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PILSEN


In the past century, Pilsen has been a global port of entry for immigrants. Despite having been settled by Eastern Europeans, whose imprints remain visible in the neighborhood’s architecture and street fronts.Today, the neighborhood’s latino population has imbued it with a strong Mexican character and identity. Pilsen is projected to continue to experience transformations and ethnic shifts in the following years. This will bring even more diversity and opportunities for architecture and urbanism. Pilsen has a strong potential to become one of the next major redevelopment areas in Chicago.


PILSEN


CONTENTS

1 2 3 4 5 6

UNDERSTANDING PILSEN SHIFTING DEMOGRAPHICS LOOKING INTO THE PAST TO ANALYZE THE FUTURE HISPANIC INFLUENCE IN THE COMMUNITY (RE) POSITIONING PILSEN FUTURE SCENARIOS


LITTLE MEXICO AT THE HEART OF CHICAGO 12


1

UNDERSTANDING PILSEN


14


Pilsen. Pilsen (Lower West Side) with a population of 35, 904 people and an area of 2.48 sq. mi is located southwest of Chicago’s business district and in close proximity to many of the city’s main attractions. Western avenue to the west, 16th St. to the north, and the South Branch of the Chicago River to the east. “The eastern side of the community is located south of the University of UIC University of Illinois at Chicago home to 25,000 students, 12,000 faculty and staff, 15 colleges including the nation’s largest medical school and the state’s major public medical center.” (Betancur, 2005) The southern border relates to the 1000 acre industrial corridor. This vast piece of land, remains underutilized, in some parts abandoned and a high pollutant within the neighborhood. It potential remains there; it has direct access to the Chicago River, broad band fiber optic band passing by, direct rail access and a great amount of land that allows a large scale benificary project. The community area is connected to the rest of the city by both Chicago Transit Authority and Metra transportation services. This proximity advantage minimizes the car dependency of the neighborhood. It has a total of 19 DIVVY Bicycle stations and a total of 8 different buses transit daily along Pilsen allowing the residents a variety of alternatives without the need of a car. Still, the amount of cars in pilsen is high (60%) this relates to a cultural attribute; it has always been the “Mexican Dream” being able to buy a car, it is seen as a luxury and a trophy. This neighborhood is also defined by it’s internal boundaries, the 18th St. that crosses the northern area of Pilsen serves as the neighborhood’s commercial corridor, full of “shop houses” with retail facing the main street, and families living on the top floors. The commercial corridors remain mainly as mixed use buildings enclosing all the street vibrancy within the facades. Bordering to the north, there is a giant wall that extends through along the entire 16th St. that passes through Pilsen, has been painted with Mexican symbols, murals and art; contributing to the Mexican character of the neighborhood. But this wall creates insecurity and crime spots. Along the eastern side, Halsted marks a subtle but evolving division between “West Pilsen” which isorrounds the commercial center along the 18th and Ashland and “East Pilsen” (reffering to the artistic district) which is centered at 18th and Halsted, which is then enforced by the gigantic expresway. Moreover, there is a notable gap along Cermak Ave. between the neighborhood’s residentail and commercial vibrancy and the Industrial Corridor. Walking along that street feels like walking within a ghost town, bordered by fences, abandoned factories, deteriorating buildings; urging the need of revitalization. In relation to open space, Pilsen is 76% below Chicago’s average open space per capita. With a total of seven parks, the amount of poeple and density within the nieghborhood has an extreme disproportion. Educational facilities have been evolving and improved, currently there’s 20 schools and 2 rated with excellency. (source). It is interesting to note that schools, community buildings and parks have emerged as an effect of the parishes and the evolution of sub-neighborhoods. A trait that has been seen since the early years in Chicago with Catholic Churches and a common aspect in Mexico too.

15


Expressways and Boundaries.

16


PILSEN Pop: 35,904 Area: 2.48 sq mi.

17


PETERSON AVE 6000 N

ASHL AND AVE 1600 W

DAMEN AVE 2000 W

CAL IF O RNIA AVE 2800 W

WEST E RN AV E 2400 W

KEDZIE AVE 3200 W CENT RAL PARK AVE 3600 W

KOST NER AVE 4400 W

PUL AS KI RD 4000 W

AUSTI N AV E 6000 W

DEVON AVE 6400 N

CICERO AVE 4800 W

O'Hare International Airport

PRATT AVE 6800 N

CENTRAL AVE 5300 W LAR AMI E AVE 5200 W

EAST RIVER RD 8800 W

TOUHY AVE 7200 N

NAGLE AVE 6400 W

MANN HEIM RD 10000 W

OA K PARK AVE 6800 W

OR IO LE AVE 7600 W

HOWARD ST 7600 N

HARLEM AVE 7200 W

The Industrial Corridors.

Elston/Amstrong

Peterson/Pulaski

BRYN MAWR AVE 5600 N

Ravenswood

FOSTER AVE 5200 N LAWREN CE AVE 4800 N

Addison

MONTROSE AVE 4400 N IRVING PARK RD 4000 N

Knox

Kennedy

PACIFIC AVE 8000 W

BELMON T AVE 3200 N

CUMB ERLAND AVE 8400 W

ADDISON ST 3600 N

Pulaski

DIVERSEY AVE 2800 N

FULLER TON AVE 2400 N

North Branch

Armitage

ARMITAGE 2000 N

HARL EM AVE 7200 W

NORTH AVE 1600 N

DIVISION ST 1200 N CHIC AGO AVE 800 N

KINZIE ST 400 N

Kinzie

Northwest

MADISON ST 1N/1S HARRISON ST 600 S

ROOSEVELT R D 1200 S

Western/Ogden

Roosevelt/ Cicero

16TH ST 1600 S CERMAK RD 2200 S

Little Village

26TH ST 2600 S

Pilsen

31ST ST 3100 S 35TH ST 3500 S

PER SHING R D 3900 S 43RD ST 4300 S

47TH ST 4700 S 51ST ST 5100 W

Midway Intl. Airport

Harlem AUSTIN AVE 6000 W

NARRAG AN SET T AV E 6400 W

OA K PARK AVE 6800 W

63RD ST 6300 S

HARL EM AVE 7200 W

Stockyards Brighton Park

MARQUETTE R D 6700 S 71ST ST 7100 S 75TH ST 7500 S 79TH ST 7900 S 83RD ST 8300 S

Greater Southwest

87TH ST 8700 S

KOSTNER AVE 4400 W

59TH ST 5900 S

CENTRAL AVE 5600 W

55TH ST 5500 S

Stevenson

91ST ST 9100 S

Burnside

95TH ST 9500 S

99TH ST 9900 S

Calumet

103RD ST 10300 S 107TH ST 10700 S

18

STAT E L INE RD 4100 E

AVE NUE O 3430 E

TO RRE NCE AVE 2630 E

STATE ST 1E/1W

RACINE AVE 1200 W

HAL ST ED ST 800 W

DAMEN AVE 2000 W

WESTERN AV E 2400 W

60,000 Feet

JEFFERY AVE 2000 E

45,000

WOODL AW N AV E 1200 E

30,000

138TH ST 13800 S

STO N Y ISLAND AVE 1600 E

15,000

127TH ST 12700 S

COTTAGE GROVE 800 E AVE

7,500

Pullman

DR M L KING JR DR 400 E

0

ASHL AND AVE 1600 W

Existing Railroad

West Pullman

119TH ST 11900 S CAL IFORNI A AVE 2800 W

Rail access difficult, impossible

KEDZIE AVE 3200 W

CICERO AVE 4800 W

115TH ST 11500 S

CENTRAL PARK AVE 3600 W

Rail access possible

PULAS KI RD 4000 W

111TH ST 11100 S

STEWA RT AVE 400 W

Most of sites have rail access


“PILSEN’S BOUNDARY IS 60-79% ADJACENT TO EXPRESSWAYS AND INDUSTRIAL PROPERTY. - Chicago Sustainable Cities

Elston/Amstrong

Peterson/Pulaski

Ravenswood Addison Knox

Kennedy

Pulaski

North Branch

Armitage

Kinzie

Northwest

Roosevelt/ Cicero Little Village

Stevenson

Western/Ogden

Pilsen

Stockyards Brighton Park

Harlem

Greater Southwest

Burnside Calumet Number of employees Industrial Corridors with access to waterways West Pullman

Industrial Corridor WITHOUT access to waterways

0

7,500

15,000

30,000

Pullman

45,000

60,000 Feet 19


Ward Boundaries. Aldermanic Wards for the City of Chicago

NEIGHBORHOODS AND WARDS: 49 50

41

OUT

40

39

45 OUT 38

46

47

33

36

48

30

44 35

31

32 43

1 26

37 29

42

27 28

2 24 25 22 11

12

4

3

14 23

16 20

15 13

17 18

6

WARD 25: Danny Solis

8

21

OUT

7

19 34

10 9

20

5


“CULTURALLY RICH AND ECONOMICALLY DIVERSE COMMUNITIES IN THE 25TH WARD.” - David A. Baran ALDERMAN DANNY SOLIS:

WARD 25: The 25th Ward is a district on Chicago’s near Lower West Side. The ward is one of the most diverse in the City of Chicago, encompassing UIC/West Loop, areas of historic Little Italy, vibrant Chinatown, and one of the largest Latino communities in the state, Pilsen and Heart of Chicago. Alderman Danny Solis was appointed alderman in 1996 by Mayor Richard M. Daley Major Projects: 1. Cermak: The most sustainable street in America. 2. Wage rise of $8.00 to $14.00

21


A 12 min metra ride to the loop.

CTA Lines

Metra Lines

22


“THE COMMUNITY AREA IS CONNECTED TO THE REST OF THE CITY BY BOTH CTA AND METRA TRANSPORTATION SERVICES.” - City of Chicago

O’HARE:

34 min 1 hr M

Blue Line

LOWER WEST SIDE

THE LOOP:

12 min 13 min MEDICAL CENTER:

8 min 1.4 mi

M

Pink Line MCCORMICK:

UIC:

8 min 8 min

M

Red Line

15 min 20 min

IIT:

13 min 38 min Midway:

15 min 37 min

M

Orange Line

23


Boundaries.

Little Italy North Lawdale

Pilsen Chinatown

Little Village

Bridgeport

McKinley Park

24

Armour Square


“THE BOUNDARIES OF PILSEN ARE THE CHICAGO RIVER NORTH TO 16TH ST AND THE CHICAGO RIVER WEST TO DAMEN AVE.” - PNCC

More than 1/3 of the land:

LAND USE:

35.2% TOTAL:

1000 acres Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Mapping (2012)

25


What defines Pilsen. 49

50

09 RAILROAD TRACKS / WALL

19 Western Ave. Western Ave.

Ashland-Midway

Isl a Bl

ue

WEST PILSEN

“Old Pilsen”

nd

Harrison Park

Cullerton Cullerton Western-Douglas

21

Damen

Cullerton

Benit Acad

Damen

Cermak

Damen

B

Baraga Play Lot Park

Ashland Ashland

nd

sla eId BlIuslan lue

S Damen Ave.

Western Ave.

S Ashland Ave.

INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR

Ashland-Midway

26


“W 18th ST IS AN ACTIVE COMMERCIAL CORRIDOR WITH MEXICAN BAKERIES, RESTAURANTS, AND GROCERIES.” - PNCC 60

62 Halsted Ave.

16th

18th Throop Park Guadalupe Reyes Park

EAST PILSEN

“ARTS DISTRICT” Dvorak Park

to Juarez Community demy

Cermak-Chinatown

S Halsted St.

INDUSTRIAL VS. RESIDENTIAL: GAP

DAN RYAN EXPY (90) Halsted-Midway

BUSINESS (B1,2,3): COMMUNITY SHOPPING DISTRICT COMMERCIAL: NEIGHBORHOOD COMMERCIAL DISTRICT RESIDENTIAL PLANNED DEVELOPMENT PLANNED MANUFACTURING CITY OF CHICAGO: PLANNIND AND ZONING BUREAU (2014)

27


Public Transportation. METRA

CTA

CTA AND METRA LINES

Halsted Ave. 18th Western Ave.

Western-Douglas

Damen

Cermak-Chinatown

Halsted-Midway

AVERAGE TIME:

Ashland-Midway

35 min TO WORK

COMMUTING METHODS TO WORK: CHICAGO, ILL

PILSEN

26% Carpool 16% Public Transp. 8% Bike or Walk

50

% CAR

Source: 2012 American Community Survey, Five Year Estimates. 28

2% Other 10% Carpool

28% Public Transp. 8% Bike or Walk

52

AUSTIN, TX

3% Walk 5% Public Transp. 1% Bike

86

% CAR

% CAR

Source: 2011 American Community Survey, 2009. Austin Texas.


“THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN PILSEN AND THE OTHER NEIGHBORHOODS IS IT’S LOCATION AND PROXIMITY TO UNIVERSITIES, HOSPITALS, DOWNTOWN AND TRANSPORTATION.” - Susana Vazquez (Executive Director LISC)

Pink Line Metra Station on 18th St. (2014)

29


Bycicle and Bus routes. BICYCLE ROUTES. DIVVY Stations.

Racine Ave & 18th St

Paulina St & 18th St

Blue Island Ave & 18th St

Clinton St & 18th St

Morgan St & 18th Halsted St & 18th St

Damen Ave & Cullerton St.

Wells St & 19th St

May St & Cullerton St

Wentworth Ave & Arc Western Ave & 21st

Ashland Ave &21st St

Halsted St & 21st St

Normal Ave & Archer Ave

Damen Ave & Coulther St

Wentworth Ave & 24

Western Ave & 24th

Halsted St & Archer Ave

Emerald Ave & 28th St

Morgan St & 31st

Emerald Ave & 31st

BUS ROUTES Urban Density BICYCLE

Blu

eI

sla

nd

Bike Lane Bike Route

Cullerton

30

Halsted

nd

sla

eI

Blu

Ashland

Damen

Cermak

ROUTES


“COMPARING BIKE TO PUBLIC TRASPORTATION, .” - Susana Vazquez (Executive Director LISC)

WITHIN:

30 min BIKE ROUTES:

LOCATION:

BIKE PT

MILES

TRUMP TOWER:

27 min

19 min 4.1 mi

THE LOOP:

20 min

20 min 3.4 mi

MEDICAL CENTER: DOUGLAS PARK:

10 min

2 min 8 min

UIC:

8 min 17 min

1.4 mi

15 mi

11 mi

SOILDER FIELD:

17 min 3.1 mi

18th MCCORMICK:

CICERO:

27 min 30 min

5.2 mi

M

Pink Line

18 min 29 min

3.3 mi

IIT:

19 min

PALMISANO PARK:

15 min

28 min 3.4 mi

3.4 mi

WHITE SOX:

19 min 28 min

3.4 mi

DIVVY Bike Station. Chicago. (2014)

31


Open Space. OPEN SPACES

Throop Park Harrison Park

Guadalupe Reyes Park

Ping Tom Memorial

Canal-port River walk Barret Park

Benito Juarez Community Academy

Sun-Yet-Sen Baraga Play lot Park

Park No. 571 Canal port River walk

Palmisano Park

Bosely Park

Are this areas seen as a potential for increasing the green space?

32


“CHICAGO HAS 17.6 sq m OF OPEN SPACE PER PERSON.” - Madhavi Rajadyaska - The Times of India

Harrisson Park. Baseball Field. (2014) wibit Images

LAND USE:

1.6% 4.2 sq m

OPEN SPACE PER CAPITA:

TOTAL:

38.6 acres

Harrisson Park. Baseball Field. (2014) wibit Images

Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Mapping (2012) 33


34


76%

Pilsen is below the average open space per capita of Chicago. It only has

4.6% sq m.

35


A wealth of educational institutes. SCHOOLS Public / Private

EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTES:

65% of children DROP OUT OF SCHOOL TO JOIN:

workforce.

9 CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS

5 HIGHSCHOOLS

> Irma C. Ruiz Elementary School > John A. Walsh Elementary School > John Greenleaf Whittier Elementary School > José Clemente Orozco Community Academy > Joseph Jungman Elementary School > Josiah Pickard Elementary School > Manuel Perez Elementary School > Peter Cooper Dual Language Academy > Pilsen Elementary Community Academy

> Benito Juárez Community Academy (public) > Cristo Rey Jesuit High School (Catholic) > Instituto Health Sciences Career Academy (charter) > Jane Addams High School (alternative) > Rudy Lozano Leadership Academy (alternative)

4 CATHOLIC ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS > St. Ann School > St. Paul-Our Lady of Vilna School > St. Pius V School > St. Procopius School/Escuela San Procopio

20.6%

Bachelors Degree

11.2%

5.4%

Associate Degree

4.1%

14.3%

1 or more years of college

9.2%

1 CHAPTER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL > Bartolomé de Las Casas (a campus of the UNO Charter Network)

Less than 1 year of college

1 COMMUNITY COLLEGE

High school or Equivalent

> Arturo Velasquez Institute (a division of Richard J. Daley College)

36

Less than High school

3.8% 4.8%

23.7% 7.8%

19.3% 53.8%

METROPULSE: COMMUNITY DATA SNAPSHOTS (PILSEN) 2014


“AS OF 2010, CENSUS PROJECTIONS ESTIMATE PILSEN IS HOME TO 17,139 CHILDREN WHO ARE 17 YEARS OLD OR YOUNGER.” - 1998 City Space Plan

70% of adults DO NOT COMPLETE:

9th grade.

37


Parishes and sub-neighborhoods. RELIGIOUS. Churches

CATHOLIC

95% 1 2 3 4 5

St Anns Catholic Church St Matthew Lutheran Church Cermak Baptist Church St Paul Convent St Paul Catholic Church

6 7 8 9 10

St Stephens Catholic Church St Vitus Catholic Church St Adelbert Catholic Church Bethel Temple Assembly of God St Pius Catholic Church

11 12 13 14 15

St Procopius Catholic Church Assembly of God Church Emmanuel Presbyterian Church Sacred Heart Catholic Church St Joseph Catholic Church

16 17 18 19

Providence of God Catholic Church King David Missionary Baptist Church Our Lady of Vilna Catholic Church

CLUSTER 2

2 Churches 1 Schools 3 Community Organization 1 Museum

CLUSTER 4

3 Churches 1 Schools 6Community Organization

CLUSTER 3

2 Churches 2 Schools 3 Community Organization

CLUSTER 1

1 Church 2 Schools 1 Community Organization

38


“AS OF 2010, CENSUS PROJECTIONS ESTIMATE PILSEN IS HOME TO 17,139 CHILDREN WHO ARE 17 YEARS OLD OR YOUNGER.” - 1998 City Space Plan St Procopius Holy Trinity Croation

St Adalbert

St Pius V

New life Covenant Pilsen

39


Walking distance Clusters.

40


“PILSEN’S COMMUNITY HAS BEEN INSTRUMENTAL TO THE CONSTRUCTION OF MANY BUILDINGS.” - PNCC

41


HISPANIC POPULATION KEEPS ON GROWING 42


2

UNDERSTANDING PILSEN

43


A growing community. CHICAGO POPULATION (2010):

2,695,598

3,000,000 2,890,000 2,690,000

WHITE

WHITE

2,000,000

HISPANIC

HISPANIC

1,000,000

0

BLACK

BLACK

ASIAN

ASIAN

2000 AND 2010

POPULATION COMPARISON

2000

2010

Asian

65% or Greater

50% or Greater

124,437

144,903

Black

65% or Greater

50% or Greater

1,053,739

872,286

Hispanic

65% or Greater

50% or Greater

753,644

778,862

White

65% or Greater

50% or Greater

Other

No Majority

907,166

854,717

57,030

44,830

Source: Chicago Tribune. Census 2010 and 2000 Interactive Map. American Community Survey. 44

POPULATION BY RACE FROM CENSUS: 2000


“WITH SHARP DECLINES IN BLACK AND WHITE POPULATION, LATINOS MAKE GAINS.” - Chicago Tribune OF THE ENTIRE POPULATION:

1/3

of 2,695,598

IS HISPANIC.

TOP THREE HISPANIC POPULATION ORIGIN GROUPS:

SHARE AMONG HISPANIC:

1. Mexican

1,561,000

79.2%

2. Puerto Rican

190,000

9.6%

3. Guatemalan

41,000

2.1%

Source: 2011 American Community Survey

SHARE HISPANIC AMONG POPULATION:

21.5% AMONG HISPANICS SHARE FOREIGN BORN:

39.6% AMONG UNDER 18, SHARE HISPANICS:

30.3%

POPULATION BY RACE FROM CENSUS: 2010 45


Mexican Settlement in Chicago. MEXICAN SETTLEMENT IN THE USA: 1900

1930

1942

U.S. Labor recruitment in Mexico for jobs in: railroad construction, auto and steel manufacturing, meat packaging and agriculture.

1964

1970

2014

The Destabilization of the Mexican economy caused by globalization caused an increase in legal and illegal immigration in the U.S.

5,000,000 Mexicans worked in the U.S. as part of the Bracero Program.

3 4

me

Ho

o

mp

Te

y rar

Near West Side

2 Back of the Yards

MEXICAN SETTLEMENT IN CHICAGO:

The major areas of Mexican settlement were located near particular industries where the newcomers found employment: 1. SOUTH WORKS: 2. BACK OF THE YARDS: 3. NEAR WEST SIDE: 4. PILSEN:

46

Steel Packing houses Railroad Temporary

South Works 1

MICHIGAN BEET FIELDS


“FOR NEARLY 150 YEARS, PILSEN HAS BEEN A PORT OF ENTRY FOR THOUSANDS OF IMMIGRANTS.” - Peter Nero

1947-18TH ST. NEAR WOOD STREET VIEW - EAST .

2013 - SAME LOCATION

John R. Schidnt.

John R. Schidt.

47


48


Port of entry for immigrants.

1870-1900: Polish, Czechoslovakians and Lithuanians 1920: BOHEMIAN COMMUNITY. Czechoslovakia, Poland Lithuania and Italy 1950: DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFT. Expanding Latino population predominantly from Mexico.

1960: Polish were the only group that outnumbered the Mexican population. 1970: Pilsen became the first Majority Latino Community in Chicago. 2000: According to U.S. Census: Pilsen was 88.9% Hispanic. 2010-2014: DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFT. White population is increasing and Latinos decreasing,

Source: The Chicago Fact Book Consortium, 1984: 86. 49


Pilsen is 78% Hispanic. POPULATION DIFFERENCE IN PILSEN

44,031

-18%

LANGUAGE SPOKEN AT HOME

17% English

35,761

80%

PLACE OF BIRTH 6% Out of State

49%

ETHNICITY

78%

Hispanics

Foreign

Spanish

43% In state of residency

2000 2010 HOUSEHOLD INCOME DISTRIBUTION

14% $10K or less

31% $

MALE / FEMALE RATIO 1:1

50%

Women

54%

Less than high....... ............ School

YEAR HOUSE BUILT

55%

1939 or earlier (13,686)

OWNERS AND RENTERS

20% Renters

80% 50%

Men

16% $40K-60K 11% $60K-100K 3% $100K-200K 1% $150K-200K EMPLOYMENT Unemployed

75% Employed

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY (FEMALES) 1% Construction 22% Construction

7% Financial & Insurance 15% Wholesale & Retail 2% Public administration 21% Education & Health

29% 50

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT

1% Out of US

10-25K

24% $25K-40K

25%

3% Other

12% White 3% Black 1 Other 1% % Asian

Other

8% High school 5% < than 1 yr of College 9% 1 or more yr of College 4% Associate Degree 3% Profess. Degree 11% Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY (MALES)

11% Construction 28% Manufacturing

4% Financial & Insurance 14% Wholesale & Retail 2% Public administration 6% Transportation 4% Education

32%

Other

Owners

6% 1940-49 (1,545 houses) 6% 1950-59 (1,572 houses) 3% 1960-69 (625 houses) 4% 1970-79 (957 houses) 3% 1980-89 (640 houses) 5% 1990-99 (1,301 houses) 6% 2000-05 (1,578 houses) 12% 2005- later (2,8304) UNDER POVERTY

36%

Under Federal Poverty rate

AVERAGE HOUSEHOLD INCOME

52%

Homeowners

Average Household Income:$42,000


“PILSEN IS 78% HISPANIC WITH THE YOUNGEST POPULATION IN CHICAGO.” - University of Illinois

51


Household sizes are changing. HOUSING AND TENURE 85% 86%

Occupied Housing Units 14% 14%

Vacant Housing Units

12%

Single Family, Detached Single Family, Attached

26%

1% 3%

2 Units

26%

15%

3 or 4 Units

34%

17% 27%

5 or more Units

20%

0 to 1 Bedrooms

27%

2 Bedrooms

34%

5 Bedrooms

5% 7% 3% 4%

16%

Less than $150,000

21%

$150,000 to $299,999

42%

6%

$500,000 and Above

13% $252,958 $247,800

Median Value

Built 1970 or Later Built 1940 or Later

4%

8% 6%

15% 12%

Built Before 1940 Median Year Built

54%

24% 25%

$300,000 to $499,999

Built 2000 or Later

46%

26% 27%

3 Bedrooms 4 Bedrooms

39%

32% 45%

78%

1903 1945 Chicago Pilsen CMAP: Metropulse, Community Snap Shots - Pilsen (2014)

52


“IN 2006, PNC RELEASED 32 HOUSING PROJECTS TO BUILD A STRONGER NEIGHBORHOOD.” - Smart Communities, Chicago Digital Excellence Initiative

POPULATION DENSITY PER SQ. MILE:

12,227 sq. mi CHICAGO:

11,844 sq. mi

City of Chocago: 2006-2010 ACS: Census Data.

53


Pilsen is the oldest neighborhood in Chicago with a median year built:

1903. It is the only neighborhood that survived the Chicago Fire.

CMAP: Metropulse, Community Snap Shots - Pilsen (2014)


Community Comparison.

HOUSING AND TENURE 2012

40%

Near West Side North Lawndale

60%

24%

76% 36%

South Lawndale

64% 26% 73%

Lower West Side 35 %

Armour Square

65 %

McKinley Park 48 %

Bridgeport 38 %

Lake View

56% 44%

53 % 62 %

37 %

Logan Square

63 %

41 %

West Town

60 %

Owner-Occupied Renter-Occupied

AGES 20 TO 34 2012

Near West Side North Lawn-dale

42 % 22 %

South Lawndale

30 %

32%

Lower West Side Armour Square McKinley Park Bridgeport

22 % 24 % 27 %

52 %

Lake View Logan Square West Town 56

38 % 44 %


CMAP: Metropulse, Community Snap Shots - Pilsen (2014)

“MORE THAN 21 AGENCIES CURRENTLY EXIST IN PILSEN THAT PROVIDES CARE FOR THE COMMUNITY.” - Chicago Tribune

Lake View

HOUSING VALUE 2012

North Lawndale South Lawndale

West Town

$330,623

Near West Side

$183,282

Logan Square

$171,423 $252,958

Lower West Side Armour Square McKinley Park

$246,446

Pilsen

$221,376

Bridgeport Lake View Logan Square

Near West Side North Lawndale South Lawndale

Armour Square Bridgeport

McKinley Park

$283,767 $383,268 $368,279

$368,279

West Town

MODE OF TRAVEL TO WORK : DRIVING 2012

41%

Near West Side

50%

North Lawndale

49%

South Lawndale

42%

Lower West Side Armour Square

34% 49%

McKinley Park Bridgeport Lake View

50% 34% 51%

Logan Square West Town

51% 57


THE RIVER HAS BEEN FORGOTTEN 58


3

LOOKING INTO THE PAST TO IMAGINE THE FUTURE

59


60


History. Being one of the oldest neighborhoods in Chicago, during the late 19th century, Pilsen was inhabited by Czech immigrants who named the district after Plzen, the fourth largest city in what is now the Czech Republic. They replaced the Germans and Irish who had settled there first, in the midnineteenth century. The population also included smaller numbers of other ethnic groups from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, such as Slovaks, Slovenes, Croats and Austrians, as well as immigrants of Polish and Lithuanian heritage. Many of the immigrants worked in the stockyards and surrounding factories; and since the jobs offered along the southbranch of the Chicago River (southern border of pilsen) did not ask for any skills, it became a point of attraction for every immigrant arriving to Chicago. Pilsen was home to both wealthy professionals and the working class, with the whole area knitted together based on the ethnicities, mostly of Slavic descent, who were not readily welcome in other areas of the city. Although there was some increase in the Hispanic presence in the late 1950s, it was not until the early 1960s that there was a great spurt in the numbers of Latinos in Pilsen. This was due to the displacement of Latinos from the neighborhood UIC currently occupies. In 1970, Latinos became the majority population in Pilsen, surpassing the population of people of Eastern European descent.

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The Central Mexican migration. IMMIGRATION FROM MEXICAN BORDER

Chicago

California

Kansas City Arizona

Poo peo r Cond ple it nor ions i n th l ook Mexi co ing for conti opp n ortu ue to nity push .

Texas

Zacatecas Guanajuato Jalisco Mexico Michoacan HISPANIC POPULATION CONCENTRATIONS 50% or More 12.5% to 25% 6% to 24% Less than 6% 62


“MEXICANS IMMIGRATED TO CHICAGO IN SEARCH OF JOB OPPORTUNITIES, AFTER 1910 MEXICAN REVOLUTION.” - Carlos Tortolero

The Bracero Program

4.6 million

signed contracts

MEXICAN IMMIGRANTS, BRACERO PROGRAM 1943

MEXICAN FARM WORKERS, KANSAS 1917

ARMOUR & COMPANY 1950 63


An Everchanging Neighborhood.

1877

19

THE GREAT LABOR UPRISING

DEMO

1880 River: Busiest Port in the Nation

1880

1890

1900

1910

1914-1918 World War I

1890 Czech immigrants from slovakia began to arrive. 1887 Hay-market riot 1886 The battle of the Viaduct. The police turned their guns towards the working class. 1877 Economic Ressesion. Railroad National Strike. Shutting down workplaces across the country. Involving industrial workers in Pilsen. 1875-1876 Lumber Shover Strikes

1871

Chicago Fire: Pilsen was the only neighborhood that survived the fire. 1870’s Polish and Italians began to arrive . Italians resided in the Southwest corner of Pilsen

1870’s

Creation of thousands of unskilled jobs induced the Bohemian immigration into the 18th St.

64

1920

1908 Slovaks founded St. Stephen’s chapel 1907 The Commonwealth Edison Company created a Frisk Power Station to generate electric power in Carpenter St. It is now known as Midwest Generation Station.

1900

McCormick Reaper Company was created occupying acres along Blue Island and Western Ave. Largest employer in Pilsen and largest farm machinery producer in the world.

1900-1940

Mexican Revolution

1940

1950

1920: 85,000 pop.

1910-1911 Labor Struggles Related to the textile industry in Chicago. Six month long strike by 40,000 workers.

Pilsen was undergoing a periodic shift in ethnicity. The second Generation of Czechs followed the pattern of the Southwest movement along Blue Island and Archer. They were replaced by Poles, Lithuanians and Croatians.

1930

1943-1944 World War II

1943

Bracero Program 1928 American Economic Crisis.

19 Eas im


2014

950

OGRAPHIC SHIFT

0

Logistics

Heavy Manufacturing

1960’s Deep Tunnel Awakening of environmental conciousness: laws to protect the river.

1960

1970

1980

2000’s River remains polluted and underutilized.

1990

1963 The construction of a University of Illinois campus caused Mexicans near Little Italy to be pushed south of 16th St.

2000

2010

2014

Redefined by gentrification.

1992 Hot Spot for gang violence.

2010 47,000 people living 78% Hispanics 8% Whites

1990 1973 La Raza Unida Party -Ethnic identity politics with traditional leftist demands.

Resurrection Project Founded 1990: 88% Hispanics 3% Whites

1960 Polish presence rivaled the Czechs. 1970’s Howell House was taken control by the militant Latino Organization: The Brown Berets demanding that it should be reoriented to serve 1950-1960 the Mexican Community. It was renamed to “La Mural art traditions emerged. Casa Aztlan”.

950 stern Europeans moved out and Mexican mmigrants began to move in.

2020

2003 International Produce Market was established offering: international produce and organic foods. 2000: 90% Hispanics 8% Whites

1970 The International Harvester Pilsen plant was closed.

65


Population then:

1920:

87,000 1930: 1960: 1990: 2000: 66

66,198 48,448 45,654 44,031


Population Now:

2010:

35,769 The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. 2005. Chicago Historical Society. The Newberry Library. 67


68


The industrial Corridor. JOBS IN THE INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR The industrial corridor used to be the primary job employer in pilsen. The Lower West side was seen as a magnet for immigration since thousands of unskilled jobs were created. Men were mostly envolved in manufacturing and women and children were involved in the Garmet Industry located on east Pilsen. The Garmet Industry was related to the needle trades. With important manufacturing factories like McCormick Reaper Works, the largest employer in Pilsen and largest farm machinery producer in the world. One other important area within the corridor was called Pilsen Yards, (1850-1900) The largest lumber distributer in the world. Cargo Boats traveled through the Chicago River delivering coal and iron keeping the work cycle going. ABANDONED OR VACANT PLOTS OF LAND Pilsen’s economic assets include the Pilsen and Western Industrial Corridors, a retail economy based on 18th St., Cermak Road and 26th St. And the community’s strategic location near the city’s center and regional transportation network. Industry is concentrated along the industrial corridor located on the south border of Pilsen. Almost a century ago, the corridor was a vibrant area hosting more than 10,000 jobs. Now, buildings remain abandoned and deteriorated increasing the level of unemployment within Pilsen. The EPA tested for dust and radiation pollution around the now vacant Fisk site earlier this year. “Preliminary results of testing indicate lead levels are very high,” she said, adding that the EPA has tested soil around the factory and nearby Harrison Park. The vacant property at either the Fisk or Loewenthal sites can be turned over to the community. The city has to agree to take over the land. THE CHICAGO RIVER: The congress is hurrying the development of a plan to protect the lakes from the invasive species, through sanitation reforms: the river is on track to be officially swimmable by 2016. Surrounded by abandoned or underutilized industrial plants, the Chicago river lacks connection between it’s surrounding neighborhoods. Still, the potential remains there; people must realize the river’s potential to improve the areas along the river banks. THE COMMUNITY AND THE LEAD PROBLEM The land located along the south border of Pilsen remains underutilized. With the FAR higher than the current construction, it remains as a potential for future development. The addition of vacant plots of land can result on the creation of a highly influential project. Pilsen residents continue to push for a say in what’s next for polluted factory sites. Stephanie Dunn, a member of PERRO, said the organization would soon be launching a campaign to get the city of Chicago to seize the vacant property at the former Loewenthal Metals site at 947 West Cullerton St. The site is home to a shuttered lead smelting factory that last operated in the 1940s. “We’re going to start the process of engaging residents and getting them to start thinking about what they want to see on that site.” - Stephanie Dunn.

69


People must realize the potential.

70


“THE RIVER HAS BEEN LEFT BEHIND IN THE SHADOWS OF HEAVY INDUSTRY IN CHICAGO.” - Philip Enquist

1000

ACRES

TIF DISTRICTS: EMPOWERMENT ZONE: ENTERPRISE ZONE: VACANT PROPERTIES: BUSINESSES: NO. OF JOBS:

240 9249

Pilsen Industrial Corridor Pilsen 1 and 2 43

Pilsen Industrial Corridor Manufacturing Vacant buildings/ land Institutional Commercial/Business Open Space Railroad Tracks DHED - Planning Division. Luis Monterrubio 2011.

EMPLOYMENT In labor Force 26%

Not in Labor Force

74%

34% 84% 87%

Emplyed Unemployed

66%

16% 13%

CMAP: ACS Community Survey 2010. 71


A thriving source of jobs. MANUFACTURING, PRODUCTION AND PACKAGING: 1882 Thalia Hall

1860 Peter Schoefen Company

1905

Blu e

Isl

an

d

Casa Aztlan

n

de

Og

d

lan

e Is

Blu

1915 Atlas Brewing Co.

Pilsen Yards

.

ve

rA

e rch

A

A source of work for women, immigrants and children related to the needle trades. Garmet industry was located in the industrial lofts of East Pilsen.

1873-1969 McCormick Reaper Works Largest employer in Pilsen at the beginning of the 20th century. Largest farm machinery producer in the world. Led to the Hay market Massacre on May 1886.

EMPLOYMENT

25% Unemployed 75% Employed

1836-1848 Illinois & Michigan Canal Cargo Boats traveled through the Chicago River delivering coal and iron.

1850-1900 Pilsen Yards One of the largest lumber distribution centers in the world.

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY (FEMALES) 1% Construction 22% Construction

7% Financial & Insurance 15% Wholesale & Retail 2% Public administration 21% Education & Health 29% Other

72

EMPLOYMENT BY INDUSTRY (MALES)

11% Construction 28% Manufacturing

4% Financial & Insurance 14% Wholesale & Retail 2% Public administration 6% Transportation 4% Education 32% Other


“PILSEN CURRENTLY PROVIDES AROUND 9,500 EMPLOYEES IN THE INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR.” - Ashlee Rezin, Progress Illinois ABANDONED INDUSTRIAL AREAS

How many jobs could this land create today?

?

A large part of the trade that composed Pilsen’s workforce have disappeared: coat makers, brewers, tractor assembles and brick makers. Food production, restaurant services and local tourism remain.

73


Major source of jobs is gone.

2012

OF FISK ELECTRIC PLANTS: CLOSURE IN SERVICE SINCE:

1903

ELIMINATING THE BIGGEST:

CARBON EMISSIONS

CLOSURE OF MIDWEST AND ITS IMPACT 16th

. NE

OB

CE

R

O AJ

R OU

J OF

TA

T N

O SG

PO LL U

S

M

MIDWEST GEN - BANRUPT NRG - $2.6 BILLION AQUISITION

Midwest Generation Station produced electric energy through coal, gas, oil and nuclear sources causing a large amount of polluting emissions. Today, NRG acquired EMEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portfolio of generation, which includes wind power, gasfired power plants, coal plants and oil and waste coal-fired plants across the US.

URBAN DENSITY

What will the business plan be for the aquisition? 74


“NRG ENERGY INC. IS OPEN TO CONVERTING AT LEAST SOME OF THEM TO NATURAL GAS.” - Chicago Business 2014.

BANKRUPCY - CLOSING COAL PLANTS MIDWEST GEN

BOUGHT BY NRG

POTENTIAL INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

PRIVATELY OWNED COMPANY

75


STRONG VOICE STRONG PEOPLE 76


4

HISPANIC INFLUENCE IN THE COMMUNITY

77


Pilsen is an Active Community. COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS

1 Instituto del Progreso Latino 2 Mujeres Latinas en Accion 3 Pilsen Little Village Community Mental Health Center 4 Gads Hill

5 6 7 8 9

El Valor Centro Familiar Guadalupano The Resurrection Project Latinos Progresando Pilsen Chamber of Commerce

10 Pilsen Neighbors Community Council 11 El hogar del Nino 12 San Jose Obrero 13 United Merchants of Pilsen

14 15 16 17 18

United Merchants of Pilsen Pilsen Alliance Casa Aztlan Spanish Coalition for Housing Eighteenth St. Development

19 20 21 22

Pros Arts Studio Alivio Medical Center Rauner Family YMCA West Side Technical Institute

COMMUNITY ORGANIZATIONS: TIMELINE 1894 1898

1916

1954

Bethlehem Howell Neighborhood Hull House

1961 1966

19731975 1977 1982

1990

The Neighborhood Service Organization: Casa Aztlan

Gads Hill Center PNCC: Pilsen Neighbors Community Council Spanish Coalition for Housing

HAS LEVERAGED MORE THAN

$146 million

El Valor Mujeres Latinas en Accion

STARTED WITH $5000 DLLS.

Instituto del Progreso Latino National Museum of Mexican Art Alivio Medical Center Resurrection Project 78

2014


“MORE THAN 21 AGENCIES CURRENTLY EXIST IN PILSEN THAT PROVIDES CARE FOR THE COMMUNITY.” - Chicago Tribune

79


Affordable Housing.

R. P. - Casa Morelos

R. P. - Casa Oaxaca

TRP SCHEDULED A PROJECT (2015):

$15.8 million WITH AN INITIATION LOAN OF:

$ 25,000 FROM LISC

Over the past two decades, TRP has developed over 350 units of affordable housing, helped close over 800 mortgage loans and developed more than 41,000 square feet of commercial and community space.

80

R. P. - Casa Monterrey

R. P. - Casa Guerrero


“MORE THAN 21 AGENCIES CURRENTLY EXIST IN PILSEN THAT PROVIDES CARE FOR THE COMMUNITY.” - Chicago Tribune

LA CASA STUDENT RESIDENCE HALL:

100 students STUDENTS MAY QUALIFY FOR SUPPORT FROM THE SCHOLARSHIP FUNDS

81


Art as a mean of acceptance. MEXICAN MURALISM:

This movement emerged in Pilsen during the late 1960’s and 70’s to convey a social political message and to embrace cultural diversity. “We Latinos were giving validity to our identity because it had been negated.” (Castillo, Mario) Pilsen’s muralism revitalized public art, as a tool of expression. Due to Pilsen’s activist traditions, ethnic homogeneity and strong sense of identity, Mexican residents retain and promote their Mexican heritage. Mexican culture is mainly represented along Pilsen’s public spaces, murals, events, movements, institutions and family businesses. From Plaza Tenochtitlan at 18th and Loomis, to Aztec calendars printed in Pilsen’s sidewalks, murals and mosaics along the streets of Pilsen honor Mexican traditions.

82


“TODAY CHICAGO IS CONSIDERED TO PRODUCE MORE MURALS THAN ANY OTHER CITY IN THE UNITED STATES .” - Felix M. Padilla

83


Pilsen has a vibrant character.

84


“TODAY CHICAGO IS CONSIDERED TO PRODUCE MORE MURALS THAN ANY OTHER CITY IN THE UNITED STATES .” - Felix M. Padilla

85


Cultural heritage. CULTURAL HERITAGE: MAXWELL ST. MARKET

Located from Halsted St. To 16th St, Maxwell Street Market used to be huge, but a large portion of the area is now the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as a new private housing development sponsored by the university. It’s most notable feature was it’s open air market (flea market); legal and illegal items were sold along this commercial strip. This was the source of income of many in need of jobs and quick cash. The market responded to the spending power of the immigrants and minorities. In 1994, the Maxwell Street Market was moved by the City of Chicago due to the University’s expansion. It was relocated a few blocks east to the canal street and was moved again to Des Planies Ave. In September 2008.

Market Culture W 18th St

W 18th St Halsted St.

rt

o alp

e

Av

an

SC

Pilsen Community Market 1800 S. Halsted St.

Street Culture W 18th St W 18th Pl W 19th St W Cullerton St.

El Zocalo Plaza W 18th St. & Paulina St.

Family Culture

Block Parties All throughout Pilsen 86

Paulina St.

W 21 St.


“AFTER MICHIGAN AVE. PILSEN’S 26 ST. IS THE CITY’S MOST VIBRANT BUSINESS DISTRICT IN CHICAGO.” - Northern Illinois University Located from Halsted St. To 16th St, Maxwell Street Market used to be huge, but a large portion of the area is now the campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago, as well as a new private housing development sponsored by the university. It’s most notable feature was it’s open air market (flea market); legal and illegal items were sold along this commercial strip. This was the source of income of many in need of jobs and quick cash. The market responded to the spending power of the immigrants and minorities. In 1994, the Maxwell Street Market was moved by the City of Chicago due to the University’s expansion. It was relocated a few blocks east to the canal street and was moved again to Des Planies Ave. In September 2008.

THEN NOW

87


A year round active community. Chicago Food Truck Festival: A one day event with food trucks, live music and fun for all ages. Mole de Mayo: Annual mole cook off and outdoor festival at the beginning of May. Pilsen East Artists Open House: Studios in East Pilsen open their doors for an annual weekend-long festival during the last weekend of September or start of October. Pilsen Open Studios: West Pilsen’s open their studios: local businesses and cafes get involved during the second weekend of October. Fiesta del Sol: Annual fundraising event organized by the Pilsen Neighborhood Community Council. July 31st-Aug 3rd Fiesta del Sol: In 1972, fiesta del Sol began as a celebration to commemorate PNCC’s role in securing the city’s commitment to build the Benito Juarez Community Academy. This festival has becomed one of the seven largest annual festivals in Chicago attracting more than 1.3 million people to

88


“FIESTA DEL SOL IS THE LARGEST LATINO FESTIVAL IN THE MIDWEST.”

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be r

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ct

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be r Ju ly

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Ju ne

Au gu st

M ay

Ap ril

M ar ch

ry Fe br ua

Ja nu ar y

- PNC - Pilsen Neighbors Community Council 2014

1.3 million people during the four day event event 01

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A STRUGGLE TO PRESERVE THEIR IDENTITY 90


5

(RE) POSITIONING PILSEN

91


New evident subdivisions. NEW DEMOGRAPHIC SHIFTS / DIVISIONS

West Pilsen

1.6%

East Pilsen

-3.6% -18%

3% Whites 9% Other 88% Hispanics

8% Whites 2% Other 90% Hispanics

12% Whites

78% Hispanics

45,654

44,031

POPULATION 1990

POPULATION 2000

1990

92

2000

35,769

2010 POPULATION 2014


“MORE THAN 10,000 MEXICANS LEFT THE NEIGHBORHOOD IN THE LAST DECADE .” - Ashlee Rezin, Progress Illinois East Pilsen

West Pilsen

WEST

VS.

EAST

EAST AND WEST PILSEN? There is an increasing split between the two halves of the neighborhood, and businesses seem torn between appealing to the working-class Mexican community already here and the affluent community that is still arriving. The facades of the “Artistic District” have been recovered in a monochromatic way: black.

OPPORTUNITY Towards the east side of the neighborhood the Podmajersky Family owns more than 125 properties. “Chicago Arts District” is an ambiguous designation, as much a brand as a region. The label was crafted in 2002 by John Podmajersky III to promote his family’s properties and the artists who lived and had gallery space within them. East Pilsen into cheap studios for artists intended to: A) Revitalize the nearly vacant eastern half of an economically depressed neighborhood by creating spaces where exciting young artists could live, work, and exhibit, a “SoHo in Chicago”.

93


Internal Fear. GENTRIFICATION Pilsen’s location has attracted the interests of developers and City Hall especially with the transformation of the city from a manufacturing into a service city anchored by the interests of a growth coalition of financiers, developers and high service professionals from the CBD. In the public perception, gentrification is already moving in at a fast pace. Residents see the daily parade of real estate characters and fortune seekers looking for “deals;” suffer from dramatic increases in home prices and rents; fear the specter of proposed conversions looming in the horizon, the presence of cafes, businesses and residents of other ethnicities and incomes, and a City Hall ever more sympathetic to gentrification.

Current / Forecast: $225 K

Pilsen Market Overview - Home Values $299 K

$260 K

$222 K

2005

2006

2007

http://www.zillow.com/pilsen-chicago-il/home-values/ 94

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015


“RESIDENTS ARE WORRIED ABOUT POTENTIAL DISPLACEMENT AND WHETHER SMALL BUSINESSES WILL BE REPLACED BY LARGE CHAINS.” - Teresa Puente - CHICAGO TRIBUNE

95


Prices are rising. PROPERTY Owership

RENT PRICES Monthly

20%

3% 15%

Owner Occupied

Over $1,500 $1,000-$1,500

70%

80%

Renter Occupied

SELECTED OWNER COSTS Commuting Methods

$500-$1000

13% 16%

$50,000-$74,999

33%

$25,000-$49,000

$50,000-$74,999

36%

Under $25,000

RENT

12%

PREDOMINANTLY RENT PROPERTY

Under $500

RENT $500 - $1,000

Property in Pilsen is much more likely to be rented (75%), than it is to be owned (25%). Pilsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proportion of rented units is high for Chicago, which reports 55.1% of its properties to be rented. 2012 DATA CENSUS BUREAU: American Community Survey 2007 - 2012.

Owning A HOME TYPICALLY COSTS OVER $2,000

Most rental units cost between $500 and $1,000 every month in Pilsen. This proportion of residents paying rent within this range is a higher percentage than Chicago (60%) and Cook County (61%).

In Pilsen, 45% of home-owners with a mortgage spend over $2,000 on selected home-owner costs per month. This is a very similar proportion to Cook County, but a lower percentage than Illinois.

The next most common monthly rent range is between $1,000 and $1,500. Approximately 15% of Pilsen's renters pay between $1,000 and $1,500.

Between $1,500 - $2,000 The next most common cost range for home-owners with a mortgage is between $1,500 - $2,000. Approximately 25% of Pilsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residents pay between $1,500 - $2,000 on selected homeowner costs every month.

Selected owner costs include payments for mortgages, deeds of trust, contracts to purchase, house debts, real-estate taxes, hazard insurance, utilities, fuels and monthly condominium fees (when appropriate).

Affordability Median Listing Prices

$240,000 $240,000

$270,000

$150,000

$230,000

$200,000 $210,000

$160,000

$220,000

$210,000

$205,000

$159,250

96

$500,000


“RESIDENTS ARE WORRIED ABOUT POTENTIAL DISPLACEMENT AND WHETHER SMALL BUSINESSES WILL BE REPLACED BY LARGE CHAINS.” RENT IN EAST PILSEN:

$1,500

MONTH

2 Bedroom

EAST BOTTOM RENTS WEST OF ASHLAND:

$500

MONTH

1 Bedroom

WEST

PILSEN HOME SALE PRICES TRENDS (2014) 260,000

220,000 180,000

140,000 100,000

Q2 2012

Q3 2012

Q4 2012

Q1 2013

Q2 2013

Q3 2013

Q4 2013

Q1 2014

INTERO: Real Estate Services. Pilsen Home Sales Price Trends (2014) 97


A new wave of redevelopment. 1. Former Macaroni Factory: developed into The Lacuna Arts Lofts. Home to nearly 200 small creative arts based businesses. The building defines Wards 25â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current arts district movement. 2. Midwest-Gen to shutter coal plants in Pilsen, Little Village (2012). 3. Three landmark buildings renovation: former Western shade Cloth Co., Thomson & Taylor Spice Co. In order to create: A creative Industries District potentially employing as many as 1,600 people. 4. Residential conversion: 1600 S. Jefferson St. A 25 unit apt. Building with a ground level retail space. 5. Pilsen University Village Condominiums 1610 S Halsted St. 6. Chinese developer plans to build a 400,000 sq. foot cold storage warehouse in Pilsen hoping to attract food companies getting pushed out of the gentrifying Fulton Market Corridor. 7. Resurrection Project: Casa Morelos, Casa Puebla, Casa Guerrero, Casa Oaxaca, Casa Monterrey 8. The Gads Hill Day Care Center

ARTS DISTRICT - Landmark Renovations

LACUNA - Artists Loft Studios

GADS HILL DAY CARE CENTER

UNIVERSITY VILLAS - Condominiums

98 CRAWFORD,

INSTITUTO HEALTH SCIENCES CAREER ACADEMY

FISK ELECTRIC PLANTS - Closure


“ARTISTS HAVE ARRIVED AND OPENED GALLERIES.” - Ashlee Rezin, Progress Illinois

REDEVELOPING: Most recently, the real estate industry has been combing Pilsen for buildings to turn over (flip) or redevelop; the city has engaged in an intense process of promotion of Pilsen’s unique Mexican culture including the neighborhood in its downtown tourist route; condominium conversions have moved into east Pilsen; the media and multiple web pages are promoting the area as a place to visit and live in; specific sites have been proposed for zoning changes and middle income developments; in short, the area has moved into center stage as a high stakes development/gentrification prospect. CHICAGO ARTS DISTRICT EVERY

2nd Friday

AT HALSTED AND 18TH: MORE THAN:

30

ART STUDIOS

99


ENVISIONING NEW SCENARIOS


5

FUTURE POTENTIAL


HE RIVER RACE T B M E

Water Cleaning

Farm Lands


IMAGINE IF THE 1000 ACRES WERE TURNED INTO SUSTAINABLE FARMING LANDS WHERE CROPS ARE TO BE PRODUCED AND TRANSPORTED THROUGH THE CHICAGO RIVER.


05. JUNE.

2050

Chicago River is drinkable

CHICAGO S

Pilsen Top Urban Ag

ASSAULTS TIED TO TERROR-

CLOSER TO NET CARBON ZERO THAN EVER

By: Jonathan Miller

By: Maru Padilla

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which


SUN-TIMES

gricultural Producer in the U.S.


LINCOLN PARK


IMAGINE IF THE 1000 ACRES WERE TURNED INTO A

BIG PARK.


05. JUNE.

2050

Hacker Attack on the White House

CHICAGO S

Juarez Park contrib

ASSAULTS TIED TO TERROR-

CLOSER TO NET CARBON ZERO THAN EVER

By: Jonathan Miller

By: Maru Padilla

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which


SUN-TIMES

butes to the river cleaning.


MAXIMIZE FAR

INCREASE DENSITY

INCREASE JOBS


IMAGINE IF THE 1000 ACRES WERE BUILT WITH ITS MAXIMUM CAPACITY AND TRANSFORMED INTO CHICAGO’S MOST POWERFUL INDUSTRIAL CORRIDOR.


05. JUNE.

2050

Hacker Attack on the White House

CHICAGO S

Fastest Developing I

ASSAULTS TIED TO TERROR-

CLOSER TO NET CARBON ZERO THAN EVER

By: Jonathan Miller

By: Maru Padilla

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which


SUN-TIMES

Industry in Chicago


IMAGINE IF THE 1000 ACRES WERE TURNED INTO THE BIGGEST ARTS DISTRICT IN CHICAGO. ATTRACTING THOUSANDS EVERY YEAR.


05. JUNE.

2050

Chicago River is drinkable

CHICAGO S

Pilsen Top Urban Ag

ASSAULTS TIED TO TERROR-

CLOSER TO NET CARBON ZERO THAN EVER

By: Jonathan Miller

By: Maru Padilla

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which


SUN-TIMES

gricultural Producer in the U.S.


LITTLE VILLAGE

BRIDGEPORT

MCKINLEY PARK


IMAGINE IF PILSEN WAS ALLOWED TO GROW ORGANICALLY TO ENGAGE THE CHICAGO RIVER AND ACOMODATE THE HISPANIC POPULATION?


05. JUNE.

2050

Chicago River is drinkable

CHICAGO S

Pilsen has doubled it’

ASSAULTS TIED TO TERROR-

CLOSER TO NET CARBON ZERO THAN EVER

By: Jonathan Miller

By: Maru Padilla

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Today the U.S. faces complex, significant threats beyond jihadi terrorism. Russia has invaded Ukraine and threatens America’s NATO allies. China is flexing its military, economic and cyber muscles in East Asia. Iran remains dedicated to developing a nuclear-weapons capability. North Korea, which already has nuclear weapons, is highly unstable.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Still, these nations are not to our knowledge actively plotting attacks against the American homeland. A handful of terrorist groups, however, remain dedicated to attacking the U.S. at home and overseas.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Some of these groups have an interest and ability to strike the U.S. homeland. They are a top priority, and include al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula based in Yemen, and the core al Qaeda along the Pakistan-Afghanistan border. There are also individuals like the Tsarnaev brothers, the Boston Marathon bombers, who read al Qaeda propaganda and used sources, such as al Qaeda’s Inspire magazine, to build their bombs. The growing number of radicalized Americans fighting against the Assad regime has also raised the threat from Syria.

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which

Given the high-level threat posed by these groups, and the limited capacity of local governments, the U.S. should engage longterm in Yemen, Pakistan, Afghanistan and possibly Syria. The strategy should involve clandestine special operations, intelligence, diplomatic and other capabilities to target al Qaeda groups and their financial, logistical and political support networks. The U.S. should also help train, advise and assist local governments in their struggle against terrorism and to deal with its root causes, which


SUN-TIMES

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s population from 2014.


ECOLOGIC

SOCIAL

ECONOMIC


PILSEN HAS EXTRAORDINARY ASSETS THAT NEED TO BE REFOCUSED AND RE- INTEGRATED.


THIS CAN HAPPEN...

UI Labs

Trainning Development Cente Sweat Equity Hyper Local Project

COULD CREATE

Pilsen

HAS

Built in Market Cash Culture Restaurants

Com

Neighborhood Vibra


er

Advanced Manufacturing Mexican Workers

Vertically Integrated Agriculture

Logistics Business Operation Marketing Branding

Vertical Farming

International Partners Freeway Access Railroad Access Water Way Access

mpetition Advantage Fiber Optic Broad Band

ancy Tourism


126


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This Research project is the result of a collaborative effort, without each one of the contributors, this book would not have been possible. I would especially like to thank Paola Aguirre for being my mentor and for playing a key role in the development of this project. Without her guidance throughout the six weeks this wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be possible. Thankyou for believing in me and helping me persue this project. Andrew Balster, my Virginia Tech professor who encouraged me to be involved in this project, and has provided me guidance and support throughout the six weeks. Susana Vazques and Raul Raymundo for allowing and giving me the oppportunity to talk to them. Paul Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor and Cameron Barandale for helping me understand the future potential of Pilsen and for connecting me with people that provided me with valuable information. Michael Khavalari for answering all my questions and giving me the time to edit my work. Drew Ranieri for always being there and making the time to go through my work and provide me with new ideas. Jennifer and Robert for helping me at the very beggining of the project. Finally, thank you to Phil Enquist for allowing me to be part of the SOM

To all of you my most sencere THANK YOU.

127


128

Pilsen Research, 2014.  

Created by Maru Padilla.

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