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Andrew L. Pries

University at Buffalo Undergraduate Portfolio 2008-2011


Andrew L. Pries 1915 Pointe Lane, Apt. 301 Ann Arbor, MI 48105

OBJECTIVE:

SUMMARY OF QUALIFICATIONS:

EDUCATION:

Cell Phone: (585) 313 6498 E-mail: apries@umich.edu

Seeking a position as an architectural intern that provides a challenging, engaging and supportive work environment in which I can obtain and contribute knowledge and ideas at a professional level. Participate in a variety of work phases to gain professional knowledge.

• • • • • • •

Idea to solution implementation Initiated design development and collaborated with production staff for technical details Ability to develop alternative solutions Adaptive to situations and environments; Ability to multitask effectively Highly skilled in 2D and 3D designs utilizing manual and computer-aided techniques Excellent in concept designs and drawing production with AutoCAD, Rhino, SketchUp, Revit Program and 3-axis CNC routers utilizing MasterCAM

Masters of Architecture candidate Expected M. Arch, May 2014 University of Michigan: Taubman School of Architecture and Urban Planning GPA: 3.600 Bachelor of Science in Architecture University at Buffalo (SUNY) Cum Laude; GPA: 3.389

EXPERIENCE:

February 2012

University of Michigan September 2012 – Present Fabrication Lab Assistant Evaluate prepared digital models and program proper toolpaths to create an accurate physical model. Calculate proper feed rates, speed rate, plunge rates, stepover and depth of tool to operate the 3-axis CNC router. Boston Valley Terra Cotta

March 2012 – August 2012

Boston Valley Terra Cotta is the nation’s most specialized Architectural Terra Cotta manufacturer

Intern and Lead Researcher: Through directed research between the University at Buffalo and Boston Valley Terra Cotta, researched technology and techniques for digitally capturing detailed historical terracotta samples. Lead implementation of a new documentation to fabrication process starting with the use of structured light scanning to create a digital model. The resulting mesh was imported into Rhino for clean-up and extraction of information necessary for reconstruction. Files were next prepared to be laser-cut or 3-D printed and eventually milled on a CNC machine for precise and efficient production. Achieved ‘Proof of Concept’ which lead to creation of two new positions. Wrote Python scripts to implement new technology and automate the drafting process Taught Rhino as part of a new drafting solution; specifically detailing the similarities between Rhino and AutoCAD for easy transitions. Also highlighted Rhino’s 3D capabilities and it’s inherent benefits. Design Works Architecture P. C. Summer 2010 Architectural Intern: Updated CAD drawings as well as input hand drawn blueprints into AutoCAD Certified Soccer Official, USSF and NFHS

2005 – Present

AWARDS:

Gaylord and Roberta Watts Architectural Award, University of Michigan Eugene T. Celand Scholarship, University of Michigan Provost Scholarship, University at Buffalo (SUNY) Dean’s List, University at Buffalo (SUNY)

ARCHITECTURAL SKILLS:

Design, Hand Drafting, Sketching, Computer Drafting, Digital Modeling, Rendering, Model Building, Construction, Carpentry

2012 2012 2008 - 2012

AutoCAD, Rhinoceros, Revit,ZBrush, SketchUp, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, V-Ray, Ecotect, Microsoft Office Suite; Scripting in Grasshopper, Python, IronPython, Arduino REFERENCE:

Letter of Recommendation attached Gary Etherton, Treasurer, Boston Valley Terra Cotta Additional References and recommendations available upon request


Freshmen Year: 2008-2009

Sophomore Year: 2000-2010

Junior Year: 2010-2011

Barcelona: 2011

Senior Year: 2011


Additional Classes: 2010-2011

Graduate School: 2012


Project_01 Cardboard Construct

Cardboard Construct_

Creating a relationship between five unique objects. Utilizing cardboard and hot glue, a hierarchy is achieved to connect objects a soccer official uses during a match. The objects are placed in fixed positions that specifically accommodate each item.


Professors: Joyce Hwang, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Ernest Ng ARC 101, Fall 2008

A uniquely designed container houses the five objects in precise orientations. Each object has a distinct purpose and location. A set of drawings measured from the container shows the relationship the objects share.


Project_02 Wireframe Diagram

Wireframe Diagram_

Express the relationship between the five objects through a linear model. Utilizing piano wire and solder, the relationship between objects is expressed through structural connections. Each object has a meaningful connection to the other objects.


Professors: Joyce Hwang, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Ernest Ng ARC 101, Fall 2008

Objects are simplified and recreated using large gage wire. Prismatic structural connections also make the model self-supporting and express the relationship between the objects. The model is cantilevered on a wooden dowel to demonstrate the reliance of the objects upon one another. If one object is removed, the entire model falls apart.


Project_03 Objects in Motion

Objects in Motion_

Assign each object a specific motion (rotation and sliding) to diagram and represent three dimensionally. Utilizing Adobe Illustrator, develop a diagram that represents sliding and rotation of the five objects. Next, create a physical model expressing the ideas portrayed in the diagram.


Professors: Joyce Hwang, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Ernest Ng ARC 101, Fall 2008

The motions that evolved out of the drawing were sliding and rotation. The watch band, Official Cards, and whistle were recreated using linear materials to represent sliding. Rotation of the patch and quarter were represented through a wireframe sphere.


Project_04 Inhabiting a Collection

Inhabiting a Collection_

Create a spatial relationship, in the form of a exhibition space, between three distinct art pieces. Sol Le Wit - Curved Wall with Towers Alberto Giacometti - Walking Man I Donald Judd - Untitled Taking into account the spatial qualities each art piece brings, a exhibition space is developed that allows the occupants to experience these qualities through circulation.


Professors: Joyce Hwang, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Ernest Ng ARC 101, Fall 2008


Project_04 Inhabiting a Collection


Professors: Joyce Hwang, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Ernest Ng ARC 101, Fall 2008

Horizontal Vertical

Horizontal Horizontal circulation Vertical Vertical circulation


Project_05 Observation Point

Observation Point_

Break apart a twenty foot cube in a manner that creates two observations points. The reconstructed cube must be ten feet above grade and cantilevered off a vertical plane. Separating the cube with a diagonal cut created a unique spatial quality that provided an entrance, a means of circulation and a vantage point in two directions.


Professors: Shadi Nazarian, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Nate Cornman ARC 102, Spring 2009

Intersecting grids determined how the cube was positioned on the vertical plane, where the cube was cut and the structural framing methods for the project.


Project_05 Observation Point

The cube is positioned ten feet off the ground as a cantilevered object, The observation point was required to be at least twenty feet above the ground.


Professors: Shadi Nazarian, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Nate Cornman ARC 102, Spring 2009


Project_06 Modular Wall Modular Wall_

Create a modular unit to cast repeatedly and form a wall with a window and corner condition. A uniquely shaped single unit with precise proportions is intertwined to create a wall with three dimensionally occupiable space. Each piece relies on the others to create a selfstructuring wall.


Professors: Shadi Nazarian, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Nate Cornman ARC 102, Spring 2009

Repetitive plaster units, strategically stacked together, rely on each other to remain structurally sound. Integrity of the design is tested by removing units to create a window within the wall. A corner condition provides counterbalance. The corner also tests the design unit’s ability to change planes.

This wall also behaves as a space frame. The vertical and horizontal members are woven together to create the wall throughout the structure; the vertical members carry the load down while the horizontal members prevent the wall from splaying outwards.


Project_07 Pac Man Lift

Pac Man Lift_

In a group of five (Joey Humnicky, Corey Knox, Kristen Gabriele, Matt Eckmair and myself) create a machine with no prefabricated pieces that lifts a human six feet in the air. The body must change orientation to the ground plane. The project must be built using 128 linear feet of 2�x 4� and an unlimited amount of rope. Rotation is a simple, but effective way to raise a human six feet in the air when utilizing gravity advantageously.


Professors: Shadi Nazarian, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Nate Cornman ARC 102, Spring 2009

A wheel is a simple tool for moving objects from point A to point B. Utilizing the basic principles of gravity and rotation, a strategic series of group members can be lifted six feet in the air by applying heavier weight to the opposite side.


Project_07 Pac Man Lift


Professors: Shadi Nazarian, Chris Romano Teaching Assistant: Nate Cornman ARC 102, Spring 2009


Project_08 Rock, Paper, Scissors

Rock Paper Scissors_

In a group of three (Mike Buckley, Mike Wier and myself) a ream of paper and a fifty pound rock were to be positioned in a manner that the rock relies on the paper for support. Folded and woven paper creates a tension system that holds the rock in a precarious position. If the paper counterweight is unrolled, eliminating the tension force, the rock becomes dislodged. A dichotomy exists between the rock and paper; the paper is lightweight and pliable while the rock is solid, massive and heavy. The contradiction and interaction between the material properties yields a connection that relies on each other for completion.


Professor: Dennis Maher ARC 201, Fall 2009

A charcoal drawing shows the ominous rock supported by the lightweight paper structure. At any minute, the rock could fall from its precarious position destroying the rock, paper relationship.


Project_09 Newgrange

Newgrange_

Reconstruct a monolithic historic precedent. The studio worked together to create a performative model detailing how Newgrange functioned structurally. The model also considered the effect of the winter solstice and the illumination of the center crucifix by the rising sun. Studio members: John Brennan, Mike Buckley, Braedy Chapman, Corey Knox, Olga Lubegian, Joe Metzger, Steve Parks, Duane Warren, Emily Warren, Matt Wazorick, Mike Wier, Jeff Hollern


Professor: Dennis Maher ARC 201, Fall 2009

A post and lintel system is used to reconstruct the passageway. Careful consideration determined the height of each lintel. Each vertical and horizontal rock was thoughtfully placed to emulate the effect of light illuminating the interior during the winter solstice. A corbelled arch is utilized to form the end and highlight the crucifix.


Project_10 Occupiable Monolith

Occupiable Monoliths_

Returning to the Rock, Papers, Scissors project, construct a plaster cast depicting an occupiable monolith. The space carved into the monolith represents 70% of the mass.


Professor: Dennis Maher ARC 201, Fall 2009

Occupying the Monolith_

Continuing with the Occupiable Monolith, design a space incorporating a working movie theatre and film archive in the space created by the void. The building is ADA compliant and includes other supportive activities, such as a ticket kiosk, needed to operate.


Project_11 Occupying the Monolith


Professor: Dennis Maher ARC 201, Fall 2009

Unrolling the “paper weave� from the rock, paper, scissors project allowed for topography to be created. This topography helped to enforce the idea of one surface defining the entire building.


Project_12 Mosque Manual

Mosque Manual_

Develop a working manual on mosques using historical precedents. Historical precedents provide key information on how a certain type of architecture is to be constructed. For this manual hypostyle mosques were chosen. Hypostyle mosques have five common elements; a minaret, a courtyard, a place to perform abolution, a prayer hall and qibla wall.


Professor: Adam Sokol ARC 202, Spring 2010

Mecca


Project_12 Mosque Manual


Professor: Adam Sokol ARC 202, Spring 2010

??

COURTYARD EVOLUTION PRAYER HALL EVOLUTION AXIS EVOLUTION CROSS AXIS EVOLUTION HORIZONTAL COLUMN ORIENTATION EVOLUTION VERTICAL COLUMN ORIENTATION EVOLUTION


Project_13 Cornell Site Analysis

Cornell Site Analysis_

Study the given site to help inform the design. Analyzing different pathways of Cornell University and the surrounding city of Ithaca, NY produced multiple grid patterns. Four distinct grids inform the programmatic requirements of the mosque.


Professor: Adam Sokol ARC 202, Spring 2010

The Cornell Mosque was derived from information in the manual and addendum. Additionally, four necessary programs, prayer hall, courtyard, education center and campus store, were each assigned a specific grid to design a volume. The volumes were then placed together with respect to the grid intersections.


Project_13 Cornell Mosque


Professor: Adam Sokol ARC 202, Spring 2010

Overlapping the grids did not express the three dimensionality of them. Highlighting and utilizing the ideas of extrusion and extension, along with shifting the programmatic spaces to interact with each other, a cohesive building developed. This heterogeneous mosque displays each different grid system with varying faรงade materials


Project_14 Patterns in Space

Patterns in Space_

Analyze a textile and pattern found in nature. Construct a model showing the combined patterns. The textile appears to be chaotic but when broken down to its basic elements, a pattern appears. The geode has a more visible pattern but also, when broken down, reveals a crystalline pattern.


Professor: Omar Khan ARC 301, Fall 2010

Using the crystal’s geometry and the horizontal and vertical structures from the textile, a series of iterations are developed to explain the new relationship. Study models are made using chipboard and flexible wire to understand the different unit combinations and how they work together. The final model is made by casting plaster into a rubber mold. The units are cast with a wire inside of them which allows for a strong final solder joint and provides rigidity to the model.


Project_15 Diefendorf Wall Facade

Diefendorf Wall Facade_

Taking structural ideas from the previous iterative models a new wall façade was created for Diefendorf Hall on UB’s South Campus.

VERTICAL MIRROR

VERTICAL MIRROR

HORIZONTAL MIRROR

HORIZONTAL MIRROR

DIRECTION OVER AXIS

DIRECTION OVER AXIS

THE CRYSTAL CONGLOMERATE THE CRYSTAL CONGLOMERATE IS CREATED THROUGH IS CREATED A WIRE THROUGH A WIRE TENSION SYSTEM. TENSION THE WIRE SYSTEM. ALLOWS THEFOR WIRE EACH ALLOWS CRYSTAL FORTO EACH BE ACRYSTAL TO BE A STANDALONE PIECE STANDALONE IN A LARGER PIECE GROUP. IN A LARGER GROUP. COMPRESSIVE COMPRESSIVE MEMBERS MEMBERS TENSION

TENSION


Professor: Omar Khan ARC 301, Fall 2010

ELGNA NUS REMMUS

THGILNUS SISYLANA

ELGNA NUS REMMUS

ELGNA NUS RETNIW

AIR MOVEMENT AIR MOVEMENT

DESOLC SELFFAB HTIW REFSNART TAEH REMMUS

THGILNUS SISYLANA

TheAIRfacade is a double cavity wall that introduces a new ENTERS THE BUILDING AIR ENTERS THE THROUGH THEBUILDING RECESSED GLASS THROUGH GLASSIt also helps to create a large thermal buffer. circulation path. PANNELSTHE RECESSED PANNELS

SMARGAID TAEH

GNIDLIUB EHT SHTNOM REMMUS EHT GNIRUD ETOMORP OT DENEPO SELFFAB STI EVAH DLUOHS SREWOL NRUTNI HCIHW EDACAF EHT FO GNILOOC .STSOC GNILOOC LANOITAREPPO


Strip District Office/ Market

Strip District Office/ Market_

Design an office/market for an infill site located in the Strip District of Pittsburgh, PA

CONCEPT CONCEPT CONCEPT CONCEPT

Develop the office and market space utilizing the crystal shape as a base point. Introduce multiple points of view and maximize daylight potential for each floor by rotating the plate around a central axis. Structural methods also were derived by replicating features on the Diefendorf faรงade.

CONCEPT

Project_16


STRUCTURE + SUNLIGHT CONTROL

Professor: Omar Khan ARC 301, Fall 2010

Different tower configuration provided a means to understand how each tower worked in relation to each other. The end product resulted in a tower configuration that provided maximum open space and allowed the egress towers to be placed in an unobtrusive location.


Project_16

PLANS PLANS SITE ANALYSIS

PLANS

Strip District Office/ Market

pointsofofconflict conflict points pedestrian

PLANS

vehicular

points of conflict

TECHNICAL DRAWINGS

T TE EC CH HN NI IC CA AL L D DR RA AW WI IN NG GS S

vehicular vehicular

T


Professor: Omar Khan ARC 301, Fall 2010

ELEVATIONS ELEVATIONS

SECTIONS

SITE SECTION The baffles follow the contours of the structure. They differ in size and spacing to express the crystalline form. The baffles allow adequate daylight in without heat gains and losses or harsh sunlight.

SITE SECTION SITE SECTION

ELEVATIONS


Project_16 Strip District Office/ Market


Professor: Omar Khan ARC 301, Fall 2010


Project_17 Chronograms

Chronograms_

Study the Eden Project located in Cornwall, UK. Develop a series of diagrams, 2D and 3D, explaining the time-space relationship with respect to the functional program.

Flora (plants) and fauna (humans) have a symbiotic relationship when it comes to the circulation of air. Flora absorbs the carbon dioxide which fauna give off. Fauna take in the oxygen flora gives off. Every time flora or fauna exhale, the air is hotter, causing an expansion in the total air volume of the biome.

Multiple actions between plants and animals result in an interdependent relationship that benefits both. Each action has the potential for expanding beyond its given ‘territory’ (represented by the dashed lines). Outside forces can also contribute to the process causing the symbiotic relationship to change (represented by the blurs.)


Professor: Jordan Geiger ARC 302, Spring 2011


Project_18 XYZ Model, Vigilant Programing

XYZ Model_

Develop a 1m x 1m x 1m model that has different permeability on each side. Wooden frames with an sub-structure latticework layered upon one another create a visual density and permeability depending on where the spectator is looking from.


Vigilant Programs_

Digitally recreate the XYZ Model in Grasshopper. Use its parametric functions to design a meditating space. Each axis of the XYZ Model is able to be moved independently while maintaining the same grid intersections. Waiting spaces were created using stretched fabric as a divider between the exposed grid.

Grasshopper Iterations_

Irritative digital models using Grasshoppers parametric software. Each model repositions the linear elements found on the x, y, or z axis. These variations create different spatial conditions and performative conditions.

Professor: Jordan Geiger ARC 302, Spring 2011


Project_19 Birthing/ Hospice Center

Birthing/ Hospice Center_

Design a birthing/ hospice center for an in fill site in Buffalo, NY Utilizing the Grasshopper script from the previous Vigilant Programs project, determine the structure of the birthing/hospice center. The room utilization and placement along with hallways and all related activities are considered before creating the structural grid in Grasshopper.

Site Plan: Divison of Space


Professor: Jordan Geiger ARC 302, Spring 2011

Theatre

Ambulance

Hospice Exhibition Space

Education Room

Circulation

Kitchen/ Laundry Exterior Cool Air Sheltered Cool Air Accession Hot Air Temperate Air Warm Air: Room Hot Air Warm Air: Hallway Cool Air Temperate Air Cool Exterior Air

Nexus

Birthing

Grieving

Library

Tenancy by Program Range of Motion

Thermal Grid


Project_19 Birthing/ Hospice Center

Time baed architecture was a key component in this design. The building is based on a cyclical program involving life and death. To that extent an aquaponic system was added to continue the cyclical theme while introducing green space and a water feature.


PLANTS PROVIDE SHELTER

ANIMALS USE SHELTER

Professor: Jordan Geiger ARC 302, Spring 2011 PLANTS PROVIDE FOOD

ANIMALS TAKE FOOD

FAUNA HOT AIR EXPANSION OXYGEN

An aquaponic system combines aqua-farming with hydroponics to make the system self supportive. The fish waste in the water provides nutrients to the plants to grow. The plant roots filter and clean the water for the fish and can provide subsistence for the fish to live on.

ANIMALS SPREAD SEEDS

MAX VOLUME POTENTIAL

PLANTS RECEIVE PROTECTION

CARBON DIOXIDE

MAX VOLUME POTENTIAL

The Eden Project: Chronogram

Aquaponics System Aquaponic System Waterfall Waterfall

Garden Garden

Vertical Garden + + Vertical Gardern Structure Structure

Fish Tank Fish Tank

Hydroponics Hydroponics

Duckweed DuckweedPond


Project_20 Construction Detail Drawings 12

6 8

13

11

12 8

10

1. Footer #1 30 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous s 3 - #5 bottom set rebar, long

7

12

6 13

6

8 13

2. Footer #2 42 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous s 6 - #6 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and b

3. Footer #3 60 inches wide x 12 inches deep dontinuous s 4 - #5 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and b

1. Footer #1 30 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous site cast concrete 3 - #5 bottom set rebar, long 2. Footer #2 42 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous site cast concrete 6 - #6 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and bottom, short

3. Footer #3 60 inches wide x 12 inches deep dontinuous site cast concrete 4 - #5 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and bottom, short

1. Footer #1 30 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous site cast concrete 3 - #5 bottom set rebar, long

5.

2. Footer #2 42 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous site cast concrete 6 - #6 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and bottom, short

5

13

5 2

9

6. Retaining wall Concrete masonry unit, 12 inches x 16 inches #6 at 8 inches on center to mid height #6 at 24 inches on center to top 1. Footer #1 Filled solid 9. Floor #1 inches wide x 12 inches deep continuous site cast conc Cast30 in place concrete, 4 inches Wire mesh, 6 inch grid Vapor barrier3 - #5 bottom set rebar, long Rigid board insulation, 1 inch 7. Window #1 Crushed stone, 4 inches

11. Floor #3 #3 rebar reinforcement, ties at 36 inches o in place concrete, 8 inches 3. Cast Footer #312 #3 rebarLintel: Horizontal Reinforcement: tied 16 inches on center 12. Stairs 60 inches wide x 12 inches deepmullions dontinuous site cast conc Steps Metal window Steel staircase 3 - bar#5 top andCast bottom set rebar tied, 11 longfeet 5-3/8inches 1 inch x ½4inch stiffener in place concrete Railing 1 inch diameter standard weight pipe #4 rebar at 24(2) inches center, top4 and bottom, short ½ inch diameter rod Bondon beams with #5 rebar reinforcin

13. Fireplace #3 rebar reinforcement ties at 36 inches o x 40 inch x 8 inch concrete masonry lintel, over chimney opening 4. 8ClayinchWall flute lining,#1 8 inches x 18 inches Solid concrete infill FireConcrete brick chimney lining, nomasonry cavity, 4 inches x 4 inches x 8 inches, interior unit, 8 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches, int Fire brick decorative chimney floor, Window no cavity, 4 inches x #2 4 inches x 8 inches 8. Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches, exterior #5 verticalMetal rebarwindow reinforcing at 48 inches at center, corn mullions #5 dowelsInsulated at 24 inches on3/8” center, extend 3 feet above glass, HorizontalSill: reinforcing at 16 inches on center Bituminous dampCast proofing in place concrete, 8 feet 8-3/8 inches 2 Rigid board insulation, 2 inches 4 #5 rebar reinforcement, long ways Air space, 2 inches #3 rebar reinforcement, ties at 36 inches o Concrete masonry Lintel:unit, 8 inches x 4 inches x 8 inches, exte

6. Retaining wall Concrete masonry unit, 12 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches #6 at 8 inches on center to mid height #6 at 24 inches on center to top Filled solid

Construction Technology_

Spec a building out and axonetrically draw all the construction details. 7. Window #1

3

8. Window #2 Metal window mullions Insulated glass, 3/8” Sill: Cast in place concrete, 8 feet 8-3/8 inches 4 #5 rebar reinforcement, long ways #3 rebar reinforcement, ties at 36 inches on center Lintel: Metal window mullions Cast in place concrete 11 feet 5-3/8inches (2) Bond beam with 4 #5 rebar reinforcing, continuous #3 rebar reinforcement ties at 36 inches on center

Metal window mullions #2 2.10. FloorFooter #2and grooveInsulated 2 inch x 6 inch tongue wood finish flooring glass, 3/8” Batt insulation 2 inch xinches 10 inch plywoodwide web I-joints x at 16 inches on center 42 Grate Sill: 12 inches deep continuous site cast conc Fin tube 6 - #6 toplumber andCast bottom set rebar tied, long Bracket between dimensional in place concrete, 8 feet 8-3/8 inches 2 inch x 10 inch board ½ inch plywood #4 rebar at 244inches onreinforcement, center, top andlong bottom, Bracket (3/16th inch x 1-1/2 inch), holds floor to mullion #5 rebar waysshort

5. Wall #2 Concrete masonry unit, 16 inches x 12 inches x 8 inches, #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 24 inches on center, exterior #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches on center, interior 1 Horizontal reinforcing at 8 inches on center Filled solid

Metal window mullions Insulated glass, 3/8” Sill: Cast in place concrete, 8 feet 8-3/8 inches 4 #5 rebar reinforcement, long ways #3 rebar reinforcement, ties at 36 inches on center Lintel: Metal window mullions Cast in place concrete 11 feet 5-3/8inches (2) Bond beams with 4 #5 rebar reinforcing, continuous

5. Wall #2 Concrete masonry unit, 16 inches x 12 inches #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 24 inches o #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches o Horizontal reinforcing at 8 inches on cente Filled solid

7. Window #1 Metal window mullions Insulated glass, 3/8” Sill: Cast in place concrete, 8 feet 8-3/8 inches 4 #5 rebar reinforcement, long ways #3 rebar reinforcement, ties at 36 inches on center Lintel: Metal window mullions Cast in place concrete 11 feet 5-3/8inches (2) Bond beams with 4 #5 rebar reinforcing, continuous #3 rebar reinforcement ties at 36 inches on center

3

4

5

6.

#6 at 8 inches on center to mid height #6 at 24 inches on center to top Filled solid

3. Footer #3 60 inches wide x 12 inches deep dontinuous site cast concrete 4 - #5 top and bottom set rebar tied, long #4 rebar at 24 inches on center, top and bottom, short 4. Wall #1 Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches, interior #5 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches at center, corners, openings #5 dowels at 24 inches on center, extend 3 feet above footings Horizontal reinforcing at 16 inches on center Bituminous damp proofing Rigid board insulation, 2 inches Air space, 2 inches Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 4 inches x 8 inches, exterior

4. Wall #1 Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 16 inches x #5 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches a #5 dowels at 24 inches on center, extend Horizontal reinforcing at 16 inches on cen Bituminous damp proofing Wall #2 Concrete masonry unit, 16 inches x 12 inches x 8 inches, #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 24Rigid inches on center, exterior insulation, 2 inches board #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches on center, interior Horizontal reinforcing at 8 inches on center Air space, 2 inches Filled solid 6 Retaining wall Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 4 inches x Concrete masonry unit, 12 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches

4. Wall #1 Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 16 inches x 8 inches, interior #5 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches at center, corners, openings #5 dowels at 24 inches on center, extend 3 feet above footings Horizontal reinforcing at 16 inches on center Bituminous damp proofing Rigid board insulation, 2 inches Air space, 2 inches Concrete masonry unit, 8 inches x 4 inches x 8 inches, exterior

5

Metal window mullions 5. Wall #2 Cast in place concrete 11 feet 5-3/8inches Concrete masonry(2)unit, 16 beam incheswith x 124 inches x 8reinforcing inches, Bond #5 rebar #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 24 inches center, exte #3 rebar reinforcement ties on at 36 inches o #6 vertical rebar reinforcing at 48 inches on center, inte Horizontal reinforcing at 8 inches on center 9. Floor #1 Filled solidCast in place concrete, 4 inches Wire mesh, 6 inch grid


oncrete curb

gle finish to m length =10 feet- 0 inches 12 inches on center nection

SUB STRUCTURE 1. Foundation 18 inches wide x 10 inches deep site cast concrete foundation beam 2 #5 horizontal continuous rebar, 3 inches clear from bottom #5 vertical at 24 inches on center and center wall

Professor: Christopher Romano Teaching Assistant: Kathy Yuen ARC 442, Spring 2011

2. Foundation Wall 8 inches wide by 28 inches deep site cast concrete #5 horizontal rebar at 16 inches on center SUPER STRUCTURE Concrete Frame Exterior 3. Footer 5 feet by 5 feet by 14 inch deep site cast concrete 5 # 6 each way, top and bottom 4. Column 16 inch diameter cast in place exterior columns spaced 25 feet apart 2 #5 dowels at 12 inches on center Ties column into beam #4 spiral ties with 3 inch pitch ¬ 8 #8 vertical reinforcement; inside spiral ties 5. Beam 36 inch wide by 34 inch deep cast in place concrete beam 6 #10 longitudinal rebar 1 ½ inches clear from top 6 #10 lap splice rebar 4 inches clear from bottom of rebar above 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from bottom #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties top and middle rebar together #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties top and bottom rebar together 2 #4 vertical hairpins at 12 inches on center On second rebar; ties top and bottom together #4 horizontal hair pins at 12 inches on center Ties middle rebar together Interior 6. First floor column 16 inch diameter cast in place interior column; 21 feet 6 inches from south wall 2 #5 dowels at 12 inches on center Ties column into beam #4 spiral ties with 3 inch pitch ¬ 8 #8 vertical reinforcement; inside spiral ties 7. Beam 36 inch wide by 34 inch deep cast in place concrete beam 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from top 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from bottom of concrete plank 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from bottom #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties middle and bottom rebar together, on second rebar #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties top and bottom rebar together #4 horizontal hair pins at 12 inches on center Ties middle rebar together #5 horizontal rebar with 90 degree bend at 24 inches on center Ties concrete plank to concrete beam # 5 vertical hairpin with 90 degree bend at 24 inches on center Ties concrete beam to concrete floor topping 8. Second floor column 16 inch diameter cast in place interior column; 21 feet 6 inches from south wall 2 #5 dowels at 12 inches on center Ties column into beam #4 spiral ties with 3 inch pitch ¬ 8 #8 vertical reinforcement; inside spiral ties 9. Beam 36 inch wide by 34 inch deep cast in place concrete beam 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from top 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from bottom of concrete plank 6 #10 lap splice rebar 1 ½ inches clear from bottom #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties top and middle rebar together #4 stirrups at 12 inches on center; ends terminate with 135 degree hook Ties top and bottom rebar together 2 #4 vertical hairpins at 12 inches on center On second rebar; ties top and bottom together #4 horizontal hair pins at 12 inches on center Ties middle rebar together First Floor 10. Floor type A 2 inch concrete topping slab with radiant heating system 4 inch cast in place concrete on grade #5 horizontal rebar at 18 inches on center Vapor barrier R-10 rigid insulation at perimeter and under slab 2 inches sand 4 inches crushed gravel 11. Floor type B Raised floor system 24 inch by 24 inch by ½ inch tiles Pedestals spaced 24 inches on center 4 inch cast in place concrete 6 inch wire mesh Vapor barrier R-10 rigid insulation under slab 2 inches sand 4 inches crushed gravel

14. Curtain Wall Sealant and Backer rod ¾ inch Chamfer and sealant aligned with concrete curb Roller shade inside compensation channel Continuous 2 inch by 2 inch aluminum angle finish to match curtain wall system minimum length =10 feet- 0 inches Attach to aluminum system with screws at 12 inches on center Spandrel Panel above aluminum angle connection 15. Window Aluminum framed double glazed storefront with tempered safety glass 16. Wall #2 8 inch site cast concrete 3 ½ inch metal studs Batt insulation 5/8 inch gypsum board 17 Concrete Half Wall 6 inch site cast concrete Wood panel system type 1 2 ¼ inch by 2 inch steel flat bars; 4 locations 1/8 inch steel plate anchored to concrete 18. Railing 1 inch by 2 inch steel rail 2 inch by 8 inch wood railing 19. Skylight Aluminum frame, double glazed skylight with laminated safety glass

Second Floor 12. Floor Type A 2 inch concrete topping slab with radiant heating system 6 inch cast in place concrete slab #5 horizontal rebar at 18 inches on center 13. Floor Type B Raised floor system 24 inch by 24 inch by ½ inch tiles Pedestals spaced 24 inches on center 2 ½ inch topping slab 8 inch hollow core concrete slab

fety glass

s

with laminated safety glass

14. Curtain Wall Sealant and Backer rod ¾ inch Chamfer and sealant aligned with concrete curb Roller shade inside compensation channel Continuous 2 inch by 2 inch aluminum angle finish to match curtain wall system minimum length =10 feet- 0 inches Attach to aluminum system with screws at 12 inches on center Spandrel Panel above aluminum angle connection 15. Window Aluminum framed double glazed storefront with tempered safety glass 16. Wall #2 8 inch site cast concrete 3 ½ inch metal studs Batt insulation 5/8 inch gypsum board 17 Concrete Half Wall 6 inch site cast concrete Wood panel system type 1 2 ¼ inch by 2 inch steel flat bars; 4 locations 1/8 inch steel plate anchored to concrete 18. Railing 1 inch by 2 inch steel rail 2 inch by 8 inch wood railing 19. Skylight Aluminum frame, double glazed skylight with laminated safety glass

2

Andrew Pries

Braedy Chapman Joe Metzger Pablo Lituma 1

Pierce County Environmental Services 2 Office Building Miller Hull

2

Andrew P


Projects_21,22 Mobius Strip

Computational Methods_ Develop a mobius strip in Rhino, a 3d modeling software, that can be realized three dimensionally using the laser cutter. Using RhinoNest, a nesting plug-in for Rhino, the laser cut files were optimized to conserve as much material as possible. Create a relief drawing by tracing a previously hand drawn project in AutoCAD. Layers were to be extruded and sunk in from a single plane to give the drawing its 3D quality.


Professor: Nick Bruscia ARC 411, Fall 2010


Projects_23,24,25 Barcelona 01, Summer 2011

Media Studies_

A variety of mediums were used to capture the essence of Barcelona.


Professors: Bonnie Ott, Dennis Maher, Santi Bragulat Barcelona 01, Summer 2011

Photo collages recreated ideas from Las Meninas, by Diego Velåzquez. Specifically reflection and multiplicity of views from a single vantage point. Surface studies depicts the variety of materials Barcelona’s built world has to offer. The study engages the idea of excavation to reveal new surfaces. Sketches from Barcelona explore the powerful nature of architecture, both past and present.


Projects_25 Museu d’Historia de la Ciutat

Barcelona Studio_

Re-design the Museu d’Historia de la Ciutat. The exterior facades must be maintained due to their historical significance. Focusing on circulation, a central node organizes visitors as they chronologically trace Barcelona’s history. Guests ‘travel through time’ going from the past (Roman city of Barcino) to the ‘future’ (roofs of the current buildings), understanding how the city and its inhabitants have evolved over 2,000 years through a variety of exhibits.


Professors: Bonnie Ott, Santi Bragulat Barcelona 02, Summer 2011


Projects_26 Inner Harbor Fire Pit

Inner Harbor Fire Pit_

A design build for the Inner Harbor of Buffalo, NY. This group design by Jill Bunyea, Peter Schmidt and myself was selected by Erie Canal Harbor Development Corporation for construction and use. Construction is to be completed during the Spring 2012 semester by UB students. Required qualities include aesthetic views through the fire and efficient heating properties. The propane fueled fireplace will be portable and durable. The torqued structure is created through the triangulation and uses Ÿ� plate steel. Two burners are located within the fireplace. The lower one is a low BTU burner that uses fire glass to create an aesthetically pleasing flame. The upper portion of the fireplace features a very efficient spiral burner to produce a plethora of heat and inferred warmth to visitors of the Inner Harbor.


Group #2 #2 Group

Jill Jill Bunyea, Andrew Pries, Peter Schmidt Bunyea, Andrew Pries, Peter Schmidt

Oct.19, 2011 Oct.19, 2011

Inner Harbor Fire Pit Project Professor: Brad Wales Erie Canal Harbor Development Corperation ARC 448, Fall 2011 State University of New York, University at Buffalo, School of Architecture Standard Marketed Propane Heater Features/ Propane Tank Estimated Cost Group #2

Jill Bunyea, Andrew Pries, Peter Schmidt

Oct.19, 2011


Projects_27 Jahana

Jahana_

Taking into consideration all structural, technical and design needs a comprehensive project emerges. A 24 unit apartment complex is designed for an in fill site in the City of Buffalo. It includes multiple meditation spaces for both public and private use. The units are aggregated together in 4 towers. Each unit in a tower rotates 15 degrees off of the previous floor plate. This rotation creates a central atrium space that is very powerful for meditation. The 4 separate towers create a paradox between insolation and community. The atrium space brings the people together while the separation of towers allows for privacy. The public meditation garden helps to bring tranquility to the bustling downtown area.


Professor: Nerea Feliz ARC 403, Fall 2011

Community

Circulation Unit Aggregation

Circulation Unit Aggregation Unit Aggreation

Rotation

Rotation

Isolation Structure + Wet Cores

Isolation Isolation

Jhト]a Jhト]a

Deleware Ave., Buffalo, NY Deleware Ave., Buffalo, NY

Community Community Community


Projects_27 Jahana

Studio

Two Bedroom

One B

Two Bedroom

West Chippewa St.

Deleware Ave

on B

Underground Parking

Section B Mezzanine Parking Underground Underground Parking

First Floor Mezzanine Mezzanine

N

First FirstFloor Floor

Second Floor

Third Floor


oom om

Professor: Nerea Feliz ARC 403, Fall 2011

One OneBedroom Bedroom

Two TwoBedroom Bedroom

One OneBedroom Bedroom

Three ThreeBedroom Bedroom

on A

on B

r

Third ThirdFloor Floor

Fourth FourthFloor Floor

Fifth Floor

Sixth Floor

Roof Fifth Floor Plan


Projects_27 Jahana Structural and construction details were explored through both modeling and drawing a slice of the building.


Professor: Nerea Feliz ARC 403, Fall 2011 Detail Section

Call-outs Detail Section


Projects_27 Jahana

Structure_Jhト]a

Wall Triangulation

Structure_Jhト]a


Professor: Nerea Feliz ARC 403, Fall 2011


Projects_28 Quarter(s): Repas [Grunter]

Quarter(s): Repas [Grunter]_

Proposes a solution for putting meat on the table for city dwellers. It rethinks the idea of an apartment and farm homestead; the place where a person resides and works is no longer strictly that. It becomes an experiential space filled with a multitude of relationships and influences. Quarter(s):Repas [Grunter] takes the typology of a single bedroom apartment in Chicago, Il. and farm logic to devise a new means of living in the city. It explores the relationships between human and animal. Meat production occurs within one’s personal quarters. An occupant will raise a pig from weaner to market weight. A pig at market weight will provide a person enough meat to use as nourishment for a year. The pig will be nourished, cared for and looked after by the occupant. The apartment is programmed to provide all of the necessities for the pig and human. The programs have been specifically detailed to provide a duality of uses and interactions. Quarter(s):Repas [Grunter] is an experiential space composed to generate unique relationships and foster the transfer of ideas from rural to metropolitan.


Professor: Neal Robinson ARCH 552, Fall 2012

The apartment is programmed to provide all of the necessities for the pig and human. The programs have been specifically detailed to provide a duality of uses and interactions.


Projects_28 Quarter(s): Repas [Grunter]

The mastication surface is used to eat meals at, however when it is time to slaughter the pig the surface is designed and detailed to provide the exact space necessary to complete the task. Pigs and humans have similar sleeping habits and requirements. To explore this idea the two species sleep next to each other. A flexible membrane allows each to influence the others space. This membrane also permits sight to pass through; adding an additional interaction to the already complex relationship.


Professor: Neal Robinson ARCH 552, Fall 2012


Projects_29 Echi[noid]ea

Echi[noid]ea_

Variable thin gauged plastic formwork This group design by Lindsay Evans, Eric Meyer, Nathan Walker, Tai Suwanrumpha and myself Required qualities include aesthetic views through the fire and efficient heating properties. The propane fueled fireplace will be portable and durable. The torqued structure is created through the triangulation and uses Ÿ� plate steel. Two burners are located within the fireplace. The lower one is a low BTU burner that uses fire glass to create an aesthetically pleasing flame. The upper portion of the fireplace features a very efficient spiral burner to produce a plethora of heat and inferred warmth to visitors of the Inner Harbor.


Professor: Maciej Kaczynski ARCH 571, Fall 2012


Andrew Pries - Complete Undergraduate Works  

The complete works of Andrew Pries' undergraduate career at the University at Buffalo, SUNY. 2008-1012. This is a work in progress

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