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Architectural Design Portfolio 2011/2012 Andrew Paul


In Search of Quality


IN SEARCH OF QUALITY AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Community SPACE Centre


THE SITE

Materials

Vegetation

Sun Path & Prevailing Wind

Transport

CONSTRUCTED, 1890s

REDEVELOPED, 1990s

Growth in the cotton industry provided the impetus for the construction of the present docks, beginning in 1885 and the Official Opening took place in June, 1892. The mainstay of the port was international trade, but difficulties keeping a sufficiently deep river channel clear limited the size of visiting vessels. Pleasure trips to Blackpool and beyond also departed from Preston.



Density



CLOSED, 1980s

By the First World War, oil storage tanks were constructed, allowing for a diversification of trade. After the Second World War a roll-on-roll-off ferry service was instituted to carry lorries to Northern Ireland. Subsequent expansion of trade made the 1960s the busiest decade for the Dock. The final decline of the Dock came in the 1970s, as increasing size of shipping led to constant and costly dredging. The Port was closed in October 1981. Redevelopment of the area began after the closure. The dock railwaywas moved from the north of the basin to run along the Ribble, freeing up land for redevelopment but requiring the construction of the swing-bridge and accompanying Control Building, completed in 1985. Throughout the eighties, redundant buildings and machinery were demolished to make way for new commercial developments to the North and East of the basin, including a large Morrisons supermarket. Water quality has limited the use of the Dock for water-sports, but a marina has been in place at the western end since the mid-eighties. The 1990s saw the construction of flats and houses across the South side of the dock. This decade also saw the railway became redundant - however the establishment of the Ribble Steam Railway in 1999 has allowed the track to stay in operation as a preservation line, gaining its own rail museum in 2005.

A Personal Response

Model showing circling winds and traffic

SPACE CENTRE

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

Initial Idea

Visitors circle around to multi-sensory room


Precedents

Possible Schemes

Hazelwood School, Glasgow Hazelwood School, Glasgow

University of Central Lancashire Pre-School Centre

Murray + Alan Dunlop Architects Gordon Gordon Murray + Alan Dunlop Architects 2007 2007

ADP Architects 2011

Hazelwood Schoolfor caters for around 50 Hazelwood School caters around 50 with impaired sight and hearing. childrenchildren with impaired sight and hearing. have learning difficulties and often All haveAll learning difficulties and often other physical disabilities. other physical disabilities.

UCLAN Pre-School centre caters for up to 90 babies and children under school age. The centre is purpose-built at the northern end of the university sports building, with its own secure access.

The consists school consists of placed rooms along placed along The school of rooms single central The building a singleacentral corridor.corridor. The building curves to accommodate the and terrain and curves to accommodate the terrain pre-existing trees, thus minimising pre-existing trees, thus minimising visual visual for visitors to the neighbouring impact impact for visitors to the neighbouring park. A high wall row of trees help park. A high wall and rowand of trees help noise from a nearby reduce reduce noise from a nearby road. road.

A wide corridor, or internal street, runs the length of the building, giving access to all rooms and providing a dining area. This space is lit by north facing clerestory windows and heated by underfloor heating. Acoustic panels hung from the ceiling keep noise levels comfortable.

Materials in construction Materials used in used construction create acreate a variety of sensory particularly variety of sensory inputs, inputs, particularly tactile. To help navigation, the main tactile. To help navigation, the main a cork clad wall, whilst corridorcorridor includesincludes a cork clad wall, whilst slate andslats larch slatsasserve as outside,outside, slate and larch serve pointers. Colours and textures pointers. Colours and textures are alsoare also to aid navigation. used toused aid navigation.

Circulation Circulation

 

N N

S

All classrooms open out into an outdoor play area, via a canopied area. Outdoors, a slide is embedded in a central hillock, circled by a pathway. Along the pathway are placed various playthings including a giant xylophone, giant chimes, small huts and a reading area.

S

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Daylight Daylight

Daylight

Massing Massing Sources:Sources:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/designing-a-school-for-children-with-sensory-impairment/6269.html http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningzone/clips/designing-a-school-for-children-with-sensory-impairment/6269.html http://www.glasgowarchitecture.co.uk/hazelwood_school.htm http://www.glasgowarchitecture.co.uk/hazelwood_school.htm http://archrecord.construction.com/schools/08_Hazelwood.asp http://archrecord.construction.com/schools/08_Hazelwood.asp http://www.alandunloparchitects.com/work/hazelwood-school http://www.alandunloparchitects.com/work/hazelwood-school

Development Models

SPACE CENTRE

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

Circulation

Massing Sources:

http://www.adp-architects.co.uk/project-detail.php?ID=158&CatID=1 http://www.uclan.ac.uk/information/services/fm/projects/media/LCP_Info_180310.pdf

Initial Scheme

Daylighting is provided large northDaylighting is provided by largebynorthfacing clerestory windows which avoid facing clerestory windows which avoid glare and hide distractions. glare and hide distractions.

To the south of the ‘street’ are ranged administration and staffed rooms, including the kitchen. To the north lie four classrooms split into two age groups. Each of these rooms have ensuite toilet or nappy changing facilities.

S

Refinement

mirror initial scheme to utilise existing slope


FINAL PLAN: Best views from exploratory area and garden. Wheelchair access to both levels of Multisensory Room.

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views fromareas. exploratory area and garden. Meaningful journey• Best between • Wheelchair access to both levels of Multisensory Room.

Effective use of terrain.

• Meaningful journey between areas. • Effective use of terrain.

Exploratory Area Toilet Toilet Plant / Boiler

Cleaner’s Store Control Room Multi Sensory Room Cloaks Toilets Store Room

Quiet Room

Staff Room Office

Office

lower floor

Multi Sensory Room

Toilets Store Room

SPACE CENTRE

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul 0

metres

5

10


SPACE CENTRE

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Roundwood Columns • Greater strength than sawn timber • Shoe bolted to concrete floor • Flitch bolted to roof beam • Tactile and visual variety

Tree trunk principle of construction.

SPACE CENTRE

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Educational Visit: Glasgow & Edinburgh


GLASGOW + EDINBURGH 2011

Student Reportage

Educational Visit: Glasgow and Edinburgh AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Urban Design


PRESTON CLIMATE

TYPOLOGY

PRECIPITATION AMOUNT

RAIN/DRIZZLE DAYS PER MONTH

TEMPERATURES: AVERAGES AND EXTREMES

SNOW DAYS PER MONTH

WIND SPEED

CARBON EMISSIONS

Fishergate

Ringway

Lune Street

month

wind speed (km/h)

temperature (ยบC)

days

days

precipitation (mm)

TOTAL PER ANNUM 1,061,000 Tonnes

month

month

Abs. Max

month Avg. Max Avg. Min

Domestic 306,000 T

Roads & Transport 335,000 T

Industry 413,000 T

Emissions per person 2.4 T

month Abs. Min

Avg. expected wind speed

Max. recorded wind speed

Materials conflicting areas primary route to university highway

SOIL COMPOSITION top soil subsoil: firm to stiff sandy clay clay soil carboniferous rocks: permian triassic

high noise moderate noise low noise

NOISE: macro scale

Routes

NOISE: micro scale

WIND: micro scale

rented properties owned properties churches catholic school

hotel, church, offices ground floor retail, upper level living industrial roads pedestrians trees, grass living retail

Spaces & Places

External Spaces

URBAN DESIGN

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

PRE STON

Ownership

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

LOCATION & CONTEXT WATER & GRASS

SECTION LINE 25 km

PUBLIC SERVICES

WATER SUPPLY

SECTION DIAGRAM 25 km

preston re station police station rail station bus station penwortham re station

site water grass areas

site water grass areas

preston fire station police station railway station

bus station penwortham fire station

Section

site water supply

site water supply

Fair Snape Fell Preston

Site Plan

Historic Plans

Overview

Detail

1890s

1910s

1930s

1960s

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

Urban Design

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

WIND & SUN : macro scale


Precedent

Layout / Visual Design

Spurious Juxtaposition

ANGRY PIRATE Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum

Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

A HEADING

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat. Duis aute irure dolor in reprehenderit in voluptate velit esse cillum dolore eu fugiat nulla pariatur. Excepteur sint occaecat cupidatat non proident, sunt in culpa qui ofďŹ cia deserunt mollit anim id est laborum

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

URBAN DESIGN : PRESTON

A0 210 0: A RC H I T E C T U R A L

Site Map : 1930s / Present

D E S I G N

2

URBAN DESIGN

PRESTON

A02100: AR CH IT E CT U R AL D E SIGN 2 A02100:

A rchitec t ur al

De sign

2

Urban Design : PRESTON

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II

URBAN DESIGN : PRESTON

A0 210 0: A RC H I T E C T U R A L

D E S I G N

2

URBAN DESIGN

PRESTON

A02100: AR CH IT E CT U R AL D E S IGN 2 A02100:

A rchitec t ur al

De sign

2

Urban Design : PRESTON

Urban Design

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

URBAN DESIGN

PRE STON

A02100: ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN II


Corporation Street Wall & Stairway Precedent / Inspiration

Igualada Cemetry (1985–1994)

Initial Staircase Designs

Reclaimed Railway Sleepers

Enrique Miralles & Carme Pinós

Three Shadows Art Centre (2007)

Expressive Brickwork

Ai Weiwei

Grand Louvre (1989)

Spiral Staircase / Central Lift

Oscar Niemeyer International Cultural Centre (2011)

Spiral Staircase / Central Lift

Säynätsalo Town Hall (1951)

Staircase Indicates Direction

I.M. Pei

Oscar Niemayer

Alvar Aalto

Urban Design

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Final Design

Video Presentation

Rainwater Collection Wall

Seating

Retaining Wall

Urban Design

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

Lamp


Comprehensive Design Project: Place of Health and Wellbeing


Location

Site

Solar Plot

Historic Maps

1890s Access

Prevailing Wind

1960s

1:200 Site Model

Maggie’s Centre, Dundee

Maggie’s Centre, Gartnavel

Gehry and Partners 2003

O.M.A. 2011

Data from multiple surveys collated.

Summary:

Summary:

Positive Points:

Positive Points:

Negative Points:

Negative Points:

Form inspired by historic local ‘Brochs‘ In landscaped setting Materials; rendered brickwork, steel clad timber roof Curved walls External walkway / seating area Rooms clustered around central lobby Deep protective roof overhang

Boxes joined to form ring Kitchen not at centre Promenade around central courtyard Full height glazing gives views all round Floor levels follow topography using ramps Private spaces given a variety of treatments Main materials; concrete, beech, glass, aluminium

Single level access (except tower) High ground gives good views over Tay Hand-made, non-institutional quality

Simple navigation Sense of space given by large windows Single level access

Exposed location

Poor acoustics - noise travels around ring Too much space given over to circulation Somewhat severe, lacking domestic feel

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul Precedent Study : The Place of Heath and Wellbeing

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

Precedent Study : The Place of Heath and Wellbeing

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

Solar Path


A Secluded Clearing

1:500 Elevation

Social Space

Sheltered and South-Facing

1:100 Elevation

Rest Space

metres 0

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

1

2

3

4

5


Winter Shelter

Summer Shade

ĂŠ N Landscaped and Re-modelled Woodland Walks

Coppiced Fuel

1:1000 Site Location Plan

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

1:200 Site Plan


Car Park Road Entry

A Route from Order to Relaxation

Library

Gents

Ladies

Cloaks

WC

Courtyard Entrance

Relaxation

Office

Kitchen

WC Relaxation Relaxation

Rest

Counselling 1:100 Plan

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


1:100 Site Model Development Models

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


1:20 Detail Model

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT Louvres allow low winter sun whilst blocking high summer sun. Burner uses sustainable willow, coppiced on site.

Place of Health and Wellbeing AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Day Design Workshop 2: Space Station


Space Station

AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Institute of Time and Horology


development models

1:200 exqui-site model

1:50 final model

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Order by Day

1:100

Chaos by Night

1:100

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul


Expanded Metal Canopy allows daylight but blocks glare from direct sun

workshop

Raised walkway allows supervision

Glazed Paving lights interior by day and exterior by night

library

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

store


control over his environment

Markus Otteppeg

control over his students

a client profile

Markus Otteppeg had been the black sheep of the family, or so he assumed. As the only son of a long line of bankers not to go into finance he had taken the view that he was a disappointment to his father. Not that his father had ever said that. The Otteppeg were a tight-lipped bunch, preferring to communicate amongst themselves with a tip of the head, or disapproving glance down the nose. Now, even this communication was gone and Marcus was the last of the line. He had received notification of the death of his brother Hans a month ago and was now the sole inheritor of the acquired wealth of generations, or so it appeared.

Now he realised that he had been in hiding all these years, living a simple life, dedicating his time to craftsmanship, to the finest most delicate work possible. Making and remaking the most exquisite details - always an act of creation. Even then, he knew it would catch up with him, that shadow of destruction, the deaths of those young men, so young.

bedroom

Now he would do what he could. Was he seeking absolution? He did not know - that blood would always be on his hands. This was his last chance, he could give his all - his skills and his fortune to the native town of those poor lads he left on the border .

Waiting at Zurich airport, he thought things over, now he was the last Otteppeg, near extinct. the Otteppeg. He thought of the money. If that wealth had all been honestly earnt he would have been content, but he had never wanted to touch that fortune. It was tainted. He remembered that moonlit night in 1943, him and Hans and to hell with the consequences. A bitter taste came to his mouth. Hans got the money, he got the guilt.

living room

workshop

kitchen An ordered man Few possessions but all meticulously stored Never prepares own food, preferring restaurants or delivery

Entrance from Old Cock Yard

Keeps a small quantity of fine wine An early riser, waking with the sun

cafe

Enjoys music, particularly J.S. Bach Has a small collection of poetry books Hates digital technology lecture hall

Top-lit dwelling masks view to outside

Living ‘over the shop’ with private entrance at rear.

Basement Institute of Time and Horology

Private lift gives Ottepeg fast access to public and private areas.

First Floor AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

1:100 Ground Floor

Bedroom

Living Room

Workshop

Kitchen

Exhibition

Café

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

Exhibition

Library

Lecture Hall


An Urban Square

Street lamps help define extent of square.

Paving signals square as shared vehicle / pedestrian space.

Restaurant tables and seating make use of square

Steps invite passers-by to sit

Day time Route: shoppers and workers rest, eat and drink in square. Night time Route: drinkers scurry through alleyway between So Bar, Lava and beyond

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul

Cafe and Exhibition spaces overlook square


Precedent

Time - a brief study

De Vogels Primary School Herman Hertzberger 2004-2007

De Vogels primary school in Oegstgeest responds to the need to fit into a tight parcel of land between a railway embankment and a high-voltage power line.

Raised Platform

Exterior

Raising the building preserved daylight and view for nearby dwellings and allowed space below the building for a playground. Further playground space is provided on the roof.

Exterior

Time & Horology

Systems

The TARDIS

Measurement

The understanding, measurement and calculation of The TARDIS is the time machine featured time stems from in thethe need to predict the regular cylong runnning BBC television Who’ cles series of sun,‘Doctor moon and seasons needed to manage an It acts as both a time-machine andsociety. a home for the agrarian series’ central characters. From 4236 BC the Egyptians developed an annual calendar which relied on the position of Sirius to set Non-Contextual the of date of the newbudget, year, which foretold flooding of the The exterior, intitally for reasons programme Nile. In practice this is of a form which looks out of place in almost any365 set-day year began to drift from the physical environment, ting, however it is of a human scale and is obviously a so whilst used for adminisbuilding that can be entered.trative purposes, a lunar calendar as more commonly used for practical agricultural uses.

The gnomon of 3500 BC was a simple stick, but sundial technology reached its maturity by 300 BC with the hemispherical sundial. By night water clocks could be used, as they were by the Egyptians as early as 1500 BC. Sand-filled hour-glasses were also used. Whilst further refinements were later added to these devices to aid in their use, these were simply ‘whistles and bells’ (quite literally in many cases). Mechanical clocks had been independently developed in China but it took until the 14th Century before Europeans started to make headway, with the invention of the verge escapement. This system employed heavy weights dropping over a large distance to provide power to a foliot, or weighted crossbar, which could be set to oscillate at a set rate by adjusting the position of its weights. The verge itself was an arrangement of metal leaves contrived to allow the advance of a cog wheel, one tooth at a time. Verge clocks still had problems keeping regular time, much of the speed at which they ran was governed by the force applied by the weights and and by the internal friction in the system.

THE FRONTIER

Unexpected Juxtaposition

The shallow plan of the building was enforced partly because of the land available for building. Its avdantage is to provide daylighting throughout the school and also views out over the surrounding area.

Laterascivilizations added refinements to the Egyptian It’s bigger on the inside! As well this obvious arrangement. Sumerians, science-fantasy twist there is a clear difference betweenaround 3000 BC subdivided the day fiof rstthe intoexterior twelfths, then each of those into thirthe rectilinear, wooden box language tieths. The Babylonians and the more flowing, organic feel of circular depres-settled on the system we use todayfound around 2000 BC, dividing the day successively sions arond a hexagonal console inside. into 24 hours, 60 minutes and finally 60 seconds.

A Learning Street

Time at the Centre

Shallow Plan

Access to classrooms is via a wide internal street. Sliding doors along this corridor allow for rooms to be added or removed from the learning space as required. 1963 Interior Set

Concepts The central focus of the control room is a hexagonal console which forms the base for a moving glass cylinAristotle: time as athrough continuum, not composed of ‘indider. This cylinder’s movement indicates travel visible nows’ time. Other rooms in the TARDIS are occasionally seen and often hinted at. The 2010 set goes the furthest to time seen as one a function of creation suggest a network of tunnels Plato: converging on this central room - and towards the representation of time Augustine: there is only the present itself. present of things past = memory present of things present = sight An Extrapolated Present present of things An impression of a craft which can travel through timefuture = expectation

1996 Interior Set

entropy = time’s arrow Clausius: 2nd Law of Thermodynamics entropy time’s is arrow Einstein:=“There an inseperable connection between time and the velocity of light” Einstein: “There is an inseperable connection “There is something essentialbetween about the now time and the velocity of light” which is outside the realm of science” “There istime something essential about now affected by velocity andthe mass which is outside the realm of science” time affected quantum by velocitytime andcontradicts mass Heisenberg: relativity time uncertainty principle demonstarates small scale Heisenberg: quantum time contradicts relativity time time measurement to be impossible. uncertainty principle demonstarates small scale time measurement be impossible. Deutsch: time as ato series of snapshots

The pedulum clock grew out of Galileo’s research of the 1580s,although it wasn’t until 1640 that he attempted to use the pendulum’s regular properties in a clock - and this attempt resuled in failure. It was Huygens, in 1656 who created the first working pendulum clock.His later, refined versions were able to keep time to an accuracy within ten seconds per day. Working on a similar principle to the pendulum, Hooke created spring regulated clocks - an idea which Huygens was later to use in a mechanism which was the direct forerunner of that found in today’s wristwatches.

was effected in the 1960s by extrapolating a future Newton: absolute time, external to universe from current technologies. Hence a bank of open-reel leads to the ability computer tape drives stood in the background and the to calculate future and past 1:100 central console was adorned with the type of switches Clausius: 2ndNASA, Law ofwhose Thermodynamics and controls familiar to anyone following entropy = time’s arrow Mercury program ended as Doctor Who began. 1996 Interior Set

used for Later practical agricultural uses. peans started to make headway, invention of civilizations added refinements to the Egyptian weights dropping over a with largethe distance to provide the verge escapement. This system employed heavy arrangement. Sumerians, around 3000 BC subdivided power to a foliot, or weighted crossbar, which could be Later civilizations nements to each the Egyptian weights dropping over aatlarge to providethe position the day fiadded rst intorefi twelfths, then of those into thirset to oscillate a setdistance rate by adjusting arrangement. Sumerians, around 3000 BC subdivided power to a foliot, or weighted crossbar, which be tieths. The Babylonians settled on the system we use of its weights. The verge itself was ancould arrangement of the day fitoday rst into twelfths, then each of those into thirset to oscillate at a set rate by adjusting the position around 2000 BC, dividing the day successively metal leaves contrived to allow the advance of a cog tieths. The settled on the was anVerge arrangement ofhad probintoBabylonians 24 hours, 60 minutes andsystem finally we 60 use seconds. of its weights. wheel,The oneverge toothitself at a time. clocks still today around 2000 BC, dividing the day successively metal leaves contrived to allow the advance of a cog lems keeping regular time, much of the speed at which into 24 hours, 60 minutes and finally 60 seconds. wheel, one tooth a governed time. Verge stillapplied had probthey ran at was by clocks the force by the Time - atime, brief study Concepts lems keeping regular much of the speed atin which weights and and by the internal friction the system. they ran was governed by the force applied by the Systems Concepts Aristotle: time as a continuum, not composed of ‘indiweights and and by theclock internal the system. The pedulum grewfriction out of in Galileo’s research of visible nows’ The understanding, measurement and calculation the 1580s,although it wasn’t until 1640 that he at- of Aristotle: time as a continuum, not composed of ‘indiThe pedulum clock grew out of Galileo’s research of time stems from the need to predict the regular cytempted to use the pendulum’s regular properties in a visible nows’ Plato: time seen as a function of creation the 1580s,although wasn’t until 1640 that he atcles of sun,it moon and seasons needed to Itmanage an clock - and this attempt resuled in failure. was Huytempted to use the pendulum’s regular properties in a agrarian society. gens, in 1656 who created the fi rst working pendulum Plato: time seen as athere function of creation Augustine: is only the present clock - and this attempt resuled in failure. It was Huyclock.His later, refi ned versions were able to keep time present of things past = memory gens, in 1656 who created the fi rst working pendulum From 4236 BC the Egyptians developed an annual to an accuracy within ten seconds per day. Working Augustine: therepresent is only of thethings present present = sight clock.His later, refi ned versions were able to keep time calendar which relied on the position of Sirius to set on a similar principle to the pendulum, Hooke created present of thingsof past = memory present things future = expectation to an accuracy within ten seconds per day. Working the date of the new year, which foretold fl ooding of the spring regulated clocks an idea which Huygens was present of things present = sight on a similar principle to the pendulum, Hooke created Nile. In practice this 365 day year began to drift from later to use in a mechanism which was the direct forepresent ofabsolute things future expectation Newton: time,=external to universe spring regulated - an idea which Huygens the physical so whilst usedwas for adminisrunner ofclocks thatenvironment, found in today’s wristwatches. leads to the ability to calculate future and past later to use in a mechanism which was the direct foretrative purposes, a lunar calendar as more commonly Newton: absolute time, external to universe runner of that found in today’s wristwatches. used for practical agricultural uses. leads to the2nd ability future and past Clausius: Lawto ofcalculate Thermodynamics

ON THE EDGE

Old Workshop Jack Woolley 2011

Institute of Time and Horology

Guiding Lights

Summer Sun Information taken from: http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_1.html http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_2.html

W

Top Lighting

The basement is offset to allow daylighting down through the structural walk along rooflights.

Penrose: “The temporal ordering we appear to percieve is, I am claiming, something we impress upon our perceptions in order to make more sense of them in relation to the uniform forward time - progression of an external reality”

N

Information taken from: http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac. http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.

Institute of Time and Horology

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

AO2100 Ar

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

Chris Paterson 2011 A refurbished workshop sandwiched between terraced houses becomes a live-work unit.

The pedulum clock grew out of the 1580s,although it wasn’t u tempted to use the pendulum’s clock - and this attempt resuled gens, in 1656 who created the clock.His later, refined versions to an accuracy within ten secon on a similar principle to the pe spring regulated clocks - an ide later to use in a mechanism wh runner of that found in today’s

Deutsch: time as a series of snapshots is time 2 dimensional?

Institute of Time and Horology AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

Mechanical clocks had been in in China but it took until the 14 peans started to make headwa the verge escapement. This sy weights dropping over a large power to a foliot, or weighted c set to oscillate at a set rate by of its weights. The verge itself metal leaves contrived to allow wheel, one tooth at a time. Ve lems keeping regular time, mu they ran was governed by the f weights and and by the interna

Heisenberg: quantum time contradicts relativity time uncertainty principle demonstarates small scale time measurement to be impossible.

Prevailing Winds

Institute of Time and Horology

Aristotle: time as a continuum, not composed of ‘indivisible nows’

The gnomon of 3500 BC was a technology reached its maturity hemispherical sundial. By nigh used, as they were by the Egyp BC. Sand-filled hour-glasses w further refinements were later to aid in their use, these were s bells’ (quite literally in many ca

Einstein: “There is an inseperable connection between time and the velocity of light” “There is something essential about the now which is outside the realm of science” time affected by velocity and mass

time and the velocity of light” In 1996 Doctor Who had been off-air for seven years “There is something essential about the now and although only a single television show was made which is outside the realm of science” that year, the set was significantly redesigned to sugtime affected by velocity and mass gest a connection with the past as much as with the future. This time the central console had a more Heisenberg: quantum time contradicts relativity time victorian ‘steampunk‘ feel, demonstrated in polished uncertainty principle demonstarates small scale wood and brass. This approach has been followed in time measurement to be impossible. the revived series (2005-present) so the interior can be seen as co-existing with many periods of time rather Deutsch: time as a series of snapshots than attempting to be one step ahead of the present. is time 2 dimensional?

2010 Interior Set

Concepts

Plato: time seen as a function of creation is time 2 dimensional? Deutsch: time as a series of snapshots isPenrose: time 2 dimensional? Augustine: there is only the present “The temporal ordering we appear to perpresent of things past = memory cieve is, I am claiming, something we impress upon Penrose: our “The temporal ordering we appear to perpresent of things present = sight perceptions in order to make more sense of them cieve is, Iinam claiming, something we impress upon Information taken from: present of things future = expectation relation to the uniform forward time - progression of our perceptions in order to make more sense of them http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_1.html an external reality” Informationhttp://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_2.html taken from: in relation to the uniform forward time - progression of Newton: absolute time, external to universe http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_1.html an external reality” leads to the ability to calculate future and past http://www-history.mcs.st-andrews.ac.uk/PrintHT/Time_2.html AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Institute of Time and Horology Andrew Paul Clausius: AO2100 2nd Law of Thermodynamics Architectural Design 2 Institute of Time and Horology entropy = time’s arrow Andrew Paul

An Extrapolated Past Einstein: “There is an inseperable connection between

Penrose: “The temporal ordering we appear to percieve is, I am claiming, something we impress upon our perceptions in order to make more sense of them in relation to the uniform forward time - progression of an external reality”

Later civilizations added refinements to the Egyptian arrangement. Sumerians, around 3000 BC subdivided the day first into twelfths, then each of those into thirtieths. The Babylonians settled on the system we use today around 2000 BC, dividing the day successively into 24 hours, 60 minutes and finally 60 seconds.

Measurement

Winter Sun

Winner of the ideas competition Forgotten Spaces 2011: Sheffield.

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AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

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Frog Walk, previously dark, isolated and foreboding, is brought to life by animated creatures or ‘avatars’ which accompany travellers on their journey between Ecclesall and Sharrow. An LED screen interacts with travellers by using motion sensors to track their movements and generate bright, colourful silhouettes which escort them along the path. Additionally, the silhouettes signal other persons approaching along the path, to reassure lone travellers at night.

History

Climate data from myweather2.com

Cinema abandoned for twenty years.

Summer Sun

Prevailing Winds

One of three remaining streets from Preston’s mediaeval street pattern.

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Once a place of industry...

... now demolished or derelict.

James Stirling’s Avenham flats demolished 1999

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1975 Murder still unsolved data from myweather2.com

Institute of Time and Horology

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul Cinema abandoned for twenty years.

Institute of Time and Horology AO2200 ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN 2 Andrew Paul Institute of Time and Horology

One of three remaining streets from Preston’s mediaeval street pattern. AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul

Institute of Time and Horology

Once a place of industry...

AO2100 Architectural Design 2 Andrew Paul James Stirling’s Avenham flats

... now demolished or derelict.

Portfolio 2011-2012  

Academic Portfolio for Andrew Paul. Year 2 BSc Architecture.

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