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OUR CONTRIBUTORS Office of the Executive Director, Services for Students The Principal’s Fund: Office of the Dean of Students McGill Women’s Alumnae Association (MWAA)

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Editorial Board Rosalia Felice, Office of the Vice-Principal (Administration and Finance) Jennifer Markowitz, The McGill Daily Andrew Seo, Social Equity and Diversity Education Office (SEDE) Graphics and Printing Bernard LaFleur, Le zeste graphique Communications QUADCOM Inc.

Centre for Continuing Education Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism Desautels Faculty of Management Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Faculty of Arts Faculty of Arts Development and Alumni Relations Faculty of Education Faculty of Engineering Faculty of Law Faculty of Medicine Faculty of Science Fine Arts Council, Arts Undergraduate Society (AUS) Graduate and Postdoctoral Studies Office (GPSO) IAIN Indonesia Social Equity Project (IISEP) McGill Association of University Teachers (MAUT) The McGill Daily McGill Institute for the Study of Canada McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies (IGSF) Office of the Provost The Office of Students with Disabilities (OSD) Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM) Post-Graduate Students’ Society (PGSS) School of Architecture School of Environment School of Social Work Schulich School of Music Social Policy, Advocacy, Research, Community (SPARC) Sustainable Futures Research Laboratory, Department of Natural Resource Sciences


MISSION STATEMENT The Social Equity and Diversity Education Office (SEDE) is committed to fostering a fair and inclusive environment that respects the dignity of each member of the McGill Community.

EQUITY RESEARCH CALENDAR 2009-2010 How do representations of public history affect diverse communities where deep inequalities exist? Who are the stakeholders and what are the benefits of community-based participatory research? How does one’s membership in a particular identity group inspire creative variation through art, space, and music? What are the current challenges faced by Canada’s immigrants and what can we learn from experiences of subsequent generations? SEDE’s 2009-2010 Equity Research Calendar aims to support McGill’s academic community and identify some of the compelling questions that are encompassed in contemporary social justice and equity-related inquiry. The research projects featured in this publication are rooted in a variety of disciplines including the sciences, arts, humanities, engineering, and social sciences; they address topics at the local, national, and international levels while upholding McGill’s time-honoured tradition of insightful and reputable scholarly analysis. The broad and multifaceted scope of this research reflects an area of interest that is highly inter-disciplinary and acutely aware of the social processes and struggles currently faced by our global society. In furtherance of the University’s commitment to institutional excellence, SEDE was created to promote strong collegial bonds and actively support the diversity of its own community without exception to age, ability, gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic status. By extension, we feel it is part of our mission to facilitate dialogue and develop understanding on key issues and current topics that concern all members of this vibrant community.

SEPTEMBER 2009 MULTICULTURALISM, EQUAL CITIZENSHIP AND THE ACCOMMODATION OF DIFFERENCE PROSPECTS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA: INSIGHTS FROM INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW

OCTOBER 2009 BREAST MONITORING WITH MICROWAVES EXPLORING THE GLOBAL CAREERS OF GENERATION X PROFESSIONALS AND MANAGERS IN DUALEARNER/CAREER FAMILIES

MARCH 2010 THE KAHNAWAKE SCHOOLS DIABETES PREVENTION PROJECT (KSDPP) CULTURE CLASH: “BEST INTERESTS OF THE CHILD” IDEOLOGY AND THE IGBOS OF EASTERN NIGERIA

APRIL 2010 INSTITUTIONAL IMPACTS ON THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT: PROVINCIAL AND NATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN SETTING ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY IN WESTMINSTER-BASED SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT WHAT IS PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH?

NOVEMBER 2009

MAY 2010

SOCIAL POLICY, ADVOCACY, RESEARCH, COMMUNITY (SPARC)

BILLY STRAYHORN’S QUEER MUSIC

SOUTH ASIAN YOUTH IN THE DIASPORA: MEDIA INFLUENCES FROM HOLLYWOOD TO BOLLYWOOD

DECEMBER 2009 IAIN INDONESIA SOCIAL EQUITY PROJECT (IISEP) MCGILL MEDICINE TO CHILCAPAMBA

PINK NOISES: WOMEN ON ELECTRONIC MUSIC AND SOUND

JUNE 2010 THE POWER OF PINK: CHILDREN’S BEDROOMS SINCE WORLD WAR II MARIA’S ROOM: LIVE-IN DOMESTIC WORKERS’ SPACES AND PERSPECTIVES IN COLOMBIA

JANUARY 2010 PUBLIC HISTORY, CONTEMPORARY POLITICS, AND URBAN SPACE

JULY 2010

BARTERING PLACE: (RE)DEFINING HONG KONG PUBLIC MARKET SPACES

WHAT THE EYES CAN TELL US ABOUT LANGUAGE UNDERSTANDING IN ADULT BILINGUALS DEAFNESS AND SIGN LANGUAGE IN A YUCATEC MAYA COMMUNITY: COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL INCLUSION

FEBRUARY 2010 HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR DOMESTIC WORKERS, IMMIGRANT WORKERS’ CENTRE, MONTREAL THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES OF FILIPINO YOUTH IN QUEBEC IN THE CONTEXT OF GLOBAL MIGRATION

AUGUST 2010 COMMUNITY CAPABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT IN NUNAVIK ECONOMIC INEQUALITY PREDICTS BIODIVERSITY LOSS

Design: Le zeste graphique

The SEDE Calendar Project is one that encompasses the talents, hard work, and dedication of its staff, students, artists, alumni, and academics. We hope you enjoy the Calendar and invite you to learn about some of the exciting research currently being undertaken at the University.


MULTICULTURALISM, EQUAL CITIZENSHIP AND THE ACCOMMODATION OF DIFFERENCE Professor Vrinda Narain McGill Institute for Gender, Sexuality and Feminist Studies (IGSF), Faculty of Arts Faculty of Law Professor Narain’s research interests are focused on the compelling and complex interface between public and private law and the impact of constitutional law on women’s rights within the family. She looks at these issues through the lens of Muslim women in India, although these are questions that resonate globally in multicultural societies grappling with similar concerns on how to balance seemingly competing constitutional rights, especially religious freedoms, gender equality and minority rights. In this context, the question of the legal status of Muslim women is an integral part of the political dilemma of a pluralist democracy committed to equality. As a legal controversy, it reverberates far beyond the courtroom and the classroom. It implicates issues not only of equality and democratic citizenship, but also those of minority rights, family law reform and the accommodation of difference.

© Cheryl Braganza, 2009

Seeking to move towards a policy of critical multiculturalism, Professor Narain’s research is concerned with better understanding the factors that a state needs to consider when formulating public policy that respects group difference while still enforcing gender equality. In particular, she is interested in understanding the paradox of multicultural vulnerability - when policies aimed at protecting minority groups can undermine the voices and rights of its most vulnerable members. Furthermore, she seeks to understand how the narrative of the law frames women as citizens. By interrogating dichotomous categories of modernity/tradition, Western/non-Western, public/private, and feminist/true woman, Professor Narain seeks to re-conceptualize constitutional rights in a way that is dialogic, inclusive and pluralist. She is interested in examining the idea of citizenship as a site from which minority women are able to reclaim their selfhood, free from essentialist definitions of gender interests and group identity.

“THE HARVEST”, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 2009 CHERYL BRAGANZA is a local artist, writer, poet and musician. Selected as the 2008 “Montreal Woman of the Year” by the Montreal Council of Women for her artistic and charitable contributions, her recent collaborations include the Jewish General Hospital, Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan, and McGill’s South Asian Congress and South Asian Women’s Aid (SAWA). Her bold and daring brushstrokes in vibrant complementary colors reach out not just to the senses, but also to the heart. www.cherylbraganza.com

SEPTEMBERSEPTEMBRE Dimanche Sunday

Lundi Monday Ramadan August 21 - September 19

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Labour Day

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PROSPECTS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES IN AFRICA: INSIGHTS FROM INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW Futsum Tesfatsion Abbay O’Brien Fellow & DCL Candidate, Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism, Faculty of Law Persons with disabilities are now one of the largest minority groups in the world. They encompass approximately 650 million throughout the world 80 million of whom are in Africa. Those who have been marginalized and denied adequate legal guarantees and protections in many countries are also marginalized and left without legal protection at the regional level in Africa. In other words, regional legal developments in Africa have not incorporated the protections included in the 2006 International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Most African states have also failed to take appropriate and adequate measures to ensure and protect the equality and non-discrimination of disabled persons. The main objective of this research project is to examine the rights of persons with disabilities in Africa, drawing on comparative and international law developments. It is argued that the African regional human rights system, including the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights does not provide adequate guarantees for ensuring and protecting the human rights of persons with disabilities. By taking Eritrea as a case study, this project examines how regional and international human rights protections for persons with disabilities would impact the Eritrean legal framework relating to disability and ultimately enhance the rights of persons with disabilities in Eritrea.

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BREAST MONITORING WITH MICROWAVES , Professor Milica Popovic Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Faculty of Engineering Faced by devastating statistics on breast cancer fatality rates, scientists are always on a quest to find new methods to detect, diagnose and suppress breast tumours. Breast tumour detection with microwaves is a new modality which promises to detect tumours at their early stage, thus increasing the chances of success for subsequent treatments. What is the principle of this technique? It works like radar, transmitting electromagnetic waves and measuring the reflections. All tissues have electrical properties. These properties depend on the frequency of the electromagnetic wave that is interacting with the tissue. For microwaves, in the electrical sense, the healthy fatty breast tissue “looks” very different from potentially embedded tumours. If a low-power microwave is launched from the skin surface into the tissue, it will travel through the fatty tissue with little reflection until it encounters a tumour. When it “sees” material that is electrically different from normal tissue, much of it will scatter back to the skin surface where it can be captured by a measurement antenna. Using sophisticated signal-processing techniques, these captured backscattered microwaves can yield information on a tumour that may be hiding under the breast skin surface. As there is no surgical procedure required, this methodology is non-invasive and since no X-rays are involved, it is also non-ionizing. This area of research is still in its infancy. The researcher’s goal is to construct a microwave-based device that can easily be used at home for monthly exams. The detection of any significant tissue changes will raise a red flag and urge the woman to seek detailed scanning (e.g. MRI) while the potential tumour is still small. Ideally, such a device will have a bra-like form, with transmitting and receiving antennas woven into its fabric shell.

“L’ENVERS DU DÉCOR”, ILLUSTRATION, 2009 MANUEL R. CISNEROS is an Architecture graduate student. He currently works as an intern in an architecture firm. Lately, he has also been exploring digital illustration as a freelance graphic and web designer. ‘L’envers du décor’ is about the unbalanced relations between two symbolic coexisting realities and questions the order of our social and environmental priorities. The image can also be viewed upside down. www.manuelrcisneros.com

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EXPLORING THE GLOBAL CAREERS OF GENERATION X PROFESSIONALS IN DUAL-EARNER/CAREER FAMILIES Pamela Lirio, MBA. PhD Candidate Desautels Faculty of Management

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Managing the “global workforce” is increasingly challenging as 24/7 global business demands compete with employee personal and family demands. Global careers imply frequent crossing of multiple geographical and cultural boundaries and have generally been associated with expatriate assignments. Increasingly, technology and alternative forms of global assignments, such as short-term international travel and virtual work are being used to conduct global business. However, it is not clear how these work forms are viewed or what impact they may have on the personal lives of those pursuing global careers. Moreover, evidence suggests that the profile of today’s global careerist is increasingly younger, non-managerial, female and/or part of a dual-career family. Addressing work-family issues in the context of global careers remains underresearched, and yet is timely given the desire of younger generations to have flexible work arrangements combining both career and family. This research explores emerging forms of global careers among men and women born in the United States and Canada between 1965 and 1980 known as “Generation X” (or “Gen X”). The sample is focused on dual-earner/career Gen X professionals and managers who are currently located domestically in the United States or Canada, but perceive themselves to be pursuing global careers (“Global Gen X-ers”). The purpose is to increase understanding of today’s global careers and to explore how working globally interacts with managing one’s personal and family demands. This research aims to contribute theoretical and practical knowledge on international careers, workfamily issues and generational diversity. The findings could guide organizations in the recruitment, development and retention of younger global workers, as well as inform individuals who are interested in pursuing global careers.

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SOCIAL POLICY, ADVOCACY, RESEARCH, COMMUNITY (SPARC) Professor Tara Flanagan Director of Social Policy, Advocacy, Research, Community (SPARC) Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology Tara Flanagan is the Director of SPARC (Social Policy, Advocacy, Research, Community), a research group that is comprised of students from diverse backgrounds with a wide range of strengths and interests. Past and present team members include students from Human Development and Law programs, a fellow at the McGill Institute of Health and Social Policy, teachers, practitioners, and students with disabilities. SPARC’s mandate is to promote social inclusion among individuals with disabilities by emphasizing selfdetermination, community, and a shared responsibility for successful outcomes. SPARC is currently working with two Montreal school boards, two specialized schools, a community service provider, and an inclusive CÉGEP curriculum to set up programs that support quality of life and positive outcomes in the transition to adulthood for adolescents with developmental disabilities. SPARC’s close collaboration with Adam’s PACE (Post-secondary Alternative Community Education), a pilot curriculum which began in St. Lambert’s Champlain College, led to the creation of Friendship and Community Ties (F.A.C.T.), a socialization and awareness program, funded by Québec’s Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (2007-2009). Initiated by students with developmental disabilities, F.A.C.T. is a collaborative effort between Tara Flanagan of McGill University and Patti Buchanan of the Riverside School Board. The collaborators are currently working on a friendship program where volunteer CÉGEP students are paired with students from Adam’s P.A.C.E. to socialize together in typical community settings. F.A.C.T. also develops community awareness workshops for various stakeholders (students, educators, parents, and community partners) in order to provide accurate information, debunk stereotypes, and improve links with the larger community. By leading these initiatives, SPARC hopes to move towards a society where it is assumed that each person with a developmental disability will have the opportunity to live a rich and fulfilling life. “RAILWAY NAATYAM”, BLACK AND WHITE, 2007 AMAR KHODAY is a Doctor of Civil Law candidate at the Faculty of Law and an O’Brien Fellow associated with McGill’s Centre for Human Rights and Legal Pluralism. His current research work focuses on law’s legitimization of acts of resistance in the context of asylum law. Amar is also a photographer who specializes in portrait and dance photography. www.atkphotoworks.com

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International Day for Tolerance

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Anita Menon, MA Student Faculty of Education This study explores identity construction for secondgeneration youth growing up in the South Asian Canadian diaspora. Attention is placed on the influence of competing medias in shaping hybrid or dual identities that blend the home and mainstream cultures. How do representations of South Asians in Eastern and Western media influence secondgeneration youth in constructing their identities? This study takes particular interest in what is not being represented. The images of South Asians portrayed by Western media and Bollywood characterize only a slice of the South Asian population, homogenizing a heterogeneous group of peoples. Through ethnographic examination and autobiography, this study explores the effect of the homogenization process on South Asian youth who are misrepresented in Hollywood and unrepresented in Bollywood.

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SOUTH ASIAN YOUTH IN THE DIASPORA: MEDIA INFLUENCES FROM HOLLYWOOD TO BOLLYWOOD

International Day of Peace

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IAIN INDONESIA SOCIAL EQUITY PROJECT (IISEP) Professor Philip Buckley, Principal Investigator Dr. Lina Kalfayan, Project Director Since the late 1950s, McGill has had a unique and evolving commitment to development initiatives in Indonesia - the world’s fourth largest democracy and home to the largest Muslim population. The roots of this relationship are found in McGill’s own Institute of Islamic Studies and its mission to understand the richness and diversity of Islamic cultures. The IAIN Indonesia Social Equity Project (IISEP) is the most recent cooperation project to be carried out between McGill and the State Institutes of Islamic Studies (IAIN). The mission of the IAINs is to promote: “Critical thought and objective enquiry; understanding of other religions; a participatory, democratic and inclusive approach to development; and respect for the humanistic, tolerant, egalitarian and open traditions of classical Islam.” An educational project in the broadest sense, the IAIN Indonesia Social Equity Project is designed to find the resources within tradition and society that will enable Muslims in rural areas and the urban fringes, a critical segment of society, to open to modernity. In this capacity, IISEP has been crucial in bringing young lecturers from the rural institutes to McGill where several of them have been awarded professional degrees and have since returned to the IAINs as formal educators. Heavy emphasis has also been placed on improving the IAINs’ curriculum with the help of McGill’s own professors especially in the areas of social science, humanities, library studies, math, and sciences. Following the cataclysmic tsunami that hit Aceh on December 26, 2004, McGill is now committed to the reconstruction and rehabilitation of the hard-hit region through its educational initiatives. The scope of this project encompasses the development of new academic programs at IAIN Ar-Raniry and will continue to strengthen IAIN linkages with the surrounding community. These partnerships will also focus on addressing issues of law and gender in the Aceh region.

“THAT USED TO BE OUR HOUSE, MOTHER.”, OIL ON CANVAS, 2005 ROUND KELANA is a 70-year-old painter from Banda Aceh, one of the areas hardest hit by the December 2004 calamity. He was washed away by the tsunami and rode with the wave for two kilometers. Miraculously, he survived though his house, along with most of his lifetime paintings, are now at the bottom of the ocean. After the tsunami, Mr. Kelana started to make new paintings describing the ordeal and sharing his feelings of this tragedy with the rest of the world.

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International Day of Persons with Disabilities

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Study Day

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International Volunteer Day for Economic and Social Development

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International Human Solidarity Day

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Human Rights Day (1948)

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International Migrants Day

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Day of Remembrance for Tsunami Victims (2004)

MCGILL MEDICINE TO CHILCAPAMBA Andrea Evans, MSc. MD in progress Faculty of Medicine Nestled between two snow-capped volcanoes in the Andean mountains of Ecuador, McGill medical students will be standing beside Quichua leaders running focus groups on health. Imagine a project with the needs of the community as its priority that integrates local knowledge into its framework and offers students an intimate global volunteer experience that allows them to peer into the roots of healthcare inequalities. These are the goals of McGill Medicine to Chilcapamba, a project that adopts a participatory research approach, thereby encouraging community-led decision-making on the healthcare topics targeted, integrating community members in running focus groups and submerging the medical student in all cultural aspects of the community. Since the initiation of this collaboration, five focus group meetings with women in the community have been held with a McGill medical student on-site. Meetings were used as a forum to intimately discuss the needs of the women and their families, and to identify topics and methods for addressing these issues. Previously identified topics include the prevention of parasitic infections as well as assessing vitamin and nutritional content of local foods. Furthermore, a study was conducted to assess socio-demographics of the indigenous women in the area. Medical students are also embedded in the community by living with a local family and participating in everyday activities and community events during their stay. Through McGill Medicine to Chilcapamba, the community and medical students will address pressing health issues in a way that recognizes two-way learning and understanding. This project was developed in association with the Department of Family Medicine, Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM) and Asociación Risitas, Chilcapamba, Ecuador.

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PUBLIC HISTORY, CONTEMPORARY POLITICS, AND URBAN SPACE Professor Shelley Ruth Butler McGill Institute for the Study of Canada How do representations of public history, in the context of museums and tourism, affect diverse communities where deep inequalities persist? This question informs Dr. Butler’s ethnographic research in Canada and South Africa. In Toronto, Dr. Butler conducted a detailed study of the explosive and controversial exhibition “Into the Heart of Africa” at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM). Her book on the subject explores the deeply flawed attempt by an establishment museum to create its first major exhibition about the representation of Africa and colonialism. Failures in community consultation, racial tensions in the city, and the exhibit’s ambiguous representation of colonialism left many Black Canadians with a sense of alienation and betrayal. Dr. Butler continues to trace an evolving relationship between Black Canadians and the ROM, most recently in light of the opening of the first permanent gallery on African culture and the institution’s architectural renaissance. In contrast with national museums in Ottawa, the ROM is reinventing the imperial notion of a world museum. Toronto’s diverse communities may be able to identify their transnational roots and gain added value from the experience, despite the fact that the institution operates on another level as a tourist destination. In South Africa, township tours are operated by people from historically disadvantaged communities, showing international tourists (and sometimes white nationals) locations outside of cities where millions of black residents were poorly housed and used as cheap labour by colonial and apartheid governments. Through ethnographic fieldwork, Dr. Butler explores the problems and potentials of township tours in contributing to the remaking of social space and narrating the past. The question of whether the tours reconfirm apartheid racial categories and space or have the potential to create meaningful contact zones is central to this work. In related comparative research, Dr. Butler explores how the Downtown Eastside in Vancouver is represented in the public imagination and media, contrasting this with alternative tourism, heritage, and arts projects that seek to place people in this social space in productive ways. “THE DREAMS YOU HAVE TONIGHT ARE IN THE MARKET PLACE TOMORROW...”, INK ON CARDSTOCK, 2009

“The fanatics singing, the homemade flags of the youth sub-cultures behind the goal of the home-end, the choreographed display of emotion after a goal is scored – all of this is stadium art.” JONATHAN HIMSWORTH is the Montreal founder of the Stadium Art Movement. Stadium Art refers to any form of spontaneous activity that is inspired by the walls of the stadium. In this piece, made specifically for the Calendar, Himsworth depicts an aerial view of the cityscape and replaces his trademark football stadium with a lively street market. www.stadiumartmovement.com

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International Day of Commemoration in Memory of the Victims of the Holocaust

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Heidy Zunn, MA Department of Geography Faculty of Science

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BARTERING PLACE: (RE)DEFINING HONG KONG PUBLIC MARKET SPACES

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The formation of global cities through the process of urban redevelopment is transforming the day-to-day manner in which people are interacting with the space around them. Notions of how public spaces are used and what they represent are shifting as cities re-imagine the urban landscape to fit globalized ideals. Public market spaces in Hong Kong are changing, in part, as a result of concerted efforts by the State to promote the city as ‘Asia’s World City’. Street markets and public wet market buildings are closing down as the spaces they occupy become repurposed. In Wan Chai District, Hong Kong, the closure of the existing Wan Chai Market building and a portion of the fixed-pitch street stalls illustrate the conflict between globalizing interests and local uses of space. Urban redevelopment projects are changing the quality of public spaces in Wan Chai and the ways in which people can interact with that space. This study demonstrates how the re-imagining of the public urban landscape is causing the loss of livelihood for those who depend on public spaces to make a living. The current definition of public spaces in Hong Kong needs to be reformulated to recognize the necessity of these spaces for the economic stability of a critical segment of the population. It is also necessary to match the appropriateness of the spaces available for market trade with the ways in which social interactions occur in these locales. As public spaces in Hong Kong continue to change through increased privatization and the conversion of existing spaces into other functions (such as closing street markets for improved vehicular traffic access), it will be important to continue to monitor how these changes will affect existing social and economic dynamics in the community.

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HEALTH AND SAFETY FOR DOMESTIC WORKERS, IMMIGRANT WORKERS’ CENTRE, MONTREAL Professor Jill Hanley Kezia Speirs, MSW/BCL/LLB in progress School of Social Work Paid domestic work in Canada is overwhelmingly performed by immigrant women in private settings where labour rights are systematically disregarded. It was only in 2001 that a successful campaign won domestic workers the right to be covered by Quebec’s minimum labour standards although today’s domestic workers still do not receive workers’ compensation from the Commission de la santé et la sécurité au travail (CSST). To combat this, the Pinay Filipino Women’s Organization in Quebec started the “CSST for Domestic Workers Campaign” in collaboration with several organizations. The campaign’s efforts have been frustrated by mistaken attitudes toward domestic work that still persist: that it’s not dangerous, and that it isn’t “real” work. In response, Pinay collaborated with the McGill School of Social Work to create a survey documenting the experiences of domestic workers. The study’s preliminary findings, released in November 2008, confirm that a significant number of domestic workers are injured or become ill because of their work. Some of the project’s central goals are to empower domestic workers, to have statistical information on which to base labour advocacy, and to contribute to academic knowledge about a population that is difficult to reach. This research represents the collective work of more than fifteen Pinay members including Pinay director Evelyn Calugay. Professor Jill Hanley provided academic support and supervised student contributions by: Nancy Cannella, Effro Cocolessis, Sigalit Gal, Monica Caracamo Hernandez, Min Chul Hwang, Karima Kinlock, Valérie Lavigne, Jessie Luciano, Bora Mahano, Natasha Sobers, Jennifer di Stephano, and Debbie Veinish. Two specialists in occupational health and safety, Dr. Karen Messing and Dr. Stephanie Premji, also contributed their efforts. Apart from the time donated by volunteers, domestic workers, and students, this project was made possible by the Freda L. Paltiel Award from the McGill School of Social Work.

“1ST MURAL”, WING DIOCSON YAP, OIL/ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 2008 WING DIOCSON YAP is a visual artist and muralist. He studied art and design at the College of Fine Arts, University of the Philippines in Diliman. Imagery and symbolism permeate through his art to bring forward the socio-economic, cultural, and political realities of the Philippines. His murals often address themes of poverty, landlessness, migration, and colonization. He is currently based in Montreal. obramasa.pinturada.googlepages.com

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THE EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCES OF FILIPINO YOUTH IN QUEBEC IN THE CONTEXT OF GLOBAL MIGRATION Josie Fely Caro, MA Faculty of Education

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Filipino youth have one of the highest dropout rates in Montreal. “Delinquents”, “trouble-makers”, “gangviolence”, and “drugs” are some of the words commonly associated with the Filipino youth living in the Côte-des-Neiges area. Josie Caro’s research in Educational Psychology sets out to examine how various immigration policies such as the Live-In Caregiver Program, and educational policies such as the Charte de La Langue Française, are shaping the Filipino community in Côte-des-Neiges today. In particular, she explored the effects of family separation on Filipino youth whose mothers came to Canada as domestic workers under today’s Live-In Caregiver Program and how these youth adapted to schooling in Quebec given the province’s language policies and their own respective linguistic and educational backgrounds from the Philippines. Conducting in-depth qualitative interviews with Filipino youth, Caro discovered that several of their problems were related to long periods of family separation. Children whose mothers had gone to work abroad when they were very young (1-2 years old) fared much worse than those whose mothers left when they were older (10-12 years old). In addition to the difficulties of developing close relationships with their mothers, economic struggles were sources of hardship for the children which also directly affected their educational outcomes. The focus of learning French in order to do well in the Quebec high school was also significant. This work was done in collaboration with the Filipino Youth group Kabataang Montreal and the Philippine Women Centre of Quebec - two community organizations that advocate for the rights and welfare of Filipino youth. By empowering the youth through skills-building, cultural development, and the education of Philippine history and migration, these programs have encouraged many youth to return to school and also help strengthen the Filipino community in Montreal.

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THE KAHNAWAKE SCHOOLS DIABETES PREVENTION PROJECT (KSDPP) Professor Katherine Gray-Donald Department of Dietetics and Human Nutrition Amelia McGregor, Chair of the KSDPP Executive Committee Kahnawake is a Kanien’kehá:ka (Mohawk) territory of over 7000 people on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, fifteen kilometres from downtown Montreal. The Mohawk Nation is part of the Iroquois Confederacy whose traditional lands cover an area that includes southern Quebec and Ontario, and northern New York State. The traditional Mohawk diet consisted of corn, beans and squash supplemented by foods acquired through fishing, hunting and gathering. In this region, 12% of adults between the ages of 45 and 64 have documented Type 2 diabetes, twice the rate of the general population within the same age category. This population suffers the highest rate of macro vascular complications documented in a Native community to date. In fact, 48% have coronary artery disease and the overall risk of a macro vascular complication is six times higher than for those without diabetes. In 1981, the average age of onset of Type 2 diabetes was 59 years and in 1995, it was 49 years. This information led to many requests to help prevent future generations from suffering the same burden of disease. Concerns about the perceived increases of obesity in children, combined with the Mohawk tradition to care for future generations, led to the development of a prevention program focusing on elementary school children, their families and the entire community. KSDPP began in August 1994 as a three-year community-based participatory research project and has since operated under the support of various Kahnawake and community organizations, private foundations, and the federal government. In collaboration with its community and university partners, KSDPP designs and delivers school and community-based interventions, prepares diabetes intervention workers from communities across Canada, trains Aboriginal health researchers (students and fellows), and furthers the understanding of Type 2 diabetes and its prevention. www.ksdpp.org “LAZARUS”, OIL, INK, OAT GRASS, EARTH AND PAPER ON CANVAS, 2007 NALEDI JACKSON is a visual artist who spent her formative years growing up in Harare, Zimbabwe. She returned to Canada to pursue her studies in fine arts, and finished her BFA from Concordia in 2003. She then went on to study film production at the New York Film Academy, where she obtained a diploma in 2008. She now spends most of her time now in Montreal working on her first film production and doing freelance illustration. www.naledijackson.com

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CULTURE CLASH: “BEST INTERESTS OF THE CHILD” IDEOLOGY AND THE IGBOS OF EASTERN NIGERIA Ugochi Oparah, LLM Candidate Faculty of Law

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One of the main criticisms of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights is that it is based on Western philosophies and, therefore, does not take into account the particular social circumstances or cultural orientation of African societies. By necessary extension, this assertion also applies to issues related to children’s rights. This is reflected in the Igbo’s traditional legal system which places heavy emphasis on duties. The rights of the child in Igbo society arise fundamentally from the obligations that a community imposes on its members to protect and ensure the general well-being of the young and vulnerable of the society. Consequently, the interests of children, their parents and the larger community are hardly distinguishable whereas the predominant conceptions of human rights, and concurrently, the rights of the child, emanate from Euro-centric jurisdictions and institutions which largely support a paradigm of individualism. The aim of this research is to develop an understanding of what children’s rights mean in the Igbo culture. It examines the Igbo traditional system and appraises the “best interests of the child” concept which is a core principle in the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC). In taking this approach, the researcher’s intention is to question the applicability of the CRC as a universal instrument and provide deeper appreciation of some of the challenges African countries face when implementing their international obligations. The distinctive aspect of this Master’s thesis is its socio-cultural interpretation of Chinua Achebe’s “Things Fall Apart” which will be used as a literary backdrop to investigate the role, perceptions and “rights” of a child in an African context. Recognizing the dynamic nature of culture, the approach will be to show the continuity of the customary law and practices as seen in contemporary Igbo society.

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INSTITUTIONAL IMPACTS ON THE STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT: PROVINCIAL AND NATIONAL EXPERIENCES IN SETTING ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY IN WESTMINSTER-BASED SYSTEMS OF GOVERNMENT Professor Gordon Hickey Director, Sustainable Futures Research Laboratory Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Research into sustainable futures is a vital component of sustainable development, simultaneously spanning economic, social and environmental issues. It draws on scientific knowledge from diverse disciplines to analyze policy-relevant problems on a range of scales. Professor Hickey’s research program aims to be trans-disciplinary, international, and applied - producing analyses that further the intra- and inter-generational equity objectives of sustainable development. As Director of the Sustainable Futures Research Laboratory, Professor Hickey is currently exploring the processes that move environment-related science into public policy and the international outcomes that emerge from that process in Westminster-based jurisdictions (provincial and federal). Focusing on the 35-year period between 1971 (the year that the Canadian Government appointed its first Environment Minister) and 2006, this research will analyze the changing face of environment-related issues in these jurisdictions to clarify the obstacles facing government agencies charged with achieving environmental outcomes through public policy. Such a study will provide valuable insight into the challenges facing environment-related science as it strives to equip these governments with the tools necessary for sustainable development. This research is funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC).

“PARADISE” (PART OF THE TRILOGY OF THE EARTH), ILLUSTRATION, 2008 SUZANNE DURANCEAU is an award-winning illustrator and the artist behind several children’s storybook titles. ‘Paradise’ is part of a three-piece work which explores humanity’s evolving relationship with the environment. Her stamp designs are featured in the United Nations Endangered Species collection, while her most recent philatelic illustration pays tribute to Canada’s first Black elected Member of Parliament, Rosemary Brown (1930-2003). Duranceau is currently based in her native Montreal. www.suzanneduranceau.com

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WHAT IS PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH?

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Participatory Research (PR) is “systematic investigation, with the collaboration of those affected by the issue being studied, for purposes of education and taking action or effecting social change.” It involves researchers and stakeholders as partners in as many stages as possible throughout the research process. Bringing everyone together in this process not only strengthens and provides credibility to the research but also speeds up the dissemination of results. The equally important goals of PR in health are to answer important health questions and benefit the partners in the research process, while developing valid knowledge that is applicable to a wide range of settings. Hence, PR is often seen as emancipatory empowering individuals, groups or whole communities to address inequitable access to resources needed to live their lives with health, safety and meaning. Participatory Research at McGill (PRAM) was inaugurated in September 2006 to promote better understanding and use of this research approach within the McGill Faculty of Medicine. PRAM provides guidance and mentorship to faculty and student researchers wishing to undertake participatory projects. The research unit also collaborates on new and existing PR grants, offers seminars and workshops, and provides seed funding, scholarships and fellowships in Aboriginal health research in addition to performing its own original research in the emerging field of PR. http://pram.mcgill.ca

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BILLY STRAYHORN’S QUEER MUSIC Professor Lisa Barg Department of Music Research Schulich School of Music How have notions of race, gender and sexuality shaped historical narratives and aesthetic values in jazz? What does a focus on the intersection of these identities tell us about the practices, sounds, meanings, and debates central to jazz studies? Professor Lisa Barg’s research project addresses these questions through the exploration of black gay identity in the life and work of the African- American composer, arranger and pianist Billy Strayhorn. Strayhorn, who was openly gay during an intensely homophobic era, was the long-time composing partner of Duke Ellington. He joined the Ellington band in 1939 and, aside from a short period in the early 1950s, remained in Ellington’s employ until his death in 1967. Strayhorn’s musical legacy presents an intriguing and distinctly queer paradox in which active musical presence stands in stark contrast to public invisibility. Indeed, Strayhorn’s compositions and arrangements were enormously influential, yet throughout his career, he remained largely anonymous outside of the Ellingtonian world, always working behind the scenes. Thus, Strayhorn’s freedom to compose and to live as an openly gay black man closely aligns musical and sexual identity. Put another way, Strayhorn’s sexual identity required that he work in the shadow of a collaborator, a distanced but empathetic space from which his voice could — with the unwavering support and encouragement of Ellington — merge with and give shape to the voices of others. Through close reading of selected Strayhorn compositions and arrangements, Professor Barg’s research explores how such relationships have come to bear on Strayhorn’s music and its historical reception.

“DROP A BEAT”, NEWSPAPER, TISSUE, AND MARKER ON CARDBOARD, 2009

“Through art, one is able to express him or herself in an unpunctuated manner. In my opinion, art is the most effective and thorough means of communication.” CARA HANLEY is pursuing a Psychology and Art History double-major at McGill. She prefers to use mixed media in her pieces which often convey themes of freedom and liberation. She is also a regular contributor at the McGill Daily.

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PINK NOISES: WOMEN ON ELECTRONIC MUSIC AND SOUND

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Tara Rodgers, PhD Candidate Richard H. Tomlinson Doctoral Fellow Department of Art History and Communication Studies, Faculty of Arts

Pink Noises is a collection of twenty-four interviews the researcher conducted with women who are DJs, electronic musicians, and sound artists (forthcoming from Duke University Press). It is an intervention into existing historical narratives of electronic music cultures and music technology, which have thus far marginalized the work of women as cultural producers. This project grew out of Pinknoises.com, a website that was established in 1999 to promote women making electronic music, and to make audio production resources more accessible to women and girls. The Pink Noises book offers glimpses of contemporary electronic music practices through stories of several generations of women. Among the interviewees are septuagenarian sonic experimenters Pauline Oliveros and Eliane Radigue; DJ Rekha, organizer of the long-running Basement Bhangra party in New York City; San Francisco-based artist Pamela Z, who performs with a wearable electronic sensing apparatus in combination with bel canto and experimental vocal techniques; and feminist electro-pop band Le Tigre. The interviews investigate the artists’ personal histories, their creative methods, and how issues of gender inform their work. At stake, on one level, are questions of who has access to opportunities for creative expression, and how women artists are represented in mainstream media. The interviews also show how women use sound to work creatively with structures of time, space, and language; to challenge distinctions of nature and culture using sound and audio technologies; to question norms of technological practice; and to balance their needs for productive solitude with collaboration and community organization. In this broader sense, the interviews open up many connections among electronic music practices and feminist philosophy, media and cultural studies.

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THE POWER OF PINK: CHILDREN’S BEDROOMS SINCE WORLD WAR II Professor Annmarie Adams School of Architecture This illustrated paper explores the dynamic relationship of gender ideals and the design of children’s bedrooms in North America in the postwar (1944-80) and postmodern (1980-) eras. Engaging a material-culture approach, the hypothesis of the paper is that queer theory and medical “progress” have had paradoxical effects on these everyday spaces. Historian Susan Stryker has described transsexuality as “nothing short of an atomic blast to the gender system,” yet Professor Adams’ research shows that gender identity in children’s bedrooms has become increasingly fixed, rather than more ambiguous, in the sixty years since transsexualism materialized as a cultural topic and psychiatric “condition.” The main question driving this research is how changing ideas about so-called “gender identity disorder” are played out in children’s bedrooms. How do young boys living as girls experience domestic space? Are their bedrooms spaces in which private desires are projected or are these rooms sites of resistance to gender ambiguity on the part of parents and doctors? While most of the literature on transgenderism focuses on kids’ preference for clothing (especially underwear) or highly gendered toys, this paper is intended to show how the built environment can inform our current understanding of gender and space in the humanities (e.g. architectural history) and modern day psychiatry. Primary sources for the study include a systematic survey of the popular domestic magazine, House Beautiful, influential consumer catalogues such as Pottery Barn Kids and IKEA, photographs and plans of real and remembered houses, television interviews featuring transgender children, personal interviews with children, parents, transgender and transsexual adults, and child psychiatrists specializing in gender issues.

“THE LION AND POPPIES”, INDIA INK AND ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 2008

“There’s such a rush toward furthering the human cause of perfection, the rest of the world is largely forgotten. Both preservation and progress can happen together and there are ways to make them happen if people really applied themselves.” JAY PADIA is an international student studying Economics and Biochemistry. Inspired by the beauty of wildlife and nature found in his native Kenya, Jay’s work focuses on the world outside large cities.

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MARIA’S ROOM: LIVE-IN DOMESTIC WORKERS’ SPACES AND PERSPECTIVES IN COLOMBIA Julia Tischer, MA Candidate School of Architecture

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How is space really perceived and used by live-in domestic workers in Colombia? Inspired by Rebecca Ginsburg’s work in South Africa, this study illustrates individual and collective spatial experiences from the perspectives of five domestic workers living on 26th Street in Cali, Colombia. It argues that female live-in domestic workers’ use and understanding of their environment is substantially different than prescribed by the architectural floor plan and societal rules. Moreover, it shows how domestic workers rearrange their built environments, ultimately changing spatial meanings and creating networks, which contribute to the neighborhood’s cultural landscape in essential, unexpected ways.

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Designers of contemporary middle-class homes in Colombia agree that a “maid’s room” sells just like a beautiful kitchen or a luxury bathroom. Such rooms are smaller and darker than other spaces, have a private shower and toilet, and are confined to the back of the house in what is known as the “service area”. Most middle-class Colombian architecture today showcases these rooms as status symbols for home buyers, and describes the social and physical limits of domestic workers’ spaces, as generally assumed by designers and homeowners.

The insights of domestic workers’ spatial experiences and perceptions of the rooms and their neighborhood were gathered through in-depth interviews, drawings (mental maps), and photographs taken by the interviewees. The plans of houses, obtained from the original architectural drawings, also tell us about the social and spatial inequalities that domestic workers face in Colombia today. This study illustrates how this particular environment diverges fundamentally from its original intention. Domestic workers not only transcend social boundaries and physical barriers, but their own spatial conceptions are fundamental in the construction of their neighborhood’s cultural landscape.

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WHAT THE EYES CAN TELL US ABOUT LANGUAGE UNDERSTANDING IN ADULT BILINGUALS Professor Debra Titone Department of Psychology Faculty of Science Bilingualism is a fundamental part of Canadian culture and often the norm in other global societies. As of 2001, almost 18% of the Canadian population (and 41% of people in Quebec) reported they were bilingual. Thus, any complete study of human language must account for these important and essential cognitive abilities. One cognitive challenge for bilinguals involves the process of acquiring and representing material for multiple languages and determining when and how to use that knowledge on a flexible basis. One important consequence of this challenge is that bilinguals face greater attention and executive control demands during comprehension than monolinguals. The work undertaken in this research advances the understanding of reading and spoken language comprehension in proficient adult bilinguals, and the language-independent capacities that modulate performance. In particular, Professor Titone and her students are now investigating three interdependent questions regarding bilingual language processing using a highly sensitive measure of comprehension - eye movement recordings. First, how do bilingual adults comprehend visually presented words in semantic and non-semantic contexts while reading sentences? Second, how do bilingual adults comprehend words in context during spoken language, using the Visual World Paradigm? Finally, do individual differences in executive function correlate with critical comprehension measures obtained in these experiments? These experiments, which are funded by a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) Discovery Award and a Canada Research Chair Award, will be extended to the collection of brain-based measures of comprehension (e,g. electrophysiological measures), and to special populations for whom the challenges of bilingual language processing may possibly confer a protective advantage (e.g. schizophrenia).

“I CAN LAUGH IN ANY LANGUAGE”, ACRYLIC ON CANVAS, 2009 “Laughter is universal. It’s a beautiful, therapeutic activity that is both intercultural and cross-linguistic. In this piece, made specifically for the SEDE Calendar, the dreadlocks are coloured with the palettes of different national flags which all stem from the same human scalp. Laughter is a phenomenon that unites us all.” AQUIL VIRANI is a first-year Arts & Science student and an emerging visual artist who experiments with a variety of mediums. aquil.virani@mail.mcgill.ca

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DEAFNESS AND SIGN LANGUAGE IN A YUCATEC MAYA COMMUNITY: COMMUNICATION AND CULTURAL INCLUSION

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J. Paige MacDougall, PhD Candidate Department of Anthropology Faculty of Arts The situation for deaf people in the Yucatec Maya community of Chican presents exceptional circumstances for investigating the relationship between language, social integration and identity. The ratio of deaf to hearing people in Chican is approximately 23 in 600, whereas elsewhere in the world deafness occurs at a rate of 1 in 1000. Intriguingly, the Maya of Chican have developed an elaborate sign language – independent of Mexican Sign Language – which is used by both deaf and hearing members of the community. In this context, where sign language use is widespread among the hearing population, deaf people do not experience the same degree of social alienation they do in other settings. Rather, it appears that deaf people in Chican are active members of community life who participate in economic, educational, recreational and social activities. In cases where sign language is used by both deaf and hearing people, it appears to form part of the wider system of communication rather than operating as a determinant of group membership or exclusion. In Chican, it is striking to observe hearing people use sign language with one another even when deaf people are not present. An ethnographic study of the circumstances in Chican forms the basis of the researcher’s doctoral degree in socio-cultural anthropology.

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COMMUNITY CAPABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT IN NUNAVIK Professor Wendy Thomson Director, School of Social Work Inuit communities in Nunavik experience some of the most serious social problems in Canada. According to a recent Commission des Droits de la Personne et des Droits de la Jeunesse (2007) report, these include one of the highest rates of suicide among young people, a high rate of sexual abuse of children, wide-scale alcohol and drug misuse, a large number of children with serious behavioural problems, higher incidences of teenage pregnancies, and a rate of family violence 10 times the Canadian average. Social programs and services delivered in Nunavik represent a significant public expenditure and an important component of Quebec’s strategy to reduce social exclusion. Despite this investment, the people of Nunavik continue to experience poor health and social outcomes relative to others. The Community Capability and Development in Nunavik study will examine the social policies and programs shaping the experience of ‘social exclusion’ (MESS, Quebec, 2002) amongst Inuit communities in Nunavik - in order to help the Kativik Regional Government prepare for its social policy role after self-governance in 2011. The study will explore the relevance of deficit and asset-based theories of social development to Inuit leaders’ development strategies. It will also examine the existing governance and organization of services, to determine the need for Inuit personnel and local adaptation of policy. Finally, it will assess the fit between needs perceived by Inuit leaders and current social exclusion programs, to provide evidence for future policy development. The research team, will be led by Dr. Wendy Thomson, and will bring together social policy, community capacity building, leadership and research experience drawn from work in the UK, Africa, the US, Canada and Nunavik. The McGill team will work closely with an advisory committee, composed of representatives from the Makivik Corporation, the Kativik Regional Government and the Kativik School Board, which will help to design and plan the project and facilitate connections with the local community.

“SOUTHLANDS”, COLOUR, 2006 STEVEN CAMPBELL is currently pursuing a B.Sc. concentration in molecular genetics while doing freelance photography in his spare time. This photo was shot in the Southlands region of Bermuda which is home to 37 acres of pristine forest, hills, agricultural fields, ocean cliffs and beaches. In 2007, the sale of the Southlands property to a private luxury resort sparked immediate protest by locals and organizations abroad. This prompted the Bermudan government to re-negotiate the sale and preserve the area for future generations. www.stevephoto.ca

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ECONOMIC INEQUALITY PREDICTS BIODIVERSITY LOSS Professor Greg Mikkelson Department of Philosophy, Faculty of Arts School of Environment

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Human activity is causing high rates of biodiversity loss. Yet, surprisingly little is known about the extent to which socioeconomic factors exacerbate or ameliorate our impacts on biological diversity. One such factor, economic inequality, has been shown to affect public health, and has been linked to environmental problems in general. The researchers tested how strongly economic inequality is related to biodiversity loss in particular. They found that among countries, and among US states, the number of species that are threatened or declining increases substantially with the Gini ratio of income inequality. At both levels of analysis, the connection between income inequality and biodiversity loss persists after controlling for biophysical conditions, human population size, and per capita GDP or income. Future research should explore potential mechanisms behind this equality-biodiversity relationship. The results suggest that economic reforms would go hand in hand with, if not serving as a prerequisite for, effective conservation.

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McGill SEDE Equity Research Calendar  

Project Lead: Andrew Seo, Social Equity and Diversity Education Office, McGill University - recruited artists, faculty and graduate studen...

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