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LANDSCAPE AS ... 2013 - 2017 Selected Works of Andrew|Paul|Baklaich


Contents

... TRAVEL SKETCHBOOK

... MITIGATING HABITAT LOSS

PREFACE: Landscape architecture can be many things. It is a profession as broad as the Earth’s horizons themselves, offering a multitude of directions and potentials to explore. It is also a multi-disciplinary profession that demands the refinement of the landscape architect as the master generalist. Designing with the natural environment can require a range of skills as designers communicate with a range of disciplines and clients to achieve more suitable environments for humans and wildlife alike. As such, this collection of work seeks to demonstrate a range of topics within the profession.

... REMEDIATION / REVITALIZATION

... GARDENS

... COMMUNITY / PLAY

... ADAPTING TO NEW TECHNOLOGIES

... LEADERSHIP


01 07 i

19 PLANTED GREENS MOUNTED SLIDES

31

BUDDY BENCH OPEN LAWN WOOD STUMPS

45 Master Plan

53

Thomas Mifflin School Project

OLIN Partnership Ltd.

Jul 15, 2016 0’

30'

60'

120'

ACTIVE PLAY ZONE PROPOSED

57


Place Saint-Michel, Paris Sketchbook | 01


... TRAVEL SKETCHBOOK 15 - 30 min site sketches during my summer study abroad exploring European landscapes.


Sketchbook| 03

Bomarzo, Parco dei Mostri, Viterbo, Italy

Urban Paris Bomarzo, Parco dei Mostri

Urban Paris

Arezzo, Tuscany

Arezzo, Italy


Sketchbook | 04

Villa Gamberia, Florence, Italy

Chateau de Chenonceau

Chateau de Chenonceau, France Chartres, France


Sketchbook | 05

St. Peter’s Square, Vatican City Piazza San Pietro Vatican City, Rome

Boboli Gardens, Florence, Italy

Assisi, Italy


Sketchbook | 06

etsE’d alliV ylatI ,iloviT

Hadrien’s Villa, Tivoli, Italy

Villa d’Este, Tivoli, Italy


... MITIGATING HABITAT LOSS Exploring Designs for a Wildlife Overpass Corridor


Habitat | 08

PRECEDENT STUDY Wildlife experiential studies of Janet Rosenberg Studios’ ARC wildlife crossing competition design for I-25 near Vail, Colorado

Part I


Habitat | 09

Part II


Habitat | 10

Part III


Habitat | 11

Original Designs for a

WILDLIFE OVERPASS

CORRIDOR State Highway 17 / Santa Cruz Mountains


Habitat | 12

ECOLOGICAL TRANSECT

SITE TOPOGRAPHY

SITE CONTEXT 3D Digital Model of Existing Site Topography + Overpass + Visitor Center


Habitat | 13

OVERPASS DESIGN T

he form of the overpass was informed by the pre-existing natural topograghy of the site prior to the highways interference. As the highway construction cuts right through a mountain hillside, the overpass design intends to reinstitute the natural hillside form and slope making it seem as if the highway flows through a tunnel creating an overpass arch above it like the process of water on the naturally formed sand stone arches in Moab, Utah at Arches Natinal Park. The shape and curves of the overpass itself recall these organic, yet cavernous, forms making for a more naturalistic experience in homage of water’s effect on sand stone.


Habitat | 14


Habitat | 15

VISITOR CENTER

ANALYSIS

I

n order to identify an ideal location for the wildlife overpass visitor center, visibility in the form of quality prospect over the entire overpass area was considered fore-most criteria for site selection. To determine the range and quality of potential site visibility, multiple visibility functions were run in ArcGIS from points on the overpass model. These three points centered on both ends and the midpoint of the overpass were given approximate vertical offsets from the digital elevation model according to their corresponding overpass model heights. An additinal offset was created to account for a 5 foot tall viewer from every point in the DEM looking toward the overpass. Locations where all three point visibilities overlap were then accounted for optimal visibility of the overpass. Slopes with a southern aspect were also priority so that the visitor center could have optimal exposure for solar power potential. Optimal slopes for the visitor center were also considered to be between 10 - 20 % with under 5% slopes for the parking lot. Finally, the site selection was to abstain from areas of continous and wholesome vegetative cover and habitat.

OVERPASS VISIBILITY VEGETATION

SLOPE

ASPECT


ECOLOGICAL TRANSECTS

Habitat | 16

SITE TOPOGRAPHY

SITE PLAN

37.23 N, 121.98 W / 06-21 / 11:00 hrs. *70 degree solar altitude angle meets 20 degree angled photovoltaic roof surface for perpendicular, maximum summer solar exposure and energy generation to power the visitor center.


Habitat | 17


Habitat | 18

ENTRY GARDEN T

he visitor center entry garden is designed to be a human scaled experiential distillation of the wildlife overpass corridor itself. As visitors leave the parking lot and head toward the visitor center’s front entry, they get the chance to walk through a condensed sample of the unique, endemic flora and fauna of the region in a naturalistic setting. Statues of the large mammals that the wildlife overpass is primarily designed to suite stand above on arches over the entry walk looking down on the approaching visitors to serve as a reminder of their presence in the natural world around them.


... REMEDIATION / REVITALIZATION Creating A Pedestrian Realm in the Motor City


PRIMARY PED ACCESS POINTS

DETROIT, MI.

Remediation | 20

W Grand Blvd. / Fort St.

ALL ROADS LEAD TO

DOWNTOWN

Rosa Parks Blvd. / Fort St.

W Jefferson St.


Remediation | 21

DETROIT’S SOUTHWEST RIVERFRONT /


LAND USE HISTORY

Remediation | 22


Remediation | 23


Remediation | 24

NATURAL SYSTEMS / INFRASTRUCTURE REFERENCES Combined Sewer Outflow Points

1840 Historical Land Cover

Soil Reference Glacial Landsystems Lacustrine Fine Lacustrine Coarse Ice-Marginal Till

Glacial Landsystems Lacustrine Fine Lacustrine Coarse Ice-Marginal Till


P R O P O S E D

Remediation | 25

• • • •

Mixed-use Market Square / Green Industrial Sculpture Garden Public Marina / Boat launch Riverside Farmers’ Market Plaza

Vacant Greenway

• CSO Wetland Riverwalk(s) / Plaza • Beech / Sugar Maple Urban Forest • Ambassador Bridge Site Parking

Ambassador Bridge / Invasive Lots

Invasive Vacant Lots

• Phyto-remediation Meadow • Recycled Pump-Cart Track • Breakwater Habitat “Dock-Lands”

Derelict Rail Yard

Poor Site Access / Broken Riverwalk

EXISTING


S I T E

• • • •

M O D E L

Rosa Parks Pedestrian Promenade Continuous Riverwalk Underpass Mixed-Use Amusement Park Plaza Minimalist Amphitheatre / Ice Rink / Splash Pad

Vacant Green

• Urban Forest Canopy Walk • CSO Wetland Gardens • Commercial / Residential Strip

Under-Utilized Parking Lots

CONDITIONS

Riverfront Apartments

Remediation | 26

• Riverwalk Overpass • People - Mover Parking Plaza

Riverwalk End

Downtown Area


Remediation | 27

Detroit Southwest Riverfront The primary Goals for the planning and design of Detroit’s southwest riverfront were to; remediate the contamination and pollution built up on site after years of toxic land use, to revitalize the riverfront for pedestrian realm in the “motor city,” and to offer new and interesting program to what would be a continuous public park experience on the Detroit river while existing within the Detroit Future City 50year Framework plan which calls for the development “Green CommercialResidential” zoning. The new riverfront offers a whole continous riverwalk that directly connects the east riverfront and downtown to the west’s more dis-infranchised historical neighborhoods and districts while celebrating the areas industrial history as a new “Eco-Industrial Arts District.”

MASTER PLAN


Remediation | 28

4.5%

ROSA PARKS PEDESTRIAN PROMENADE

+ Mixed-Use Amusement Plaza + Urban Beach + Continuous Riverwalk + Beech Tree Allee Overhang + Multi-Purpose Minimalist Amphitheatre with Seasonal Splash Pad / Ice Rink

Rosa Parks Blvd. Commercial Bosque Plaza

Jefferson St. Round-about

Stepped Seating Grade-Change to Riverwalk Plaza

Riverwalk Underpass

Urban Beach Overhang

Rosa Parks Pedestrian Promenade


Remediation | 29

CSO WETLAND

+ Wetland Habitat Zone + Commercial / Residential Density Development + Continuous Riverwalk + Canopy Walk

TYPOLOGY

Sedimentation / Aeration / Infiltration / Phytoremediation / Habitat

Pipe Forebay Diversion

Pump Tower Plaza

Wetland Cell 1

Wetland Cell 2

Wetland Cell 3

Elevated Riverwalk


Remediation | 30

CSO WETLAND TYPOLOGY

PHYTO MEADOW

+ Recycled Rail Cart Track + Pedestrian Paths to Docklands + Beech / Maple Urban Forest + Continuous Riverwalk

Mixed - Use Development

Jefferson St. Parkway

TYPOLOGY

Phyto - remediation Meadow

Riverwalk Plaza

Naturalized Riverbank

Habitat “Dock-Lands”


... GARDENS Technical Designs for the Colorado State University Morgan Library Courtyard


Gardens | 32

Shadow Analysis Fort Collins, CO. / 40 34’ 22.43” N 105 05’ 03.13” W / ELEV: 5009 ft.

Fall Equinox

Winter Solstice

Spring Equinox

Program Context / Views / Access

Conceptual Plan

Main Library Lobby

Adapting / Locating / Traveling

Primary Secondary

Traveling

Seasonal Doors

Emergency

P R O S P E C T I V E Resting / Contemplating / Working

V I E W S

Reading Room / Study Hall

Hallway

Traveling

Tertiary

V I E W S

Tertiary

Hallway

I N I T I A L

Summer Solstice


Design Development / Physical Model

CSU MORGAN LIBRARY COURTYARD

Gardens | 33


Gardens | 34


Gardens | 35

Layout Plan


Paving Plan

Gardens | 36


Gardens | 37

Grading Plan


Planting Plan

Gardens | 38


The Bosque “The Bosque” is comprised of twelve, in grade tree planters, each consisting of three closely planted single stem Silver Birch trees. Between the rows of silver birch planters are wide corridors occupied by semi-mobile precast tables for ideal lunch and study spots. The Silver Birch bosque has a back drop of Red Maple trees in elevated planters contained within the 2.5’ tall stone fountain wall along the southern wall of the courtyard. As the fall semester progresses and the leaves of these trees turn to vibrant yellows and reds, the central sunken fire place offers a great gathering spot for students to warm themselves by the courtyard’s symbolic fire of knowledge.

D E T A I L S

Gardens | 39


Gardens | 40


The Perch The Perch is one of three areas within the courtyard where the grade changes, in this case to 2.9’ above the main courtyard grade of the Silver Birch bosque. It is only accessible through the stone steps that climb through the stone fountain wall and its pooling zones. In this way, “The Perch” is an area of reclusion. Being able to take a load off under the Paper Birch tree near the lush and graceful Maiden Grasses or to find a seat on the floating wood bench that overhangs the reflecting pool atop the fountain wall for a nice toe dip in the open air, all make for unique seating choices within the courtyard.

D E T A I L S

Gardens | 41


Gardens | 42


The Theater “The Theater” is another area of grade change within the courtyard as it eventually drops to just over 2.5’ below the main courtyard grade of the Birch bosque to another fountain pooling area where one may step through the pool to sit on stone benches tucked between the 5.5’ tall stone fountain pillars. The grade change is made by a 5% ADA stone paver path that runs flush with the stone steps which offer visitors an opportunity to sit among them and take in the echos of the fountain pillar nook under the canopy of the River Birch Tree. “The Theatre” offers a nice area for small groups and couples to gather and socialize.

D E T A I L S

Gardens | 43


Gardens |44


... COMMUNITY / PLAY Professional Work from a 2016 Summer Internship at The Olin Studio, Philadelphia.

/

All Mifflin School works are product of the Olin Studio 2016 Summer Intern Team consisting of Jaqueline Schaffer, Cindy Xu, Andrew Baklaich, and Dawn Tse, with considerations from Chris Landou and Ari Miller.


Play | 46

MIFFLIN SCHOOL CONCEPTUAL DESIGN FOR SCHOOL YARD GREENING AND CAMPUS IMPROVEMENTS AUG 05 2016


Play | 47

Locator / Proximity / Context Design Considerations

WILLIAM PENN CHARTER SCHOOL BLUEBELL PARK MCMICHAEL PARK

RAVENHILL FIELD Car

Staff and Emergency Only

Public Access

Informal Access

Student Access

Major Entrance

CIRCULATION EXISTING

0

30

60

120

MIFFLIN SCHOOL Cultural/Amusement Park/Open Space Residential Low

SEPTA STATION

Residential Medium

10 MINUTE WALK

Residential High Civic

20 MINUTE WALK

Industrial

SCHUYLKILL RIVER

Commercial Consumer Commercial Business

30 MINUTE WALK

Car

Staff and Emergency Only

Public Access

Controlled Student Access

Student Access

Major Entrance

CIRCULATION PROPOSED

SITE CONTEXT

0

200

400

0

30

60

120

800

Mifflin School Existing Plan

SCHOOLYARD ENTRY 8’

L1

AL W

SCHOOLYARD

L8

RS

AI ST

0’

NE

L1

N EE QU

AL W

W

MAIN ENTRANCE

AL W

Water Flow

D

RA

N CO

GY MN

FE

S

CA

FE

ITO

R TA

IUM

Storm Water Inlets

0

30

60

120

0

30

60

120

FLAT SPACE

TE

RIA

T

DS

A HE

Drainage Issue

STORMWATER EXISTING

AS

M

U RI

D AU

BASKETBALL

ET

ET

E TR

RE

ST

E NC

ARBORETUM

TERRACE HEADSTART BACK ENTRANCE FLAT LAWN

MIDVA

LE AV

ENUE

Bioretention Depaving

STORMWATER PROPOSED N

0’

30’

60’

120’


OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

Play | 48

NATURE GATE ACTIVE PLAY

MASTER PLAN

ENTRY GARDEN WATER GARDEN

CONRAD STREET

ASTER PLAN

0

30

60

120

BASKETBALL

NATURE PLAY

ARBORETUM

TERRACE HEADSTART OUTDOOR CLASSROOM

NATURE GATE

INCREASE VISIBILITY

0

IMPROVE CONNECTIVITY

DEFINE THRESHOLDS

30

Design Objectives

MASTER PLAN

60


3

Play | 49 1 Play 9

3 Log Extrusion Play Seating

10

10 1 Relocated Dumpster

4 Proposed Trees x11 5 Climbing Play Structure

2 Privacy Fence with Vines 3 Painted Pavement

2

3

4 Main Building Entrance

7

6 Swing Set (4 swings)

4

7 Buddy Bench

8

5 Schoolyard Entrance 11

8 Lawn 9 Slide Mound (+8’)

6 Steps 12 7 ADA-Friendly Ramp (5% slope)

10 2 Slides

6

8 Planting

7

15’

13 Hydration Station 14 Rubber Play Surfacing

4

2

12 Hydration Station

12 Benches x3

12

3

9

11 School Entrance

11 Chess Tables x4

11

8

10 Flexible Open Space

0’

4

1

9 Planted Terrace & Seating Wall

N

Mound with Climbing

2 Play Mound (+4’)

15 Rain Garden

3 30’

60’

7

9

4

17

16 Water Runnels

15

17 Gym Emergency Exit 18 Hydration Station

4 8 6

10

4

5

17

11 0’

2

18 30’ 12

60’

120’

18

1

0’

30’

60’

ACTIVE PLAY ZONE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

120’

SCHOOLYARD ENTRY

ENTRANCE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

N

0’

15’

30’

60’

0’

N

15’

30’

60’

MAIN SCHOOLYARD

TERRACED GREEN

RAMP ACTIVATED

PLAY

PLANTED GREENS MOUNTED SLIDES

SWING SETS FLEXIBLE OPEN SPACE BUDDY BENCH

RAMP

OPEN LAWN WOOD STUMPS

OLIN Partnership Ltd.

Jul 15, 2016 0’

30'

60'

120'

RAMP

PLAY STRUCTURE

Thomas Mifflin School Project

TERRACED GREEN

Master Plan

9


MOVIE: 200 PEOPLE

MOVIE: 200 PEOPLEPlay | 50

MOVIE: POTLUCK: 200 PEOPLE 500 PEOPLE

Flexible Program Possibilities

OPEN SPACE: 250 PEOPLE FOURSQUARE: 3 200 PEOPLE MOVIE: POTLUCK: 200 PEOPLE 500 PEOPLE OVIE:MOVIE: 200 PEOPLE MOVIE: POTLUCK: 200 PEOPLE 500 PEOPLE

FLEXIBLE PROGRAM STUDY SIDE SCHOOLYARD

OPEN SPACE: 250 PEOPLE N SPACE: 250 PEOPLE

FLEXIBLE PROGRAM STUD BASKETBALL COURT

FOURSQUARE: 3 FOURSQUARE: 3

B-BALL

BLE PROGRAM STUDYSTORM-WATER PROGRAM STUDY

GARDEN

VISIBILE WATER CYCLE

CLIMBING WALL

WATER CHANNEL

OPEN SPACE: 250 PEOPLE

RAIN GARDEN

RAIN BARRELS

FENCE BIOSWALE

THEATER SLOPED LAWN

BENCHES


6

9 Viewing Amphitheater & Steps 10 Concrete Unit Pavers

Play | 51

11 Stick Gym

7

12 Steps to Outdoor Classroom 13 Preserved Vegetation 14 Hydration Station

5

14

15 Existing Fence

8

1 Rain Garden

1

2 Curved Benches

10

4 Sloped Lawn Panel

3 Linear Benches 4

5 Flat Lawn Panel

2

6 Painted Surfacing 3

9

7 Open Fence

15 6

8 ADA Friendly Ramp

11

9 Viewing Amphitheater & Steps 10 Concrete Unit Pavers 11 Stick Gym

7

12 Steps to Outdoor Classroom 13 Preserved Vegetation

120’

“STICK GYM

14 Hydration Station 15 Existing Fence

8

KETBALL COURT PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

0’

10

15’

30’

60’

4

9 11

OLIN Partnership Ltd.

13

Jul 15, 2016

60’

120'

30’

120’

ARBORETUM WALL

BASKETBALL COURT PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

RAMP STICK GYM

SITTING STEPS

NATURE

0’

15’

PLAY

30’

60’

60'

0’

30'

12

0’

5

60’

Thomas Mifflin School Project

13

Master Plan

12

NATURE PLAY STICK GYM OFF-STREET ARBORETUM OPENING

NATURE

GATE

NATURE PLAY

SIGNAGE

NATURE GATE

CLEAN UP STONE PATH


Play | 52 8 9

11 2

8

8

10

6

11

8

3

11 2

8

1 7

2

6

2

9

8

8

5 1

2

4

1

2

8

7

11

8

2

9

5 4

4

2

3

11 2 7

2 Wood Chip Surfacing

2

2

6

2 Linear Classroom Seating

9 Viewing Amphitheater & Steps

3 Steps to Nature Play

10 Concrete Unit Pavers

4 Viewing Platform

11 Preserved Vegetation

6

0’

0’

30’

60’

7 Mifflin Signage

15’

5 Curved Benches

1 Tricycle Path

6 Flexible Play Space

2 Wood Chip Surfacing

7 Log Extrusion Play Seating

3 Rain Garden

8 School Entrance

4 Cafe Seating

9 0’Headstart 30’ Entrance 60’

3

120’5

3 7

Curved Benches

6 Flexible Play Space 7 Log Extrusion Play Seating

5 Restored Stone Walls 6 Nature Gate Steps

4 7

4 Cafe Seating

7

8 Stick Gym

3

3 Rain Garden

5

1 Existing Back Steps

8

1 Tricycle Path

4

30’

8 School Entrance

HEADSTART PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

60’

9 0’Headstart 30’ Entrance 60’

120’

D ENLARGEMENT OUTDOOR CLASSROOM PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

BACK ENTRANCE LAWN

CLASSROOM SEATS

15’

30’

OUTDOOR

CLASSROOM NATURE PLAY

OVERVIEW TERRACE

0’

RESTORE ARBORETUM

0’

15’

30’

60’

120’

60’

“HEADSTART” AREA

HEADSTART PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT

0’

HEAD-START

PLAY

TRICYCLE PATH

RAIN GARDEN

WOOD STUMPS

15’

30’

60’


... ADAPTING TO NEW TECHNOLOGIES Replicating the Piazza San Pietro of Vatican City Today, new technologies are innovated at an unprecedented rate, continually offering designers opportunities to upgrade both the quality and efficiency of their work. This section highlights an INDEPENDENT effort to learn a few of these new, and game-changing technologies as they presented themselves during my academic explorations at Colorado State University.


Technology | 54

Step I

SITE VISIT MEASUREMENTS

S t e p II

HISTORICAL RESEARCH


DIGITAL MODEL

Step III Technology | 55


Technology | 56

Step IV

3D PRINT Printed at 30 scale in 33 seperate parts


... LEADERSHIP An Intensive Work-Study Project


Leadership | 58

land.mark

Magazine

i

Chief Student Editor land.mark is the official annual magazine of the landscape architecture department at CSU. As the chief student editor, I coordinated with all students, affiliates, and faculty in developing the format of the magazine, its graphic layout, and contributed to much of its photography, writing, and editing. The theme of this year’s fifth anniversary issue was “Trajectory.� The cover shown here is the result of a long-exposure photograph of a fireball being continuously spun around from the end of a steel wire, creating a central circle of light that ejects sparks at a variety of tangents, signifying the multitude of various trajectories we are capable of assuming from a single origin.

1

2

news & events

14

faculty news

18

feature articles

52

alumni q&a

74

studio works

84

student awards

88

people

musings...

land mark

CSU land landscape la nd dsc scap cap ape pe architecture arch chit hit itec ecttu ec tture tur ure re mag magazine agaz ag aziin az ine / wi ine winter int nter ter 2 2017 017 01 7

v


Leadership | 59

land.mark Magazine Sample Spreads

editorial team

transition spreads 18 • features

faculty news features • 19

14 • news & events

16 • news & events

Jane Choi Associate Professor

Kelly Curl Associate Professor

The 4th year studio...where all the magic happens!

6 • news & events

news & events • 7

The program’s flagship event of the year once again showcased the best the profession has to offer. This long-running, student-organized event brought some of today’s most prominent practitioners and academics to the CSU campus for one-of-a-kind presentations and workshops.

David Rubin hosts an open portfolio review and professional interview workshop for CSU landscape architecture students.

Lucinda Sanders,

fellow of ASLA and CEO of OLIN, explored the gradient scale of her work with students beginning with her personal endeavors and ending in large-scale urban projects. Sanders queued students in on her home life, describing herself as a lifelong learner in drawing, painting, and meditation, as well as showing off the garden that she designed for her own home. Her attention to detail is also on display in her sensitivity towards hydrologic systems, such as Mill River Park, stating that “you don’t see something until you’ve graded it.”

42 • features

features • 43

founding principal of Land Collective, introduced students to Steven Hawking’s theories, speaking of the here-and-now as the collision point between the past and future. Rubin specializes in inclusive landscapes and advocates for amenities such as electrical access and comfortable benches for the disadvantaged. He spoke of his recent planning efforts in Baltimore’s Bromo Arts & Entertainment District, where vacant land is abundant and problematic.

Thomas Woltz,

FASLA, is principal of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architecture, working out of both New York and Virginia. He highlighted projects rooted in ecological restoration, such as Houston Memorial Park and Powell Avenue Steam Plant Plaza, as well as more manicured gardens, such as the Carnegie Hill House in New York City. Woltz shared entertaining photos of workers hanging off a cliff in order to install a fence that would keep invasive rats off a property in New Zealand.

Laura Solano,

principal of Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, delved into the theme of “razing limitations in a world of rising expectations.” Her work with MVVA is largely based on pleasure—meandering riverfronts, public parks for children, and urban garden retreats—while also tackling complex limitations such as degraded infrastructure and hyper-urbanized natural systems. Solano showed students images of garden hoses mimicking the paths of the future Monk’s Garden, and the playful light xtures and play features of Maggie Daley Park. “Don’t ever lose the joy component” is the statement she closed with.

Michelle Muldrow had always drawn landscapes, but they did not resonate for her on a conceptual level until after college. Muldrow realized that drawing and painting people did not hold her interest, but landscapes continually invited her to think and expand. She feels that she has not even come close to exhausting her interest in landscape. Every series she creates reflects a different aspect of landscape and place. Muldrow considers herself a quintessentially American landscape painter, as her work is a mirror on American experiences.

“I could go on and on – but truly, to psychoanalyze it, I am sure it comes down to the military kid rootlessness the loss of home, the search for home, the trying to figure out place, culture, people – all of it channels through landscape for me.”

TEXT T and n GRAPHIC CS by Gre reg Howe ‘19 PHOT PH OTOS OS by Grreg How owee an and Edward Monczynski

David Rubin,

Visitors admire ‘Off the Rails’ design competition proposals.

The Nation’s Landscapes

2016

LA DAYS

Professor Choi was also instrumental in the city’s first-ever urban design competition. Using her past experience on successful large multi-disciplinary teams for international design competitions, and having served on professional juries, she assisted in writing and editing the competition brief, facilitated the design review process, and helped to organize the public event at which the winners were announced to the public.

“The Switchyard” (competition winner)

features • 21

20 • features

The Student Chapter ASLA from University of Colorado Denver visited Fort Collins to dine with the CSU Student Chapter ASLA for dinner with Jerry Van Eyck.

EVENTS

Associate Professor Jane Choi continues to serve as a consultant to professionals and municipalities regarding best practices for sustainable urban design strategies and advocating for leading-edge ideas in the design of the public realm. Much of this work is accomplished through her involvement with the Urban Lab, an organization that serves to engage, educate and benefit the Fort Collins community through its numerous initiatives and events. Professor Choi was instrumental in several significant initiatives implemented last year, including the first demonstration ‘living wall,’ which started as a service-learning design project for students in her Irrigation and Water Conservation course. This vegetated wall, the first of its kind as a research and educational amenity, was fully funded and installed last spring at the new Fort Collins Utilities building.

In 2016, Kelly Curl was promoted to Associate Professor and earned tenure. Curl recently had a chapter published in Representing Landscapes: Hybrid, edited by Nadia Amoroso. This book series represents various techniques for introducing hybrid drawings within the design process. Several student hybrid drawings were selected and were part of the publication. Selected landscape architecture students included Jie Li, Taylor Hickey, and alumni Klara Rossouw, April Sorenson, and Christian Drury.

The following three articles were conceived and written by CSU students and address the trajectories of various people, places, and events.

Through the Eyes of Michelle Muldrow

Jerry van Eyck,

founder of Melk! Studios, entertained the audience with a spoof video of a man milking an elk (melk, get it?) before introducing students to his design rm. van Eyck showcased the context around his signature vertically-scaled elements, highlighting his recent project. “The Park,” along Las Vegas Boulevard, remains the only signicant landscape architectural work on the strip. He describes the lavishly-customized plaza landscape as having “the botanic splendor of the desert,” deeming it “an ecological crime to irrigate the desert.”

Muldrow’s grandfather cultivated her love of art when she was a young child by taking her on cherished trips to the Art Institute of Chicago. A child of the armed forces, Muldrow continually moved to different Air Force bases throughout America as she was growing up, the ever-changing landscape scenes molding the mind of a now nationally-recognized painter who finally settled in Portland, Oregon. “I was a very sad child that experienced trauma at a young age and my way of coping was to try to appear normal. I did normal things – made friends wherever I moved, assimilated – but when asked by my second-grade teacher to bring in my favorite song based on a poem, I brought in “Richard Cory” by Simon and Garfunkel. I still think that is pretty hysterical.” That said, music and art were Muldrow’s places of greatest comfort as a child. She lived in a private world of creating music, drawing scenes, writing poems, and making illustrated books. Her comforting solitude was an unlimited place for creation. Muldrow realized at an early age that her expression through art, though a solo undertaking, impacted others around her. She noted that on a practical level, when she was the new kid at school and a talented artist, it inspired other students to be more curious about their surroundings and open in their own expression.

By Anna Chevalier ‘20 bsla

features • 35

34 • features

SOUND S C A P E S THE

8 • news & events

news & events • 9

into

2016

EVENTS

FALL LA

Landscape architects and designers from around Colorado come to CSU to speak to students about their rm’s work, specialities, and experiences, as well as news from the profession. Many guest speakers are former alumni of the CSU LA program and come to network with current students about career opportunities.

Mark Johnson

Wendi Birchler

Josh Brooks

Stacey Weaks

Civitas co-founder, Mark Johnson, discussed some profound projects that he has spearheaded in recent years that he felt embraced his way of thinking about our profession and its impact on society. His public housing project in Kabul, Afghanistan helped residents to inhabit affordable and suitable housing. Johnson also talked about his work with Bette Midler on the New York Restoration Project - The Haven Project. NYRP works to “improve the health of people through green measures.”

Norris Design Principal, Wendi Birchler, another CSU graduate, talked to students about the importance of a well-designed, consistent portfolio. She handles a lot of the interviewing for her rm, and gave students valuable insights into what she personally looks for when reviewing portfolios. Her talk was very helpful in addressing many of the mistakes she encounters with student portfolios. Birchler also made it a point to tell students to take every opportunity to improve themselves and their skills.

Design Workshop Associate, Josh Brooks, spoke to students about the transition from graduation to entering the workforce. He discussed the importance of taking writing classes while in school, because writing is a huge part of professional life that most schools don’t adequately prepare you for. Brooks also talked about the varying types of projects you may encounter once you’re working at a rm. Projects that he presented addressed issues of storm water management, intelligent infrastructure and green infrastructure.

Norris Design Principal, Stacey Weaks, a CSU graduate, discussed with students several projects he is currently working on, and some of the challenges that arise from them. He also talked about how budgeting and design don’t always work together, and how it is best not to get too attached to any one idea because it may need to be altered or eliminated altogether. Some projects that he presented included sites located in Colorado and Arizona.

news & events • 11

10 • news & events

EVENTS

FIRM VISITS

Members of the Student Chapter ASLA (SCASLA) carpool to Denver to visit landscape architecture ofces for the afternoon to inquire about the nature of their work and to get a feel for their ofce culture.

CIVITAS was the rst rm visit of the day. Upon

entering the ofce, one is greeted with motorcycles, colorful art, and modern architecture. The ofce atmosphere encourages fun, creativity, and ingenuity. Sarah Maas, a landscape designer at Civitas, presented us with a slideshow of her past and present projects at the rm.

One of many local artist-commissioned pieces strewn about the office.

Students take it all in while touring the office. SO MUCH TO SEE!

Students admire award-winning projectt boards from CIVITAS.

Landscape designer, Sarah Maas, shows students around.

Local artists paint murals at one of the office entrances.

WENK

Associates recently moved to a new ofce building that was formerly a church. It offered lofty architecture to serve as a cozy, intimate space for designers. Associate J.C. Culwell gave us a tour of one of their current redevelopment projects, known as Taxi. The area, named for a former taxi dispatch site, is surrounded by industrial context. Wenk focuses on recycling materials that are found nearby in new and clever ways to create wetland habitats and better stormwater management. They focused on creating open parking and streets where cars and pedestrians can move freely about in a slow and respectful manner. The Taxi site was a very unique development for students to see and experience.

WENK Associate J.C. Culwell shows students the masterplan for the Taxii Campus before their tour.

Native plants in the bioswales manage all stormwater at Taxi.

Curbless roads feature painted linework to direct visitors to various entrances around the complex.

DESIGN WORKSHOP offered a calm, structured atmosphere that encouraged detailoriented design. Upon entering the ofce, there is a large collaboration table and wall for everyone to share current projects. Associate and CSU alumna, Anna Cawrse, gave a presentation about the rm and some of her current projects in the area. Students check out Design g Workshop’s p working g project p j pin-up p p wall.

news + events

OF

DAN POUND By Jessica Ricalde ‘18 & Charlie Smith ‘17

...a Q+A

Students admiring the firm’s in-progress work.

feature articles


Leadership | 60

alumni Q+A

studio works 76 • studio works

studio works • 77

alumni news • 53

52 • alumni news

APRIL SORENSON bsla ‘16

q&a

CONVERGENT BOUNDARY: CULTIVATING A COLLECTIVE IDENTITY ALONG THE ELBOW RIVER

HOUSTON’S HEART: RESUSCITATING THE BUFFALO BAYOU

The project site is located at the convergence of many geologic, cultural, and economic transects. Geographically, the site is located along the confluence of the Bow and Elbow Rivers in Calgary, Alberta. This site poses a unique opportunity to “converge” all of these geologic, cultural and economic qualities. The intent of the project is to generate a cohesive design that unites all of these qualities in order to enrich the city’s collective identity. There is a significant amount of neglected land surrounding Stampede Park, providing the opportunity for a unique space to emerge. This space has the potential to become the common thread that connects all of the diverse elements of the site together. The design will include: a flood mitigation channel, a system of bike and pedestrian pathways, increased public green space, new residential living, retail, nightlife, and an increased riparian buffer for the Elbow River.

Winding through the center of Houston, Texas, the Buffalo Bayou connects one of the most ethnically and ecologically diverse regions in the country. Since the founding of the city in 1836, the “Mother Bayou” has played an important role in shaping the identity of Houston. While its dynamic nature has been preserved, ecologically sensitive areas around its banks have slowly disappeared. By re-imagining a vacant stretch of land near downtown, the Buffalo Bayou will be at the heart of a site that combines social, environmental and economic factors to create a truly diverse and unique experience. Houston’s Heart restores ecological areas, while providing space for economic development and community events. This natural oasis will be a sanctuary for local animals and give inner-city residents the chance to experience and enjoy the beauty of nature.

Houston, TX. USA

AUSTIN M. LUCERO bsla ‘16

Calgary, AB. Canada

studio works • 81

80 • studio works

MAY LIU bsla ‘16

Alumni News and Interviews

THE [GREEN] STITCH: STITCHING BACK THE WILLAMETTE RIVER TO SOUTH PORTLAND

(RE) CREATING SYSTEMS: RECLAIMING HUNTER’S POINT

The South Waterfront is the last major underdeveloped area within Portland’s Central City. The area is bounded by the Willamette River, which topped the list of waterways by number of unique toxic chemicals. The existing riverbank is an amalgamation of byproducts from the concrete, maritime and other manufacturing industries that located in the district for most of the last century. The former and current manufacturing and industrial uses have left behind significant contaminants, contributing to an official brownfield designation for the district. However, South Waterfront is poised to play a critical role in the city’s newly-christened “Science and Technology Quarter.” With that in mind, the proposed South Waterfront Master Plan will reinforce the district’s relationship to the riverfront, providing a restored natural habitat for wildlife and developing a multi-functional riverfront greenway to increase social human interaction along the riverfront.

Hunter’s Point, a former US Navy Shipyard located just south of San Francisco, ceased activity in 1994 and is now abandoned. After World War II, the shipyard expanded and turned into one of the major nuclear research laboratories on the west coast. This ultimately led to large amounts of radioactive land contamination and was a main reason of why the doors were finally closed. A mixture of coal- and oil-fired power generators impacted the land greatly and destroyed ecological habitats in the surrounding area. This area is a true eyesore, acting as a barrier, closing off surrounding neighborhoods from access to the shore line. Hunter’s Point Shipyard offers an abundance of opportunity to not only rehabilitate the existing site, but also to improve surrounding neighborhoods. A large decontamination and remediation project would be most beneficial to the land, as it would restore health to the area for both wildlife and people. The proposed master plan includes a heavily vegetated waterfront that is focused on bioremediating the surrounding water and lands. The parkway highlight would be a place of human invitation, encouraging people to walk and explore the former Navy base and learn its history.

San Fransisco, CA. USA

Portland, OR. USA

NICK RAEL bsla ‘16

by Sydnie Stahler ‘18 bsla & Zhiyao Shu ‘19 bsla

Our alumni have traveled across the wide world making names for themselves within many a great variety of niches the profession of landscape architecture has to offer, all the while continuously pushing the boundaries of the profession. Meet three of our notable alumni and see where their journeys as design professionals have taken them since leaving the program at CSU.

74 • studio works

studio works • 75

The following pages reflect the diverse body of work from some of the top students in the CSU BSLA and MLA programs from Spring 2016.

Danial Tal’s Placemaker Render Civic Commons, Cheyenne, WY.

54 • alumni news

alumni news • 55

q&a

alumni news • 67

66 • alumni news

A

q&a with

with

TOP: Tullymore Golf Club, Stanwood, Michigan. Named the “Best New Public Upscale Golf Course” of 2002. LEFT: Green Topograghy Construction Document BELOW: The Creek Club at Reynolds Plantation Greensboro, Georgia BOTTOM: Harmony Golf Club, Timnath, Colorado

From a young age, Jim Engh had a passion for creation. He originally wanted to be an architect working in the world of buildings. In high school and college, Jim Engh played golf competitively. This background not only influenced his eagerness to design golf courses but also gave him a welldeveloped understanding of the game, a base of knowledge that is expressed in the courses he creates. He pursued an education in architecture prior to discovering landscape architecture. During a summer position as a draftsman at an engineering firm, he had the opportunity to consult with a highly-regarded golf course designer, Dick Phelps. This interaction influenced and inspired him to follow a new path. He, like so many in this field, realized that landscape architecture would fulfill his passion, in this case a passion for golf course design.

JIM ENGH ‘85, RLA

Placemaker Render - San Fransisco, CA

DANIEL TAL ‘98, RLA is a licensed landscape architect who freelances on a range of projects and consults on technology education and software development. He consults on SketchUp-related tools, conducts workshops and seminars on 3D modeling, and beta tests future software releases to assure that they meet the needs of professionals. http://danieltal.com/

In a design profession called upon to create places in the landscape, 3D modeling is an essential piece of the process. When it comes to experts in 3D modeling of the environment, alumni Daniel Tal is the man to know. Daniel Tal has built an incredible career in landscape architecture within the ever-expanding niche of 3D digital modeling. Tal graduated from Colorado State University in 1998 with a Bachelor of Landscape Architecture. With extensive experience that allowed him to build his career around 3D modeling, a major component of Tal’s work is education. In 2013 he published Rendering in SketchUp and in 2016 he published SketchUp for Site Design. His books, along with blogs and a new video series, are all devoted to teaching anyone in the profession the art of 3D modeling and rendering. He strives to make the content accessible for everyone, especially students and emerging professionals. Along with his educational services, Daniel Tal is the owner of Ambit3D, a 3D modeling, visualization, and BIM (Building Information Modeling) studio for Stanley Consultants, and also serves as the tech-editor for Landscape Architecture Magazine. Most recently, he has developed a

new modeling platform called Placemaker. Before switching to the landscape architecture program at CSU, Tal was studying to be an architect. His love of the outdoors and environment lit a spark that inspired him to change course. The Landscape Architecture Program was a struggle for him, but one that Tal learned to love. He was taught to unlearn what he thought he knew in order to embrace the creative process. Tal expressed an appreciation for how the program at CSU taught him to problem solve, to let go of the need for deadlines, and to find satisfaction in the process that leads to the end result. Daniel’s educational experience at CSU was not a consecutive four-year stretch, however. After three years he was struggling to grasp the concepts, so he took a year to regroup and rebuild, a time he is thankful for because it allowed him to return refreshed and ready to do some work. However, he does wish that

after he returned from taking a year off, he would have spent some more time on expanding his understanding of the field’s scope. He would have liked to research more firms, explore more internships, and read more about landscape theory. Before Daniel found his way to 3D modeling, he had a love of hand drawing. Perspectives and hand renderings came before the 3d modeling, but with an introduction to a limited graphic design program, a door was opened in the design process. The door that opened led in to the world of 2D drafting and 3D modeling. This new interest allowed Tal to expand his scope and become fully immersed in the design process. Daniel enjoys the problems of each new design, as each requires new strategies, has new issues to address, and ultimately, new solutions. The projects are stimulating in the sense that they require new thinking. Daniel Tal’s work sets him apart from others because he is constantly

degree in Landscape Architecture can lead to a career with limitless possibilities and specializations, as evidenced by the career of distinguished alumnus Jim Engh, who specializes in golf course design. After graduating with a Bachelors of Science in Landscape Architecture and a concentration in Turfgrass Science from Colorado State University in 1985, Engh received a certification in project management from the University of Wisconsin. Jim went on to gain years of experience, working with several well-established golf course designers, including Dick Nugent, Ken Dye, and Joe Finger. While working with Cotton Pennick, Jim became the Director of Golf Course Design for International Management Group Developments at their London headquarters. In 1991, he opened his own firm, James J. Engh Golf Design, a firm which has built an astounding reputation that has earned him Golf Digest’s Best New Course Award four times since 1997.

is Founder and Chairman of Jim Engh Design. Throughout the years, Jim has ascended to legendary status as a golf course designer, accruing a plethora of prestigious awards with his partner Mitch Scarborough within the world of golf course design and construction. Although he has designed golf courses in a variety of countries around the world and received an unprecedented number of unique awards, Jim will tell you the most rewarding aspect of his 33 year career is the friendships he has made along the way.

Engh recalls his time at CSU as being filled with endless hours in the studio and a tunnel-vision determination to make it to graduation. He looks back with fondness on the education he received and the classmates to which he grew quite close.

“Better Philly” project montage by MLA students Rita Manna, Klara Rossouw, and Sam Cranshaw

https://www.enghgolf.com/

musings • 89

88 • musings

Where are we headed? In the midst of our everchanging economic, environmental, and political climates in the United States, I begin to wonder about the future of landscape architecture. Through the years of my college education, I have overheard peers and professors make statements such as, “Nature no longer exists, because every inch of the Earth has been affected by humans.” I haven’t decided if I agree with this statement, but it is certain that our natural systems have been affected by human action (and inaction). The priorities and moral direction of landscape architecture has always been reactive to social, environmental, and political systems, which makes it a perpetually evolving profession. Early English landscape architecture was rooted in the principle of enhancing the natural, “wild” landscape.

Professor Joe McGrane discusses the important elements to note during a site visit for a project

site visits

Italian and French landscape architecture consisted of structured plantings that symbolized man’s ability to manipulate the natural world. Current landscape architecture in the United States attempts to weave nature back into an already fragmented landscape. The Industrial Revolution and urbanization broke apart our natural environment, and we have witnessed the consequences in recent decades. Thankfully, awareness about the environmental impacts of suburban sprawl has increased exponentially since the 1970’s and 1980’s. People are starting to see landscape architecture as a necessity to improve quality of life, rather than an aesthetic detail. This plays an important role in the evolution of the industry. The question remains: Where do we go from here?

Student’s Landform Ideation Studies

personal topography studies

musings...

My prediction is that landscape architects will begin to direct their focus to addressing social issues. Gone are the days when we are hired for high-end private projects. The landscape is shifting back to the public. Mindfully-designed landscapes have the potential to be powerful tools to make positive social impacts. This concept is already being implemented in a few different ways, such as urban planning that encourages diverse communities and increasing the amount of public parkland and streetscape planting in low-income neighborhoods. If landscape architects put their creative minds together, we will discover new and innovative ways to make positive social changes through designed outdoor spaces. Writing & Watercolors by Kyra Czerwinski, BSLA ‘17


Resume

ANDREW PAUL BAKLAICH Andrew.Baklaich@gmail.com (720) 254 - 8954

BIO : As an individual naturally drawn to landscape architecture as a canvas to apply my many diverse interests and skill-sets, I hope most to make my mark within the public realm through urban design, and in particular, its interaction with ecologically sensitive areas. As the world shrinks, the need to establish harmonious environments for its’ diverse stakeholders becomes imperative. Landscapes are for people, and as such should be great manifestations of democracy that seek to obtain a social, economic, and ecological equity and sustainability for the benefit of generations to come, whilst celebrating the gift of the present of course! ... Something you can find me doing during an explorative sketchwalk in a new city, down at the park on the basketball court, at a poker table, or having great discussions over a cold one.


R E S U M E

EDUCATION 2013 - 2017

Colorado State University

2008 - 2013

Metropolitan State University of Denver

PROFICIENCIES

EXPERIENCE

Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture, Global Environmental Sustainability Interdisciplinary Minor

Business, Philosophy, Psychology & Entrepreneurial Creative Problem Solving courses completed

• • • • • •

AutoCAD / AutoCAD 3D ArcGIS Rhino Sketch-Up 3D Printing Digital Photography

• • • • •

Photoshop Illustrator InDesign Microsoft Office Hand Sketch / Render / Drafting Techniques

2016 - 2017

• Chief Student Editor, land.mark magazine (Work Study)

Summer 2016

• Intern, The OLIN Studio, Philadelphia

2015 - 2016

2014 - 2015

AWARDS 2017 2015 - 2016

Consulted, Developed, and Designed all written and graphic content for the annual Landscape Architecture Department publication at CSU

Collaborated, Designed, and Presented a variety of project types at different scales

Planned, Organized, and Managed all financial, graphic, and outreach agendas, events, and activites for students of the landscape architecture department at CSU

• President, Student Chapter ASLA at CSU

• Treasurer, Student Chapter ASLA

Procured and Managed all event and activity funding including the “FALL INTO LA” & “LA Days 2015” annual lecture series

• ASLA Student Honor Award

at Colorado State University • Recipient of the “Kirvin Knox”and “Ag-Day” from Colorado State University

Scholarships


ANDREW PAUL BAKLAICH Undergraduate Portfolio

Portfolio of Andrew Paul Baklaich Landscape Architecture Works  

A Collection of Professional and Academic Works from Four Years at Colorado State University

Portfolio of Andrew Paul Baklaich Landscape Architecture Works  

A Collection of Professional and Academic Works from Four Years at Colorado State University

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