto an A1-size sheet of cartridge paper with a weight of at least 200g/m2, at 1:20 scale.

The goal of the exercise is the production of a

proportionally accurate, hand-drawn, orthographic projection elevation drawing (including the plan of the elevation) of the student’s delegated building. The drawing should delineate the state of the building as recorded; with all the imperfections that would be normal for an historic building to reveal over its lifetime. Drawings will be displayed side-by-side in a group presentation.

Each A1 size hand drawing shall be accompanied by an A4 size sheet

comprising a black and white photographic elevation image of the building (photographed by the student in-situ) along with the address and a few words describing the building (when it was built, who the architect / client was, if known). Formal assessment is via design review by a tutor judging panel.

Assessment: Part 1: Lecture series (60% of module) As each lecture is based on specific chapters in the textbook and supplementary reading (see Preparation / Support). Students are expected to read the contents of the aforementioned before each lecture in order to maximise their learning experience during the delivery of the lecture. There are three separate essays to submit in order to pass the module. Each essay is a response to a given question based on the content of the lectures. Each essay must be at least 1,000 words (maximum 1,250 words) and should include relevant images to support the text. Each essay is worth 20% of the overall module grade. The average grade for Part 1 must be a pass in order to pass the module.

Part 2: Measured drawing (40% of module) Drawings are graded by a tutor judging panel according to the following criteria: •

Proportional accuracy

Line weight

Attention to detail

Note: drawings must be in pencil only; they may be rendered with pencil at the student’s discretion (shading of windows, delineating the texture of masonry, etc.). 4

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University of Dundee – Architecture – Year 2 – Humanities - Module Guide – AR21009 – 03.09.2018

Materials / Equipment Required Part 1: Paper and pen/pencil / laptop / tablet, etc. for taking notes during the lectures as required. Part 2: •

Hardback sketchbook, minimum A5 size, with good quality paper

Tape measure (5m recommended)

We also recommend a digital camera

Preparation / Support Part 1: Bibliography of required reading:

Bergdoll, Barry, European Architecture 1750 – 1890, Oxford University Press, 2000.

Curtis, J. R. William., Modern Architecture Since 1900, Third Edition, Phaidon Press Limited, London, 2003.

Frampton, K., Modern Architecture a Critical History, Third Edition, Thames & Hudson, 2002.

Hearn, M.F. (Editor), The Architectural Theory of Viollet-le-Duc, Readings and Commentary, MIT Press, third printing, 1995.

Le Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture, translated from the thirteenth French edition and with an introduction by Frederick Etchells, Dover Publications, Inc., New York, 1986.

Hitchcock, H.R., Architecture: Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries, Yale University Press, Pelican History of Art, 1977.

Roth, Leland M., Understanding Architecture Its elements, History, and Meaning, second edition, Westview Press, 2007.

Part 2: Recommended reading: •

Unwin, Simon. Analysing Architecture, 4th Ed. Routledge, 2014

Ching, Francis, D.K. Design Drawing, 2nd Ed. John Wiley & Sons Inc., 2010

Student Feedback & Absence Reporting Refer to the student issues section of the Architecture Programme Handbook 5

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University of Dundee - Architecture

Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context Joseph Thurrott – updated: 03.09.2018

AR21009 - Part I: Origins of Modern Architecture (1753 – 1933)

LECTURE SUMMARY and READING Title

Context

00

Introduction to the lecture series

Overview of lectures 1 through 20

1

The dawn of the Modern era

End of the Baroque, dawn of modernity

2

Form, function and the beginnings of abstraction.

Scientific, industrial and social revolutions.

Thinking

Making

Building Type

Reading

Marc-Antoine Laugier: the ‘Primitive Hut’ the embodiment of a new architecture.

French Pantheon, Church of SainteGeneviève, Paris, 1757-1789, Jacques-Germain Soufflot architect.

Mausoleum

1. European Architecture 1750–1890, pg. 9-32.

The ‘loss of absolute authority’ of Renaissance norms and theories of classical ‘Antiquity’

1. Royal Saltworks at Arcet-Senans, France, 17751779, ClaudeNicolas Ledoux architect.

1. Factory

2. Understanding Architecture, pg. 438-447.

2. European Architecture 1750–1890, pg. 97-102. 2. Bridge 3. Understanding Architecture, pg. 447-451, 462-467.

2. Severn Bridge at Coalbrookdale, England, 17751779, Abraham Darby industrialist. 3

Primacy of structure: the use of iron in architecture

Industrialisation, the collapse of vernacular traditions and new building types.

How to evolve a genuine culture in the face of the more brutish aspects of mass production?

Bibliotheque Ste.Genevieve, Paris, 1838-1850, Henri Labrouste architect

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: Introduction and chapter 1.

Library

1. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part I, chapter 3 (pg. 29-36). 2. European Architecture 1750–1890, pg. 179-184. 3. Understanding Architecture, pg. 499-502. 4. The Architectural Theory of Viollet-le-Duc, pg. 1-15.

4

Rain, Steam and Speed: the triumph of industry

The Great Exhibition of 1851.

Historical progress and the quest for an ‘authentic’ style of the times.

The Crystal Palace, Hyde Park, London, 1851, Joseph Paxton.

Exhibition Hall

1. European Architecture 1750–1890, pg. 207-218. 2. Understanding Architecture, pg. 486-491. 3. Architecture: 19th and 20th Centuries, pg. 169190.

1

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University of Dundee - Architecture

Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context Joseph Thurrott – updated: 03.09.2018

AR21009 - Part I: Origins of Modern Architecture (1753 – 1933)

5

6

7

8

Title

Context

Thinking

Making

Building Type

Reading

Architecture + engineering: the struggle for reconciliation

Chicago, 1871: the development of the skyscraper.

Brave new world: ‘Form follows function’ and the ‘Tall Office Building Artistically Considered’.

Guaranty Building, Buffalo, NY, 1894 - 1895, Louis Sullivan and Dankmar Adler architects.

Office

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: chapter 2.

Art and Craft in the Machine Age

In the latter half of the nineteenth century, society was split between those who embraced the machine age and those who were highly critical of it.

The Arts and Crafts movement and Art Nouveau.

Glasgow School of Art, 1897-1909, Glasgow, Scotland, Charles Rennie Mackintosh architect

School

Breaking up the box: an architectonic conception of space

Diverse influences and events: Japanese vernacular architecture, Frank Lloyd Wright in America and the aftermath of WWI in Europe.

Frank Lloyd Wright and the Art and Craft of the Machine. De Stijl and the architectonic conception of space.

Schroder House, Utrecht, 1924, Gerrit Rietveld architect

House

Towards a new architecture

Post war reconstruction and the need for new housing.

Le Corbusier and L’Esprit Nouveau.

Villa Savoye, Poissy, France, 1929-1931, Le Corbusier

House

2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part II, chapter 2 (pg. 51-56).

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: chapters 3 + 5. 2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part II, chapter 1 (pg. 42-46) + chapter 5 (pg. 74-77).

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: chapter 7 + 9. 2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part II, chapter 3 (pg. 57-63) + chapter 16 (pg. 142-148).

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: chapter 10 + 16. 2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part II, chapter 17 (pg. 149-160). 3. Towards a New Architecture: pg. 85-148.

9

Less is More: exploring the essence of architecture

The search for essential truths: the desire to return to a true correspondence between form and content.

How can the will of an epoch be translated into space?

German Pavilion, International Exposition, Barcelona, 19281929, Mies van der Rohe architect

Pavilion

1. Modern Architecture Since 1900, chapter 15. 2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History: Part II, chapter 18 (pg. 161-166).

2

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University of Dundee - Architecture

Between Thinking and Making: Modern Architecture in Context Joseph Thurrott – updated: 03.09.2018

AR21009 - Part I: Origins of Modern Architecture (1753 – 1933)

10

Title

Context

Thinking

Making

Bauhaus: a new unity of art and technology

Craftsmanship vs. mass production

Is it possible to reconcile massproduction with the individual artistic spirit?

Bauhaus Dessau, 1925-1926, Walter Gropius architect

Building Type School

Reading 1. Modern Architecture Since 1900: chapter 11. 2. Modern Architecture: a Critical History, Part II, chapter 12 (pg. 109-115) + 14 (pg. 123-129).

3

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Integrated Design 2 (40 Credits)

MArch Year 2

Module Guide

TOWER OF BUREAUCRACY

Typology and Tectonics: A Space of Appearance. The descriptions below are a summary of the information contained in the main Course Outline and Studio Guidance booklet. This guide should therefore always be read alongside the main booklet.

Brief A Place of Appearance builds on the understanding of architectural plurality, specifically its correlation with the social field of the city. It draws on Hannah Arendt’s book ‘The Human Condition’ in which she discusses what she considers to be “the loss the world” through our elimination of “the public sphere of action and speech” in favour of the private world of introspection. According to Arendt, the public sphere is contracted to two distinct but interrelated dimensions, the space of appearance and the common world. Both these dimensions are spatial - they involve an understanding of the city, and consequently its architecture, as a field of pluralistic action. Semester 2’s project will therefore locate in an area of intense population and activity, yet an area of little pluralistic action – The City of London. Here, amidst architecture of commodity and spectacle, you will seek potential to reclaim some common world. The yield of your investigations and discoveries will be played out in a detailed proposition for an architecture of public performance. You will focus on two urban anomalies – the estates of Golden Lane (Chamberlin, Powell and Bon, 1952-57) and the Barbican Estate by the same architects (196576). You will address public interfaces on their edges, questioning the place of different occupants in the public realm, their interactions, and the avoidance of socio-spatial seclusions. Your ambition will be to devise a truly public building - A Space of Appearance. Andy Stoane, Module Leader

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Methodology Stage 1 Typical! involves the critical analysis of case studies - with a view to understanding how to inform the atypical through studying type. You will pull apart each case study and analyse its anatomy, asking yourself the following questions: Is the building really public? Why have the spaces (including exterior spaces) been assembled in their particular way? What is the organisational strategy in the relationship between enclosed and open spaces and private and public spaces What social structures and rituals are played out in these spaces? What are their temporal cycles? What part does/do the building envelope(s) play in this? In groups, you will consider how you might make a comparative classification of types - a taxonomy. You will curate your findings into a bound taxonomoligical book and a poster. Stage 2 The Social Field requires you to analyse the surrounding collective realm. You will be allocated a site with particular programmatic potentials derived from its contiguous territories. In stage 3, you will implant propositions for a public building into an established residential community. Such an implant will deliver activity and stimulate its locality, but equally it will be stimulated and informed by its locality. At this stage, you will therefore be expected to research in detail the history, social ambition and the architecture of the estate; to analyse how it operates today; to fully understand and map out its existing balance between public and private territories; and to begin to formulate ideas about what the community might need. You will carefully consider how different populations will interact with existing and new programmes and with each other. What are the temporal and cyclical structures of these programmes? How do they connect with existing public and private facilities? Accordingly, you will develop your own brief, derived from well-defined and well-reasoned programmatic ideas which have emerged from rigorous theoretical, typological, social and cultural analysis. Stage 3 The Propositional Field involves the dissolution of boundaries, allowing you to view the area as a continuous social fabric rather than a series of individual buildings - as what might be considered a social condenser. In the words of theorists Michal Murawski & Jane Rendell “the social condenser is a concept with an extraordinary, totalising reach. In its very formulation, it encompasses society’s economic and material infrastructure, the humdrum minutiae of everyday life as well as the unruly domains of the transcendental and fantastical. Crucially, it also encompasses the entire domain of architectural endeavour: from dwelling and work to public space and everything in between.”1 In line with Murawski & Rendell’s definition, your propositions should be considered as an opportunity to exploit the area’s socially condensive capacity, drawing on the surrounding activities and considering infrastructural and programmatic connectivities through and around it. Your projects will deploy architecture “as a way to forge radical new kinds of human collectivities: collectivities of co-habitation, of co-production, of intellectual work; as well as collectivities of affect, beauty, empathy and passion.”

Merida Factory Youth Movement, Salgas Cano, 2011

You will develop detailed architectural propositions, integrating critical insight with contextual, formal, spatial and tectonic strategies. You will put together a highly resolved project which is able to articulate a rigorous argument with meaningful efficacy toward the future. 1 Michał Murawski & Jane Rendell (2017) The social condenser: a century of revolution through architecture, 1917–2017, The Journal of Architecture, 22:3, 369-371, DOI: 10.1080/13602365.2017.1326680

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Module Timetable See detailed timetable in Course Outline and Studio Guidance booklet.

Aims and Outcomes

The module aims to allow students the opportunity to:

-

integrate knowledge gained across the curriculum, exploring structure, materials and construction as a primary design drivers in creating well-considered, well- resolved spaces

-

Investigate an architectural type through comparative drawn analysis

-

Explore the detail design of spaces which relate to human scale and use.

-

Consider in more detail the ways that buildings relate to, and impact upon, their environment.

Students will demonstrate broad knowledge & understanding of:

-

An architectural ‘type’ through reference to key precedents.

Subject-specific practical intellectual skills + attributes. Students will be able to:

-

Generate and communicate clear architectural ideas based on an understanding of context and programme, critically reflecting upon their work placing it within a broader cultural context

Make considered design proposals which reflect an understanding of users, clients, wider society and relevant legislation.

Evaluate and communicate structural, constructional and environmental ideas, demonstrating a creative and holistic approach to the integration of technology including the impact of buildings on their environment and the precepts of sustainable design.

-

Work with others to undertake an analytical study, communicating this both visually and verbally to a range of audiences.

Transferable, employability enterprise skills & attributes. Students will be able to:

Assessment 10% Group presentation of the taxonomological book and poster. 90% presented in a comprehensive individual portfolio of drawn and modelled materials supported by a critically reflective text. Including assimilation and individual curation of group work. Graded using the University of Dundee Assessment Scales. https://www.dundee.ac.uk/registry/exams/assessmentscales/

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Students must submit & attend all assessments to pass the module & all module outcomes must be passed to pass the module. Summative Assessment AR22008 Integrated Design 2 Typology and Tectonics: A Place of Appearance Date: Tutor Group:

Student:

Assessor(s)

Students will demonstrate a broad knowledge and understanding of: -

the scale, proportions and character of architectural space and how this might be experienced by the occupant. The properties and characteristics of materials. The relationship between methods used in contemporary fine arts, related disciplines and architecture.

Students will be able to: -

utilise an understanding of materials, details, surface and light to inform an architectural design.

-

creatively apply a range of making techniques, including both manual and digital tools, to conceptualize and communicate complex ideas.

Submission Requirements:

complete

incomplete

non-submit

Taxonomological book and panel. Presentation of detailed analysis of social field. Presentation of social manifesto (textual / illustrated), including discourse on theoretical text(s). Presentation of drawings and models illustrating design process, social, conceptual and tectonic ambition. Final plans, sections, elevations, axono(iso)metrics, digital 3d work and physical models.

Fail QF-M1

Satisfactory D3-D1

Good C3-C1

Very Good B3-B1

Excellent A5-A1

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

The exhibited work evidences:

- Insufficient understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Graphical editing and execution lack appropriate skills.

- Some understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Graphical editing and execution with some potential but lacking some key skills.

- Very good understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Very good skills in graphical editing and execution.

- Excellent understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Meticulous graphical editing and execution.

- Insufficient knowledge of architectural type; very limited attempt to extract crucial conceptual, spatial and tectonic ideas from it and to assimilate them intelligently into a design project.

- Some knowledge of architectural type; a reasonable attempt to extract crucial conceptual, spatial and tectonic ideas from it and to assimilate them intelligently into a design project.

- Good understanding of an appropriate level of resolution. Generally good graphical editing and execution which may be deficient in some areas.

- Very limited critical thinking, disjointed from project brief and design argument.

- Some critical thinking in the area of political economy, drawn from relevant theory, with an attempt to support a workable project brief and design argument.

- Insufficient ability to carry out, conceptualise and develop socially relevant programmatic, spatial and formal analysis of urban landscape.

- A fair ability to carry out, conceptualise and develop socially relevant programmatic, spatial and formal analysis of urban landscape, with an attempt to integrate it with tectonic thinking.

- Insufficient ability to understand, control and resolve modest scale architectural propositions technically, in areas of usability, spatial and environmental organisation, construction technology, material processes and applications, building legislation and cost.

- A basic ability to understand, control and resolve modest scale architectural propositions technically, in areas of usability, spatial and environmental organisation, construction technology, material processes and applications, building legislation and cost.

- A reasonable knowledge of architectural type; a good attempt at extracting crucial conceptual, spatial and tectonic ideas from it and to assimilate them intelligently into an atypical design project. - Some critical thinking I the area of political economy, drawn from relevant theory, supporting a well resolved project brief and design argument. - A good ability to carry out, conceptualise and develop socially relevant programmatic, spatial and formal analysis of urban landscape and to integrate it with tectonic thinking. - A good ability to understand, control and resolve modestscale architectural propositions technically, in areas of usability, spatial and environmental organisation, construction technology, material processes and applications, building legislation and cost.

Assessor comments (overleaf)

- A thorough knowledge of architectural type; a good ability to extract crucial conceptual, spatial and tectonic ideas from it and to assimilate them intelligently into an atypical project.

- An excellent knowledge of architectural type; a highly skilful ability to extract crucial conceptual, spatial and tectonic ideas from it and to assimilate them intelligently into an atypical project.

- Some good critical thinking in the area of political economy, drawn from relevant theory, supporting an original project brief and robust design argument.

- An excellent ability to integrate critical thinking in the area of political economy, drawn from relevant theory, with the formation of a highly original project brief and a robust design argument.

- A very good ability to carry out, conceptualise and develop socially relevant programmatic, spatial and formal analysis of urban landscape and to integrate it with tectonic thinking.

- An excellent ability to carry out, conceptualise and develop original and socially relevant programmatic, spatial and formal analysis of urban landscape and to integrate it with tectonic thinking.

- An very good ability to understand, control and resolve modest-scale architectural propositions technically, in areas of usability, spatial and environmental organisation, construction technology, material processes and applications, building legislation and cost.

- An excellent ability to understand, control and resolve modest-scale architectural propositions technically, in areas of usability, spatial and environmental organisation, construction technology, material processes and applications, building legislation and cost.

Agreed Grade

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THINK AND THINK SOME MORE. FROM TIME TO TIME, HUMANS ARE ENDOWED WITH THE CAPABILITY TO DISCOVER JUST A LITTLE MORE REGARDING THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THEIR ROLE IN THE COSMIC SCENARIO. YOU TOO MIGHT CATCH ONE OF THESE COSMIC FISH. R. Buckminster Fuller 83


This booklet brings together information and documentation necessary to study in Year 2 MArch (Hons) Architecture at University of Dundee. It is intended to be used by students, studio tutors and anyone else involved in the Year 2 programme. While the booklet providers a comprehensive overview of the year, it should always be read alongside other information provided by the university and coursework documents issued by academic staff throughout the semester.

YEAR 2 | CONSTRUCTING ALTERNATIVES | COURSE BOOKLET  
YEAR 2 | CONSTRUCTING ALTERNATIVES | COURSE BOOKLET  
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