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INTERwoven Design Portfolio Andrew Carleton carleton.andrew@gmail.com


INTERwoven

INTERwoven

exhibits the designs, essays, photographs, paintings, and sketches of Andrew Carleton. The samples seen in this portfolio represent a cross section of the work produced while studying Architecture at Ball State University and during an internship with Rottmann Architects. Contact Information: Andrew Carleton 3629 Braewick Drive Carmel, Indiana 46033 carleton.andrew@gmail.com 317.796.9628

References Mr. Timothy Gray Associate Professor of Architecture Ball State University tcgray@bsu.edu Mr. George Elvin Associate Professor of Architecture Ball State University elvin@bsu.edu Mr. Todd Rottmann, AIA Principal Rottmann Architects, Indianapolis todd@rottmannarchitects.com Mr. Sonne Palmer Professor of Architecture Ball State University spalmer@bsu.edu


Resumé Education 2003- 2007...............................................•Graduated with a Bachelor’s of Science Degree in Environmental Design from Ball State University. Cumulative GPA: 3.574

Honors 2003.........................................................•Finalist in 2003 Indiana AIA High School Design Competition •Third Place Finish- IHSAA Individual Wrestling State Finals at 171 lbs. •IHSAA Academic All State- Honorable Mention for Wrestling •Winner of a Silver Key- Scholastic Art Award for Visual Arts; Presented by Indiana Universities Herron School of Art 2004.........................................................•Ball State Intramural Wrestling Champion 2005.........................................................•Ball State Intramural Wrestling Runner-Up •Ball State Intramural Ultimate Frisbee Champion •Finalist- Indiana Concrete and Masonry Institute Spa Design Competition 2006.........................................................•Participant in MILKhaus art/architecture installation 2007.........................................................•Participant in World Tour 3/Polyark 17; a 103 day academic adventure around the world

Organizations/Volunteer Work 2004-2007................................................•Member of Ball State University’s AIAS Chapter •Volunteer Wrestling Coach at Carmel High School (Carmel, IN) 2005- 2007...............................................•Member of the Wizards- BSU’s Ultimate Frisbee club team 2006-present............................................•Member of Ultimate Players Association; governing body of ultimate frisbee within USA 2004 & 2005.............................................•Helped construct two homes with Habitat for Humanity 2007.........................................................•Member of a week-long, fact finding/brainstorming mission to improve quality of life while preserving indigenous culture for the Ngöbe Bugle tribe of Northeast Panama 2008.........................................................•Coach of a winter season team for Jacksonville (FL) Ultimate League

Previous Work Experience 2008-present...........................................•Architecture Intern at Gresham Smith and Partners; Jacksonville, FL office 2007-2008...............................................•Architecture Intern at Rottmann Architects, Indianapolis, IN 2006........................................................•Summer Architecture Intern at URS Corporation, Indianapolis, IN 2004 & 2005............................................•Summer Street Laborer for Westfield Public Works Department, IN 2003-2008...............................................•AutoCad Consultant for Independent Concrete Pipe Company, IN

Skill Sets •Computer Programs -Proficient in AutoCad (both 2D and 3D), Microstation V8, Microsoft Office, Adobe Creative Suite, and Sketch-Up. •Physical Model Building; both scaled and full size •Internships working with a large corporate firm, a small architecture firm, and hands-on job site experience


Table of Contents

Pages

Title

School 1-2.....................................................................................Water Color Paintings 3-4.................................................................................................Field Sketches 5-6..........................................................................................Project: Revolution 7-8............................................................................................Project: Tectonics 9-10........................................................................................Project: Vernacular In-depth Presentation 11-34........................................................................Project: Knowledge Worker World Tour 35-38.........................................................................Writing Sample: Globalism Internships 39-40....................................................................................University Shoppes

INTERwoven Carleton 2008


Image taken of physical model from Knowledge Worker Project


Division One:


School

The following section contains projects that were completed for academic credit. The studio designs demonstrate a brief overview of graphics generated during the design and presentation process.


Water Color Paintings

“Cabbage” watercolor. Originally 13.5”x15.5” 1


“Apollo IX” watercolor. Originally 14”x12.25” 2


Field Sketches

3

Pudong New Area Skyline in Shanghai, China


Ponte Vecchio in Florence, Italy

Villa Savoye in Poissy, France

CN Tower in Toronto, CA

4


Second Year Studio

5

ASICS “INTENSITY” wrestling shoe (mixed media on mylar)


revolution

Morphology This project involved purposefully transforming a sentimental belonging into an inanimate object. In this case, I decided to transform my wrestling shoe into a tire. This transformation dissects and analyzes the purpose and value behind my object. The shoe morphs into a tire, because the root of booth objects lies in their ability to provide support, stability, and traction to a larger host. The transformation process was acquired through various Adobe Photoshop techniques.

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Second Year Studio

Conceptual Definitions Concept vs. Realization Andrew’s Retreat

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Cory’s Retreat

Robert’s Retreat


Tectonics

Gaps Diagram

Bridging Gaps The program for this project was to create a retreat space for a team of three architecture students that could not exceed 1,000 cubic feet. The structure was to be self-supporting on a patio outside Ball State’s College of Architecture and Planning (CAP) building. A distinctive, triangular, structural frame intersects the site. The project team included Robert Norton, Cory Miller, and Andrew Carleton. Each group member was responsible for establishing their own, personal definition of a retreat. Individualized, physical abstractions were then created to represent the three definitions. One major challenge of the project was to marry the three distinct ideas into a space that all of the team members could enjoy. As a group, we wanted to focus on the differences between the definitions as a unifying design factor. The project began to materialize as two distinct spaces that utilized a floating transition piece between the structural member of the CAP building. We began to utilize “gaps” (both literally and philosophically) between the spaces to help accentuate the design concept. The two spaces and the transition space were then designed during a collaborative group charrette session. The small project scale allowed for a more in-depth look at the tectonics and spatial relationships (see joint detail below and exploded axon to the left). Synergy is created in the design by molding and connecting the components so that as a whole they are able to harvest light, water, and heat.

Tectonics Diagram

Seclusion The space below provides a secluded resting space and uses collected rainwater to filter light between its windows, creating a passive heating, cooling system.

Transition The transition space utilizes a tension joint to support itself off of the triangular structure of the CAP building. This creates the effect of floating between the spaces

Inclusion The open portion of the retreat utilizes large a large glazed area to allow one to see and be seen. It provides safety and privacy by cantilevering out over the stairs to prevent unwanted entry.

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Third Year Studio

9

Wind Flow Diagram


CIVIL CERVICE CONSERVATION CLUB FELLOWSHIP HALL

WIND DIAGRAM

S

BROWN COUNTY, INDIANA

Vernacular

SITE PLAN 1” = 60’

FL

OUTDO

OUTDOOR GATHERING DECK

FL

Front Elevation

Conceptual Sketches

FL

FRONT ELEVATION 1/4” = 1’

Roof Plan and Sections

SECTIONS 1/16” = 1’

A

FL

B C

A

AA

B

BB

CC

C

FL

VIEW FROM THE LAKE

W Slice & Shift The program asked for a gathering facility to be developed for a group of RV enthusiasts. The site is located on sixty-two acres of forested land in Brown County, Indiana. The clients had a strong bond with traditional Southern, African-American vernacular. My concept begins with a gabled roof structure that is cut and sliced to allow the building to shift with the sloping contours of the site. These slices also allow the retreat to bloom in the middle; which provides a space for a second level patio/deck that overlooks a private lake. This elevated space is passively cooled by drawing air off of the lake through a modified stack effect. Emphasis was also placed on using sustainable building materials and local Indiana Limestone.

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Division two:

GIDW


In-Depth Presentation

This section contains a more detailed look at a specific studio project. Originally presented as a sixty-five page book, the design was produced through a collaborative effort between Brandon Lanius and Andrew Carleton. Both team members were equally involved in all aspects of the project. The next two pages provide a project synopsis, which is then followed by selected excerpts of the actual book layout and presentation.


Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Support Space

Atrium

Atrium

Team Space

Team Space

PODS space

Atrium

Stability in Motion: Project Introduction

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The program asked for an office complex to be developed for an Industrial Design Firm (Goose Island Design Works, or GIDW) of one hundred employees. The site is located on the North end of Goose Island in Chicago, Illinois. During this comprehensive, semester-long project, an intense study was first done to analyze the “knowledge worker”. The ideas that surfaced during the research session kept coming back to a theme of mobility, motion, and teamwork. Since the city of Chicago also strives on movement, the form for this project begins to look at ways to harness and stabilize motion. The most dramatic of these stabilizations occurs by rotating and carving into the purity of a cylinder. This form creates the primary anchor for the office complex. The building is then balanced and supported by “roots” that stretch outward from the core. On the interior of the core, a Portable Office/Design System (PODS) was designed to allow the employees to easily relocate within the office.

PODS space


Knowledge Worker

Design Diagram (left) The design concept first began by studying the knowledge worker and deciding what this employee needed to function both comfortably and efficiently. From this original design dialogue, three spaces were conceived and analyzed: Individual Space- a place for the employee to call home. Also a base to operate from and reference back to. This space finds itself along a ring that hugs the exterior of two of the three tower sections. Group Space- The main workhorse of the spaces. Most design and meetings will take place here. Also, constructive activities such as model building and pin ups will be housed in these areas. It is located adjacent to the Individual Space on the inner circle of two of the sections. Support Space- The space in which shared communal activities are held. It includes tasks such as administration, plotting, sleep pods, and supply storage. This space locates itself in the third tower section. All of these spaces rely on the movement of people, objects, and ideas in order for GIDW to successfully produce well designed products. The design intent of this new office is to stabilize motion so that it may intertwine people and place; site and building; nature and man.

Image: The physical model is created by using laser-cut pieces of basswood, transcribed from slices of a digital model. The cut wood was then laminated and sanded to create a rotated, cylindrical effect.

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

13


Knowledge Worker

F o r e s h a d o w i n g

007

14


Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Roots

Natural Plantings

Nature always tries to persevere. From the moment a building is constructed it begins the process of deterioration and degradation, much like all living things. Given time, however, the natural cycle will steady itself into a combined equilibrium of the old and new. The design of the GIDW office uses this stabilizing force to help marry the office design with the specific site on Goose Island. This union is accomplished through a series

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of natural plantings that weave up and down the rooftops throughout the site. These plantings consist of natural grasses and small shrubs that are native to the northern Midwest landscape. Implementing plants onto the rooftops provides the effect of watching nature reclaim the landscape. The building no longer fights the inevitable finite lifespan, but instead embraces it as a natural, stable act.


Knowledge Worker

N a t u r a l

Most of the plantings occur on the structures that radiate outward from the building core. These structures relate to the site angles and act as roots growing outward from the center. The Roots protrude above ground in several spaces allowing for natural plantings to occur on their surfaces. These structures also have a berm that cradles them into the landscape. This berm provides for a small hill that allows employees and guests the ability to sit back and relax with the city skyline as a backdrop.

G r o w t h

The natural plant life placed on top of the Roots set them apart from the site and help them read as regrowth. The idea of the landscape reclaiming a space overtime is strengthened by allowing visitors the ability to walk on the rooftops and gaze down into the spaces below through light wells that also double as benches. By looking down into the space it gives the viewer a tangible recognition that nature is persevering and is steadying itself with both old and new.

Refection Hill

Paved Trail Light well Bench Informal Path

Scrim Panel

Natural Grasses

Gym

Glass Panel

013

Wellness Center

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Cylinder Rotation

The building’s form is a pure cylinder rotated around an axis. This act of rotation is a simple move that reflects nature’s symmetrical and imperfect growth patterns. This rotation, due South, allows the floor plates to slip past each other as they proceed up the building. Therefore, to the South, the floor plates create a sun shading device for the floor below, but , to the North, they step back and allow more sun to reflect into the space. The

PODS

Structural Column

eighteen degree rotation shades the harsh summer sun, but allows the low winter sun to penetrate and warm the space. The rotation also creates a floor plate that is not a perfect circle, as the cylindrical form might suggest. The shape of the floors are pulled into an ellipse. This steady rotational transformation creates a stable movement encompassing the entire building.

Signal Arms

Group Meeting Tables

North Side

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Knowledge Worker

S i t e

S p e c i f i c

North East

West

South

Shading System Diagram

Zoning Diagram

The design also reaches out from the site into circular activity zones that emanate from the building. These zones rotate from the center of the action and grow out into Chicago. This gesture helps weave the site into the community. These zones are laid out to include functions of the site and building in a hierarchical pattern starting from the office building.

Atrium

Group Space

Individual Space

015

South Side

Workplace Section

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Carving the Cylinder

The destructive forces of nature breed beginnings. Carving is a form of destruction, and proceeding this comes new life and growth. Just as the site and the canal were carved by the City of Chicago to create Goose Island, the building form has been carefully sliced and removed to reveal additional beauty. Within this carved section, new life begins to grow. The

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slices once again relate back to the site angles and the stretching, and therefore they carry through to the Roots that also carve out into the site. The Roots tunnel through the ground and tie the site to the building. The various carved spaces were designed to reveal hidden spaces locked within the landscape and the building mass.


Knowledge Worker

S c u l p t u r a l When archeologists dig into the earth they meticulously carve out their site in order to reveal hidden treasures within the ground. As objects begin to appear through the surgically carved land they create a sense of stability and mystery. The GIDW office design channels this energy as a wayfinding tool. The service cores create a dialogue between being exposed and incased. Because these spaces only peak out of the carved atrium they read as being locked into the mass of the cylinder, much like an archeological artifact being unearthed. These cores become permanent shafts in the design and each one takes on their own character. The distinguishing differences allow users various points of reference while in the space. Another effect of the carving effectively splits the cylinder into three connected towers. These towers are divided into a support tower and two design towers. The towers are bridged by an atrium and catwalks through the carved area. The small cat walks maintain an open feeling within the interior atrium space. The atrium also allows designers/employees a visual connection with all of the floors in the office building. The visual link further enhances a sense integration amongst teams.

F o r m

Service Cores

Tower Diagram Group Space Individual Space Support Core Amenities

018

Carved Roots

20


Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Stretched Roots

The office building, as a great mass, deforms and impacts the site. As this mass is placed upon the site it pulls and stretches the earth into the ground. To stabilize this heavy object, the Roots act as tensile members that flex to receive the weight. The areas of the Roots that stretch out of the ground are then detailed with

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a series of copper, scrim panels. These panels are pulled taught from the ground up and over the building to provide railings for the roof above. This layer of scrim reads as a tight wrapper that has been stretched proportionately with the Roots.


Knowledge Worker

R e c e i v e

a n d

W r a p

Life of Copper The copper scrim panels that stretch over the Roots are used to assist in breaking the wind as the seasons grow colder throughout the year. Theses panels also create a dynamic permeable layer between the inside and outside of the Roots.

Boardwalk

Copper panels are used for their properties of oxidation. Over a span of many years the copper will slowly change from its original deep maroon to a lively green. This gives the copper life and movement, because it is constantly changing and evolving. The color change is also important because it begins to blend the Roots into the natural environment and give them the appearance of being overgrown.

Scrim Plan

Northern-western Winter Winds Heat Lamp Outdoor Meeting Tables Natural Plant Railing

Sliding Scrim Panel

020 Chicago River

Boardwalk Section

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Personalized PODS

In a dynamic design environment each employee brings his or her talent and skills to the office team. These teams are compiled and organized to maximize the individual employees attributes for a specific project. Teams are rapidly changing floors and members on a project to project basis, and are in need of a fast efficient means to move their belongings. The Portable Office/Design System (PODS) is a customizable individual work space provided for each employee. PODS are easily folded up and moved to a new work space in a matter of minutes. The pods are set on a nine foot polar grid and are integrated into the window and wall system. This grid allows the PODS to dock into the

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fixed components of the building. The PODS themselves are completely customizable and are encouraged to be a design project for each employee to express his/her identity. This creates an original and identifiable office that can be used as a wayfinding tool to locate the on-the-go team member. Technology is also a very important need of the employees. The front screen of the PODS holds a smart board linked to the PODS and to the computer inside for presentations and digital art to be displayed. This interfacing technology allows a designer to present directly from the front of the PODS. The assimilated technology within these PODS allows the designer to use their entire work environment as a tool.


Knowledge Worker

P O D S

E v o l u t i o n

022

Moving Process

24


Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

View of Window System Integrated with Wall and PODS

The new GIDW complex also implements a specific language of design elements that set up a rhythm in the building. This tempo can be understood when examining the Window System. This window element becomes an integrated unit that works with the walls and the PODS. The window assembly is a component that has been designed to maximize natural ventilation and day lighting techniques. This window component

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utilizes a computerized system which will track and bounce the appropriate level of daylight into the spaces. The window system also includes a filtered trickle vent and adjustable heating unit that can be controlled by a central GIDW building computer or by the individual that is working at the individual station. The units also have operable windows that users can adjust to their liking.


Knowledge Worker

H e a l t h y

F a c a d e

Computer Operated Clerestory Glazing

Adjustable Light Shelf/ Shading Device

Computer Operated Light Shelf Control

User Operated Glazing

Trickle Vent with Air Filter

024

User/Computer Operable Coil Radiator Unit for Heat

Window System Detailed Section

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

9.

8. 2.

1. 10. 7.

2.

2.

6. 3.

5.

4.

N▲

100’ 500’

Site Plan 1. Chicago River and Turning Basin 2. Walking/Jogging Path 3. Activity Field 4. Wellness Center 5. Underground Parking Garage Entrance/Exit Ramp 6. Visitor Parking 7. GIDW Office Building 8. Day Care Facility 9. Pedestrian Bridge 10. Canal

27


Knowledge Worker

S i t e

D e v e l o p m e n t

11. 12. 7.

4.

2.

6.

West

5. 9.

9.

8.

East 10.

1. 3.

North Section 1. Chicago River and Turning Basin 2. Boardwalk 3. Theater 4. Way finding Core 5. Individual/ PODS space 6. Group Space 7. Atrium 8. Gallery Space 9. Cafe Space 10. Canal 11. Green Roof

11. 9. 7.

10.

2. North

12. 1.

6.

5. 11.

8. 4.

13.

South

14. 3.

East Section 1. Chicago River and Turning Basin 2. Boardwalk 3. Theater 4. Wayfinding Core 5. Individual/ PODS space 6. Group Space 7. Atrium 8. Gallery Space 9. Design Library 10. Break Lounge 11. Green Roof 12. Day Care 13. Wellness Center 14. Underground Parking Garage

027

100’ 500’

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

Sub-level Two 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

1.

Main Stair/Elevator Rest Rooms Lobby Fire Stairs Theater Mechanical Space

2.

3.

4.

6.

5.

Sub-level One 1. Main Stair/Elevator 2. Rest Rooms 3. Lobby 4. Fire Stairs 5. Wood Shop 6. Mechanical/Storage Space 7. Building Entrance from Parking Garage 8. Loading Dock 9. Parking Garage 10. Maintenance Office 11. Archive Room 12. Underground Hallway to Day Care

12.

11.

1.

2. 3.

6. 4.

4.

10.

5.

8. 7.

9.

29


Knowledge Worker

F

l

o

o

r

P

l

a

n

s

Ground Floor 1. Main Entrance 2. Atrium 3. Primary Gallery Entrance 4. Gallery Space 5. Café 6. Café Kitchen 7. Reception Desk/Waiting Lounge 8. Main Conference Room 9. Mail Room 10. Fire Stairs 11. Rest Rooms 12. Main Stair/Elevator 13. Secondary Entrance

12.

13.

11.

6.

8.

7.

9.

7.

5.

2.

10.

10. 3. 4.

1.

Second Floor 1. Boardwalk 2. Scrim Wall 3. Natural Plant Railing 4. Individual PODS Space 5. Group Space 6. Support Lobby 7. Support Rooms 8. Meeting Rooms 9. Atrium Entrance from Boardwalk 10. Fire Stairs 11. Rest Rooms 12. Main Stair/Elevator 13. Atrium Space Open to Below

7.

12. 6.

2.

13.

11. 8.

5.

9.

1.

3.

13.

1.

4.

10.

10. 8.

5.

13.

028 4.

50’ 200’

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Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

31


Knowledge Worker

R o o t s

D e t a i l

M o d e l

030

32


Fourth Year Studio: Monograph Excerpt

33


Knowledge Worker

G I D W

S i t e

M o d e l

031

34


Division three:

Sketch: Roof Structure; National Heritage Museum - Shanghai, China


World Tour

The next portion of the portfolio contains a paper written while traveling the globe on World Tour 3/Polyark 17. It provides insight into my writing style and the thoughts I developed while analyzing world culture during my study abroad experience.


World Tour One-World Culture? This paper examines the cultural and societal experiences while on “World Tour 3/Polyark17.” The primary goal is to observe whether a one-world culture exists. Journals, sketches, photographs, online assignments, and formal/informal group discussions became the means of documenting this search. Four installments were produced to assist in investigating cultural similarities and differences. The first stage involved a pre-trip statement paper that established our original position on the subject. The second phase is an update written after spending a month in Mediterranean Europe. The third section is an update that occurs after a few weeks of experiencing life in Asia. Finally, the fourth segment is a conclusion that summarizes the overall beliefs on one-world culture throughout much of the world. Pre-trip position statement Is there a world culture? This question will continually be posed to us throughout this trip. I believe that individual cultures will always maintain enough differences to stop the creation of a single culture world. To say that there is a definitive world culture by most definitions would also be saying that multiple cultures do not exist. Advancements in technology continue to make it easier for a global economy to exist, and I feel that individual cultures have assimilated traits of a global world, but they have not accepted a single world society. I cannot yet speak for all of the other countries throughout the world, but here in the United States one cannot describe a unified United States culture. The southern states have their own idiosyncrasies that make them very different from the northern, western, or eastern states. The idea of a cultural melting pot is often times far fetched, and can better be defined by a salad bowl analogy (a conglomeration of parts, not a homogenous mixture). Although New York City is known for being diverse, many of the ethnic groups live in very specific areas of the city. Some traits have “melted” together, but the individual groups still maintain their identity. The primary traits that seem to define a widespread “American Culture” are democratic freedom and consumerism; but are they enough to define an entire culture? I believe it takes more than these two traits to define an entire society. If it is impossible to define a solitary American culture, it would be difficult to argue that a one world culture exists. Update Two After visiting various cities and countries throughout southern Europe, I am still very hesitant to believe that a world culture exists. I feel that everyone on the trip noticed a lifestyle difference between the assortments of cities we have visited. The lifestyles were similar, much like they are across the United States; but just as there are eccentricities between New York City and San Francisco, Madrid and Barcelona have different pulses that drive the city. Madrid, in our short visit, appeared to be fast paced, loud, business driven, at times rude, yet still relaxed compared to our American standards. Barcelona, although some areas did appear to move quickly, materialized as a city in love with design, fashion, and life. Walking down La Ramabala Street on a Saturday evening is truly an experience; thousands upon thousands of people wondering and perusing the store windows and market stands. On one particular Saturday evening, a group of us were in a hurry to get back to the hotel to meet others before walking to a soccer match between Barcelona and Espanyol, but our attempts to zig and zag through the crowd were quite feeble. The life of the city forced us to take our time and soak in our atmosphere. Although it was only for a brief moment, it felt as though we understood what it means to live in Barcelona. 35


Writing Sample I do not yet believe that there is a world culture, but I think that all humans find joy and wonder in certain objects. While in Granada, some of us had the chance to sit in front of St. Nicholas Cathedral just as the sun was setting. Most of the city of Granada is in the valley, Alhambra is on top of the adjacent hill, and the Sierra Nevada Mountains, with their tops dipped in snow, lay in the background. Many other people joined us at this lookout point. All walks of life, from the drifting gypsies that live in caves above the city, to tourists, to societal elite. The moment at which the sun dips under the mountains and the sky turns from a pink hue to a dark violet color, individual cultures do not exist; natural beauty seems to connect us all. Another wonderful experience that I believe most countries share is the love of sports. This is especially obvious in Europe with the love of football (soccer). I mentioned before we were privy to attend a soccer match. To actually witness the pandemonium everyone talks about was undeniably incredible. This match was not a “big game� by any real terms in the football community, yet there were fans that would ignite road flares and toss them onto the field when their team scored. The endless cheering and chanting displayed such joy and passion it was inspiring. This idea of cultural barriers melting away becomes an interesting argument towards the belief that a one-world culture does exist. It is interesting to note that major societies throughout history have, among other things, all played some kind of sport, participated in a form of religion, and have shared in the joy of nature. It makes me believe that human beings all have inherent traits, or basic instincts, that still link them together. These instincts become widely apparent in people across the globe, however they surface through varying means that are culture specific. Is there a world culture? I think not, but I leave Southern Europe knowing less about life than I did when I left for the trip. This Socratic belief and constant questioning/observation teaches me what I think I know is ever changing. Update Three After visiting Southern Europe and much of Southeast Asia, my view of the world has changed. I have seen things I could never have of dreamed. One cannot fully understand these experiences until they can actually smell, taste, touch, and see the environment. I approached the trip feeling that there was not a single world culture, and one thing that has not changed is my belief that multiple cultures do exist. We live in a world dominated by human beings, so inherently there will be some similarities between physical constrains, restraints, and primal reactions. However, the idiosyncrasies between all of the places we have visited are not so small. By dissecting various aspects of everyday life such as religion, cuisine and dinning habits, clothing/attire, government, language, and an endless number of other attributes, one may observe the cultural differences. In Europe, the primary religious faction is some form Christianity, which varies little from our upbringing in the United States. Perhaps we could see a heavier influence of Catholic icons while in Italy, especially near the Vatican, but for the most part our religion in the US hold true to that of our original European roots. However when we arrived into Istanbul, Turkey we were faced with a somewhat foreign religion and style of architecture. The Islamic faith dominates almost all facets of the countries culture. Five times a day loud, Arabic chanting greeted us by radiating from the hundreds of minaret towers nearby. Another outward sign of religious power could be observed by noticing that the women covered their heads in shawls as to not expose their face. These obvious signs of 36


World Tour religious significance are not to be outdone by the subtle yet noticeable controls underneath the surface. There was an obvious degree of censorship taking place outside of the tourism realm in which we were placed. Everything from state sponsored sermons to arranged marriages were signs that we were entering a new sense of cultural identity. As we progressed deeper into Asia we encountered a strong Buddhism presence, and along with the religion, a new style of architecture followed. The Buddhist temples varied dependant on the country. Their shapes covered everything from large stuppa domes, to pyramiding gable roofs, to convex gable roofs with intricate wood eaves. These temples were located in the heart of neighborhoods, which allowed the monks to travel out into the surrounding area in the morning to collect food for their two allotted meals per day. The monks wandering around in their exquisitely bright, orange robes contrasting with the underdeveloped infrastructure was not a sight that can be duplicated in the Midwest region of the United States. So far, the religion in Asia has been an influential factor in separating culture of the West from that of the East. Also, many of the countries in Europe appear to value a consumer driven society, but consumerism is not nearly as important as enjoying life. Although most of the places we have visited in Europe and Asia abide by this principle of enjoying life, they all interpret them differently. Venice, for instance, celebrates with a large month-long festival every year. Other societies observe this zest for life at the local pubs on afternoons and evenings, even more enjoy a long cup of coffee or tea at a nearby café, and furthermore many cultures rejoice in spending the afternoon with their family instead of at work. In Southeast Asia, we noticed that, for many of the small communal housing complexes in the country, an afternoon game of volleyball was a favorite way of passing the time. The similarities in enjoying life still hold true to the belief of primal human instincts, however racial/social background, geographical location, and religious beliefs still influence these methods enough to classify themselves as separate cultures. Conclusion After arriving back in the United States, following three and a half months of traveling around much of the world, it was good to be home. This sense of “home” becomes a comforting experience for all of us who went on the trip. It is familiar to us and it is what we know. Although the ability to see old friends and families begins to fill a large void that was missing on the trip, being “home” also gives us many other comforts that we had been without for three and a half months. By having a strong identity for what was missing during the trip shows that we are accustomed to a certain way of life, and therefore a certain culture. The faced pace of the trip consequently created difficulty when delving into the study of pure culture. We were forced to make decisions on societies and traits after very little total analysis of the overall situation. Traveling around in a tourist bubble definitely hindered us at times form observing what life around the world actually entails. It was the few times when the walls of the bubble where thin, and one could reach out of this distorting film, that the most learning about culture and customs took place. In Spain it happened at Granada while overlooking the sun setting on Alhambra, and in Barcelona while being forced to aimlessly wander the crowded shopping streets. In Florence, Italy, it occurred while having a long talk with a young restaurant owner, named Giuseppe, about his life growing up in Sicily, and how he still helps to support his family who operates a small farm on the island. While in 37


Writing Sample (continued) Bangkok, Thailand the film was thinned by witnessing a professional Thaiboxing match where we were surrounded by thousands of Thai men cheering and participating in various betting rituals/fighting chants. During our stay in Hanoi, Vietnam, we were privy to witness a communist flag lowering on a hazy night just outside of Ho Chi Minh’s mausoleum where the national pride could be seen gleaming from the soldiers eyes. Our visit to China gave us a slim window to reach true culture, however our guide in Beijing gave us a wonderful monologue into his family’s life. He discussed how his parents lived with two to three generations under one roof, but how that model is starting to change as China becomes capitalist. On a frigid night in Mongolia we were treated to a stay in a traditional wool “ger” (or yurt), and were able to get a glimpse of how the nomadic people still live even today. In Scandinavia, the architecture revealed itself as a cultural trait by showing its strong influence for natural land formations and dedication to delicate, purpose-driven natural and artificial lighting schemes. In Munich, Germany, I had the privilege to sit and meet with Matthias, a schoolteacher in his upper twenties, at the Augustiner, a local Bierhalle. During this evening, a seemingly endless number of cultural topics ranging from language barriers, to bias in the news, to beer where all discussed at great length. Finally yet importantly, in London, England, on the second to last day of the trip, a group of us spent the afternoon in Hyde Park relaxing in the sun and playing Frisbee. It was a spectacular day and it seemed as though all of London was out enjoying the weather, drinking wine, having a picnic, and frolicking through the park. These few times, along with some other, similar events, became the closest, clear porthole into culture around the world. After experiencing these snip-bits of life around the world, I still believe that multiple cultures do exist. However, it was interesting to learn how easy it is to travel around the world despite sometimes-extreme cultural differences. Minus a few minor hiccups, our travel process and ability to sustain ourselves around the world went smoothly. This makes me feel that globalization is definitely taking an effect on breaking cultural boundaries and walls. It seems as though societies are becoming more and more tolerant of each other and are interested in learning about cultures other than their own. I do believe that cultures are a living thing, they shift and change, but they still maintain core beliefs and ideals. I do not feel this transfer of information and trend towards globalization will create a single world culture, but will in turn help create cultures that continue to grow and strengthen themselves by being aware and tolerant of other customs.

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Division Four:


Internship

The final division of the portfolio displays a project completed while interning at Rottmann Architects in Indianapolis.


Internship Images: Left: This project board was created during the design phase as a marketing tool. It allowed the owner to show the vision of the future retail center to possible tenants. The images are generated using a digital Sketch-up model that I constructed. Opposite: 1. Existing Marsh Supermarket 2. Completed construction image (after renovation process) 3. South elevation from digital model 4. Photograph of South elevation (after renovation process) Sources: Images and renderings are used with the consent of Rottmann Architects and Keystone Corporation.

UNIVERSITY SHOPPES Retail, Re-use Located on the Southside of Indianapolis, Indiana, University Shoppes is a new retail center that was converted from a vacant grocery store. Keystone Corporation commissioned the project and Rottmann Architects represent the design team.

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As more and more “big box stores� become unoccupied, it raises the social question of what to do with these spaces. Do we tear down and rebuild, or are there more sustainable ways to deal with the infrastructure? Instead of demolishing the existing building, this project focused on re-skinning the vacant grocery store, and setting up an appropriate module for retail tenant spaces. I was involved as a lead designer and project coordinator for this adaptive re-use project. Under the guidance of a licensed Architect, I was in charge of creating the elevations, floor plans, and three-dimensional models. I coordinated the construction documents and worked with the structural engineer to create a structural scheme that worked with the projects design intent.


University Shoppes 1.

2.

3.

4.

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Andrew Carleton carleton.andrew@gmail.com

Design Portfolio

Undergraduate and Internship Portfolio  

This portfolio contains selected works while pursuing my Bachelors Degree in Environmental Design (Architecture) at Ball State University, a...

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