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ANDRESSA ESTEVES

Interior Design Portfolio


ANDRESSA ESTEVES Interior Design Portfolio Bachelors of Interior Design New York School of Interior Design ASID, IIDA 917.301.3977 acep85@gmail.com

Hello, my name is Andressa! I have had a passion for creating since an early age. Drawings, oil paintings, comic books, collages... you name it! I excel through my artistic ability and love that Interior Design allows me to share my passion with others. The prestigious Bachelor of Fine Arts in Interior Design at New York School of Interior Design helped me to uncover my passion for design, while enhancing my abilities to transfer ideas to reality and to envision the mood and impact of a space. I believe the key to great design is a balance of creativity and perseverance. I am seeking the opportunity to create great design with great people.


CONTENTS 001

SACRED ROOTS

Healthcare (Thesis, currently in progress)

002

UMI

Restaurant

003

HARMONY CONNECTION

Workplace

004

CHILDREN’S CENTER FOR AUTISM

Healthcare/ Educational

005

CARVING THROUGH THE ROCK

Workplace

006

BLANKET AMERICA

Retail

007

AMAZONIAN

Residential_ D.C. Competition

008

OTHER WORKS

Fine arts & Photography


INTRODUCTION

002 Umi Client: Umi (Asian fusion restaurant) Restaurant Fall 2012 . Contract I Course The design inspiration for this project came from its name, Umi, the Japanese word for ocean. When thinking of oceans, qualities such as serenity, fluidity, and beauty may come to mind. Such elements were the inspiration for designing the interior of the space. One of the biggest challenges was to find the perfect balance between its serene and dynamic qualities. The solution was to find a combination between a sober, serene architectural design with an overall aesthetic affect that would convey movement and dynamic appeal. Concrete is the signature material, notably on the walls and staircase. To contrast, an FSC certified walnut was chosen for the flooring of the main dining areas. Beyond the cool, quiet gray tonal areas, the interior conveys a sense of spectacle in its dynamic convergence of angles, multiple contrasting surfaces, and multiple two-story luminous water columns. The columns are the space’s design signature. They provide not just the aesthetic element of water, movement, and beauty in soft illumination, but also a sense of privacy between tables. The newly fitted columns are located alongside the existing structural columns. They are composed of a plexiglass frame and water, which is constantly moving. To add to the spectacle, LED pinpoint lighting produces a back-lit shimmery effect, providing a fascinating interplay of light, water, and movement.

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SITE & DIAGRAMS

INDEX Retail Stores, eateries, Banks Hotels Theatres/ Culture 1095 6th Av. Building Footprint Subways:

The Location The restaurant is located at Bryant Park, one of the most prestigious areas of NYC. Bryant Park is a 9.603-acre privately managed public park located in the New York City borough of Manhattan. It is located between Fifth and Sixth Avenues and between 40th and 42nd Streets in Midtown Manhattan.

The Building Umi restaurant is located on the ground floor of 1095 Avenue Of The Americas. The building is 630 ft (192m) tall, containing 41 floors. It was constructed between 1972 and 1974 and served as headquarters of The New York Telephone Co.

>>View of the building and Bryant Park

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>> Looking North Up 6th Ave.

>> Across Bryant Park

>> Looking West on 42nd St.


Restaurant’s Location: 1095 Sixth Ave. and 42nd St, New York, NY.

Stairs Bathroom

Kitchen Stairs

Bar

Dining Area Entry

Private Area

Primary Adjacency

Public Area

Secondary Adjacency

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FLOOR PLAN C

B

KITCHEN

OPEN TO BELOW

A

A

C

B

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Not to Scale

B

C

KITCHEN

A

A

B

FIRST FLOOR PLAN Not to Scale

8

C


9


SECTION

A-NORTH SECTION Not to scale

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MATERIAL BOARD

Materials Serene and dynamic effects. The two qualities that inspired the selection of materials.

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SECTIONS

B-WEST SECTION Not to scale

B-EAST SECTION Not to scale

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INTRODUCTION

003 Harmony Connection Client: Resolution Inc. (Law firm) Working Space Fall 2012 . Contract I Course

Harmony Connection is a project designed for Resolution Inc., a firm that offers alternative dispute resolution (ADR) services. Parties involved in legal dispute come to Resolution Inc. to resolve their differences through arbitration and mediation. The space is located in the heart of NYC, on the 20th floor of the iconic Bank of America Tower, at 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue. The foremost design approach is to ensure that the space can facilitate the negotiation between parties, allowing a subtle sense of harmony and connectivity between boardroom adversaries. Having these qualities as the concept for this project, an abstract interpretation of bridge-like installations and continuous forms were applied to the design to ensure that the concept idea is ingrained within the space’s atmosphere. Another important goal was to create an image of credibility and authenticity to reflect the company’s identity. Selected rooms feature a more conservative lay-out to provide a certain level of privacy required for the given tasks at hand. Sustainable choices, such as utilizing the building’s glass curtain wall to maximize natural daylight, as well as the use of eco-friendly materials and lighting, were also an important factor. In addition to the formal private offices and hearing rooms, the workplace is complete with a variety of welcoming areas such as a cafe, lounge, and break rooms. These are all combined with an exquisite selection of materials and furniture, as well as a rich palette of warm brown, silver, gold and white tones, which give the space a sense of elegance and exclusivity.

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15


SITE

The Bank of America Tower The offices of Resolution Inc. are located at One Bryant Park, on the 20th floor of the iconic Bank of America Tower at 42nd Street and Sixth Avenue. The tower was the first skyscraper in North America to achieve LEED Platinum certification and ranks among the most environmentally advanced skyscrapers in the world.

> Bank of America Tower 20th-floor plan

>Office Location on the 20th floor

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DIAGRAMS

Reception Phone & Break Room Hearing Rooms Pantry Offices Storage Circulation

Break Room

Break Room

Administrative

Primary Adjacency Secondary Adjacency Private Area Public Area

Reception

Hearing Rooms

Pantry

ENTRY

17


PLANS

RCP

R.C.P Not to Scale

Clg. mounted LED pendant Wall mounted fluorescent fixture Recessed low voltage halogen Recessed LED Gypsum Board Soffit Acoustical ceiling tile Emergency and exit lighting Concealed 48� fluorescent strip Ceiling mounted LED down light

FLOOR PLAN

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 20TH FLOOR PLAN Not to Scale

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Entry Reception Coat Closet Waiting Phone Room Break Room Lounge Pantry Offices Workstations Mail Room Files Hearing Rooms


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ELEVATIONS & DIAGRAMS

SOUTH ELEVATION

Not to scale

NORTH ELEVATION

Not to scale

Hearing Room

Private Office

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Reception


MATERIALS

Form Individual pieces are a way of introducing visual play into a room, as demonstrated in the choice of furniture below. The organic shape of the Noguchi coffee table makes it an interesting addition to the room’s straight lines, and brings a more elegant feel to this corporate

Hearing Room Material Board

office. It is all about form and how one effect relates to another within the room. This is demonstrated through opposing themes, such as setting a curve against a straight line, placing an extravagantly sculptural shape next to a simple one, or setting an over-scaled piece adjacent to a diminutive one.

Reception Material Board

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RENDERING

Private Office The private offices were uniquely designed to leave an impression of elegance and credibility to both client’s and staff. The wood finish of sustainable bamboo is the core of the scheme, contrasting the cooler shades of gray and blue within the carpeting and upholstery. The office’s back wall is treated in a gray linen fabric, enveloped within a glass panel to add a touch of sophistication. 22


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INTRODUCTION

004 Children’s Center for Autism Client: Children’s Center for Autism Healthcare/ Educational Spring 2014. Contract III Course Children’s Center for Autism is an outpatient facility that provides educational and therapeutic strategies for children aged 3 to 12 diagnosed with autism. Autism is a developmental disorder that affects the brain’s normal development of social and communication skills, as well as difficulty in processing everyday sensory information. Therefore, the foremost design approach is to ensure that the space encourages communication and connectivity to support the child’s enhancement of social skills and social interaction. Key factors are:

• Acoustical and visual control; • Clear and simple geography; • Circulation spaces, instead of corridors; • Spaces for socializing and being alone; • Appropriate color pallet; • Sustainable approach: natural light, non toxic indoor air quality,

green roof, indoor garden, flexible

furniture, PET polyester carpets, no V.O.C. paint, and the use of sustainable materials.

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SITE Green - from Grass to Buildings The Center is located in the 20th, 21st, and roof top floors of the Whitehall building, a 20-story skyscraper at the southernmost tip of Manhattan, overlooking Battery Park. The location is a leader in the environmental “green” movement, which requires developers to build environmentallysustainable apartments. These green guidelines address five major areas of environmental concern: enhanced indoor air quality; water conservation and purification; energy efficiency; recycling construction waste and the use of recycled building materials; and commissioning to ensure building performance. The interior of the Children’s Center for Autism was designed following sustainable approaches. An indoor courtyard and an outdoor play/green roof (situated on the roof top) improve the air quality of the building, help with noise reduction and reduce energy costs. All classrooms are well lit with natural light, reducing the need for overhead lighting. Combined with high-efficiency boilers and heating equipment, extra insulation and photo-voltaic solar panels, the school’s energy costs are reduced by more than 25%. Roof-mounted photo-voltaic cells alone generate 50 kilowatts of energy, roughly one-half of the energy needed to light the school. Low-flow plumbing fixtures consume 40% less potable water than a comparable building, and the majority of the materials used in the construction and finishing are sustainable.

Manhattan Urban Condition

9 AM

12 PM

Battery Park City Urban Condition

3 PM

• Direct sunlight 26

5 PM available on Whitehall Building’s


CONCEPT & STRATEGY UNLOCKING AUTISM: From Seclusion to inclusion When an architect asked a group of parents and teachers the most important objective that could be achieved through her design, they answered: “to take those fleeting moments of calm and connection with our children and make them last longer.” Therefore, the design concept of the facility is based on encouraging communication and connectivity, supporting the child’s enhancement of social skills and social interaction.

ENCLOSED SPACES

OPEN SPACES

Children with autism do not typically deal with open spaces very well. As a result, they look for enclosed spaces, to “escape” from an overwhelming sensory input.

GOAL

The goal of the design is to encourage communication and connectivity, by creating “escapes” where the patients can interact with each other.

Smaller spaces limit the amount of sensory input; therefore; hyper sensitive ASD patients look for a dark, quiet cave-like space to climb in to “escape”. As a result, it makes it harder for the patient to interact and

Out of the bubble

• Through an abstract symbolization, this diagram exemplifies the concept of this project’s design: the process of the mental transition of a child with ASD from a secluded “inner world” into a freer and more social lifestyle, obtained through socialization. 27


RENDERING & PLAN A

20

10 10 19

21 18

17

10

5

15

4

B

2

16

B

1 24

3

6 11 7

15

9

12

10

20TH FLOOR PLAN Not to Scale

14

9

8

13

A

Inclusion/ Connection

• Parti 28

1. Reception Area 2. Staff’s Lounge & Pantry 3. Admissions Office 4. Conference 5. Multi- Purpose 6. File/ Copy 7. Director’s Office 8. Business Office 9. Psych/ Social Work 10. General Classroom 11. Counseling 12. Occupational Therapy Office 13. Occupational Therapy 14. Life Skills Therapy 15. Seating Booth 16. Atrium Garden 17. Lockers 18. Break/ Quiet Room 19. Storage 20. Computer Room 21. Science Lab

Inner Courtyard The idea is to blend the interior space with the natural environment, while encouraging communication and connectivity, to support the child’s enhancement of social skills and social interaction. Therefore, the courtyard becomes a perfect environment for social interaction, play, and nature contemplation.


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PLANS & DIAGRAMS A

A

7 8 8

8 16

8

6

15

14

8

1

5

3 4

1 B

Open to Below

2

18 B

B

3 2

Open to Below

1

9

17

B

3

4

5

ROOFTOP PLAN Not to Scale

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1. Lockers 2. Gymnasium 3. Lounge 4. Rooftop 5. Playground 6. Cafe 7. Game Area 8. Cooking Classroom 9. Storage 10. General Classroom

10

11 1

7

7 7 9

A

Social Area Therapy/ Classrooms

Exit (same as entry) Administrative

Reception

13

8

21st FLOOR PLAN Not to Scale

A

8

12

ENTRY

Therapy

Classroom

Library

Cafe

Check In Primary Adjacency Secondary Adjacency Private Area Public Area

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1. Booth Seating Areas 2. Staff’s Lounge 3. File/ Copy 4. Library 5. Multi- Purpose 6. Nurse’s Office 7. Speech Therapy 8. Classrooms 9. Game Room 10. General Classroom 11. Counseling 12. Occupational Therapy 13. Creative Arts 14. Break/ Quiet Room 15. Lockers 16. Storage 17. Elevator 18. I.T.

Staff Area Student’s Journey Sequence

ENTRY


SECTIONS

A- LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale

B- CROSS SECTION Not to scale

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MATERIALS

Autistic Friendly Environment Children on the autism spectrum need special kinds of surroundings. They have sensory overload, and can get stressed easily when in brightly colored and visually busy spaces. Therefore, it is important to lessen the visual noise that surrounds them. I based my color pallet on a research study done with ASD (Autism Spectrum Disorder) students. The study detailed the preferred colors to those afflicted with ASD. As a result, I chose to use calming tones of blues, greens, and yellows for the space. In addition, a sustainable approach was kept in mind while choosing materials such as bamboo, reclaimed wood, terrazzo, concrete, P.E.T. polyester carpets, and non V.O.C. paints

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Interactive Corridor Children with autism may feel anxious when in a long, austere corridor. A solution to this problem is to break up the typical corridor with fun seating areas to relax and interact. Another solution is to create a walls that are aesthetically pleasing. In this case, I followed the design concept of “bubbles� to carve out the walls in fun shapes, while allowing natural lighting to penetrate to the corridor.


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DIAGRAMS

CROSS VENTILATION

Cross ventilation is used as a passive cooling technique to moderate the temperature of the inner courtyard. SKYLIGHT

The school atrium features a circular skylight that provides an ample amount of daylight for the interior, and reduces the amount of energy needed. PHOTOVOLTAICS

The roof features photovoltaic panels that provide energy for the building. The energy produced allows for the school to have a significantly reduced demand on the power grid, and also reduces energy cost and

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GREEN ROOF

ELECTROCHROMIC GLAZING

The building features green roofs and gardens that are used to grow food for school lunches. It also acts a hands-on learning tool for students.

The glazing is electronically tintable and provides a beautiful and cost-effective way to control sunlight without blinds or shades.


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INTRODUCTION

005 Carving Through Client: 4C’s, Jewelry Design Co-Working Facility Working Space Fall 2013. Contract II Course Situated in Chelsey, New York, 4C’s is a Co-working facility represented by a range of professionals acting in the jewelry design industry. The design of the space challenges conventional perceptions of how an office should look like, by having a dramatic architecture with a bold pallet and materials that reflects the companies unique profile. The design concept is based on carving a solid mass within the space, symbolizing a gemstone. Therefore, representing the craft of jewelry design. The angles used to “carve the rock” (lay out the floor plan & sections) are derived from the same angles of a “perfect diamond cut” angles.

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N1- LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale


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BRAND’S IDENTITY

The Client: As a company with design at its core, 4C’S mission are to encourage and inspire productivity, innovation,

creativity, and

idea

collaboration, sharing.

Their

communities are represented by a range of professionals acting in the jewelry

diamond: Color, Clarity, Cut, and Carat. The name is also a metaphor to the brand, once the 4c’s standard is communicated in a universal language, and costumers could know exactly what they were about to purchase.

design industry.

IS

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The name 4C’s represents the standard quality of a

IS NOT


LOOK & FEEL BOARD

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CONCEPT & DIAGRAMS

Carving Through the Rock SEEN IN PLAN VIEW:

SEEN IN AXONOMETRIC VIEW:

THE ANGLES:

THE “ROCK”/ THE “MASS” REPRESENTING A MINERAL

THE MASS WITHIN THE SPACE

THE MASS HAS BEEN CARVED

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The angles used to delineate the shape of the space are derived from the same angles from the “diamond shape”.


PLANS & DIAGRAMS

TOP FLOOR Not to scale

Showroom Stairs/ Wheel Chair

Circulation Cosed Workstation Open Collaboration Closed Collaboration Support Stairs/ Wheel Chair SECOND FLOOR PLAN Not to scale

Circulation Open workstations Open collaborative Closed collaborative Support Stairs/wheelchair lift FIRST FLOOR PLAN Not to scale

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RENDERINGS

South view of the cafe area and meeting booths.

North view of the cafe area and meeting booths.

Small Conference Room 42

Product Display The existing columns were wrapped with a display that showcases each brand’s products. The aesthetic of the display follows the same concept of “carving a rough rock” and displaying a polished jewel.


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SECTIONS & RENDERINGS

N2- LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale

Showroom

E1- CROSS SECTION Not to scale

N3- LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale

N4- LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale

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Showroom A mezzanine was added to the building’s second floor to serve as a showroom. It showcases the employee’s design and serves as an important negotiation area.


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MATERIALS Shiny, Light, and Smooth, Versus Dull, Dark, and Rough The choice of materials derived from the concept of carving a rough rock and revealing a shiny, polished interior. A white, polished stone flooring is found in the interior of the “rock” (the center mass in the space), while a concrete flooring surrounds the mass to delineate the difference between the inside and outside of the rock. The same concept is applied to the walls: rough slate on the exterior while a white, smooth, and shiny Venetian plaster covers the wall on the interior. The colors of the upholstery are derived from gems such as emerald, ruby, and sapphire.

The dark color palette, the dullness, and roughness of the materials express the outer side of the rock.

While the polished, white materials indicate the “carved” portion of the “rock”. 46


RENDERINGS

Cafe Area The use of metals and shiny materials is an homage to the metallic minerals used in the production of jewelry. While the upholstered wall at the seating area creates a feeling of warmth and coziness.

Informal Meeting Areas Still following the concept of “carving�, the walls became booths that serve as break areas for focused work or informal meeting spaces. 47


INTRODUCTION

006 Blanket America Client: Blanket America Retail Fall 2013. Contract II Course THE CLIENT: Blanket America is a brand specializing in designing and producing blankets with a business model focused on philanthropy. They offer the “buy one, give one” policy, which means that every item a customer buys, another one is donated to someone in need. THE BRIEF: The goal in this design is to create a positive and authentic environment to celebrate and promote the client’s philanthropic nature, as well as engaging the customers to be part of their mission. The space would act as a “hot-spot” for the exchange of charitable experiences. THE APPROACH: The concept is created around the blanket’s manufacturing process, as well as the company’s philanthropic mission. The space has an overall feel of a modernized, classic textile mill. Reclaimed industrial machinery, such as looms, cotton threads, and wood spools are used to give credibility and authenticity to the space. Cotton threads have been installed throughout the ceiling to ensure that the story of the creation of the blanket is ingrained within the space’s atmosphere, as well as visually leading the costumers to the gallery and workshop area. In the workshop, selected costumers may participate in the production of patchwork blankets, that later are exposed in the gallery for sale to raise money for charity funds. In addition, the philanthropic action may give customers a sense of benefiting others, allowing the clients to leave the store with not just a warm blanket, but also with a warm heart.

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BRAND’S IDENTITY & CONCEPT

“Leave the store with not just a warm blanket, but also with a warm heart”.

Reclaimed Industrial Machinery Workshop table: “The Circle of Charity”

Design Inspiration

Overhead cotton threads, symbolizing the process of manufacture of the blankets.

Entry

Charity: Buy One, Give One. 50


Exposition of patchwork blankets produced by the costumers. The intention is to sell it, and raise money for charitable funds.

Site- 1100 Av. of Americas, NY 51


PLANS & SECTIONS

WEST SECTION Not to scale

Yarn Installation LED Recessed Downlight LED Wallwasher RCP Not to scale

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FLOOR PLAN Not to scale

1 Curb Presence 2 Store Entry 3 Wow Factor 4 Gallery/ Customer Involvement 5.Workshop 6 Product Display 7 Point of Purchase 8 staff/ Storage 9 Existing Bathroom


WEST SECTION Not to scale

Blanket Tower

Store Front

Vintage Tools 53


INTRODUCTION

007 LIVING WITH NATURE Client: Oka Doner Residential Summer 2012. Residential Design II Living with Nature is a residential project designed for the prolific couple Mr. and Mrs. Doner. Both clients are deeply inspired by nature. Michele is specialized in botanical themed sculptures and mosaics, while her husband is an author focused on aboriginal culture and art. The design takes place on a waterfront property located in Long Island, NY, enveloped

by majestic trees and a

private beach. An “age-in-place” home (ADA compliant) is one of the clients’ requirements, as they intend to live there permanently. The concept for this project is to create an environment that reflects the client’s love for nature and art, as well as creating a vibrant, but yet healing environment. The space features a magnificent inner garden to improve the air quality and highlight the transparent stairs and elevator. In addition, a gold leaf tile wall provides a conspicuous color and texture combination. The living room features FSC- certified cherry wood walls and flooring for a warm feel, and large glass windows and doors to frame the beautiful scenery beyond. The kitchen backsplash features a golden mosaic designed by Mrs. Doner herself, contrasting the sleek, contemporary cabinets. Metals and minerals have a dramatic presence in the space, as well as the aboriginal art displayed throughout. Adding to the well-being aspect, the second floor features a hot sauna, as well as a spacious terrace to appreciate the gorgeous view.

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PROCESS

Living Room

SITE PLAN Not to scale

Dining Room

Staircase

GROUND FLOOR PLAN Not to scale

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

Inspiration Images 56

Foyer Bathroom Coat closet Library Stairs Elevator Inner garden Living room Dining room Kitchen

Living Room Material Board


Dining Room Material Board

CROSS SECTION Not in scale

57


PROCESS

Master Bedroom RCP Not to scale

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

stairs elevator inner garden office guest bedroom guest bathroom hot sauna master bathroom walk in closet master badroom

SECOND FLOOR PLAN Not to scale

Corridor Detail

Master Bedroom Material Board 58

Master Bathroom Material Board

Corridor Material Board


LONGITUDINAL SECTION Not to scale

59


DRAWINGS

008 OTHER WORKS I have always loved art since a very young age. Usually when I draw, paint, or even photograph, I get a feeling of fulfillment and satisfaction. I push myself to improve my art skills by visiting art galleries, museums, as well as studying the work of great art masters. Practice and perfection is my dictum to reach my goals in the design world, and every project is a step closer into my professional journey.

Free Hand Geometry Pencil, markers on paper 24x18 inches 60


Dog Pencil on paper. 24x18 inches 61


ABSTRACT PHOTOGRAPHY

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TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY

Places that I’ve been.

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OIL ON CANVAS

Fractional Observation Oil on canvas, 2013. 60 x 40 inches This work is inspired by nature and the celebration of energy and radiant movement from the inside out. I have been working in a series of paintings that aims to explore the individual’s perspective of the universe and the exchange of energy between the two. By using vibrant colors, and small dots, I seek to reveal an imaginary macroscopic view of the universe; in particular subjects that are usually seen at far distances; such as solar systems and clusters of stars for example. By moving closer to the subject, the composition unites the individual and the complex code of the universe as one. It invites the viewer to have a deeper look into the pulsation and movements of the parts that makes up the whole.

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Thank You


Interior Design Portfolio by Andressa Esteves