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TEACHING Samples_Index Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

TEACHING • Architecture course for blind students In June of 2009, as a student at the University of Maryland School of Architecture, I collaborated with the National Federation for the Blind to create the first-ever architecture course for blind students. The students laid out Braille program blocks, made drawings on Braille graph paper with bendable wax sticks, associated different materials to their diagrams according to the textural ‘personality’ of different rooms, and completed a final model using prefabricated architectural elements impressed into a clay foundation, which they presented in a tactile public critique. • GSD Bridge-building project In the Spring of 2015, I was a Teaching Assistant for Structural Engineer Paul Kassabian, instructor of the GSD’s Advanced Structures II course. In addition to leading class discussion and correcting assignments and exams, I also organized and proposed the first-ever Harvard bridge-building competition, which became the course’s end-of-year project. Here presented are the project brief and a student submission. A video of the bridge-breaking event is available at https://vimeo.com/128034912. • Student dissertation excerpt In the 2018-2019 academic year, I worked as a part-time Associate Lecturer in the Masters of Architecture program at the University of Portsmouth in Athens. One of my responsibilities was to mentor students in the completion of written dissertations which supplemented their final design project. Here presented is an excerpt from one of my graduate student’s pre-final submissions (with my critique in the righthand margin). • Utopian Vision workshop As an Associate Lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, I was responsible for preparing lectures and workshops to instruct first-year graduate students in architectural history and theory. After a lecture on the urban history of Marblehead and the weird-fiction method of H.P. Lovecraft, I engaged the students in a workshop, tasking them to render in text (like Lovecraft in his shortstory ‘He’ – in which he describes a terrifying future Manhattan) a utopian (or dystopian) vision of Athens in the year 2100. Here presented are the introductory workshop slides with three examples of student work. After pinning up, the class read each work aloud and assessed (with smileys and frowns) in group discussion which descriptions were more, or less effective and why. • Community Engagement debate In a lecture at the University of Portsmouth in the 2018-2019 academic year, I introduced three distinct approaches to design practice and education – the design intelligence model, the community engagement model, and the citizen architect model – with particular emphasis on the work of Peter Eisenmann, Samuel Mockbee, and Alastair Parvin. After the lecture, I engaged the class with a public debate, dividing the students into teams to defend these three positions. Here presented are the introductory lecture slides and debate rules. (An audio-recording of the debate is also available, upon request). • Multisensory immersion In the fall of 2016 and 2017, together with French ecologist Nathan Ranc and Italian archaeologist Luigi Lafasciano, I organized and directed a week-long eco-cultural tour in Abruzzo National Park, Italy. The project investigated the relationship between nature and culture, from prehistory to the present, with activities that engaged all five senses, making it accessible to the blind and visuallyimpaired. Following is a brief, visual presentation (which we delivered to the Mayor of Villetta


Barrea, a small town located in the park) of how this educational program engages the senses to teach its participants about nature and culture. (In 2017, the project received official recognition and public support from the park itself). A comprehensive photo album of the project’s activities (with blind-accessible descriptions) is available at The Diakron Institute’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thediakron/photos/?tab=album&album_id=840765426059413. • Cultural exploration In the summer of 2018, together with Italian archaeologist Luigi Lafasciano, I organized and directed a three-week cultural exploration of the Cycladic islands in Greece. We spent Week 1 in Athens and on the island of Paros, providing a series of introductory lectures on Ancient Greek history, archaeology, and architecture, while visiting key museums and sites. During Week 2, we participated in the archaeological excavation of the Archaic sanctuary of Apollo on the island of Despotiko (directed by Greek archaeologist Yannos Kourayos), where I instructed participants in the basics of architectural sketching and surveying. And during Week 3, we engaged in a series of cultural activities organized as modern reinterpretations of the ancient ritual of ephebia. The program, which included primarily Brazilian students, was accredited as an elective by the Faculty of Philosophy and Human Sciences at the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. Following is a comprehensive photo album of the entire educational experience.


TEACHING Sample 1 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Architecture course for blind students In June of 2009, as a student at the University of Maryland School of Architecture, I collaborated with the National Federation for the Blind to create the first-ever architecture course for blind students. The students laid out Braille program blocks, made drawings on Braille graph paper with bendable wax sticks, associated different materials to their diagrams according to the textural ‘personality’ of different rooms, and completed a final model using prefabricated architectural elements impressed into a clay foundation, which they presented in a tactile public critique.


Program Layout

Students decide which parts of the house should be interconnected and arrange program blocks of corresponding square-footages. Each block represents a room-type indicated with a Braille marker.


Plan Drawing

With the program layed out, plans are drawn on Braille graph paper using wax strips. Students draw plans to scale and choose from a selection of parti diagrams to lay out their house plans.


Associative Material Exercise

Students are asked to associate materials to program blocks. Most choose smooth, austere surfaces for the bathrooms and kitchen and leave warmer materials for bedrooms and gathering spaces.


Final Model

Working from their program blocks and wax plans, students use pre-cut walls and columns to construct their final model. Clay is used to maintain the model’s stability while busy hands experiment with architectural structures, surfaces, and space-making.


Design Crit

Students of the architecture track present their projects on the final day. Tactile plans and diagrams, program layout blocks, and quarter scale models are essential to effectively describing design intentions.


TEACHING Sample 2 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• GSD Bridge-building project In the Spring of 2015, I was a Teaching Assistant for Structural Engineer Paul Kassabian, instructor of the GSD’s Advanced Structures II course. In addition to leading class discussion and correcting assignments and exams, I also organized and proposed the first-ever Harvard bridge-building competition, which became the course’s end-of-year project. Here presented are the project brief and a student submission. A video of the bridge-breaking event is available at https://vimeo.com/128034912.


FIRST ANNUAL GSD BRIDGE-BUILDING COMPETITION (2015) Design a bridge which spans from one table to the other in Room 111 (See photos below). The overall criteria call for a formally elegant bridge that is as light as possible and can support the greatest load. MATERIAL CONSTRAINTS • Materials are limited to balsa wood, 3”x5” notecards, standard dental floss, steel wire (maximum diameter of 1/8-in), and wood glue. • The maximum third dimension of any wood member must not exceed ¼”. • No materials may be coated or impregnated with or by any other material • Only standard-grade wood glue (by “Titebond” or approved equivalent) shall be used SIZE AND END CONSTRAINTS • The bridge cannot touch the floor. • The bridge can only sit on top of the tables. It cannot be stuck to, connect to, or grab hold of any part of the table. It cannot extend past the back of the table. It cannot use the thin groove that is in the front of the table. • The bridge must come fully assembled and be simply placed on top of the tables. • If you use weights at the end of the bridge, they 1) must be made of approved materials listed above, because 2) they will be included in the total self-weight of the bridge. • The bridge deck must be of a flatness and width to allow for a 5in-wide wheeled cart to be pushed from one side clear to the other. • The end supports of the bridge (on the table) cannot be wider than 12in. The supports can extend from the front to the back of the table. LOADING CONDITIONS • Each team must submit a 1-page description with illustrated diagram(s) of how their bridge behaves structurally under the intended load. This must also include where the team think the weakest spot/area is of their design and why. • Each bridge will be loaded by pushing a loaded wheeled cart from one end to the other and then back again. • All bridges that pass the initial test will then be loaded at midspan with increasing weight until failure. EVALUATION • The visual elegance of each design will be evaluated by class vote prior to the Bridge-Breaking ceremony; the group with the most aesthetically impressive proposal will win the “Pulchritude” prize. (Each bridge will then be weighed prior to loading) • The group with the highest load to self-weight ratio will win the “GSD Bridge-Master” prize. • The group whose bridge carries the greatest centerpoint load before failure will win the “Hercules” prize. SUBMISSION CRITERIA • Bring the bridges to Room 111 on Friday 24 April for testing. BRIDGE BREAKING CEREMONY • Bring the bridges for class to Room 111 on Friday 24 April for testing. • Each structural failure will be visually recorded. • Each team must supplement their 1-page description with a description of where and why their bridge failed. If it was different than what they expected, explain why. PRIZES • The “GSD Bridge-Master” Prize will be awarded to the team with the highest load to bridge-weight ratio. • The “Hercules” Prize will be awarded to the team whose entry carries the greatest centerpoint load before failure. • The “Pulchritude” Prize will be awarded to the team whose design is determined as the most aesthetically impressive (visually elegant) according to a majority of class votes. (prize details will be announced soon)


TEACHING Sample 3 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Student dissertation excerpt In the 2018-2019 academic year, I worked as a part-time Associate Lecturer in the Masters of Architecture program at the University of Portsmouth in Athens. One of my responsibilities was to mentor students in the completion of written dissertations which supplemented their final design project. Here presented is an excerpt from one of my graduate student’s pre-final submissions (with my critique in the righthand margin).


ELENI MARMAROU DRAFT DISSERTATION

Introduction Toxic spaces are part of our cities, shaping both their appearance and the quality of residents’ everyday life. They include petroleum refineries, metallurgies, ship dismantlings, foundries, tanneries, chemical factories, cable industries, aerospace industries, cement industries, plastics industries, shipyards etc. The most toxic space among them is the landfill. The management of garbage and the health and pollution problems it entails have often been studied in recent years (UNEP report, 1996, ''Alexandros P. Oikonomopoulos, 2009, Efthemios Lekkas, 2007”, David A.

Commented [AG1]: Later in your paper, you give other examples of ‘toxic’ spaces. I don’t think this list is accurate. Read through your paper carefully and decide how, precisely, you are using this term.

Savitz, 2006). However, we rarely observe actions that are also solutions. Especially, in the area of Athens where the landfill is an area with a great proximity to the city center and it is full, it is more urgent than ever to ask, both as citizens and as architects what is our position on the major issue of these toxic areas, which affect our lives constantly even if we do not see them.

Chapter 1. Toxic spaces. 1.1_the connotation of the term "toxic" According to the Cambridge dictionary, toxic is called something that causing you a lot of harm and unhappiness over a long period of time. Also, we call toxic something that poisons an entity. Furthermore toxic we can call something that has a chemical nature and it is harmful to health or it is lethal if consumed or otherwise entering into the body in sufficient quantities. Even though the term ‘toxic’ is related to poisonous substances directly harmful to life, it is also used metaphorically to describe an unpleasant situation that causes mental harm over time. Under this scope, ‘toxic architecture’ and ‘toxic urbanism’ consist of a contemporary terminology that

Commented [AG2]: What is ‘toxic’ space? You don’t answer this question clearly enough in this section. Before, you gave us some examples of ‘toxic’ spaces: “petroleum refineries, metallurgies, ship dismantlings, foundries, tanneries, chemical factories, cable industries, aerospace industries, cement industries, plastics industries, shipyards.” But then, in this section, as an example of ‘toxic’ space, you talk about n arrow streets. After reading the first two sections, I’m confused about how you’re defining ‘toxic’ spatially. Try to break down what the spatial parameters of ‘toxic’ spaces are. Commented [AG3]: Instead of paraphrasing the dictionary, give its exact definition as a quotation. Commented [AG4]: Replace all of this with the dictionary definition.

refers to either current conditions or dystopias of modern cities, that are in the process of decay due to carbonization, density, poor planning etc. In an age that the provocative Archigram collages have come closer to everyday reality, literally and figurative descriptions merge. Toxic space is used in this paper as a "literal" metaphor. It is that space which sickens and kills any living organism that lives in it, or around it, because the pollution of the soil, of the air, and the water are not limited by natural, artificial or spiritual borders. For example, if a city has narrow streets then the adjoining city will have narrow streets, to some extent, especially near the adjacent points, with what also implies the construction of the buildings as the urban design cannot contain steep changes and engravings on the building and the street lines as the human mind adapts better when points follow each other in a smooth way and harmony. (See the urban design near the borders of cities Nea Filadelfia with Patisia or Aharnai or Nea Ionia in Athens).

Commented [AG5]: This is a little confusing! I don’t think this example is strong support for your definition of ‘toxic’ space.


ELENI MARMAROU DRAFT DISSERTATION

1.2_toxic regions The spatial conditions that characterize a space as toxic are the adjacency of this space with some of the below-mentioned areas. When an urban area only a residential housing area includes or is located next to an industrial area or an airport or area where there is a landfill or refineries or in a rocket launch area or chemical industries etc, then that city is a toxic city because of the pollutants and the living conditions of the city's population are unbearable and degraded. (real.gr,2011). The phenomenon of urban neglect and gradual degradation is notably manifested in areas of very low income and living standards, and is usually accompanied by the inversely proportional increase of crime and so-called ghettos (Sage journals,2013). This inevitable complication forms toxic spaces, scattered throughout the urban configuration. In many cases, these spaces together form a toxic region which causes expanded injuriousness, whether it is to the health, the environment, the social structure, etc. or industrial zones located at the periphery of the city. An example is the industrial area of Thriasio Field or, as it is called, the industrial area of Aspropyrgos - Eleusis, which is approximately 102 km² square kilometers and it is 10 kilometers away from Athens. Forty percent of heavy-duty heavy industries and 70 percent of medium and low-noise industries across Hellas, with a total area of 13,1957 square kilometers, are installed in Thriasio Field. In this area there is the landfill of Fylis, two refineries (ELPA Aspropyrgos and ELPE Eleusis), two steelworks (HELLENIC STEEL, HALYVOURGIKI), two cement factories (TITAN, HALYPS), a munitions industry (PYRKAL) Elefsina and Skaramangas), smaller foundries, tanneries, paint manufacturing industries as well as smaller repairers, many chemical industries, petroleum products storage and handling facilities, three oil regeneration plants, plastics and rubber crafts, gas storage and handling units, quarries, large logistics warehouses, pesticide production and storage plants, ship dismantling plants, industrial and toxic waste recycling plants, etc. Several of these plants are subject to the provisions of the Community Directives Seveso I and II, namely the obligation to submit a risk study and to prepare a Large-Tech Technological Accident Management Plan (SATAME), covering also the areas which are surrounding their installations. However, from the serious possibility of a Major Technological Accident, "15% of the gas pollutants produced in western Attica - sulfur dioxide, hydrocarbons, suspended particles, nitrogen oxides, benzene etc. burden the capital, even reaching in the center of Athens, through the passage of Daphne ", according to Dr. Michalis Petrakis, director of the Institute of Environmental Research at the Athens Observatory. All of the above-mentioned facilities are one of the main causes of the toxic cloud that floods Attica. In Attica lives half population of Hellas. The most dangerous toxic pollutants (gaseous, liquid, particulate, solid) released during the production process of the above workstations and are harmful to life-threatening for any living organism that comes in any form of contact with them (inhalation, swallowing, and by direct transcutaneous contact). For example, airborne toxic pollutants are transported from Thriassio Pedio to the immediate vicinity of Athens because of the weather conditions and especially the western winds prevalent in the prefecture of Attica, which favor the transport of toxic gas waste both in the capital and its

Commented [AG6]: The ‘toxic’ cloud is a good example of how large ‘toxic’ spaces (i.e. ‘toxic’ regions) infect other urban spaces without regard to physical boundaries. You should describe this aspect more clearly in this section. Then, in general, and more importantly, you need to go into more depth about what the spatial conditions are of a ‘toxic’ region. Adjacency is a spatial condition. But you can’t only say a space is ‘toxic’ when it is adjacent to ‘toxic’ space. How do spaces become ‘toxic’ to begin with? What ‘spatially’ defines them as ‘toxic’? Commented [AG7]: This logic is flawed. You’re saying ‘a space is toxic when it is adjacent to any of the below-mentioned toxic spaces’… But why are those spaces ‘toxic’ to begin with? THIS is the question that your paper should be addressing!


ELENI MARMAROU DRAFT DISSERTATION

suburbs. In other words, the "toxic cloud" emitted mainly from the landfill in municipality of Fylis as well as from the other facilities as well as the measurements of the pollutants in Attica sky will always be at the limit of the alarm or will go far beyond when the western or southwest winds blow or when there is apnea, as the studies have shown. Not only do regions like these affect the health status of both the workers and the residents of the area in which they reside, and also the relationship between use and geographical location is abstracted. Any urban planning and town-planning interventions that are designed to relieve or improve the living conditions of the Athens population from the aforementioned toxic cloud cannot be successfully

Commented [AG8]: Not ‘and also’… THIS statement is the main point, which means you will need to rewrite this paragraph. The effect of the ‘toxic’ cloud (which you state here) is a definitive aspect of a ‘toxic’ region.

achieved as long as the pollution continues to be discharged from Thriasio Pedio and especially from the landfill of Fylis.

1.3_ landfills as the quintessential toxic spaces Toxic spaces within an urban environment can be categorized by scale. Starting from abandoned premises and residences, back alleys and vacant lots turning into garbage dumps, to enormous solid waste landfill sites. Landfills are literally toxic, as reported by the British Medical Bulletin, they are responsible for various hazardous gas emissions (such as methane and carbon dioxide), and for a large number of pollutants and microbial pathogens. Landfill leachate has an impact both on ground surface and on the groundwater quality, leading to even food pollution (Christopher O. Akinbile, Mohd S.Yusoff, 2011). Unfortunately, there are also less easily quantifiable hazards, such as odors, noise, heavy traffic and pestiferous insects. An example is the landfill of High Acres. According to a Democrat and Chronicle report, residents of the area of the landfill claim the odours and sounds coming from that landfill are “ruining their quality of life” (Democrat and Chronicle, 2018). The odorous substances emitted in the air, amplified by specific weather conditions such as high temperatures and wind, can have a limiting impact on pedestrian movement in adjacent public spaces. The same situation exists at the landfill of Fylis. Surprising as it may sound, after interviews with residents near to this toxic space (Fylis landfill) about this matter, it seems that some senior individuals try to cut down their movement outside their house to the strict minimum needed, in order to avoid the suffocating smell. In addition, studies have shown that, after systematic evaluation of evidence on the health effects of people living in areas close to landfills, there is an increase of respiratory symptoms and mortality due to cancer. The International Journal of Epidemiology (Volume 45, Issue 3) concluded that exposure to a specific tracer of airborne contamination from landfills was associated with lung cancer mortality as well as with mortality and morbidity for respiratory diseases. However, it is vital to stress the fact that health is the factor that measures not only the physical, but also the psychological or even the mental state of a living organism. According to the definition set out in the World Health Organization Statute (1946), health is defined as "the state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not just the absence of illness or disability". In other words, the concept of health is not only attributable to medicine

Commented [AG9]: Remember that you are defining ‘toxic’ spaces in SPATIAL terms. So, landfills are ‘toxic’ spaces because they case the most health problems. But what are the ‘toxic’ SPATIAL qualities of landfills that make them cause the most health problems. In other words, how are all the negative effects you describe in this section caused by the spatial qualities of the landfill? In a sentence, how would you list them? Commented [AG10]: Are these also kinds of toxic space? They weren’t included in your ‘Introduction’. Until now, in your paper, it’s still unclear how exactly you are defining ‘toxic’ space.


TEACHING Sample 4 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Utopian Vision workshop As an Associate Lecturer at the University of Portsmouth, I was responsible for preparing lectures and workshops to instruct first-year graduate students in architectural history and theory. After a lecture on the urban history of Marblehead and the weird-fiction method of H.P. Lovecraft, I engaged the students in a workshop, tasking them to render in text (like Lovecraft in his shortstory ‘He’ – in which he describes a terrifying future Manhattan) a utopian (or dystopian) vision of Athens in the year 2100. Here presented are the introductory workshop slides with three examples of student work. After pinning up, the class read each work aloud and assessed (with smileys and frowns) in group discussion which descriptions were more, or less effective and why.


Lovecraft Workshop: Utopian Vision

Prof. Andrew Gipe-Lazarou, MArch Harvard GSD 15’

AMC_UoP 18’-19’ // A.G-L


For full three seconds, I could glimpse that pandaemoniac sight, and in those seconds I saw a vista which will ever afterward torment me in dreams. I saw the heavens verminous with strange flying things, and beneath them a hellish black city of giant stone terraces with impious pyramids flung savagely to the moon, and devil-lights burning from unnumbered windows... It was the shrieking fulfillment of all the horror which that corpse-city had ever stirred in my soul, and forgetting every injunction to silence I screamed and screamed and screamed as my nerves gave way and the walls quivered about me.” Narrator of “He,” by H.P. Lovecraft 1925


1929


1927


WORKSHOP Fill a full page of text describing your utopian (or dystopian) vision of the city of Athens in the year 2100, and print a copy. Paper Size: A4 Font Type: Times New Roman BOLD Font Size: 30pt Spacing: Single Margins: 0.75� *DO NOT WRITE YOUR NAME*


TEACHING Sample 5 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Community Engagement debate In a lecture at the University of Portsmouth in the 2018-2019 academic year, I introduced three distinct approaches to design practice and education – the design intelligence model, the community engagement model, and the citizen architect model – with particular emphasis on the work of Peter Eisenmann, Samuel Mockbee, and Alastair Parvin. After the lecture, I engaged the class with a public debate, dividing the students into teams to defend these three positions. Here presented are the introductory lecture slides and debate rules. (An audio-recording of the debate is also available, upon request).


? PETER EISENMANN

SAMUEL MOCKBEE

CITIZEN ARCHITECT

Architects should never become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should always become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should be the people who will use and occupy their designs.


? PETER EISENMANN

SAMUEL MOCKBEE

CITIZEN ARCHITECT

Architects should never become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should always become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should be the people who will use and occupy their designs.


Deconstructivist 1932 -

Peter Eisenmann ARCHITECT


? PETER EISENMANN

SAMUEL MOCKBEE

CITIZEN ARCHITECT

Architects should never become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should always become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should be the people who will use and occupy their designs.


Samuel Mockbee ARCHITECT Vernacular / Modernist 1944 - 2001


It’s not about your greatness as an architect, but your compassion.” “Architecture, more than any other art form, is a social art and must rest on the social and cultural base of its time and place.” “The practice of architecture not only requires participation in the profession but also requires civic engagement.” “Architecture has to be greater than just architecture. It has to address social values, as well as technical and aesthetic values.” Samuel Mockbee samuelmockbee.net


? PETER EISENMANN

SAMUEL MOCKBEE

CITIZEN ARCHITECT

Architects should never become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should always become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should be the people who will use and occupy their designs.


Creative N/A

? Citizen ARCHITECT?


DEBATE POSITION 2

POSITION 3

Architects should never become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should always become personally acquainted with the needs and values of the people who will use and occupy their designs.

Architects should be the people who will use and occupy their designs.

P A

R

I

O

N

PREP

PREP (5min)

CLOSING ARGUMENTS

(5min)

REBUTTALS

OPENING ARGUMENTS

(20min)

A T

2min

E

2min

R

2min

P

POSITION 1

TIMELINE: Twenty minutes of preparation, two minutes for each team to make opening arguments, five minutes of preparation, two minutes for rebuttals, five more minutes of preparation, and two minutes for closing arguments. RULES: • Each member of every team should speak at least once. • Rebuttals and closing arguments should address both opposing positions. • In addition to the architects and architectural examples presented in class, students are encouraged to use additional sources to support their positions. • The winner of the debate will be selected by the professors, not according to whose position is the most ‘right’, but according to who presents the most well-argued and critically-defended position.


TEACHING Sample 6 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Multisensory immersion In the fall of 2016 and 2017, together with French ecologist Nathan Ranc and Italian archaeologist Luigi Lafasciano, I organized and directed a week-long eco-cultural tour in Abruzzo National Park, Italy. The project investigated the relationship between nature and culture, from prehistory to the present, with activities that engaged all five senses, making it accessible to the blind and visuallyimpaired. Following is a brief, visual presentation (which we delivered to the Mayor of Villetta Barrea, a small town located in the park) of how this educational program engages the senses to teach its participants about nature and culture. (In 2017, the project received official recognition and public support from the park itself). A comprehensive photo album of the project’s activities (with blind-accessible descriptions) is available at The Diakron Institute’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pg/thediakron/photos/?tab=album&album_id=840765426059413.


NATURE


CULTURE


TEACHING Sample 7 Andrew Gipe-Lazarou phoenix.gipe@gmail.com

• Cultural exploration In the summer of 2018, together with Italian archaeologist Luigi Lafasciano, I organized and directed a three-week cultural exploration of the Cycladic islands in Greece. We spent Week 1 in Athens and on the island of Paros, providing a series of introductory lectures on Ancient Greek history, archaeology, and architecture, while visiting key museums and sites. During Week 2, we participated in the archaeological excavation of the Archaic sanctuary of Apollo on the island of Despotiko (directed by Greek archaeologist Yannos Kourayos), where I instructed participants in the basics of architectural sketching and surveying. And during Week 3, we engaged in a series of cultural activities organized as modern reinterpretations of the ancient ritual of ephebia. The program, which included primarily Brazilian students, was accredited as an elective by the Faculty of Philosophy and Human Sciences at the Federal University of Minas Gerais in Brazil. Following is a comprehensive photo album of the entire educational experience.


THE ΔIAKRON INSTITUTE for Cross-cultural Exploration and Interdisciplinary Studies

PRESENTS The

PHOTOGRAPHIC CHRONICLES of its

2018 of the

“CULTURAL EXPLORATION

CYCLADES ( in 3 PARTS) ”

For more information, please visit www.diakron.org.

© The Diakron Institute


“

I appreciated the experience from the beginning to the end. I really liked the way that things were mixed, the academic stuff and the experiential part of it. I think this idea of making the experience more vivid and not so academic, in a sense, interests me. I will never read Plato again in the same way. Because I know now that Plato was writing in places like this. Also, the idea of balancing cultural activities with leisure... for example, going to the beach or having meals together, and drinking together, I thought that was very interesting. Because otherwise, we wouldn’t be a group. We would just be a bunch of people having classes, and we have that all year. - Rafael, 2018 Participant


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Š The Diakron Institute


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Š The Diakron Institute


First Meeting

Tour Director Luigi Lafasciano walks and talks with the group on Apostolou Pavlou St. in Thissio, Athens. Photo credit: Marcelo Osiecki

Š The Diakron Institute


Welcome Dinner

And Brazilians watching Brazilians in the 2018 World Cup.

Š The Diakron Institute


A C R O P O L I S M U S E U M

+ A C R O P O L I S

Š The Diakron Institute


Acropolis Museum

Introduction to the Athenian acropolis, hosted by the Deconstructivist designs of architect Bernard Tschumi. Š The Diakron Institute


Archaeology Underfoot

Glass floors reveal the ongoing excavation taking place several meters below the museum. Š The Diakron Institute


Proud Caryatids

The maidens of Karyai take center stage above the museum’s first floor exhibition. Š The Diakron Institute


View from the Top

The museum’s top floor presents a comprehensive perimetric exhibition of the nearby Parthenon.

Š The Diakron Institute


Lecture En-route

On the slopes of the Acropolis, Luigi introduces the historical relationship of Athens with the Cyclades.

Š The Diakron Institute


Ascending the Propylaia

The monumental gateway of the Acropolis.

Š The Diakron Institute


Reliquary Reconciliation

The architecture of the Erechtheion honors the efforts of the gods to earn the namesake of the sacred city, housing both Athena’s olive tree and Poseidon’s salt water well.

© The Diakron Institute


The Parthenon

Proud symbol of Western civilization, completed in 432 BC under the general supervision of Phidias, by architects Ictinos and Callicrates. Š The Diakron Institute


Doric Downpour

Ana, Cecilia, Gabi, and Luigi dry out their clothes after a ritual bath on the Acropolis. Š The Diakron Institute


Looking Back

The Acropolis Museum and the city of Athens. Š The Diakron Institute


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Museum Visit

The National Archaeological Museum of Athens hosts the largest collection of ancient artefacts in Greece. Photo credit: Marcelo Osiecki Š The Diakron Institute


Urban Jungle

Walking tour through the streets of Exarcheia, modern Athens’ ‘wildest’ neighborhood. Photo credit: Marcelo Osiecki

© The Diakron Institute


Alley Appetites

Group lunch among the wild greens and graffiti of an Exarcheia alleyway. Š The Diakron Institute


Destination Lycabettus

Standing 277m above sea level, Mt. Lycabettus is the highest point in the city of Athens. Š The Diakron Institute


Climb to the Top

Marcelo and Camilla climb the steps of Mt. Lycabettus. Š The Diakron Institute


Pause at the Peak

The group takes a moment to relax beneath the Lycabettus bell tower with a panoramic view of the city. Š The Diakron Institute


View to the Sea

SW view over the National Gardens (center) and the Panathenaic Stadium (left) towards the Mediterranean Sea and the distant island of Egina (right).

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Downtown Descent

Through Lycabettus Park and back into the city. Photo credit: Marcelo Osiecki

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CYCLADIC ART MUSEUM + N A T I O N A L G A R D E N S

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Syntagma Square

Changing of the guard at the tomb of the unknown soldier in front of the Old Royal Palace. Š The Diakron Institute


Museum of Cycladic Art

Introduction to the material history of the Cycladic islands.

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Female Figurine

Post-canonical type. Chalandriani variety. From the island of Syros. (2500-2300 BC) Š The Diakron Institute


Ionic Park Bench

Modern replicas of ancient artefacts decorate the National Garden of Athens. Š The Diakron Institute


Zappeion

Completed in 1888, the Zappeion was designed for the revival of the Olympic games and is now used as a Neo-Classical venue for televised public events. Š The Diakron Institute


Panathenaic Stadium

Originally constructed in 330 BC, the stadium was excavated in 1869 and refurbished for use in the first modern Olympics of 1896. Š The Diakron Institute


Lone Spectator

Project Director Luigi fills one of the Panathenaic Stadium’s 45,000 seats.

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Boat to Paros

Violet and Gabi take a nap on the 5-hour ferry boat ride from the port of Piraeus to the island of Paros.

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Arrival in Lefkes

The group arrives at its accommodation, the House of Literature, in the town of Lefkes and takes a moment to appreciate the view.

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House of Literature

An old hotel, now owned and operated by the Municipality of Paros, the House of Literature is a collective living experience for artists and writers from around the world. Š The Diakron Institute


Evening Briefing

Discussing the following day’s itinerary before taking the rest of the day to relax. Š The Diakron Institute


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Ka-lee-me-ra!

Morning Greek lesson with Professor Violet. (Ka-lee-me-ra // Καλημέρα // Goodmorning). © The Diakron Institute


Lost Temple

The walking tour of Parikia begins at the former location of the Archaic Temple of Athena (now the site of a Greek Orthodox church). Š The Diakron Institute


Cycladic Street Scene

Pure geometric volumes, surfaced in white plaster, with blue, wooden details, typifies the architecture of the Cyclades.

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Recycled Ruins

The Frankish Castle, built by the Venetian Duke of Naxos ca. 1200 AD, uses architectural materials (like column and architrave pieces) taken from ancient buildings.

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Ekatontapyliani

The Byzantine “Church of 100 Doors” houses the oldest preserved baptistry in the Orthodox East (dating back to the 4th Century AD). Its legend states that while only 99 doors (i.e. openings) are currently visible, the 100th will reveal itself once the Greeks have retaken Constantinople. © The Diakron Institute


Tamata

‘Votive offerings,’ in the Eastern Orthodox tradition, take the form of small metal plaques engraved with the subject of a prayer, and are hung in front of a saint’s icon, either to represent a petitioner’s need, or to express gratitude for a prayer answered. © The Diakron Institute


Evening Lecture

Erica Angliker delivers an introductory lecture about the excavation on Despotiko (the group’s destination in Week 2) on the veranda of the House of Literature in Lefkes. Š The Diakron Institute


Fascinated Felines

The animal gods of the House of Literature observe our outdoor activity with cool curiosity. Š The Diakron Institute


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Morning Stroll

Pedro, Carlo, and Paola walk down Lefkes main street, with the House of Literature behind them, and head towards the bus stop. Š The Diakron Institute


Lefkes Bus Stop

Assistant Project Director Paola Palumbo waits for the bus to Parikia, the main port of the island of Paros.

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Museum Entrance

Tickets in hand, the group makes its way into the Archaeological Museum of Paros. Š The Diakron Institute


Dr. Ohnesorg

German building researcher Dr. Aenne Ohnesorg (center), who has been working on Greek excavations in the Cyclades since 1972, gives us a surprise tour of the museum’s most prominent pieces. Š The Diakron Institute


Kouros

The Archaic marble torso of a Kouros (noble male youth), preserved to a height of 1m, likely dedicated to the god Apollo during the ritual completion of the ephebic (coming-of-age) ceremony. Š The Diakron Institute


Ionic Column Capital

Project Director Luigi discusses the cultural origins of the Ionic order, describes its principal architectonic features, and explains how it can be differentiated from the Doric. Š The Diakron Institute


Light Lunch

Tzatziki, Greek salad (cucumbers, feta cheese, black olives, onions, capers, and tomatoes), fresh bread, wild greens, and chicken souvlaki. Š The Diakron Institute


Dutiful Director

The group enjoys the afternoon at Chrisi Akti beach on the southeastern coast of Paros, while Luigi carefully reviews the weekly program.

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Island Colors

Seafront street vendors display a vibrant variety of locally-crafted decorations and souvenirs. Š The Diakron Institute


Twilight Tenderness

Marcelo and Camilla watch the light fade over the distant island of Ios. Š The Diakron Institute


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PAROS TO ANTIPAROS

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Moving Day

Karin, Violet, Carlo, and Paola bid farewell to Lefkes and make their way to the port of Pounda. Š The Diakron Institute


Island Hopping

The group travels from the town of Lefkes, located in the geographical center of the island of Paros to the town of Agios Georgios on the southwestern side of the island of Antiparos.

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Room with a View

New accommodations at Zombos Tavern boast a beautiful view of the adjacent island of Despotiko. Š The Diakron Institute


Despotiko

A northeasterly view from the small, uninhabited island of Despotiko, which is used by a single shepherd as a pasture for breeding wild goats, shows the excavation of the Sanctuary of Apollo (bottom left), the small island of Tsimintiri (center left), and the scattered development of Agios Georgios on the island of Antiparos (opposite). Š The Diakron Institute


EXCAVATION: DAY 1

© The Diakron Institute


Daily Commute

Every weekday morning at 8am sharp, the excavation crew makes the ten-minute maritime commute from the island of Antiparos (left) to the island of Despotiko (right). Š The Diakron Institute


Excavation: Day 1

The Diakron team, together with volunteers from around the world, hike up the slope of Despotiko and make their way to the excavation site. Š The Diakron Institute


Formal Introduction

Dr. Yannos Kourayos, Director of the excavation at Despotiko, and acting member of the Greek Ministry of Culture, gives a comprehensive tour of the Sanctuary of Apollo. Š The Diakron Institute


Temple Complex

The centre of the sanctuary was initially developed with unobstructed views of Antiparos to the east (down), but its buildings gradually expanded. Bulding A, the main cult building, was surrounded by a square peribolos with two gates and stoas on three sides. Š The Diakron Institute


Sanctuary of Apollo

The sanctuary flourished during the late Archaic period (second half of the 6th Century BC) and shows cult activity during the Geometric and early Archaic times (9th-7th Centuries BC). Its location is only accessible from the eastern part of the island, which, in antiquity, was connected to Antiparos by an isthmus. As indicated by inscriptions on vessel shards dating back to the 6th and 5th Centuries BC, Apollo was the deity primarily worshipped at the sanctuary.

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Stylobate Spectator

The excavation mascot (and Yannos’ baby boy) Freddie waits impatiently in the main temple building for the tour to come to an end. Š The Diakron Institute


Stratigraphic Method

Luigi and his team practice the basic operations of modern archaeology; the identification of different earthly layers, the reconstruction of the spatial and chronological relationship between layers, and the identification and contextualization of finds. Š The Diakron Institute


Pick-Axe 101

Assistant Project Director Andrew demonstrates, to team members Rafael and Tais, how to properly use a pick-axe when removing compact upper layers. Š The Diakron Institute


Wall Washing

Camilla and Gabi carefully clean the base of a wall in the south complex in preparation for the conservator to apply a weather-proof plaster cast between the uppermost layer of stones. Š The Diakron Institute


Lunch Break

Mid-day snack under the canvas canopy of the excavation’s shipping container. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Pottery Station: Cleaning

Finds from the excavation are sent to the pottery station to be cleaned and sun-dried. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Pottery Station: Cataloguing

After the pieces are dry, they are catalogued according to where they were found on site (grid location, room name, and layer number). Photo credit: Natalia Velli Š The Diakron Institute


Pottery Station: Collection

Once cleaned and catalogued, the finds are collected into bags and delivered to the museum of Paros for analysis and storage.

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Quittin’ Time

It’s 3pm and the first day’s work has come to an end. The excavation crew makes their way back across the Despotiko pier and onto the boat which will return them to Antiparos.

© The Diakron Institute


EXCAVATION: DAY 2

© The Diakron Institute


Excavation: Day 2

The Diakron team works in groups of two (Andrew’s to the left, Luigi and Paola’s to the right) to continue the expansion of the south complex. © The Diakron Institute


Reach for the Sky

Karin, Paola, and Luigi use the laser level to determine the elevation of a wall corner.

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The Locals

Wild goats, the only permanent residents of the island of Despotiko, observe the nearby human activity with occasional curiosity.

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Fortunate Find

Marcelo and Tais (right) use triangle trowels to carefully scrape away layers of compacted dirt and remove the fragmented base of a sizeable ceramic vessel. Photo credit: Natalia Velli Š The Diakron Institute


Painted Pieces

Decorated ceramic fragments evidence the historical presence of a variety of ancient storage vessels. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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R&R

After another challening day on the excavation, the group spends the evening hours enjoying some well-deserved rest and relaxation.

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EXCAVATION: DAY 3 + P R I V A T E

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Excavation: Day 3

Northerly view of the shipping container, the excavation’s multi-purpose base camp, used as a storage space, workshop, office, break room, and pottery station.

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Scenic Scaffolding

Paola and Luigi dig into the second layer of their trench with the structural framework of the main temple’s ongoing reconstruction just behind them. Š The Diakron Institute


Pulleys and Chains

An assortment of hoists, used to create the scaffolding system constructed around the main temple, hang from the interior walls of the shipping container. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Doctoral Discourse

Dr. Ohnesorg (left) and Dr. Kourayos (right) discuss the significance of the sanctuary’s reconstruction.

© The Diakron Institute


Old vs. New

The differentiation of ancient building components from new marble construction is intentionally self-evident in the reconstruction designs of architect William Orestidis. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Dumping Grounds

Excavated material, after it has been checked for artefacts, is transported by wheelbarrow to an off-site dirt heap on the island’s northeastern slopes.

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Private Cruise

The group takes a private boat tour around Despotiko to appreciate the island’s wild, unadulterated landscape and to experience the pristine, turquoise waters of its most remote beaches.

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Captain Sargos

Legend of Antiparos, the Captain has been transporting the excavation crew to and from Despotiko for over a decade. Š The Diakron Institute


Old Seadog

Poseidon, first mate of Captain Sargos, protects the portside as the boat passes Despotiko’s northwestern Kalika peninsula.

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Open Water

The boat drops anchor between northern Despotiko and western Antiparos (center right), and the Diakron crew dive overboard into the cool, crystal clear water.

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Serene Seafarers

(Left to right) Grace, Gabi, Karin, Cecilia, Ana, Rafael, Tais, Marcelo, Camilla, and Edson sit back, relax, and enjoy the ride. Š The Diakron Institute


Watermelon on the Waves

Captain Sargos treats the group to fresh watermelon and wine on the return journey to Agios Georgios. Š The Diakron Institute


EXCAVATION: DAY 4 + C A V E

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Excavation: Day 4

The Diakron team begins to remove the upper layer of a room in the southern temple complex. Rafael, Marcelo, and Tais inspect the dirt in the wheelbarrow for possible finds.

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Dig In

Assistant Project Director Andrew Gipe-Lazarou wields the pick-axe with veteran skill. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Daily Record

Luigi records the activities of his trench and highlights the discovery of any noteworthy finds. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Rock Inspection

Dr. Ohnesorg inspects the building material of an archaic wall in the south complex. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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Survey Tools

Notebook, reading glasses, mechanical pencil, calipers, adjustable level, and a small bag of drafting equipment. Photo credit: Natalia Velli

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177m a.s.l.

Looking south from the hill of Saint John, where the group has traveled to visit one of the oldest caves in Greece.

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Agios Ioannis Spiliotis

The 18th-century Greek Orthodox church dedicated to ‘Saint John of the Cave’ guards the vaulted entrance to the Cave of Antiparos. © The Diakron Institute


The Cave of Antiparos

A 45 million-year-old stalagmite (left) greets visitors at the cave entrance, where Dr. Fanis Mavridis (right) gives an introduction to the cultural significance of caves in antiquity.

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Into the Depths

The group begins the 100m (411-step) descent into the heart of the Antiparos cave.

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Cave Formation

Stalactites (shown here) hold tight to the ceiling. Stalagmites might grow to meet them.

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Corroded Chasm

The cave, which was formed by the corrosion of limestone, has a total area of about 5,600 square meters, and is about 15 degrees centigrade in the winter, with 65% humidity.

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EXCAVATION: DAY 5 S

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Excavation: Day 5

Ilia Daifa, Assistant Archaeologist to Dr. Kourayos, keeps a detailed record of the daily progress of all excavation activites. Š The Diakron Institute


Dust Cloud

Strong winds put on a show and the team takes a moment to spectate.

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Kidding Around

A baby goat wanders onto the excavation site and Andrew helps it find the way out, through the dumping grounds and back to its herd. Š The Diakron Institute


Water Break

Camilla takes a drink by the eastern perimeter wall and appreciates a beautiful view of the natural harbor and the distant Antiparos.

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Veni, Vidi, Fodi

‘I came, I saw, I dug!’ Excavation warriors (left to right) Karin, Marcelo, Camilla, Grace, and Carlo celebrate the conclusion of a week’s worth of hard work.

© The Diakron Institute


By the Dock of the Bay

The group makes its way onto the pier for an introductory snorkeling session around the harbor of Agios Georgios. Š The Diakron Institute


Goggle-eyed

Tais (left) and Rafael (center) adjust their masks while Luigi (right) provokes the cameraman.

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La Sirena

Underwater archaeologist Paola Palumbo demonstrates proper snorkeling technique and safety practices for swimming in shallow water.

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Sunken Harbor

The group explores the bottom of the bay for archaeological traces of Antiparos’ ancient harbor and locates several building footprints.

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Evening Excursion

Gabi, Paola, Tais, and Rafael, leave Agios Georgios behind and hike westwards across mountainous terrain towards the setting sun. Š The Diakron Institute


Apollonian Altar

The group explores the sandstone plateau of Antiparos’ southwestern peninsula, before gathering in the sun for a group meditation. Š The Diakron Institute


Sunset Meditation

Carlo relaxes his body and clears his mind as the sun sets quietly over the open sea.

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ANTIPAROS TO PAROS

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On the Road Again

The group takes the morning bus from the town of Agios Georgios to the port of Antiparos.

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Shipping Out

The ferry to Paros arrives at the port of Antiparos and the seasoned travelers begin to mobilize.

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Return to Lefkes

Looking eastward from the House of Literature, past the church of the Holy Trinity (far right), over the coastal plain of Paros, towards the distant island of Naxos (center).

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Veranda Guest Visit

Dr. Kourayos makes a surprise visit to Lefkes and presents several educational short films about the excavation on Despotiko. Š The Diakron Institute


Wined and Dined

Dr. Kourayos joins the Diakron team for an evening meal at a traditional tavern in Lefkes square.

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P O T T E R Y W O R K S H O P + A N C I E N T Q U A R R I E S

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Breakfast Braids

Paola braids Ana’s hair while the group has a morning snack at a cafe in Parikia.

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Picturesque Paros

Erica (left) and Grace (right) walk through the Cycladic cityscape of Parikia on their way to the ancient pottery workshop, located on the outskirts of the modern city.

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Subterranean Site Visit

The Archaic workshop (6th Century BC), located a kilometer inland from the island’s main port, contained two stone-built kilns for the production of monumental vases and roof tiles.

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Ancient Quarries

Last operated in 1844 when the French mined marble for the construction of Napoleon’s tomb, the Marathi quarries have supplied sacred Parian marble for countless ancient masterpieces, including the Hermes of Praxiteles, the Winged Victory of Samothrace, and the Venus de Milo.

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Marble Man

The last marble technician working on site at the Marathi quarries welcomes us with a tour of his workshop and stories of his family’s marble-making legacy.

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Cave Meditation

After a 100m descent into the heart of the mines, the explorers gather in a small cove and switch off their flashlights, for a silent meditation in absolute darkness.

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Out of the Depths

Paola climbs to the top of the mine shaft and celebrates finding the light at the end of the tunnel.

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B Y Z A N T I N E

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The Byzantine Road

The group sets out early on the Byzantine Road, a thousand-year-old walking trail, paved with slabs of Parian marble, extending 6km from the old town square in Lefkes, through the towns of Prodromos and Marmara to the sea.

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Wild Herbs

In view of the distant town of Lefkes, Project Director Luigi pauses for a moment to explain the cultural importance of native herbs thyme, oregano, and sage, which are native to the Cyclades and grow all along the Byzantine road. Š The Diakron Institute


Ramble On

Ana and Edson lead the march across the hilly terrain of inland Paros. Š The Diakron Institute


Coastal Plain

View to the southeast towards Kefalos Hill and the distant island of Naxos. (Left to right) Andrew, Marcelo, and Camilla begin their descent to the village of Prodromos (right).

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Prodromos

The tiny village ‘before the road’ with a permanent population of around 250 people is a spectacular way point on our voyage to the sea.

© The Diakron Institute


Street Sheets

Drying lines, for the neighborhood’s laundry, criss-cross a small, secluded square in the labyrinthine village of Prodromos.

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Marmara

On their way from Prodromos to the sea, the group passes a traditional windmill in the agricultural village of Marmara.

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End of the Road

Three hours and 6.5km later, the weary travelers arrive at the sea.

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Furious Feast

Before returning to Lefkes, the group revisits Prodromos for a traditional island meal at Tsitsanis Tavern: retsina wine, fried zucchini balls, stuffed grape leaves, Greek fava dip, choriatiki salad, fried cheese, tzatziki, grilled octopus, and fried squid.

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Dream Boat

Marcelo and Camilla rest their eyes on the early morning boat ride from Paros to Delos.

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Delos

Sacred birthplace of Apollo and Artemis, the island of Delos has been a center of cult activity since its first inhabitation in 2,500 BC. The tiny 5km long,1.3km wide island is located at the heart of the Cyclades and is shown here at the height of its prosperity as a panhellenic pilgrimage destination. Image credit: Bell’ Europa - Francesco Comi, 1995

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Delian Museum

The group has three hours to explore Delos before returning to the boat, and their first stop is the island’s archaeological museum. Š The Diakron Institute


God Apollo

Marble statue, found in 1880 in the agora of the Italians, sculpted ca. 100 BC with the dedication: The Italians set this up for Gaius Ofellius Ferus son of Marcus because of his righteousness and generosity towards them. This was dedicated to Apollo. Dionysios son of Timarchides and Timarchides son of Polykles, Athenians, made this.

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Fish Hooks

Timeless essentials for daily life in the Cycladic community.

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Temple of Isis

On the slopes of Mt. Cynthus, Luigi passes the Temple of Isis, built during the Roman period to venerate the trinity of Isis, Serapis, and Anubis.

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South Stoa

Northerly view of the Doric colonnade (opening west) and surviving architectural details of the South Stoa building, one of the three defining sides of the Delian Agora.

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Delian Lions

Dedicated by the Naxians ca. 600 BC, these 1.72m high, snarling marble monuments stand guard along the Sacred Way.

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Mt. Cynthus

Northwesterly view from the peak of Mt. Cynthus, over the modern port of Delos, towards the islands of Rinia and Syros. Š The Diakron Institute


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Ferryboat Briefing

Project Director Luigi explain’s the day’s itinerary on the morning boat to Naxos. © The Diakron Institute


Naxos Boardwalk

The largest island in the Cyclades, Naxos was and continues to be one of the most important commercial centers in the Aegean Sea.

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Street Map

In 1207, after a 5-week seige, Naxos becomes the capital of a Venetian Duchy. For over 350 years, until 1564, when the island is conquered by the Ottomans, Naxos is governed by a Venetian Duke who builds a castle in the city center. A modern map, located at one of its many entrances, helps visitors navigate the castle’s labyrinthine passageways.

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Temple Trekkers

A small band of renegade ramblers breaks from the group and walks 10km from the city of Naxos to the town of Livadi, to visit the Ionic Temple of Dionysus, constructed ca. 550BC.

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Naxos Archaeological Museum

Early Cycladic vases (3200-2300BC) on display in the Archaeological Museum of Naxos, which occupies a five-story structure in the city’s historic district, constructed in the 13th Century as part of the city’s medieval fortification walls.

© The Diakron Institute


Early Cycladic Art

Naxian variety of female figurines with folded arms, characteristic of the Early Cycladic period. Š The Diakron Institute


Gold Rosettes

Decorations from a wooden chest or dress from the Late Cycladic period (ca. 2000BC) found at the ancient Naxian cemetery of Aplomata. Š The Diakron Institute


Goddess of Grain

The group traverses the fertile countryside of inland Naxos on their way to the Temple of Sangri, earthly abode of the goddess of agriculture. Š The Diakron Institute


Temple of Sangri

Constructed around 530 BC to honor the goddess Demeter and her daughter Persephone, this Late Archaic temple has several unusual architectural features, including a nearly-square building footprint (13.29 x 12.73m), a southerly orientation, and five Samian style columns in antis. Š The Diakron Institute


Portara

Built of four blocks of solid marble, each measuring about 6 meters in length and weighing over 20 tons, the ‘great portal’ was constructed in 530 BC on an islet north of Naxos City for the inner chamber of an Apollonian temple which was never completed.

© The Diakron Institute


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Last Lecture

After a ‘free’ day of relaxation, the group assembles in the conference room at the House of Literature, where Erica delivers an introductory lecture to Ancient Greek sculpture and ceramics.

© The Diakron Institute


Wine on the Way

The Diakron crew gather in the mess hall at the House of Literature for a delicious home-cooked meal. Š The Diakron Institute


Dishwasing Directors

Andrew (left) and Luigi (right) direct the kitchen clean up.

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Midnight Samba

Brazilian participants teach the Diakron how to samba in a midnight dance session at the House of Literature. Š The Diakron Institute


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Kolymbithres

At the beautiful bay of the ‘basins’ on the north side of Paros, Gabi, Rafael, and Tais enjoy a relaxing day at the beach. © The Diakron Institute


Rivalry on the Rocks

Luigi reclines in the sun at Kolymbithres Beach and prepares the chess board for another game with the undefeated cameraman. Š The Diakron Institute


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Packed Port

The boarding gates at the port of Parikia overflow with travelers waiting for the arrival of their boats, to depart the island of Paros.

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Into the Blue

After the ferryboat to Athens arrives, we wish the Cyclades a fond farewell before heading out to sea. Š The Diakron Institute

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