Page 1

Placemaking for Sustainable Cities and Communities

DDD70014-Eco-Design Studio Andrew Renaut - 101545586 Project 3 October 2018


Introduction The site at 134 Little Bourke Street was selected by the team after visiting the Flinders Street end of Elizabeth Street, and the Queen Victoria Market three quarters of the way along Elizabeth Street. 134 Little Bourke Street was chosen because it was ‘virtually derelict’, and in need of a good design to bring it out of that state. The site is situated at the eastern end of Little Bourke between Russell and Exhibition Streets. This is the heart of Melbourne’s China Town precinct, and has a strong heritage. Nearby is the Chinese Museum. There are many Chinese restaurants in the area along with Chinese traders. These serve not only the Chinese community, but also the many tourists and theatre goers in the evening. The area is very busy from about 11am until 1am the next morning, 7 days a week. Melbourne has one of the oldest China Towns in the world, some say on par with New York and San Francisco in the United States. The earliest Chinese arrived soon after the colony was established in the early 1800s. The discovery of gold in central Victoria brought a torent of Chinese trying to make their fortune along with everyone else. The Chinese had a reputation of being particularly industrious compared to European miners, and were soon derided for being so. The colonial government even applied a levy on Chinese entering Victorian ports, so they had to walk from Robe in South Australia. The racism continued for many years, and the furniture manufacturers were prevented from supplying chairs for the 1880 exhibition, the opening of the first federal parliament, for example. Furthermore, the Chinese were portrayed in an appalling way by influential publications such as the Bulletin, whose mast head proclaimed “Australia for the White Man”. From 1896 to about 1963, all Australasian made furniture had to be stamped ‘European Labour Only’ or ‘Chinese Labour’. This was because the Chinese made the furniture under sweat shop conditions and underpaid their workers. This was a genuine concern at the time and various acts of parliament were passed over the years to ensure the law (and the stamps) was kept in place. The law was repealed in Victoria in 1958, but by this time there were few Chinese manufacturers remaining. (https://blogs.slv.vic.gov. au/such-was-life/european-labour-stamps-on-australian-furniture/) Nevertheless, as the years wore on and the Chinese became integrated and respected, and the overt the racism slowly evaporated.

Approach The team visited the nearby Chinese Museum to find out the history of the site. This was not successful. However, we did learn a little about the history of the Chinese in the area, such as their occupations. I then went to the State Library and investigated the old directories on Micro Fiche. What was to become the Sands and MacDougal directory was the most revealing. The current street numbering system wasn’t adopted until 1880, but the first directory stated that a John Bayn - Builder was at 131 together with Mrs Wilson, a milliner and dressmaker. William Barnard - Electro-plater and Silversmith, was at 133, and at 135 was a Richard Brennan - corn and hay dealer. In the 1860s there was a Chinese lodging house at 127 Little Bourke Street, a Robert Harem - grocer at 131, and a produce store at 135. The Right of Way was established where Corrs Lane is today. In the 1880s, 133 is listed as vacant land. At 135 James Liston was making “anti-friction” grease. The Munster Hotel was at 137, and the carpenter Ah Yet was in residence at 139. At the turn of the century Qong Kee was at 134, his neighbour was Tock Slin - cabinet maker. Things started to change in the 1940s with D. Smith - furniture manufacturer listed as occupying 134-138 in 1947. From 1950 to 1955 R. Jaffe is listed as a toolmaker, while in 1955 he is listed as Jaffe & Hucker, mtr & engr. The following year iconic Melbourne department store Pattersons took over and used the building as a warehouse - “furn-secdhand”. By the 1960s it was listed as Patersons - carpark or vacant land. This continued until 1974 when the directory ceased being printed. For some 80 years the site was used to manufacture furniture, so the proposal was to have some form of link to that occupation. Unfortunately, I could find no photographs or sketches that depicted that occupation in the area. (Other than the ones shown above.) In any case, the final content of any art work should be left to the community, namely the Chinese themselves. This document gives suggested examples.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

Source: State Library Victoria.

2


The Document This document is divided up into the various phases of the project. The initial research on the site was conducted by all on the team and is contained in an Appendix at the end of this document. 1. The first section - Exploring the possibilities - explores some of the various methods for improving the look of the two walls that border the site. They are: Green Walls - plants mounted on walls. These create a micro climate, and in the hot Melbourne summer would create relief when couple with the grass on the ground. The spray from the irrigation system would also help.

4. Final design. A mock-up of the final design was made once I had experimented with the halftones and layout. The screens were arranged to fit the size of the site. The four small ones fitted tightly along the south facing wall, while the four large screens fitted comfortably along the west facing wall. The walls were cleaned up, and grass overlaid the potholed dirt surface.

Mosaic murals - these are not uncommon around Melbourne and are virtually vandal proof, any paint washes off easily. However, the shier size of the walls make such an undertaking impractical. Stainless Steel screens - this was the preferred solution. Stainless steel can be etched and laser cut in various ways to make designs. Photographs can be reproduced also. 2. Screen specifications. This section deals with the technical aspects of the screen design. It gives the dimensions and size of the screens (Eight. 4 large and 4 small.) and the measurements of the key parts. It also defines the image areas, and LED lighting. Standard steel sizes were used for the calculations. 3. Final designs. Here there are various examples of the screens and how they look. For the large screens images were taken from the scroll that was made in 1988 for the Bicentenary of the colonisation of Australia. For the small screens a sketch, two photographs, and an image of a jar top were used, these being the only high quality images of the Chinese of the time that are not deeply racist. All the images were made grey-scale, and then a halftone was applied to simulate the laser on the stainless steel sheet. A test mock-up was then made to give the general feel of the design.

Source: Melbourne University Foy and Gibson Collection & State Library Victoria.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

3


Sustainability There are many guidelines for sustainability. Chris Ryan has a framework of six. They are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

Valuing prevention Preserving and restoring ‘natural capital’ Life-cycle thinking (closed system cycles) Increasing ‘eco-efficiency’ by ‘factor x’ Decarbonising and dematerialising the economy Focusing on design- of products and product-service

This project mostly focuses on guidelines 2 to 6. At a pinch we could also include principal 1 as we aim to rehabilitate the site, effectively preventing it from future development. We have also referenced the Future Melbourne, 2026 plan put out by the Melbourne City Council, and the United Nations, Global Goals for Sustainable Development. The site Sustainable development should consider environmental protection, economic practice, social responsibility and cultural diversity. The north eastern corner of the Melbourne CBD has a long and colourful history. From the prostitutes and illegal liquor trade in the Casselden area of Lonsdale Street, to what is now China town in eastern end of Little Bourke Street. Our focus is the plot of land at 132 Little Bourke Street. This piece of land has been used as a car-park for over 50 years, and is now heavily polluted. Vehicles leak poisonous fluids such as oils and radiator fluid, and tyres loose rubber. Prior to its use as a car-park buildings housed furniture manufacture and engineering works. The site is surrounded by two, three story walls to the north and east, and a narrow lane to the west. The site is level meaning water pools when it rains. Our solution is to create an open space that is inviting and sustainable. To this end, we propose an open space that adds to the existing facilities in the area such as the many Chinese restaurants, the FAD gallery, and the Chinese Museum. The Melbourne City Council in its Future Melbourne, 2026, plan suggests that the council will continue to be sustainable while acknowledging climate change. The site is a clean slate that can meet the aims of the MCC plan for Melbourne.

Source: Author Sustainability plans. There are numerous plans for sustainability. Two that provided the most promise for the site included the “Future Melbourne, 2026” plan, and the United Nations “Global Goals for Sustainable Development”. The United Nations goals are an extension of the Millennium Development Goals which started being implemented in 2000. (http://www.undp.org/ content/undp/en/home/sustainable-development-goals/background.html). These goals are mostly directed at developing nations where conditions remain in a poor state of affairs. Nonetheless, there are lessons to be learnt from some of the goals for developed nations. The goals we thought most relevant were: 1. No poverty. and 2. No hunger. “The SDGs aim to end all forms of hunger and malnutrition by 2030”. While this a tenuous link, this goal can be realised locally by providing excess food and drink from surrounding restaurants and the on site store, to the homeless and under privileged. A free “supermarket” will be set-up to give away this food in the evening. While we cannot life these people out of poverty, this will help them to survive.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

12. Responsible consumption and production. The products and produce the shop will stock will meet these goals by being organic and supplied from places as close as possible. This means that the meals will be seasonal. For things that are not grown in Victoria, preference will be given to the lowest food miles. We expect that CERES in Brunswick will supply the majority of the food. 7. Affordable and Clean Energy. and 13. Climate Action. The inner city does not lend itself well to renewable energy, roof tops have a small usable surface area in comparison to the usable floor space. This means any solar cells fitted currently do not fully power the building. Wind generation was tried on the Melbourne City Council building in Little Collins Street, but this has since been decommissioned due to variable wind patterns. While a small solar array is worth trying for most of the year the site receives little direct sunlight. The power that is needed in excess of what can be generated will be bought from sustainable sources on the wider electricity grid. 11. Sustainable Cities and Communities. This will be our main goal. The site is heavily degraded and will require industrial assessments and cleanup. Once complete the park will contribute to making Melbourne’s CBD a habitable place. Although there are not many office towers in this part of the city to bring office workers, and there are extensive parks are nearby, this will be a haven for the Chinese community, tourists, and theatre goers. The very fact that we are “greening” the site from a car-park makes a small, but worthwhile contribution to this goal.

4


The Future Melbourne, 2026 plan, envisions that “In 2026, Melbourne will be a sustainable, inventive and inclusive city that is vibrant and flourishing” (City of Melbourne, 2016) Thus, site has potential on a number of points: 1.3 Emit zero greenhouse gases. The plan hopes that Melbourne will become a zero net emitter of greenhouse gases. By placing solar cells on the site, we hope to achieve this as per goals 7 and 13 of the United Nations plan above. 1.4 Capture and reuse stormwater. This is a little difficult given the site and the surrounding buildings. Nonetheless, provision is being made for this, and the small amount of water the store gathers will provide some water for the plants to be grown on the site. The remaining water for the store (coffee and tea, washing up, hygiene, etc..) will come from the mains supply. 1.5 Use resources efficiently. By gathering excess food and giving it away in an orderly way, we aim to “close the waste loops and minimise waste production through resource recovery.” (p. 11.) Excess food from surrounding restaurants and cafés will be gathered at the site and given to homeless people or the needy. Homeless people gather in the city because of the safety of comradeship where the can look after one an other. While there are not many such people in this area, some sleep in the nearby Chinese square a few doors away. 2.1 A great place to be. The plan, suggests the site will be “A great place to be.” (p. 12) That means it will be “welcoming, accessible, safe, clean, and community focused.” Although the site is a small place, it will attract workers on weekdays, restaurant and theatre goers in the evenings, and tourists at all times. It can be used a community space at Chinese New Year celebrations, as well as other community events throughout the year. It will act as an extension to the memorial square further up the road. 2.2 A healthy community. The space will be a healthy place in an area that is not known for its health benefits. The trees will, in summer, cool and provide some clean air. It will be a place to relax, eat, and meet friends. Opportunities for exercise, meditation, and play will be available. 2.3 Designed for and by the people. This a key indicator of our project. The plan states: A Melbourne designed by the people and for the people will be a connected set of well-designed precincts or villages that celebrate and draw from their heritage, and where decisions reflect the priorities and views of an inclusive community. (p. 12.) The screens design will be decided in consultation with the local Chinese community and the Chinese Museum. The area has strong heritage ties and an equally strong community.

Source Author 2.5 Quality public spaces. This will be a high-quality space with materials that are vandal proof. Surfaces will be easily cleaned and graffiti proofed. This will not be Hosier or AC/DC lane. The design will reflect the wishes and needs of the local community. The will contribute to the: abundant public space for its diverse population. Through good design, our public spaces will be accessible, a˜ordable, sustainable, safe and well-utilised. Spaces will be designed to facilitate social connections by encouraging diverse activities in an open and welcoming environment. (p. 12.) 2.4 Affordable. The use of shipping containers that are no-longer fit for purpose, recycled wood, and steel, means that this project should be affordable for the Melbourne City Council. 2.5 An inclusive city. While the space will be primarily aimed at the Chinese community, all people will be invited to use it. Special consideration will be given to acknowledging the history of the site, furniture making, and the aboriginal community who inhabited the region prior to white settlement.

3.1 Creativity. MCC actively encourages the arts. This space will continue to foster this tradition by acknowledging the proximity of the Comedy and Princes theatres in nearby Exhibition Street. The screens may feature art from Chinese artists located in the area, and the building will encourage artistic endeavours. 6.1 A great walking city. The park will act as a connection to other parts of the city. For example, from the Fitzroy Gardens to the East and the Flagstaff Gardens in the North West of the city. A similar space can be found in Swanson Street (corner of Little Collins) but it has none of the attributes that this project proposes. With Melbourne’s population predicted to reach 6 million by 2025, up from 5 million on 1 September 2018, Melbourne’s CBD needs all the green space we can muster. Making the space meet sustainable goals is therefore a high priority.

2.9 Support for the homeless. The project is, in part, aiming to help the homeless through the distribution of free excess food as detailed above. See above.

The screens will reflect the heritage of the area, but also be aesthetically pleasing to attract visitors of all types.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

5


Master Plan - Task allocation Tasks for the overall design were allocated according to the skill set of each person. Andrew - Creative Suite, history, architectural heritage. Bora - Architecture, 3D design. Karan - AutoCad. Vicky - Landscape

Little Bourke Street

Yiting - App design, way finding.

Andrew - Screens Bora - Food store Karan - Seating

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

Corrs Lane

6


Project stakeholder map

City of Melbourne

City of Melbourne Project Manager

Community Stakeholders

City of Melbourne Stakeholders

Head consultant/ Architect

City of Melbourne Client Manager Recreation & Culture

Space Users

Building Solutions Building Maintenance City Permits Communications Heritage

Specialist Sub consultants (ABKVY)

Property Management Parks & Gardens Planning Procurement

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

Authorities (VicRoads Melbourne Water etc.)

7


1

Exploring the possibilities


Green Walls Vertical gardens are a wonderful idea. The have a natural cooling effect on the area. However, they have a number of disadvantages on this site. They need a irrigation system. This requires maintenance as the pipes can become blocked. The north wall is in constant shade. While not a problem in itself, the unprotected nature of the aspect would require a fair amount of trial and error in plant choice. The east wall – with a westerly aspect – would also present a problem during the long hot spells of a Melbourne summer as most of this wall receives eight hour of direct sun a day. Maintenance of the plants would be constant to minimise brown off and die-back. Although there are many examples of buildings being covered in plants, I could not find an example of a large scale site such as the one in Little Bourke being grown for any length of time. Vandalism and theft could also be a problem in such a unfenced site. From a sustainability aspect, this is the best option. The plants naturally cool the circulating air, and would make for a very pleasant environment. The suspension of the plants in pots or trays is not quite so sustainable, not is the plastic used in the irrigation system that would require replacing at regular intervals, especially on the west facing wall that receives plenty of direct sun. https://gardendrum.com/2016/04/06/the-right-plants-to-choose-for-a-verticalgarden/ Sources: See references

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

9


Mosaic Mural The mosaic mural would follow the same theme as the screens, i.e. Chinese history in the area and Victoria. However, as the area of the walls is very large, this would be a major project. The advantages of mosaics are that they maintain there look, remaining bright and clear with no fading. They are also reasonably vandal proof and resistant to graffiti, with the paint fairly easily removed compared to a brick wall or wood surface. The examples shown here do not cover the area of the walls bordering the car-park, but give an idea of what could be achieved by various techniques and patterns. The circus design is on the Victorian Arts Centre in StKilda Rd and commemorates the circus that was on the site along with a ball room prior to the Centre being constructed from the early 1960s. The design on the Eastern Hill Fire Station on the south facing side of Albert St East Melbourne is made up two panels plus a large extension reaching four stories high. It was completed in 1982 by artist Harold Freedman. Legend of Fire depicts the story of fire from its gifting by the gods to the ultimate destruction of man.

Source: Author

Sources: see reference.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

10


Stainless Steel Stainless steel by definition contains at least 10.5% chromium. Varying amounts of molybdenum are added for strength and hardness. ‘The strength of the layer in resisting corrosive attack is proportional to several key alloying elements: chromium, molybdenum, and nitrogen.’ (McGuire, M. F. (2008). Stainless Steels for Design Engineers. Materials Park, Ohio: ASM International.) Stainless steel is currently made up of over 60% recycled material, 25% Old scrap such as end of life products, 35% New scrap which is returning from production, and 40% New raw materials added. (https://www.bssa.org.uk/sectors.php?id=99) Its very long life means that over time the recycled content will increase substantially. Stainless steel is the preferred product for the screens. ($330 sq./m) This is because the steel is strong, weather and corrosion resistant, vandal proof, and maintains its look over a long period of time. The material can be treated in a number of ways to achieve a desired effect. The methods include etching, surface printing, and powder coating. Etching Silkscreen and photo-resistive finishes are also available to transfer any pattern onto the surface. The surface is then acid etched to reveal the pattern. Acid etching is process that removes a small amount of the surface material leaving the pattern in a dull dark form. This contrasts with the polished surfaces of the surrounding areas. While it is not confirmed, this is probably the method, combined with laser cutting, that was used on the screen behind the Dimmys redevelopment in Richmond. Laser Cutting This the process of cutting holes in the material. There are various methods for doing this but the basic process is much the same. A very high-powered laser, typically with water cooled optics, is focused on to the surface of the material. A CNC (computer numerical control) or G-code pattern is then followed by the machine. The laser then burns through the surface. The process, in practice, is similar to printing paper with a plotter. The laser can also be used to etch a pattern on the surface of the material, by ether reducing the power or the laser or speeding the transport mechanism. Whilst the power consumption of laser cutting is very high, the efficiency will depend on matching the machine to the material, or if the machine has a variable output adjusting the output to match the material being cut or etched. The amount of power required, or heat input, is dependent on the rate of the cut, (slower being more accurate and smoother), the material being used (for a given thickness aluminium will require less heat input than steel), and the thickness of the material being cut.

Ashfield Leagues Club, Sydney. Google images.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

11


Early design explorations Quick early explorations for the screens and a idea for a vinyl poster similar to advertising hoardings. The vinyl was quickly rejected for while it is durable and vandalism can be removed easily, it is not at all environmentally sustainable.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

12


In-situ design explorations for stainless steel screens

Design 1 uses multiple panels that carry over from one to the next. The art work is etched onto a perforated surface. Design 2 uses a continuous montage over the full length of the mural. This faces the railway line at the rear of the Dimmy’s development in Richmond, and forms a barrier to the wall behind for vandals and graffiti makers. The vertical sections are cleverly cut and combined with selective etching of the steel to create a half-tone effect. Only part of the panel is shown here. Access to the panel is difficult without going onto the rail-lines. Design 3 uses perforations of a consistent size and overlays a traditional Chinese symbol in baked enamel.

1 2

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

3

13


2

Screen Specifications


Screen Specifications 125

Screens will be a total of 3300 mm high. The offset from the exiting brick wall will depend upon the ground conditions. Total hight of each unit will be 3300 mm, with 200 mm ground clearence and the column being 100mm above the top of the panel. The panels will be either 3000 mm x 3000 mm (h x w) or 3000mm x 6000 mm.

3000

A bracket will attach to the wall. This isn’t strictly necessary as the screens will be string enough to free stand. Nonetheless, the strengthening can be determined in testing the final structure.

3300

The area for the art will be either 2800 mm x 2800 mm or 2800 mm x 5800 mm.

Existing Wall

All screens are to have an LED lighting strip. Each panel will be top lit by white LEDs, and back lit with coloured LEDs. It is very light in the city due to light pollution, this and the LEDs from the panels are considered bright enough for the are a without the addition of further lighting. Power will be supplied by solar-panels with battery back-up (not shown) to power the system in the evening. The lighting will automatically switch on at dusk and turn off at 1.00am. The panels will also power the cafe and shop.

Side elevation.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

15


Screen Specifications

10 125

Design Area

2800

3300

3000

3000 2800

Elevations and Plan of screen without LED lighting. Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

16


Screen Specifications

Design Area

2800

3300

3000

6000 5800

Elevation - wide design.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

17


Screen Specifications

3000 2800

Design Area

2800

3000

LED lighting strip

Elevations and Plan of screen with LED lighting.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

18


Screen Specifications

LED lighting strip

6000 5800

Elevations and Plan of screen with LED lighting.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

19


3

Examples of final designs


Example screen designs

These designs are from the 1988 scroll. “Harvest of Endurance is a 50-metre-long scroll that represents two centuries of Chinese contact with, and emigration to, Australia. Stories of hardship and survival, resourcefulness and reward are painted in the traditional gong bi style. Artist Mo Xiangyi, assisted by Wang Jingwen, painted the scroll. Mo Yimei carried out the historical research. The project was sponsored by the Australia–China Friendship Society celebration of the Australian Bicentenary in 1988. The scroll took just over 12 months to complete and consists of 18 elaborately painted panels. The National Museum of Australia bought the scroll in 1992.” (National Museum of Australia.) The scroll was first displayed in the nearby Chinese Museum. The images were some of the few depictions available that where not overtly racist in nature.

Detail of panel 12 “Vendors and Cooks”. (NMA.)

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

21


Example screen designs

The images for these example panels come from the State Library and National Portrait Gallery image collections. The first one emanates from the 1880 exhibition in the Royal Exhibition Buildings and depicts a Chinese fighting demonstration. The second image is a ‘Carte de visite’. These were small photographs mounted on card and could sent through the post. They were popular in the second half of the 19th century. This one depicts the Chinese giant Chonkwicsee and companion when he toured Australia in 1876. The third image depicts children listening to a Chinese immigrant tell a story at the Carlton Primary School in the 1950s. The final image depicts a jar top design from the 1700’s. The jar top was used to demonstrate a traditional design - it would require quite a bit of manipulation to work on the proposed screen, but is used to show what is possible.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

22


Example screen designs

Design Area

2800

3000

6000 5800

Elevation - wide design. This shows an example screen with a section enlarged. The white areas will be laser holes, and the darker areas will be laser etched.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

23


In-situ trial final screen design

This was the first trial of the final design. The image taken from the scrolls was converted to grey scale, and a half-tone filter applied. The image was placed on the frame design. The truck was removed from an image of the site, grass placed on the surface and the screens placed against the walls. Perspective was adjusted for the superimposed images to match the car park image.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

24


4

Final design


In-situ final screen design

Final design, sans elements from the rest of the group.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

26


Journey map

Jack decides to visit Melbourne for the day. Jack catches train and gets off at Parliament instead of Melbourne Central.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

Discovers ‘The Park’.

Buys a drink and food, and looks at screens.

Leaves feeling refreshed and no-longer grim having learnt something of Chinese culture.

Walks down Little Bourke Street finds it dirty and unkempt.

27


Conclusion Of the various options explored for this site the stainless-steel screens are the preferred option. Green walls, or vertical gardens, would be the best option for they are environmentally sustainable, provide a cooling effect, and look good. However, they require extensive plumbing that can block, and that requires replacement every few years because of U.V. damage. Furthermore, the variability of Melbourne’s weather may lead to burn off of foliage on the west facing wall in summer. Walls of this size require almost constant care, that over the long term becomes expensive. Vandalism and theft would be a constant problem given the garden is not in a locked environment. However, a small green wall installation’s could be installed above the screens using plants of different types. For example, Mondo Grass which is hardy in hot sunny conditions, on the west facing wall near Little Bourke Street. A shade tolerant plant such as stag ferns or monstera delosia could be tried on the corner walls where there is no sun at any time of the year. Mosaic murals are a good option. Murals can be made using old tiles. This is environmentally responsible as the tiles would probably go into landfill. Finding enough used tiles suitable for this purpose might present a problem though. Harold Freedman’s design for the Eastern Hill Fire Station required over 250, 000 tiles and is not as extensive as the site in Little Bourke Street. The cement used for affixing the tiles is not environmentally good either. On the upside, mosaic murals are virtually vandal proof. A small mural, of the size of the Wirths Circus mural on the Art Centre, should be considered for the south facing wall. Wooden panels of various constructions were also considered. They are less environmentally destructive than steel, but are a relatively short term proposition. Wood eventually rots, warps, and requires regular upkeep. This would be a problem on the south facing wall as it does not receive any direct sunlight at any time of the year. Cost is similar to steel. It is not vandal proof. Stainless-steel screens are robust, vandal-proof, require very little maintenance, can be treated in a number of different ways, including colour with powder-coating, that make them visually interesting. Their cost is relatively small in the long-term. Environmentally stainless-steel is increasingly made from scrap and recycled stainless-steel, (over 60%) and the recycled content is continually increasing. Not withstanding that it is energy intensive to manufacture, its almost infinite life and end of use recyclability mean it is on par or better than the other materials considered. The final designs on the screens will be chosen by the Chinese community through the nearby Chinese Museum. The designs must reflect the Chinse heritage and culture of the site and precinct. Consideration was given to enclosing the space with the use of further screens on Corrs Lane. This was rejected because of the risk the area would become a haven for vandals, drug addicts, and other undesirables after dark.

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

28


The final design with all elements

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

29


References Australian Stainless Steel Development Association, https://www.assda.asn.au/technical-info/technical-faqs , accessed 23 September 2018. British Stainless Steel Association, https://www.bssa.org.uk/ , accessed 15 September 2018. Images Green Walls: http://atlantisaurora.com/outdoor-green-wall/ http://gardendirect.com https://gardendrum.com/2016/04/06/the-right-plants-to-choose-for-a-vertical-garden/ http://www.elmich.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/?MD

British Stainless Steel Association, BSSA Understanding Stainless Steel - Centenary Edition, Shefield, United Kingdom, 2013. Dulieu, D., Stay Bright - A History of Stainless Steels in Britain, British Stainless Steel Association, Shefield, United Kingdom, 2013. Dulieu, D., A passion for stainless steels, Materials World, July, 2008, Vol.16(7), p.32(2).

Mosaic Mural https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hanoi_Ceramic_Mosaic_Mural_(14564312249).jpg https://moonfishartworks.com/2014/06/volunteers-needed-for-hogan-school-mosaic-mural/hogan_me_andre_8x12-copy/ Own collection. Metal Screens https://www.diemme.com.au/metal-work-screens/ Example screens: https://www.portrait.gov.au/portraits/2010.27/chinese-giant-chonkwicsee-and-companion/

submission confirmation number is 6c612ada-940f-418f-b5f2-e42236c6dba7

Andrew Renaut - DDD70014 - Eco-Design - Phase 3 - October 2018

30

Ecco Design Phase 3  
Ecco Design Phase 3  
Advertisement