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Selected Works Andrew Mateja


ARCHITECTURE HELPS PEOPLE AND SOCIETY THRIVE. CIRCULATION IS EFFICIENT. DESIGN MUST PLEASE ITS INHABITANTS. IT MUST BORROW FROM ITS CONTEXTS AND MAXIMIZE ITS PRESENCE. ARCHITECTURE IS THE POTENTIAL OF OUR IMAGINATION AND THE REALITY OF THE LIVING WORLD.

PERSONAL STATEMENT


Andrew Mateja andrewjmateja@gmail.com (740) 297 - 0622 2902 South Lowe Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60616


SELECTED WORKS A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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VERB CITIES

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NEW ANIMAL // OLD SKIN

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THE SLOW LINE

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CINCINNATI ARTS CENTER

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ELASTIC LOUNGE

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ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE

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IMI MASONRY WALL COMPETITION

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TIL COFFEE SHOP ENTRANCE

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JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL STUDY

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OTHER MEDIA

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So, we need a house...

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We'd love to see the lake, and our car.

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A HOUSE WITH A VIEW Instructors: Penelope Dean, Grant Gibson Fall Semester 2015 Graduate Studio

This is a house for a client whose passions are the lake and their car. Through a configured driveway placed in the inside of the house and a strategic placement of furniture and a mirror wall, they can see both of them at the same time. The car is superimposed into the lake as it passes through the garage across from the mirror covered wall. With the open driveway, they can always look at their electric car from within the house. Singular furniture pieces are extruded to become built-ins. The mirror box, which allows one superimpose themselves into the lake, becomes overscaled and hollow, tucking the private bed spaces behind a one-way mirror. They can see outwards down on the interior of the house and out to lake, and the visitors can only see themselves.

A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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ROOF

STRUCTURE

FURNITURE

ENVELOPE

BUILT-INS

DRIVEWAY CAR

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FLOOR


Entry Elevation

A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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West Elevation

A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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10


A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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A HOUSE WITH A VIEW

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VERB CITIES Instructor: Lisa Tilder Contributors: Nathan Lephart, Dustin Page, David Delendeck Spring Semester 2013 (Honors Studio) The project began with an interest in the development of cities - researching theoretical and real cities, past and present, and creating “postcards” that identified the key characteristics that typified the cities. We used this information to build a book where we presented ideas on how cities have progressed in regards to ideas like grid expansion, security, reconstruction and revitalization. From this we began to predict future directions of cities. We createed moments that generalized what we found unique in each region. These instances, placed within an ambiguous context, allowed us to form more complex cities from simple ideas. The final synthesis was created. We produced unique “Verb Cities”. All instances are represented as actions, which allowed for a dynamic cityscape. The more dynamic actions in each combination were implemented to a higher degree than the others. These combination Verb Cities are a merged synthesis and growth of the instances. Narratives were developed, describing the growth of each city from a tabula rasa. The final form of these combination cities show our idea of what a future city could look like. Animations present a field of constant motion and growth, some actions overtake others, some get buried by new actions. The playing field is never level.

VERB CITIES

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VERB Building Block Samples

poldering I mounting I grouping I courting I touring I Sk Su Md churching I amusing I suspending I centering I lurbinating I stealing I preserving I avoiding I abandonging I stripping I highwaying I secluding I capping I modulating I ingrowing I isolating I enlarging I deliniating I sinksuspending sinking I stepping I ingmodulating I rebuilding I edging I opening I leaving capitalizing I buffering I terrifying Icritiquing I scattering I dividing I negating I pavilionizing I provoking I conditionZo ingNeI raising I protecting IRdsprawling I undercutting I camouflaging I piering I radiating I voisoning I networking I corrupting I oppressing I enclosing I burrowing I compressing I gridding I zoning I restricting I terrorizing I slumming I bunking I distrusting I densifying I coagulating I negating zoning radiating rivering I reconstructing I regrounding I layering I reusing repetition of modules to create forms

subtractive building into a landscape

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a city which is hung from a frame and elevated from ground level.

objects growing outward from center

located below the surrounding ground plane

assigning specific areas of the city for specific purposes


VERB City Combination #18 +

+

+

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+

Mt Pu Ch Sk Cg Ce http://vimeo.com/107551897

VERB CITIES

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City Combination 18 after 3 iterations of growth

City Combination 8 after 5 iterations of growth

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City 18: Sinking

I’m drowning!!!

City 8: Suspending

Wouldn’t these be fantastic to hang from?

VERB CITIES

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NEW ANIMAL // OLD SKIN Instructor: Kay Bea Jones, Beatrice Bruscolli Contributors: Drew Grandjean, Elise Bluell

Nominee for MAXXI Roma RE-Cycle/Publi-CITY12 Competition Curator: Pippo Ciorra Spring Quarter in Rome, Italy 2012 The idea of a new animal occupying an old skin is understood to involve a formally divergant typology which both cooperates and contrasts with L. Cosenza’s existing modernist forms. Leaving the walls of the old gallery in place, the new gallery and artist’s residence create more dynamic spaces, in both their interiors, and in the exterior space between the new walls and the old. A second operation, is the artist’s intervention in the art gallery itself. The arms of the “new animal” reach into this space, interrupting the clean lines of the bar. This intervention acts to both separate the program of the exhibition space (allowing for a higher range of exhibition type), and to force interaction between the artists and the museum’s visitors. The arms themselves house studio and workshop space that is used by the artists, but open to the gallery as well.

NEW ANIMAL // OLD SKIN

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Artist Residence and Workshop

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Artist Residences Workshops

Gallery Spaces

Auditorium LS

O

GC

IN SIT

AL

AG

Z EN

NS

AL YW R E L

E

RT

I

EX

RIA

LLE

GA

’A ED

AL

ION

Z NA

NA

ER

D MO

NEW ANIMAL // OLD SKIN

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activity in the heart of campus 26


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There is a High Line and a Low LIne but now there is...

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Slow

Line THE SLOW LINE Instructor: Samuel Rosenthal Fall Semester 2012 The Slow Line injects a core of activity into the Otenami Campus via an undulating road to liven and enrich the experience of the Aalto University Campus and to provide students and the general public with on-campus amenities, including movies, live performances, dining, outdoor recreation and residencies. Spaces can be used across different seasons. The Arts Center provides a common space for multiple majors with direct connection to the Slow Line Infrastructure. The building acts as a circulation controller and disperser, with more used spaces centered near the core and expanding outward. Circulation drives interaction. What’s the rush? You’re on the Slow Line!

Injected Core Line of Activity

Manipulated to Slow Traffic

Restaurant Market Residence Theater Connect to Infrastructure

Vehicular

Activities

Subway

THE SLOW LINE

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1

1

1

14

14

14

Slow Line

Bike Line

Lake Line

“...it’s not just the Slow Line. It’s the Bike Line, it’s the Lake Line, it’s the Forest Line, it’s the Grass Line and Garden Line.” 1

Forest Line

Grass Line

Garden Line 1

1

14 14

30

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Dining Scho o and A l of Arts rchit ectu re

VTT Addition

ing

iv t L

den

Stu

Detail Road Detail

M Restaurant

The Grass Line The Forest Line

Commercial

The Garden Line

THE SLOW LINE

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Program is densely packed along a compressed path

Program becomes consolidated and introspective

2 1 7 6 3 3

4 5 1. Meeting / Study Spaces 2. Library 3. Galleries 4. Motion Picture Zone 5. Theater 6. Cafe 7. Staff Ramp Corridor

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Road Typologies Introduced


Typical Flow Weekday

Typical Flow Weekend

Staff // Student Flow

“...the building too, follows the road typologies. The on-ramp is the connector of staff and student, the cul-de-sac is the community of design rooms. It’s all about circulation.” 8 8

9

14

10 9

14

10

15

7 13

11

8. Workshop 11 9. Project 10. Studio 8. Workshop 11.Stores 8. Workshop 9. Project 12. Staff Spaces 9. Project 10. Studio Studio 13. 10. Studio 11.Stores 14. Labs 12. 11.Stores Staff Spaces 13. 12. Studio Staff Spaces 14. 13. Labs Studio

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15

7

12 13

16

17

14. Labs 2 Floor

15. Meeting 17 16. Project 17. Stores 15.Meeting Meeting 18. Materials 15. 16. Stores Project 19. 16. Project 17. Studio Stores 20. 17. 18.Stores Materials 21. Classroom 18. Materials 19. Stores II 22. Theater 20.Stores Studio 19. 23. Lounge 21. Classroom 20. Studio 22. Theater II 21. Classroom 23. Lounge

Floor 2

Floor 3

1:500

1:500

12 5 5

1 18

21

18

1921

1 20

23 23

19 20

22 22

Floor 3

22. Theater II 1:500 23. Lounge

1:500

THE SLOW LINE

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The new landscape reacts to the seasons. Rowing in the summer and ice skating in the winter. Take a walk

School of Arts

st Line

re The Fo

The Stroll Line

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on the Stroll line or enter the calming Forest Line. In the Spring, smell the flowers on the Garden Line.

School of Arts

The Slow Line

The Bike Line

The Garden Line

THE SLOW LINE

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CINCINNATI ARTS CENTER Instructor: Brandon Clifford Winter Quarter 2012 The Arts Center embeds itself around other buildings in attempt to tease visitors and pedestrians. It is a burlesque dancer. From the street you see glimmering lights, and silhouette of people moving around. It draws you closer. Your curiosity gets the better of you.

? ?

?

?

?

?

?

?

Once inside, you discover the true nature of the building. Circulation becomes the centerpiece of the Arts Center. Floor plates are suspended across the voids, and an opening above allows ? the? light to shine in. Circulation is key. Openings in the perimeter allow choreographed views of the city. Each catwalk connects ? ? specific program to the main circulation. During regular usage, viewers witness different intensities and appearance of circulators from each catwalk.

Extracted Voids Around Misleading Buildings

CINCINNATI ARTS CENTER

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sally and the city

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an architectural narrative (video stills)


https://vimeo.com/andrewmateja/sally

CINCINNATI ARTS CENTER

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Floor 1

Floor 2

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Floor 3

Floor 4

CINCINNATTI ARTS CENTER

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North Elevation

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?

?


CINCINNATTI ARTS CENTER

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ient walls

Site Plan

main frames

Ceiling Connection Handrail Connection Ground Connection

Chair

ELASTIC LOUNGE INSTALLATION Hammock 1

Hammock 2

Instructor: Sandhya Kochar Contributors: Berta O’Callaghan, Dyani Robarge, Matt Quijada, Eric Junker 5 Go Zone 1 no-go zone

Spring Quarter 2011

Hammock 2

The Elastic Hammock Lounge 1is an interactive installation piece made from Theraband, an elastic material for rehabilitation patients. The material has been cut, braided, woven and knotted to create different zones of occupiable space as defined by the color of the material. The gray and most resistant Theraband denotes interactive sitting spaces while the black 4 Go zones 2 no-go zones colored bands denote non-occupiable space.Zones utilizing both colors denote transition zones. The installation is assembled from two braids systems the mainframes: 5-way braids, and the skin: 3-way braids. The main frames attach to the external structure and the interior ones are mounted to the main frames. The three occupiable spaces will be in a state of 1 Hammock Hammock 2 flux when one is in use, thus creating combinations of denied and allowed occupations.

3 Go zones 3 No-go zones

ELASTIC LOUNGE

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1. Silver Weave Sitting

Occupiable Non -Occupiable

Occupiable

2. Black Weave Non Performative Sitting

3. Silver Weave Transition Piece

Non - Occupiable Hammock 1 Hammock 2

Ceiling Connection Handrail Connection Ground Connection

5 GO Zones / 1 NO-GO Zone

Hammock 1

Hammock 2

4 GO Zones / 2 NO-GO Zone

Hammock 1 H

3 GO Zones / 3 NO-GO Zone

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North

South

No Occupancy

East

West

Full Occupancy

ELASTIC LOUNGE

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ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE Instructor: Tracy Perry Winter Quarter 2011

How do you design a house with a gallery featuring the works of Eva Hesse, an artist whose works on the idea of repetition? Repetition is visible throughout the building. The idea of a repeating shape reappears again more broadly as “L” shapes. Unique spaces occur as the most critical elements of the private and public spaces, the bedroom and gallery, respectively. The house and gallery sit on the top floor of the building with double height spaces protruding from the roof. The parasitic nature of the new house becomes apparent as it uses the existing structure’s walls and roof. The double height spaces act as focal points as they break away from the skin of the existing building and appear to spread.

ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE

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Uniform Grid

Unique Spaces Defined

Unique Spaces become Double Height

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Public // Private Private

Publicand // Private Public Private Public Private

Public

Public is isolated from the Private spaces which wrap around the Public Public is is isolated isolatedfrom fromthe thePrivate Private Public spaces which wrap around the Spaces which warp around thePublic Gallery

Modularity and//‘L’ Modularity L Spaces Spaces

Modularity // L Spaces Gallery Wall Materiality

ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE

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Private Residence Private Residence

Public Gallery

Private Residence

Floor 1

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Scale 1/4” = 1’ - 0”

Flo


Bedroom

Bedroom

Floor 2

Scale 1/4” = 1’ - 0”

ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE

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ESTCODE

ESTCODE

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Y ER

IC

L UB

L AL

G

P

CE

EN

D SI

E AT IV

RE

PR

ROOFTOP REPETITION HOUSE

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SYSTEM

S

L

E. NEIL AV

ROAD MILLIKIN

PLANT

Knowlton School of Architecture, The Ohio State University

BAKER

R POWE

IMI / OSU 2012 Masonry Design Competition Finalist The wall materials represent a combination of early construction materials. The three systems work together to create the wall pattern,which due to the materials, creates a chromatic wall face. There is a base wythe of roman brick, a recessed pattern of roman brick, and extruded Travertine stone. These bricks were chosen for the long thin length, and the varied colors. The thin length allows for more horizontal design. The result presents a Southwestern Native American type facade. Semi-regular patterns of extruded and recessed bricks work their way up the wall. The concrete veneer areas present spots for windows and doors.

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AVENUE W. 17th

L

Site Plan


A

EPDM MEMBRANE RIGID INSULATION STEEL REINFORCMENT

A

1” OVERHANG CORBELING

DOUBLE ANGLE ANGLE STEEL SHELF ANGLE ALUM. FRAMED WINDOW

N

GLAZING

Ground Floor

TRAVERTINE STONE 2X12X6 W/ POLISHED FACE

ROMAN BRICK 2X12X4 (TYP.) CONCRETE VENEER OVER ROMAN BRICK BASE STEEL ANGLE SHELF AND WEEP HOLE W/ SOFT JOINT (TYP.)

2” AIRSPACE (TYP.)

8” CMU BACKUP WALL ROMAN BRICK 2X12X3 RECESSED CONCRETE VENEER OVER ROMAN BRICK

RECESSED 1” ROMAN BRICK 2X12X3 (TYP.)

ROMAN BRICK 2X12X4 (TYP.) 5/8” GYPSUM BOARD STEEL STUDS AT 16” O.C.

CONCRETE VENEER OVER ROMAN BRICK 2” RIGID FOAM INSULATION

RECESSED 1” ROMAN BRICK 2X12X4 (TYP.)

TYVEK 8” CMU BACKUP WALL

TRAVERTINE STONE 2X12X6 W/ POLISHED FACE SET 2” OUT FROM SURFACE

FLASHING AND WEEP HOLE

POURED CONC. TOPPING

TRAVERTINE STONE BLOCK 2X12X6 W/ POLISHED FACE

POURED CONC. TOPPING 4” CONCRETE SLAB GRAVEL EARTH FOOTER 30” BELOW FROST

Wall Section Detail Elevation

IMI MASONRY COMPETITION PROJECT NAME 2012

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Existing

TIL Coffee Shop Entrance Proposal Victorian Village, Columbus, OH Collaboration with Paul Miller (PM Studios) April 2014 58

This short weekend project was a design for a new outdoor dining and streetfront appearance for client TIL Coffee Shop. The client desired sustaniable and earthy materials to harmonize with their mission of fair-trade, fresh ingredients for their shop. Paul and I decided on a wooded barrier system with a semi-hollow core to run electrical services for floor lighting and table lighting and spaces for potted growth.




METAL SOLAR SHADE 2X6 DOUBLE TOP PLATE ROOF INSULATION PLANTS EARTH 1/8" SEPERATION FABRIC 1/2" GRAVEL STEEL NAIL FASTENERS "L" SHEET METAL EDGE 1/4" DRAINAGE MAT 1/8" ROOT BARRIER PLYWOOD INSET 1/8" EPDM WATERPROOF MEMBRANE MOLDING ROOF FLASHING 2X6 DOUBLE HEADER PLATE WINDOW TOP SILL

 

METAL SOLAR SHADE 2X6 DOUBLE TOP PLATE ROOF INSULATION

 STEEL NAIL FASTENERS

East Elevation



PLYWOOD INSET MOLDING

2X6 DOUBLE HEADER PLATE WINDOW TOP SILL



SHEET METAL CLADDING EDGE MULLION



 

GLASS MULLION

WINDOW SILL

SHEET METAL CLADDING DRAINAGE BARRIER FLASHING WITH DRIP EDGE

  PLYWOOD SIDING SHEET METAL CLADDING EDGE MULLION BATT INSULATION GLASS MULLION 5/8" GYPSUM BOARD WINDOW SILL FINISH FLOORING 2X6 FOOTER SHEET METAL CLADDING STEEL REBAR MESH METAL TERMITE SHIELD DRAINAGE BARRIER POLYETHYLENE VAPOR BARRIER POLYSTYRENE INTERIOR INSULATION

 

FLASHING WITH DRIP EDGE EMBEDDED TUBING

Sustainable House Study EXTERIOR SIDING INSULATION PLYWOOD BACKFILL BATT INSULATION

SLAB ON GRADE WITH CONCRETE FOOTER 5/8" GYPSUM BOARD EARTH FLOORING FINISH

 Columbus, OH 2X6 FOOTER STEEL REBAR



STEEL REBAR MESH METAL TERMITE SHIELD POLYETHYLENE VAPOR BARRIER POLYSTYRENE INTERIOR INSULATION

Collaboration with Emma Horvath EMBEDDED TUBING

February 2012 EXTERIOR INSULATION BACKFILL SLAB ON GRADE WITH CONCRETE FOOTER EARTH STEEL REBAR

PROJECT SHORT PROJECTS NAME

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Jefferson High School Building Study Architect: E.W. Austin Dresden, Ohio (1922) Personal Study 2006-2008

In 1920, the small basket industry town of Dresden, Ohio needed a new school to hold its fast-growing population. E.W. Austin, an architect residing in Columbus constructed the school in Dresden on the site of an old sports field. The building was completed in 1922 and received a new addition, also by Austin, in 1939. The high school was razed in 2008. The study of this building has been a personal interest since 2003. It was a catalyst which spurred my growing interest into historical studies. Through this study, I expanded my knowlege of 3D modeling programs to reconstruct room layouts, and converted many of the paper drawings to AutoCAD line drawings. West Entrance 1922

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East Wing - Rear

The High School in 1940 with added wings


Renderings

JEFFERSON HIGH PROJECT SCHOOL NAME STUDY

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West Wing - West Elevation

Name: Jefferson High School Addition (1940) Project: OH. 1704-F Architect: E.W. Austin Location: Dresden, Ohio Details Drawing: West Wing West Elevation Drawn with Autocad 2012 and Adobe Illustrator CS6 West Wing North Elevation

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JEFFERSON HIGH PROJECT SCHOOL STUDY NAME

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TRAVEL Italy 2012

Piazza Anfiteatro - Lucca

Pantheon - Rome

Santa Croce - Florence 64


PHOTOGRAPHY ajmphoto.weebly.com

2013 BETHA Grant - Ohio State Chiller Lighting Project, Official Photographer

2014 Ohio State OIA Photography Competition - Honorable Mention

2014 Ohio State OIA Photography Competition - FIRST PLACE

2012 Ohio State OIA Photography Competition - Honorable Mention

SKETCHES ANDPROJECT PHOTOGRAPHY NAME

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Selected Works 2009-2016  

Andrew Mateja Ohio State University University of Illinois at Chicago

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