Page 1

andrew h. jacobs

work/s 2018 design + research andrew h. jacobs


chester arthur school neighborhood playbook mcmichael park nature play visioning child’s play charrette bainbridge street green play visioning for a smart city district reimagining sister cities park nyc parks study of play features and value convergent dwelling storyboarding neighborhood change

andrew h. jacobs


andrew h. jacobs


DESIGN

CHESTER ARTHUR SCHOOL SALT Design

Client: Friends of Chester Arthur Project Overview: The schoolyard was designed with a holistic approach to play and learning; one that promotes sustainable city living through understanding and stewardship of natural systems that we rely on every day. The site improvements are organized into a series of outdoor educational labs focused on habitat, systems, motion, and energy. These outdoor labs enable teachers to bring STEM initiatives out of the classroom and into the landscape as part of newly developed curriculum for Chester Arthur School. In summer of 2017, I led a team to conduct post-construction site assessments to collect behavioral and environmental data. The report was published by the Landscape Architecture Foundation as part of the Landscape Performance Series in early 2018.

Top: Birds eye of renovated schoolyard Middle right: Student workshop pre-construction andrew h. jacobs

PHILADELPHIA PA 2015 // 2017


Students picking edible berries in the outdoor classroom

Evening play with community residents andrew h. jacobs


Perspective render of schoolyard

andrew h. jacobs


SPECIMEN CANOPY TREE 5 NATIVE CANOPY TREES IN GREEN

9 NATIVE CANOPY TREES IN PLANT BEDS

NATIVE UNDERSTORY TREES WITH EDIBLE BERRIES

RAIN GARDEN PLANTING USE OF NATIVE GRASSES TO CREATE BIOMASS IN WINTER

EXISTING RAISED PLANTERS

IMPERVIOUS SURFACE

UNDERGROUND STORAGE RESERVOIR

NATIVE PLANT BEDS

POROUS ASPHALT PARKING LOT

RAIN GARDEN IMPERVIOUS SURFACE

UNDERGROUND PIPING TO RAIN GARDEN AND STORAGE RESERVOIR

TRENCH DRAIN TO RAIN GARDEN

TRENCH DRAIN TO RAIN GARDEN

IMPERVIOUS SURFACE

andrew h. jacobs


THE BIG PICTURE? 230% INCREASE IN SITE USE DURING SCHOOL HOURS

PRE-CONSTRUCTION POST-CONSTRUCTION

35 AVERAGE NUMBER OF KIDS

30 25 20 15 10 5 A1

A2

A3

A4

A5

OBSERVATION AREAS

andrew h. jacobs

A6

A7

A8


SOCIAL USE OF SPACE The physical transformation of the schoolyard has had a profound impact on the overall use of the site, during school, after school, and on the weekends. Students are more active during recess and after school; there is more integrated play between boys and girls; the distribution of activity across the schoolyard is greater; and there is substantial increase in community use after school and on the weekends. Physical Activity • Physical activity levels have increased by double during school hours, for both boys and girls. • Pre-construction the most common activity level was sedentary, and least common was vigorous • Post-constriction that flipped; the most common activity level was vigorous and the least common was sedentary. Moderate activity levels hardly fluctuated in comparison. Distribution of Play • The distribution of play and use across the schoolyard is much greater. • Prior to construction, almost half of all play/use on site occurred on only 9% of entire schoolyard area (existing playground & seating, A1+A2).

• •

Post-construction, Area 1 experienced the greatest decrease in use, while Area 4 experienced the greatest increase. Area 1 is existing playground, Area 4 is berm, path and planters. Pre-construction only 24% of use occurred in areas 4-8. Post-Constructions 48% of use occurred in areas 4-8.

Gender Use & Breakdowns • • • •

Girl's vigorous activity levels increased more than boys – 2.6 for girls vs. 1.8 for boys. In areas where seating is provided, girls have a much greater tendency to be sedentary than boys do. In areas delineated for basketball, boys have a much greater tendency to be vigorous than girls. There were more girls than boys observed in every area of the site other than Areas 5&6 (Basketball courts).

1

8 OBSERVATION AREAS +CONCENTRATION OF SITE USE

6

5

7

4

PLAYGROUND

2

PLANTING AREAS

3 MORE USE

andrew h. jacobs


STRUC

andrew h. jacobs

ON

P R E-

ON

TI

C

POST-CONSTRUCTION 260% INCREASE IN COMMUNITY USE AFTER SCHOOL & ON WEEKENDS


POST-CONSTRUCTION VIGOROUS PLAY DOUBLED SEDENTARY PLAY DECREASED BY 17% POST-CONSTRUCTION PRE-CONSTRUCTION

PARKING LOT RAIN CANOPY OUTDOOR CLASSROOM PLANT BEDS

RAIN GARDEN WATER PUMP CUSTOM SEATING

MULTI-USE COURT ART PANELS STORAGE SHED

MULTI-USE COURT

TURF BERM SEATING SUN DIAL 50M TRACK

CLIMBER DOME GREEN WALL HERB GARDEN

PLANTERS

PLAYGROUND

POST-CONSTRUCTION

%v

igoro u

s

3

19

32

40

odera t

ary

ar

m 6%

y

28

sedent

e

mod % % sedenet ra

s oute

%

vigor

45 %

*COMPARISON OF AVERAGE VIGOROUS PLAY IN OBSERATION AREAS

PRE-CONSTRUCTION

andrew h. jacobs


DESIGN

PHILADELPHIA PA 2015 // 2016

Storyboard is lens for understanding Cobbs Creek neighborhood

friends gather in reading nook at main stairs for a tete a tete

storyboard highlights information about blanch nixon & library mural

Children explore the Hex blocks in the Play Pod

Rain Garden captures and filters runoff with native plants & creates pockets of habitat

Hex Pavers help tell the story as they repeat honeycomb pattern of nest

NEIGHBORHOOD PLAYBOOK SALT Design

Client: Infill Philadelphia: Play Space Design Competition Project Overview: Located in Cobbs Creek neighborhood in Philadelphia, this project unearths the potential for the Blanche Nixon library to evolve into a flexible, shared public landscape that gathers, protects and nurtures the surrounding community. Three Primary Pieces - the Hex block, a Storyboard and the Raindrop - are used to shape and animate space, and to create multiple journeys through the site. As a tactical Playbook, these strategies can be applied to similar urban sites with fundamental neighborhood institutions where play, civic engagement and multi-generational use are encouraged and activated through thoughtful, community-minded design.

Above: Perspective diagram of design elements along proposed Play Promenade Right: Network diagram of the library as “nest�

andrew h. jacobs


community corner: section

section nts

The Neighborhood Playbook supports a variety of activity levels: younger children will find cozy places for individual play as well as opportunities for climbing, running, and jumping. Imaginary play begins in the library and grows in complexity when children of all ages take it outdoors. Various risk elements are designed in each zone, especially through variations in heights for climbing and balancing on the Hex blocks, where children can climb up 8 feet. All of these play spaces utilize resilient, porous safety surfacing to cushion jumps and falls, absorb stormwater, and meet safety requirements.

“Play teaches the habits most needed for intellectual growth.” B. bettleheim

storyboard punctuated with openings to play make believe and frame what you see in the distance

storyboard with quote of the month. here’s the first one!

curved steps & stage for seating, socializing and performance

hex block sculpture for climbing and imaginary play

raised pockets of sensory plants

mown path

blanche’s meadow

Above: Plan render of the Play Promenade Below: Sect

andrew h. jacobs


DESIGN

McMichael PARK NATURE PLAY SALT Design

Client: Philadelphia Parks & Recreation Project Overview: The project, commissioned by Philadelphia Parks and Recreation (PPR), provides a vision for integrating nature play into the park program. Our team worked with two stakeholder groups, and PPR to create a thoughtful design that appeals to a multi-generational community base. The outcome is a design that sensitively integrates new features within the existing woodland context of the park, and accommodated the program needs of the various neighborhood groups.

Top: Perspective rendering of a nature play pod Above Right: Morton the Turtle is currently the only play element in the park

andrew h. jacobs

PHILADELPHIA PA 2017


CO NC E P TUA L P LA N

WEST COULTER STREET BRIDGE OVER DRY STREAM UNDERSTORY TREES

STORY CIRCLE

A

GRASSY BERM WITH IN-GROUND SLIDE

GRASSY BERMS

RUSTIC SEATING

A’ WILLOW TUNNELS

PLAY POD SOUTH

AREA DEMOGRAPHICS

RELOCATED TURTLE

IMPROVED BUS STOP AREA

ACCESSIBLE PATH

COMMUNITY KIOSK

MIDVALE AVENUE

(2) ADA ACCESSIBLE ON-STREET PARKING SPACES

NEW RELOCATED BENCHES THROUGHOUT PARK

McMICHAEL STREET

HENRY AVENUE

SWINGS

SEE CONCEPTUAL PLAN ENLARGEMENT

PLAY POD NORTH

The park is home to a mix of households that include young and growing families as well as empty nesters. The diversity of user groups in the neighborhood creates different program demands on McMichael Park.

0’

15’

30’

60’

N

SCALE: 1” = 30’- 0”

48

CO NC E P TUA L S EC T IO N (A - A ’ ) NOT TO SCALE

E

G

.A

AREA DEMOGRAPHICS HENRY AVENUE

GRASS BERMS

The park a mix PLAY of POD SOUTH EXISTING PARKis TOhome REMAIN AS to IS households that include young and growing families as well as empty nesters. The diversity of user groups in the neighborhood creates different program demands on McMichael Park.

38

E G RY . A EN G H AV OF H T U SO

G AV OF H RT NO

LE

RY

VA

N HE

ID

M

.25 mi

EXISTING PARK TO REMAIN AS IS

McMICHAEL STREET

RY

N

HE .

VE

A

P ROP O S E D DESIG N INCLU D E S :

N

No n-t r ad it ion a l n a t u re pla y ele ments, such a s logs, bo u l de r s, a n d be rm s

48

Nat u r al - look in g porous surf a ces E

G

.A

VG

CONCEPTU AL PER SPECTI V E: PL AY POD SOUTH E

O ID e s to Low-mai n t e n a n c e a n d na tiveA Runderstory tre TH M E G RY . A EN G H AV OF H UT SO

F

NO

div e r s i fy pa rk e c os ys t em

38

.25 mi

Acc e s s i b le a n d a ll- in c lusive design

G at he r i n g a n d s oc ia l spa c e s f or a ll neighbors

acres of public recreation and open space at McMichael Park

70

percent of households surrounding McMichael Park are families

RY

N

HE

5.6

McMICHAEL PARK Nature Play Visioning

L VA

RY

N HE

.

VE

A

Top: Proposed Site Plan for nature playground • Im p r o v ed t ra n s it s t op with sea ting a nd pla nting Left: Kids gather to see a new vision for the park Right: Neighborhood demographics surrounding the park • S o u nd bu f f e rin g be rm s a long H e nry A venue

U pdat ed be n c h e s re lo ca te d throughout pa rk

N

0

nature play areas within 3.5 miles of McMichael Park

andrew h. jacobs


DESIGN

CHILD’S PLAY CHARRETTE SALT Design

Client: Community Design Collaborative Project Overview: This project was part of Infill Philadelphia: Child’s Play initiative with the Community Design Collaborative, culminating in facilitating day-long charrette as part of Design on the Delaware. Prior to the charrette, our team collaborated with child care providers through the Delaware Valley Association for the Education of Young Children (DVAEYC), as well as education specialists and community stakeholders to outline the challenges and needs of home child care play spaces. The charrette culminated in schemes that were presented to the public, and ultimately developed into a toolkit for use by child care providers and funders, through DVAEYC.

Above: Workshop with stake holders and specialists at home child care facility Right: Charrette teams developing concept sketches

andrew h. jacobs

PHILADELPHIA PA 2015


house

andrew h. jacobs


house

andrew h. jacobs


Charrette participants, made up of designers, educators, community members, and students pin up their day’s work and present to a panel of experts. andrew h. jacobs


DESIGN

BAINBRIDGE STREET GREEN Independent

Client: Friends of Bainbridge Green Project Overview: Over the past few years FOBG has focused on bringing the park back to life through small-scale temporary programming, maintenance, and most importantly a vision for change. This past summer 5th Street Plaza transformed the west end of the park, through low-cost seating, lighting, planting, and public art. The organization has worked with local residents, civic associations, and small businesses to raise awareness and provide a platform for conversation about the future of the park.

Top: 5th Street Plaza Above Right: Neighborhood residents gather for Brunchfest, and annual event involving local restaurants and businesses to activate the Green. andrew h. jacobs

PHILADELPHIA PA 2016 // 2017


exchange

gather

perform

reflect

exchange

gather

perform

reflect

community table vendor kiosk seasonal market infographic timeline

open seating outdoor work pods wifi hot spots neighborhood bulletins

multi-use stage public art & performance local event venue shade canopy

enclosed seating meditative garden herb garden weekend nursery stands

multi-use stage public art & performance local event venue shade canopy

enclosed seating meditative garden herb garden weekend nursery stands

8’-0” x 30” x30” concrete planter

CONCEPT DIAGRAM BAINBRIDGE STREET GREEN

bluestone stepper walk-thru’s

picnic tables

open seating outdoor work pods wifi hot spots neighborhood bulletins

community table vendor kiosk seasonal market infographic timeline

daytime yoga studio/evening bistro and cafe seating area open ada access at corners

CONCEPT DIAGRAM BAINBRIDGE STREET GREEN backless bench

existing surface graphic & yoga mat/seating grid

ground paint, open space and flexible programming

pre-fab fiberglass planter

andrew h. jacobs


RESEARCH

PLAY VISIONING FOR A SMART CITY DISTRICT Studio Ludo

Client: Sidewalk Labs Project Overview: In 2018 Studio Ludo was hired to create a “visioning document” vy Sidewalk Lbas, an urban innovation Alphabet company, to demonstrate how multi-generational play can be infused into the public realm in an “internet from the ground up” district in Toronto, Canada. The report illustrated how play can positively impact the future of urban living across all ages, scales, and layers of innovative infrastructure. In addition to creating a framework for spatial typologies, proposed features included Kinder, a social

Top: Axon diagram adapted by the client’s original plan showing the district Middle right: Photo from the workshop conducted with client team to brainstorm ideas of how play can be an essential thread in the new district

andrew h. jacobs

TORONTO CAN 2018


TRANSIT + PLAY

ACTIVATE CAPTIVE WAITING TIME AT STOPS

STREETS + PLAY

STRATEGIC CLOSURES AND PLAY PROGRAMMING

POP UP PLAY PLAY FURNITURE AND LOOSE PART KITS

NOTE! NOTE! NOTE!

IMAGES ARE SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED %125 IN INDESIGN FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN FILE.

ON

NOTE! NOTE! NOTE! NOTE! NOTE! NOTE! NOTE!

IN

WITH

IMAGES AREARE SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED IMAGES SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED IMAGES SCALED IMAGESARE ARE SCALED IMAGES ARE SCALED %125 IN INDESIGN %125 IN INDESIGN FILE. %125 FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN PUBLIC REALM %125 INFILE. INDESIGN FILE. %125IN ININDESIGN INDESIGN FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN FILE. FILE.

NOTE!

NOTE!

NOTE!

IMAGES SCALED RE IMAGES SCALED AREARE SCALED MOBILITY DESIGN %125 IN FILE. INDESIGN FILE. %125 IN INDESIGN FILE.

IMAGES ARE SCALED %125 IN INDESIGN FILE.

STORMWATER

STORMWATER STORMWATER STORMWATER BUILDING

ON

STORMWATER

STORMWATER

STORMWATER

STORMWATER STORMWATER BUILDING STORMWATER BUILDING STORMWATER STORMWATER

LANDSCAPE

BUILDING BUILDING BUILDING ACTIVE STORMWATER BUILDING BUILDING BUILDING BUILDING BUILDING STORMWATER ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION RECREATION

STORMWATER

STORMWATER

BUILDING BUILDING BUILDING ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION

ACTIVE ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION ACTIVERECREATION RECREATION ACTIVE RECREATION

BUILDING

BUILDING

Top: Play overlay of pop-up play in the new district Below: Diagram matrix of play intersecting with infrastructure and program ACTIVE RECREATIONACTIVE RECREATION

ACTIVE RECREATION

andrew h. jacobs


P L AY

IS A UNIVERSAL LANGUAGE

46% OF TORONTO RESIDENTS ARE N O N - N AT I V E SPEAKERS

C A N TO N E S E MANDARIN TA G A L O S PA N I S H I TA L I A N PORTUGESE TA M I L FARSI URDU RUSSIAN FRENCH KOREAN ARABIC BENGALI GREEK andrew h. jacobs


KINDER

P L AY O N T H E M O V E

PLAY STREETS 9AM-5PM, NO CARS ALLOWED! BRING YOUR FRIENDS

k PLAY BLAST

FIVE OF YOUR FRIENDS ARE AT THE PLAYGROUND, COME JOIN!

k • • •

T H E F U T U R E O F P L AY D AT I N G CONNECTING KIDS TO KIDS P O P - U P P L AY N O T I F I C AT I O N S

andrew h. jacobs


RESEARCH

PHILADELPHIA PA 2018

REIMAGINING SISTER CITIES PARK Studio Ludo

Client: Center City District Project Overview: This project was part of a partnershup with Center City District to explore new opportunities to expand the already successful playspace at Sister Cities Park. A series of behavioral observations and surveys with park users was conducted to best understand what was working and what could be improved upon in one Philadelphia’s most iconic parks. This was a strategy of research driven design to best understand how we can use data and information to inform decision making in our public spaces.

Top: Kids playing seasonal fountain

andrew h. jacobs

“WE DON’T STOP PLAYING BECAUSE WE GROW OLD; WE GROW OLD BECAUSE WE STOP PLAYING.” - George Bernard Shaw


SISTER CITIES .5

P L AY

MIL

ES

INSTITUTION

PUBLIC

19141 19127

19140

19130 19123

19125 19102 19103

19143

19146

Top: Context diagram Bottom: Mapping user zip codes

19147

52%

25%

23%

CITY

SUBURB

REGION

Bala Cynwyd Swarthmore Chester Abington Wayne King of Prussia

Delaware Maryland N e w Yo r k C i t y U p s t a t e N e w Yo r k International

Center City Logan Square Art Museum Society Hill Queen Village University City Southwest Fishtown Hunting Park Fern Rock Manayunk

andrew h. jacobs


F AV O R I T E F E AT U R E

F AV O R I T E PROGRAMMING

AL C

TING SEA

KIDS ACTI VIT IC I M

IC US

26%

. SC MI

US

20% M

W H AT ’ S MISSING?

D FOO

34%

58%

15%

L+

41%

28%

15%

NOTHING

7%

OH O

ES

PACE EN S OP

TER FEATUR WA ES

ENCOURAGING USE

REVENUE G E N E R AT I O N

W H AT ’ S MISSING?

AL

CO

RENTALS

FOOD

+ LD HO

17%

37%

10%

TIVITIES A LC AC

O

FE

TY

SEATING andrew h. jacobs

S ID

Top: Survey responses (top three) Bottom: Word cloud of desired programming at park Across: Proposed design interventions based on user observation/response

33%

MUSIC

32%

K

11%

SA

9%

L + FOOD

SIC

32%

HO

MU

PLAY

35%


VISUAL QUEUES WAY F I N D I N G NEW DEVELOPMENT

C O N N E C T I N G N O RT H

A C T I VAT I N G T H E C O R N E R

AC T I V E TO PA S S I V E

FLEXIBLE USE FLEXIBLE BUFFER

HIDDEN GARDEN VS. PUBLIC AMENTITY andrew h. jacobs


RESEARCH

NYC PARKS STUDY OF PLAY FEATURES AND VALUE Studio Ludo

Client: New York City Dept. of Parks & Recreation Project Overview: In the summer of 2018 Studio Ludo partnered with NYC Parks and the Department of Strategic planning to design and conduct a study of NYC playgrounds. Twenty three playgrounds were selected across all five boroughs, by a team of seven interns, as a representative sample of the varied offerings of NYC Parks. Use was assessed over two months, and the playgrounds and site feautures were ranked by popularity, after being equally weighted for size in acreage and neighborhood population density.

Top: Kids playing at 110th Street Playground Middle right: Training interns at Washington Square park in Systems for Observing Play and Recreation in Communities (SOPARC)

andrew h. jacobs

NEW YORK NY 2018


4

EAST 110TH STREET PLAYGROUND THE BIG PICTURE:

1

This playground had MORE children (5-12) and teens (1318) than any of the study playgrounds.

2

The water play area was the MOST popular area on sunny days, but only had 20% use during overcast days, when the wooden climbing structure became the most popular. The planted space behind the climbing area had the most PEER social interaction of any area in the study playgrounds. he water play area was the MOST popular area on sunny days, but only had 20% use during overcast days, when the wooden climbing structure became the most popular.

CHILDREN 5 & UNDER

1

60% 50%

50%

WATER PLAY

50%

50%

CLIMBER USE AREA

23%

67% 60%

WATER PLAY USE AREA

CHILDREN 5-12

2

The planted space behind the climbing area had the most PEER social interaction of any area in the study playgrounds.

3

The water play area was the MOST popular area on sunny days, but only had 20% use during overcast days, when the wooden climbing structure became the most popular. The planted space behind the climbing area had the most PEER social interaction of any area in the study playgrounds.

Water play was the MOST POPULAR on sunny days, but had 20% USE on cloudy days, when the CLIMBING STRUCTURE became the most popular. LOCATION: MANHATTAN SIZE: .35 ACRES DATE COMPLETED: 2013

60% 59%

41%

WATER PLAY

23%

77%

TIRE SWINGS

58%

TEENS

3

56%

60% 44%

BENCHES AT CLIMBER

24%

42%

BELT SWINGS

60% 76%

BENCHES AT CLIMBER

57%

43%

BENCHES AT BELT SWINGS

60%

40%

BENCHES AT WATER PLAY

ADULTS/SENIORS

23%

77%

BENCHES AT WATER PLAY

36%

BENCHES AT SWINGS

64% 60%

MALE FEMALE

Playgrounds in Flagship Parks: 34 NYC PARKS STUDY OF PLAY FEATURES AND VALUE

Typically custom designed play spaces in large, flagship parks that maintain a broad cultural popularity among New Yorkers and tourists alike. We would expect park users who have NYC PARKS OF PLAY FEATURES AND VALUE 35 traveled to visit these park, as well as STUDY regular neighborhood users.

Neighborhood Centers: Playgrounds in larger parks that offer a variety of passive and recreational amenities. Typically these are parks that are larger than five acres and are considered central to the recreational offerings of a neighborhood.

Compact Park Islands: Though smaller in size than our park system’s larger park properties, these parks serve as the primary park for their immediate neighborhood. They are characterized by dense neighborhoods. Ideally, these parks would offer a little of something for every type of park user.

Neighborhood Backyards: These playgrounds are about an acre on average and are built adjacent to public institutions like schools and NYCHA housing. They serve as hyper-local play areas for the immediate neighborhood and are often situated near to a larger neighborhood park. Top: Spread from report demonstrating findings from the study Below: Location and typologies of playgrounds studied

andrew h. jacobs


RESEARCH

PHILADELPHIA PA 2014

CONVERGENT DWELLING Independent

NEIGHBORHOOD IDENTITY & THE LANDSCAPE NARRATIVE This thesis explores the phenomenon of neighborhood identity and its position within the shifting socioeconomic landscape of Philadelphia. As a way to equip landscape architects with the language and tools needed to stabilize the other factors that add value to a neighborhood, this body of research seeks to identify the spatial characteristics that establish neighborhood identity in Philadelphia. It investigates how gentrification and the migration of different social groups across neighborhood boundaries inform the cultural and physical landscapes that are embedded in the built environment. This body of research is divided into three investigations. Investigation I explores the neighborhood at the city scale. It examines the varieties of ways that neighborhood boundary is established in Philadelphia, and catalogs the terms and factors that contribute to defining neighborhood parameters. Investigation II focuses on the neighborhoods of Fishtown and West Kensington, north of Center City Philadelphia. The goal of this phase is to determine how the two neighborhoods function internally. It documents how social practices, the use of public space, and the physical andrew h. jacobs

organization of two conjoining neighborhoods operate differently. Investigation III explores Front Street and the Market Frankford Line - the seam that connects Fishtown and West Kensington. It reveals where and how the intersections of infrastructure, culture, and neighborhood identity collide, emerge, or dissipate. Ultimately, as result of the findings, the investigation concludes the thesis research by proposing three design strategies for occupying the Front St. corridor.


This study demonstrated that boundaries are not necessarily linear, opaque, or static, but function as zones of perceptual markers of transition (large vacant lots, industrial landmarks, monuments, building facades, and street art.

This documentation was conducted through on-site observation over the course of three days, and uses visible and experiential qualities and indicators to draw conclusions about social and physical patterns within each neighborhood.


OCCUPYING THE EDGE

STITCH Periodically closing down the intersecting streets and implementing temporary and flexible programs that reflect the traditions and practices of each community will create transparency across the ever present barrier of the el and catalyze an awareness of how different cultures and socials groups use and occupy neighborhoods as a way to create both inter and cross communal conversations.

EXTEND This is a small-scale strategy for extending use and program out from the el and creating new rooms and pockets by appropriating vacant space in order to improve and/or sustain the street activity along the corridor.

ESTABLISH This scheme is driven by the concept of reclaiming the edge and bringing awareness to the significance that Front St. has on the Norris Square community as a defensible edge. Reappropriating the vacant lot as a commemorative and active extension of Norris Square creates spatial and cultural authorship of vulnerable areas along the Front St. corridor.

Front Street Corridor: The seam between West Kensington and Fishtown that embodies the infrastructural, social, and cultural elements of boundary, edge and border between neighborhoods. The impetus for this investigation was to determine if there are strategies for intervening along or across Front St. for the purposes of either aggregating and/or protecting the interests of conjoining neighborhoods. andrew h. jacobs


andrew h. jacobs


RESEARCH

PHILADELPHIA PA 2016 // 2017

storyboarding neighborhood change: a conceptual rendering at the el

STORYBOARDING NEIGHBORHOOD CHANGE Independent

Knight Cities Finalist The project proposes to install storyboard timelines at publicly visible sites along the Market-Frankford El in eastern North Philadelphia, depicting the physical and social evolution of the neighborhoods through which the El passes. These storyboards will provide historical and current research in maps, images and data, and also space for communities to express their voices through illustration. The boards will provide a shared set of facts about neighborhood evolution; empower artistic minded residents to represent their knowledge of their community; engage the broader citizenry by provoking open dialogue about change. Collaborators: Norris Square Community Alliance, East Kensington Neighborhood Association, Temple University Top: Perspective diagram of the Storyboard along the El corridor

andrew h. jacobs

“the city is...closer to a work of art than to a simple material product.� -Henry Lefebrve


GIRARD

GIRARD

ALLEGHENY

THE EL STOPS: FIVE MINUTE WALK

GIRARD

GIRARD

ALLEGHENY

ALLEGHENY

ALLEGHENY

THE EL STOPS: FIVE MINUTE WALK

THE EL STOPS: POVERTY RATES

THE EL STOPS: FIVE MINUTE WALK

GIRARD

GIRARD

GIRARD

ALLEGHENY

THE EL STOPS: POVERTY RATES

ALLEGHENY

THE EL STOPS: CHANGES IN HOME SALE

GIRARD

ALLEGHENY

ALLEGHENY

THE EL STOPS: POVERTY RATES

THE EL STOPS: CHANGES IN HOME SALE

Profile for Andrew Jacobs

Andrew Jacobs Design Portfolio, 2019  

Andrew Jacobs Design Portfolio, 2019  

Advertisement