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Architecture Portfolio

Andrew Hansen


Contents 01 Bio

Residential

Bio

Andrew completed his Master of Architecture degree at the University of Washington in 2013 and is currently pursuing a second master’s degree in Construction Management. Motivated by his varied experience in development, design, construction and fabrication, Andrew is intent on more closely aligning these related fields for an integrated approach to building and placemaking. Living abroad in Italy, and later traveling though Scandinavia, has influenced his perception of engaging people and Architecture. It is his hope that through the application of interdisciplinary collaboration, emerging technologies and advanced construction processes, a smarter way of building can lead to a more sustainable and engaging built environment.

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Masterworks Addition

Civic 06

Tule Springs Chapel

10

Culture Haus - Capitol Hill

Education 14

GeoSolar Modular Classroom

18

Pinnacle at South Lake Union

Infrastructure 22

Urban Bike Station

Mixed-Use 26

Prefab Flex

30

Humanizing Industry

Personal Info 36

Curriculum Vitae

01


Masterworks Addition Designed and built in 1939 by Frank Lloyd Wright, the Sturges House is an iconic example of Modern Architecture in Brentwood Heights, California. Charged with the task of proposing an addition to the home, the small, one bedroom proposal caters to the resident as well as occasional groups of visitors. Intended to be occupied by a student of architecture, the program includes a studio, exhibition gallery, as well as a book store on the lower level. Adhering to a 6’ x 6’ planning grid, Wright emphasized the home’s relationship to the sloped site by utilizing a generous cantilever for much of the modest living area and large surrounding deck. Likewise, the spatial characteristics of the addition are based on an extension of this same planning grid while emphasizing its relationship to the site, albeit in a different manner. Partially sunken into the hillside, the series of terraced volumes follows the contour of the site, thus minimizing the structure’s prominence. Taking cues from the Sturges Residence, large open patios and deep overhangs for shade allow the resident to feel connected with the surroundings by blending interior and exterior space.

02

UNLV / b.s.arch / 2nd year / fall 2008 / critic: brian andrews / masterworks_addition


A low-lying form maintains unobstructed views from the large balcony of the Sturges Residence. The cascading volumes of the addition mimic the gradual slope of the site. While the three volumes align with the grid established by the Sturges Residence, the placement and size of doors, windows, and shade structures are based on the geometry of the diagon.

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04


05


Tule Springs Chapel Patterned after the model of Wayfarers Chapel in Southern California, the proposed chapel for Tule Springs Nature Preserve in Las Vegas, Nevada is to accommodate up to three wedding parties simultaneously while providing a unique and memorable experience. Developed to capitalize on the abundant light, the Tule Springs Chapel allows the wedding parties to experience three distinct qualities of light: Patterned, Dispersed and Chromatic. The exterior gathering spaces and circulation paths are partially shaded by the lush vegetation through which the sunlight creates a constantly varied pattern of light and shadow. The office space below, as well as the Bridal Lounges are clad in a translucent channel glass system, dispersing the incoming light evenly. Finally, varied chromatic light accents are introduced by the dichroic glass light monitor above the main building circulation. The chromatic cavity wall surrounding the alter also highlights the ceremony taking place.

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UNLV / b.s.arch / 3rd year / fall 2009 / critic: kevin kemner / tule_springs_chapel


entry to offices

arrival

07


Centered between the Pre-Garden and PostGarden is the Chapel and Office complex. The program was split into two main levels with the Chapel above and the Offices below. The Chapel is cantilevered from the hillside and is supported by the offices below. The offices are clad in translucent channel-glass and gives the Chapel the appearance of being supported by a volume of light. Partially sunken into the surrounding grade by five feet, the offices depict the weight and importance of the ceremony taking place directly above. The reflecting pool at the southeast corner redirects sunlight to illuminate the altar floor also made of a translucent glass. Surrounding the altar, the double-thickness exterior wall allows sunlight to permeate the buildings first layer and is then reflected throughout a chromatic cavity giving a subtle chromatic glow of light around the couple being married.

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“I believe a building should always be much more about the interior experience than the exterior...an external austerity followed by an inner immensity.� - Steven Holl The exterior is austere and harsh yet provides a complimentary contrast to the lush setting in which it sits. The abundant presence of trees and rolling landscape allows the complex to nestle into and become grounded in the surrounding context. Although not a typical chapel form, the Tule Springs Chapel is intended to aid in the exploration of light and quality of space.

09


Culture Haus - Capitol Hill Disparate activities, with a wide variety of individuals and interests, cross paths in the new culture house to generate a new mixture of social activity and interaction. The narrow atrium, running the length of the building defines the main entry as well as the transition space between programmed spaces and open, flexible gathering areas. Contrasting in character, the more solid and enclosed “mixing bar” brings individuals together from differing activities occurring in the light and more open “program bar.” The ground floor, with its strong connection to street activity, houses the café and restaurant spaces. More specific program activities occur on the upper floors such as the laundry, exercise space, maker lab and performance spaces. Because of the split-level section, each floor of the mixing bar serves two adjacent program areas across the atrium, one above and one below. This area houses amenities for all users of the space, including a library, storage, meeting spaces and restroom facilities. The library itself forms a thickened wall that runs vertically along the west side of the building. An open-air roof terrace on the top floor affords access to views of nearby Cal Anderson Park to the north, Seattle University to the south and downtown Seattle to the west. The terrace is partially covered by a canopy that controls light and provides cover from Seattle’s rainfall.

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UW / m.arch / 1st year / spring 2012 / critics: dorte mandrup & peter cohan / culture_haus


Supported by the Scan|Design Foundation, the Distinguished Visiting Professor Master Studio of 2012 was able to welcome Dorte Mandrup to the UW campus. Based in Copenhagen, the firm of Dorte Mandrup Arkitektur has received numerous design awards and engages in a wide variety of project types. The studio was co-taught by associate professor Peter Cohan and was based around two Intensive seven-day design charrettes when Dorte was in Seattle.

Laundry

Kitchen

Maker Lab Changing UP

Roof Terrace

Exercise

Multi-Purpose

Design / Assembly

Admin Cafe' / Bar

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

11


Progressive study models illustrate the evolution of the cut through the ground floor with a vertical atrium. Relationships between solid and void were explored to aid in exposing the program to the surrounding context.

The size and placement of the atrium was under continuous investigation and was ultimately used as an organizing element for the program relationships. Dedicated to vertical circulation, the atrium was a uniting element between the differing program pieces on each floor.

The shape of the atrium was extruded to cut through the length of the building. The vertical circulation then became the transition between dedicated program space and flexible gathering space.

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13


GeoSolar Modular Classroom The education system in general requires the accommodation of a fluctuating population. Each year, new families move into and out of the area serviced by a particular school. Limited financial resources and time constraints prevent the expansion or rebuilding of schools when number of enrolled students exceeds capacity. The traditional solution to this problem is the utilization of “temporary� modular classrooms, built and maintained on a tight budget to satisfy minimal educational requirements. The problem is, these often substandard classrooms are poorly lit and are not conducive to learning. Furthermore, the lifespan of such structures is stretched from the intended 8-10 years to 20 or more, often located on an under utilized parking lot, separate from the rest of the school and student body. Building from the development of a Classroom Design Guide specific to the needs and uses of the portable classroom typology, the GeoSolar Modular Classroom proposal addresses the educations, social, and environmental aspects of what a portable classroom could be. Integration with the surrounding environment by harnessing the potential daylight, water, and the earth are addressed and contribute to the performance aspects of the building, both in terms of education and energy use. By daylighting the space with both skylights and operable widows, the Heschong Mahone study, illustrated below, reinforces the corresponding educational improvements in a healthy learning environment.

Heschong Mohone Study Summary Daylighting Operable Windows

+20% +26% Math Reading

+8% Overall

Math Overall

+15%

Reading

+20%

+23%

View Windows

Controlled Skylight

14 Region 1

MATH 12.5

READING 12.5

MATH 12.5

READING 12.5

OVERALL 25

OVERALL 25

UNLV / b.s.arch / 4th year / spring 2011 / critic: kevin kemner / geosolar_modular_classroom


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HEAT PUMP

ELEC T H E R M A L

B UFFE R

50 48 46

Temp (deg C)

44 42 40 38

WaterHogs Concrete Lightweight

36 34 32 30 0

6

12 Time (Hours)

16

18

24


Taking advantage of the under utilized crawl space beneath the portable classroom, the thermal properties of water (through rain harvesting or in connection with the schools existing irrigation system) are used to act as a “thermal buffer.� Connecting the water storage to a high efficiency heat pump and possibly a ground source heat exchange system, the temperature of the incoming water to be heated or cooled can be kept relatively constant. This allows the heat pump to work more efficiently and require less energy as it is heating or cooling the water between a smaller temperature difference. In particularly cold climates, the solar hot water heater can be used to pre-heat the water in the storage tanks, further reducing the load on the system.

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Pinnacle at South Lake Union The area of South Lake Union is undergoing a rapid process of growth and change. The proposed zoning laws and height restrictions allow for a much more dense, urban lifestyle. As on of the earliest public green spaces in Seattle, Denny Park, located directly south of the site, provides a strong and identifiable anchor for the area. In order to support the increased economic growth, many more residents are expected to move into the area and will need appropriate accommodations. The Pinnacle at South Lake Union is intended to address not only the need for a school in this newly developing urban area, but also the needs of the student’s families and the surrounding community. Envisioned as a public-private partnership between the Seattle School District and a private developer, both parties benefit in ways that could not be accomplished separately. The School District could realize some significant cost savings by distributing the development and land purchase costs with another party. The developer, in taking advantage of various height restriction exceptions by merit of integrating a public amenity such as the school, could build residences with a incomparable views to both the lake and downtown, immediately establishing the tower as prime residential real estate soaring 34 stories high. The surrounding community would not only benefit from increased presence of families and residents, but also be able to utilize the school’s more public areas such as the gymnasium. All these benefits come with their own unique challenges and constraints, however. Ensuring the safety and security of the children is of top priority. Furthermore, separate residential access and a loading bay is required to bypass the school without imposing on functionality. A complex program on a constrained urban site is feasible and provides great opportunity for innovative solutions.

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UW / m.arch / 2nd year / winter 2013 / critic: joel loveland / urban_school


14 to 34

13

7 to 12

6 4 to 5

Res. Units

Res. Clubhouse

Grades 1-5

Kindergarten Library

3

Commons

2

Gymnasium

1

Ground Floor

-1 to -4

Parking

19


1

2

3

4

6

Level 14 192' - 0"

Level 13 180' - 0

4th and 5th Grade Cohort

Level 12 165' - 0"

School Art Room Level 11 150' - 0"

2nd and 3rd Grade Cohort

20

Level 10 135' - 0"

School Music Room

Level 9 120' - 0"

The interaction of students among their similarly aged peers is encouraged by grouping a set of two floors together. The close proximity allows for easy circulation via stair and establishes a close sense of community among those students facing similar educational requirements. To encourage a larger sense of school identity and association, the placement of specialized classrooms, one within each cohort, are intended to be used interchangeably by all grade levels thereby allowing interaction among those not in one’s own age group or cohort. This strategy allows the students to take ownership of their own space while also encouraging a broader use of the school at large.


E

D

C

B

Level 14 192' - 0"

Level 13 180' - 0"

Level 12 165' - 0"

Level 11 150' - 0"

The general organization of the building places the common areas toward the base, allowing the classrooms to occupy the upper floors. The belowgrade parking garage and the gymnasium are accessible to the public during non-school hours while leaving the remainder of the school secure. A careful programmatic and user-group separation allows for the integration of students, residents, and community without compromising the safety or convenience of any one group.

B ALLUMINUM PARAPET CAP WOOD RAINSCREEN PANEL RIGID INSULATION MOISTURE BARRIER 5/8" GYP. BOARD 2x6 METAL STUD 5/8" GYP. BOARD

Level 13 180' - 0"

LIGHT SHELF

WOOD SHADE

TRIPLE PANE WINDOW

RADIANT HEATING

3" CONCRETE SLAB ON METAL DECK

STEEL FRAMING

Level 12 165' - 0"

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Urban Bike Station Alternative transportation infrastructure is a necessary part of a healthy and accessible city. Seattle is very supportive of its cycling culture and would put such facilities to good use. Proposed for the triangular plaza across from King Street Station near Century Link Field, the Urban Bike Station would provide the spaces needed to encourage the use of cycling as a primary transportation method. Conceptually, the composition of the building takes its cue from the historical development and regrading of the site and surrounding area. Viewed as a series of stratified layers, the boundary of the site is shifted upward, revealing the layers beneath. Representative of the abstracted ground plane being lifted into the air, the thin roof takes shape as a Triangulated Irregular Network (TIN), often used as a vectorbased model of a land surface. The triangulation rationalizes the complex shape into a series of planar elements, thereby simplifying construction and assembly. The surface at street level is treated in a similar fashion. The main bike parking level is seen as a reference plane, thereby heightening the perception of the undulating TIN surface above and below. These planes are supported by a series of canted steel pipe columns positioned at various angles to provide both vertical and lateral support to the structure. The columns also mimic the spatial character of the surrounding trees. The opening in the center of the bike parking area allows existing trees on-site to remain. The surrounding tree canopy envelops the space, providing a connection to nature within the larger urban environment.

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UW / m.arch / 1st year / winter 2012 / critic: jim nicholls / urban_bike_station


Roof Composition

Cafe 1/4” Zinc Rainscreen Panel 1” Airspace Moisture Barrier 5/8” Fiber Cement Board 1 1/2” Corrugated Metal Roof Deck 6” Spray Foam Insulation 5/8” Gypsum Board Exterior 1/4” Zinc Rainscreen Panel 1” Airspace Moisture Barrier 5/8” Fiber Cement Board 1 1/2” Corrugated Metal Roof Deck Fluorescent Lighting 1/4” Perforated Zinc Panel

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gat

her

c a f ĂŠ .

DN

UP

b i k e share bike park g a t h e r

bus stop b i k e repair

UP

The paths cutting through the site are in-line with common circulation routes and also define the various program zones. The most frequently used public areas are located around the periphery, such as the access stairs, bike repair shop, and bus stop waiting area. Above, the bike prep area and cafĂŠ offer a more secluded environment, separate from the busy circulation and traffic on the street level.

24

DN


25


Prefab Flex Advances in manufacturing methods and techniques have introduced new levels of quality and efficiency to the building industry. Economical sustainability can be realized without compromising quality. Faster on-site construction, reduced waste, and favorable working conditions are all byproducts of recent trends in prefabricated architecture and construction. The proposed mixed-use development utilizes a combination of precast, panelized, and modular elements to provide affordable and flexible housing options to existing and future University District residents. Small living encourages social, environmental, and economic sustainability by consuming less, traveling shorter distances and engaging in a dense urban environment. The increasing desire to live close to the city’s amenities has also added to the demand for lower cost housing options. The smaller living area equates to lower rental rates while also providing closer proximity to highly desirable amenities such as the University of Washington and the upcoming light rail station. As a co-housing community, the residents would enjoy the benefits of communal living with ample shared amenities and services. Ground level retail, buffered from the street by seating and treescape, will add convenience, safety and activity to the street front. A below ground parking garage would be dedicated primarily to the shared use of zipcars for the residents and community abroad. The public plaza hosts communal buildings, such as the community kitchen and multipurpose space. Tying into the larger cultural community, the plaza would also facilitate a mid-block crossing that would connect through to the lobby of the Egyptian Theater if it were to be rehabilitated. Realizing sustainable living, community comes first.

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UW / m.arch / 2nd year / autumn 2012 / critic: jim nicholls / prefab_flex


NE 47TH ST.

I

Utilizing a hybrid prefabrication method, each residence is composed of a kitchen pod, a bathroom pod and adjustable partition panels. A raised-access floor system enhances flexibility and facilitates the installation of the partition panels. Hollow core slabs support the floor and roof. A green roof system adds much needed permeable surface to the area and aids in water retention during heavy rains. Sliding shades and a terracotta rainscreen system finish the cladding on the exterior allowing for adjustable solar control and weather protection. Inherent flexibility allows multiple configurations while the precast concrete frame provides added durability.

DN

COMMUNITY KITCHEN

UNIVERSITY WAY NE

BROOKLYN AVE NE

H

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH

G

DN

I

UP

DN

DN UP

F

H

G DN

E

A

1

2

3

4

5

6

B N

L

E G

GREEN ROOF

ZIP CAR PARKING

FLEXIBILITY

SOLAR ENERGY

SMALL LIVING

E C O N O M I C A L PREFABRICATION

LAUNDRY

PUBLIC PLAZA

B

6

A

SHARED COMMON SPACE

5

N I

THEATER CONNECTION

4

I

S O C I A L CO-HOUSING

3

DN

A V

MICRO BUSINESSES

2

T

SMALL LIVING

UP

A

1

S I

SUN CONTROL

GREEN ROOF

C

UP

U

E N V I R O N M E N T A L

LOUNGE

C

B

S L

DN

D

UP

D

COMMUNITY KITCHEN

RECREATION

PREFABRICATION

E

CROSS VENTILATION

PROPOSED REHABILITATION OF THE EGYPTIAN THEATER

SOLAR ENERGY

UP

F

GREEN ROOF

BATHROOM POD 8” HOLLOW CORE SLAB PRECAST CONCRETE FRAME

KITCHEN POD 4’x10’ PREFAB WALL PANELS

12 '-

6" 25 '-

0"

12 '-

6"

'25

0" PREFAB WINDOW UNITS

2’x2’ RAISED ACCESS FLOOR PANELS

SLIDING SCREENS

ADJUSTABLE HEIGHT FLOOR SUPPORTS

TERRACOTTA PANEL RAINSCREEN SYSTEM

8” HOLLOW CORE SLAB

27


Brooklyn Ave

University Way NE

28

1 D

E

D

E

1

2

2

The tartan grid frame breaks down further into a 2’ x 2’ interior grid within each unit. Moveable sections of wall panels allow the occupant to customize their interior as needed, or join multiple units together. The raised access floor facilitates the relocation of plumbing and electrical lines, allowing greater design possibilities as functional needs change or equipment becomes outdated.


29


Humanizing Industry Where industry was once the backbone of new cities and the establishment of community, it has since been relegated to seemingly self-contained areas, often on the edges of the larger community, divorced from the people who benefit from its labors. However, a certain renaissance in making is evident in the Maker’s Revolution and an increasing proliferation of accessible fabrication facilities. Never in stasis, people’s needs, interests and way of doing things change and morph over time, often very rapidly, to best suit external influential forces. The physical context in which we live, however, does not always adapt so readily. Although the typical manufacturing facilities used today are not the dark, soot-covered factories of the past, they have developed to be little more than large, sprawling boxes, disconnected from their human occupants. Envisioned to maximize open space in which the needs of the machine are placed above those of the operator, little care is given to the human aspect of industrial space. This thesis explores the humanization of the industrial environment, providing spaces crafted to give the user a sense of place and purpose within the larger whole. Conceived on the basis of Open-Building principles, embedded efficiencies allow the building to adapt to changing needs and the relative lifespan of various building components. Expressed as a framework to facilitate the early commercialization stages of product development as well as educate the next generation of skilled workers, the Kent ManufactureLAB is positioned to be just one node of a larger sub-network embedded within the manufacturing industry at large. Technology has opened many doors, once closed or unknown. It is the role of technology to leverage its capabilities to efficiently address the pragmatic and the utilitarian. It is the role of the architect not only to absorb the new technology, but also to apply that technology in a way that is ultimately for the betterment of society, community, and the individual.

30

UW / m.arch / thesis / autumn 2013 / critics: rick mohler, elizabeth golden, gundula proksch / humanizing_industry


L J H I

4

K

M

N

Level 2

E

F

G

B C

3

D

A

Level 1 1

2

31


Time

Systems Infill

20 years

100+ years

5 years

VS Support

INITIAL ADAPTATION ADAPTATION ADAPTATION ADAPTATION ADAPTATION LIFECYCLE

LIFECYCLE

RENOVATION

Infill

RENOVATION

INITIAL

Support

Time

Paine Field

Ballard-Interbay Duwamish North Tukwila South Kitsap Kent

Port of Tacoma

32

Fredrikson

A variety of scales and spatial experiences are seen as one progresses through the building. The circulation bars, combined with the intruding landscape, serve to separate the repeating manufacturing bays. Each bay linked together by means of a pedestrian bridge running the length of the complex. Along this pedestrian bridge, smaller break-out spaces are provided to foster collaboration. Separate modules within the larger volume contain space for small groups or individual contemplation. These confined spaces reinforce the focus placed on the human occupants and a humanized experience.


33


34


35


Advanced Manufacturing for potential clients, assisted in the creationinofKent, shop WA drawings for manufact custom homes, single-family tract home developments, and a LEED Platinum packages resort destination community, assisted with development feasibility studies, designed marketing material and project UW M.Arch Thesis 2013 INTERN, Sandberg Group Architects | Las Vegas, NV — 2000 (4 months) status updates, managed bookkeeping and banking responsibilities. Updated and reformatted AutoCAD details, executed red-line corrections, proce INVESTMENT COORDINATOR, Herlean Financial | Henderson, NV — 2006-2007 (1.5miscellaneous years) performed office tasks and deliveries. Assisted with the management of investor groups, establishment and management of multiple LLCs, • 2012 Scan|Design Travel Scholarship solicited and raised funds from potential investors for real-estate development projects. • 2009 AIA Las Vegas Scholarship • 2009 Student Merit Award CAD TECHNICIAN, Pohl Inc. of America | West Valley City, UT — 2004-2005 (1 year)

Curriculum Vitae

AWARDS

EDUCATION

ANDREW HANSEN

University of Washington | Seattle, WA Updated and reformatted AutoCAD details for architectural rainscreen systems, compiled marketing • Master of Architecture packages for potential clients, assisted in the creation of shop drawings for manufacturing. • Master of Construction Management, candidate Jun 2014 INTERN, Sandberg Group Architects | Las Vegas, NV — 2000 (4 months) • Southern Italy: Full-time missionary for The University of Nevada Las Church Vegas of Jesus Christ| Las Vegas, NV of Latter-Day Saints Updated and reformatted AutoCAD details, executed red-line corrections, processed blueprints, • Bachelor of Science in Architecture performed miscellaneous office tasks and deliveries. Oct 2001 - Oct 2003 Utah Valley University | Orem, UT • Drafting Technology major

VOLUNTEER WORK

18502 69th Lane NE #108 Kenmore, WA 98028 (702) 510-8661 hansen.andrew@icloud.com

EDUCATION

http://

issuu.com/andrew_hansen

University of Washington

| Seattle, WA

• Master of Architecture • Master of Construction Management, candidate Jun 2014

WORK EXPERIENCE

INTERESTS

University of Nevada Las Vegas

| Las Vegas, NV • Bachelor of Science in Architecture DESIGNER, Self-Employed | Henderson, NV — 2010-Present (4 years) • BIM Workflows Utah Valley University | Orem, UT • Digital Fabrication Providing architectural and graphic design services for residential remodels and small businesses. • Drafting Technology • major Sustainability • Prefabrication / Assembly INTERN, RAFI Architecture | Henderson, NV — 2010 (4 months) Brigham Young University | Rexburg, ID • Technology Performed urban planning research and analysis exercises focusing on redevelopment opportunities • Architectural Drafting Technology major • Constructability and prepared a formal report of findings including a schematic design proposal, participated in various • Interdisciplinary Collaboration client meetings and design reviews.

PARTNER, R&D Properties, LLC | Henderson, NV — 2007-2010 (3 years)

AWARDS

INVESTMENT COORDINATOR, Herlean Financial | Henderson, NV — 2006-2007 (1.5 years)Making Model

Hand Drafting Assisted with the management of investor groups, establishment and management of multiple LLCs, solicited and raised funds from potential investors for real-estate development projects.

CAD TECHNICIAN, Pohl Inc. of America | West Valley City, UT — 2004-2005 (1 year) Updated and reformatted AutoCAD details for architectural rainscreen systems, compiled marketing packages for potential clients, assisted in the creation of shop drawings for manufacturing.

INTERN, Sandberg Group Architects | Las Vegas, NV — 2000 (4 months) Updated and reformatted AutoCAD details, executed red-line corrections, processed blueprints, performed miscellaneous office tasks and deliveries.

• 2012 Scan|Design Travel Scholarship • 2009 AIA Las Vegas Scholarship • 2009 Student Merit Award

VOLUNTEER WORK • Southern Italy: Full-time missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oct 2001 - Oct 2003

EDUCATION | Seattle, WA • Master of Architecture • Master of Construction Management, candidate Jun 2014

Sep 2011 -

Present

University of Nevada Las Vegas

| Las Vegas, NV

Jan 2006 - May 2011

Utah Valley University

| Orem, UT

Jan 2004 - May 2005

Brigham Young University

| Rexburg, ID

May 2000 - Aug 2001

• Bachelor of Science in Architecture • Drafting Technology major • Architectural Drafting Technology major

36

TECHNICAL SKILLS AutoCAD

Photoshop

» References available upon request

| Rexburg, ID

TECHNICAL SKILLS

Jan 2006 - May 2011

AutoCAD Jan 2004 - May 2005 Revit Grasshopper Solidworks May 2000 - Aug 2001 Model Making Hand Drafting

PUBLISHED WORKS TECHNICAL SKILLS

Assisted with the start-up and operations of the company, coordinated with various developers, AutoCADHumanizing Industry: A Training Ground for builders, architects, and municipal planning departments in the planning and building of high-end custom homes, single-family tract home developments, and a LEED Platinum resort destination RevitAdvanced Manufacturing in Kent, WA community, assisted with development feasibility studies, designed marketing material and Grasshopper project UW M.Arch Thesis 2013 Solidworks status updates, managed bookkeeping and banking responsibilities.

University of Washington

Brigham Young University

• Architectural Sep 2011 - PresentDrafting Technology major

Photoshop Illustrator InDesign MS Office Suite iWork Suite Italian

» References available upon request

Sep 20

Jan 20

Jan 20

May 20


VOLUNTEER WORK

turing.

essed blueprints,

011 -

• Southern Italy: Full-time missionary for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints Oct 2001 - Oct 2003

Present

006 - May 2011

004 - May 2005

000 - Aug 2001

Photoshop Illustrator InDesign MS Office Suite iWork Suite Italian

» References available upon request


hansen.andrew@icloud.com

702 • 510 • 8661

Architecture Portfolio 2014  
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