Issuu on Google+

ISSUE 1 SPRING 2014

Vintage Fair How to shorts Vintage Shopping


Content

Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair has become somewhat of a ‘dormhold’ name (see what we did there?). With the trend for vintage rising, the cost of buying it has inevitably skyrocketed; though lucky for those of us on a budget, Judy’s bargainous fair has kept thrifty fashionistas content for six years.

03

07 Ever returned home from an evening of merriment and wondered what it’d be like to crawl through the front door with a cupcake instead of a kebab? What if you were to come back with newly-learnt skills instead of having obliterated the majority of your brain cells with Michelle McManus-sized sambuca shots?


10

The great thing about vintage clothing is that it has history and character. Vintage adds that extra edge to anyone’s wardrobe, whether you wear it head to toe or mix and match with one or two pieces, it never fails to make a unique style statement.

Scallop detailing was a big hit on the catwalks; we love it because it’s so easy to recreate! These suede shorts are great for the festival season and also look great worn with tights for when the British summer lets us down.

12


The Vintage Fair Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair has become somewhat of a ‘dormhold’ name (see what we did there?). With the trend for vintage rising, the cost of buying it has inevitably skyrocketed; though lucky for those of us on a budget, Judy’s bargainous fair has kept thrifty fashionistas content for six years.


Judy Berger Fashion-loving students are no doubt already familiar with the legendary 'Judy', having seen her name emblazed across student unions all over the country. Moving on to bigger things, Judy made the bold decision to leave the north and set up home in London. She recalls, “it was all very last minute, and I ended up sleeping on my brother’s floor until I found a flat.” Judy then got her first break with a job as a Personal Shopper for Selfridges, enabling her to network with other stylists and industry insidJudy’s Affordable Vintage Fair has become ers. After two years at the iconic department somewhat of a ‘dormhold’ name (see what store, Judy left to pursue a career as a stylist. we did there?). With the trend for vintage rising, the cost of buying it has inevitably skyrocketed; though lucky for those of us on a budget, Judy’s bargainous fair has kept thrifty fashionistas content for six years. Judy Berger, 33, began her foray into the world of fashion when she studied Fashion Design at the Leeds College of Art and Design in her beloved hometown. She says, “I made friends with fellow students who introduced me to the joys of vintage shopping. At 16, we would visit the then-limited vintage shops in Leeds, our favourite places being Leeds flea market and Dewsbury market on a Friday morning with a wonderful flea section.” Judy continued her interest in fashion, embarking upon a degree in Fashion Promotion at the University of Central Lancashire. Judy’s determination was strong from a young age and she admits to taking her studies seriously; she confesses, “aside from the usual drunken student shenanigans I’m afraid I was a pretty good girl!”

Judy’s favourite of these styling roles, she says, was working on TV drama Cold Feet; “I loved getting hold of the character descriptions, looking at their scenes and dressing them accordingly. You can really have fun with a character and it’s great to see the actors becoming that person as soon as a certain outfit comes on”, she says. She also muses upon her stylist role in theatre production Madame Butterfly on the West End, in which she was responsible for changing the dancers’ outfits. She recalls, “our evening performances coincided with Coronation Street and so I’d miss my cue,


leaving dancers prancing off for costume changes and coming back on in the same outfits as I was under stage, catching up on my soaps!”

After spending some time as a stylist, Judy says that she decided to put her “brain into gear”; “I made a complete U- turn, heading into fashion recruitment where I learnt the rules of business. I then set up a clothes swapping website – whatsmineisyours.com - before setting my vintage venture in 2005.” Judy’s ‘swap shop’ website began as a London-based event, for people to swap designer outfits. From here, she pioneered ecological fashion, which drew lots of media attention. Judy has been featured in Elle, The Independent and has even been on the BBC Breakfast sofa!

The fairs have gone from strength to strength and now serve a growing 25 cities nationwide. When asked about a particular high point of her career, Judy says, “definitely when we opened the doors to our London fair last season and over 2500 people flocked in. Sometimes I stand in a corner of the fair and After the success of her swap shops and a get overwhelmed by how much it has grown pop-up shop in Covent Garden, Judy de- in such a short space of time. cided to migrate back to her hometown of Leeds, to pursue her interest in vintage cloth- Judy is forever adding new ventures to her ing- Judy’s Affordable Vintage Fair was born! repertoire, which recently included creating and curating the market at Vintage at Goodwood, curating this year’s Vintage on the South Bank event plus the creation of the Vintage Kilo Sale; where revellers can fill a bag weighing up to a kilo for £15! Judy offers this advice to anyone wishing to start their own fashion empire: “Stay positive, look for a unique idea and a gap in the market and try not to copy what you see. Ultimately, just have faith in yourself and your staff - you’ll make it in the end!”


The Rise of the Cool Craft Kids Ever returned home from an evening of merriment and wondered what it’d be like to crawl through the front door with a cupcake instead of a kebab? What if you were to come back with newly-learnt skills instead of having obliterated the majority of your brain cells with Michelle McManus-sized sambuca shots? Have we gone completely insane? We’ll bet you a bag of wool we haven’t. This wonderful phenomenon is the nouvelle vague of the social scene, more widely known as the Craft Night. Gone are the days where a flash of the free bus pass was the solitary requirement for entry to a soiree of knitting and china teacups; these nights are strictly 18+ and welcome the un-wise mind of youth with cocktails, crayons and more paper than you’d find in Peter Stringfellow’s Pre-Nup. Filtering through the depths of the dim lights and back streets of London, these Craft Nights are finding their way from the men’s working clubs of Bethnal Green to the high streets of Caledonian Road. Drink, Shop & Do is a prime example of an establishment that embraces almost all forms of crafts activity, ranging from the ever popular ‘Play with Clay 80s Style’ to the more ambient ‘Scrabble Sundays’ with a sprinkling of ‘Cocktail o’clock’ in between. As if that wasn’t enough to convince you to whip out the aprons and curl up your fringes, this old Victorian bathhouse sells products from emerging designers as well as vintage furniture and homewares, meaning that you could potentially alarm housemates and family alike

by leaving a smart armchair by the front door instead of the usual neon traffic cone. But don’t think that the capital is the only place ‘where it’s at’; plenty of cities are getting in on the act- including TRASHION’s base! We might not be the cultural hub of the universe, but Birmingham sure does know how to give Kings Cross a run for its money with the emergence of new Craft Nights popping up from Kings Heath to the city centre. One such night is A Crafty Beer, the brainchild of local lady Katie Moran who came up with the idea as she gazed around at her friends sewing and drawing at the bar, whilst she was in fact knitting. Running for a year and a half at the famed nineteenth century pub The Victoria, boasting a feature in Glamour Magazine and recruiting newcomers with every stitch, after little more than the equivalent of Facebook Chinese Whispers, A Crafty Beer shows no sign of retreat, embracing the ever innovative creative community of Birmingham. Whether you’re replenishing your jewellery box, stocking up on next winter’s homemade Christmas presents or seeing how many beers it takes before you begin to colour outside the lines, it seems this free, monthly night is not to be missed. And there are plenty more like it around the country! So there you have it. There really is no reason choose between culture and a healthy social life. Here’s to the ‘Coronas and CrossStitch’ revolution.


Vintage Shopping in London The great thing about vintage clothing is that it has history and character. Vintage adds that extra edge to anyone’s wardrobe, whether you wear it head to toe or mix and match with one or two pieces, it never fails to make a unique style statement. Every girl would admit to that secret enjoyment we get when the compliments start rolling in and the reply is simple; “oh this? Well, it’s vintage.” It’s that pleasure of sitting quietly in the safety that no-one else will look like you.

find a bargain here as it’s renowned for its extremely reasonable pricing. If you get the chance to visit on a Saturday, there’s the chance to listen to live music whilst rifling through clothes too.

Brick lane has a fashion pulse of its own; you name it, there’s no doubt that you’ll find it here. From quaint Edwardian collector’s pieces (try The Vintage Emporium) or the perfect floral playsuit to frolic around in the sun (hit Rokit), there’s so much temptation Of all the fashion capitals in Europe, Lonso be warned, you’ll certainly come home don has to be the epicentre of vintage finds. with a dwindling bank balance. But there’s From Brick Lane to Camden Market, there more than the bags of goodies to look forare thousands of square feet of the city ward to, the people are as eccentric as they dedicated to finding that amazing one of a come around here. Forget trend magazines, kind piece to perfect any wardrobe. The first you’ll get plenty of inspiration from people thing you need to note is that the majority of watching. the best vintage stores are out of the main e city area so Oyster card in tow, it’s time for If it’s more the high end, designer side of an adventure . . . vintage you’re after, then Annie’s in Islington’s Camden Passage is your next stop. If you’ve got a heavy purse and a fair The fashion set adore this boutique, from amount of caffeine packed into you, then Kate Moss to the late Alexander McQueen, head for Brick Lane in the Shoreditch area many-a-name has frequented this place for and, in particular, the side streets surround- inspiration. With a window display always ing it. Rows upon rows of vintage boutiques reminiscent of ‘My Fair Lady’, here you will hidden in little nooks and crannies will greet find treasured investments- delicate dressyou so keep your eyes peeled. Your first es, feather capes, embroidered shawls, stop however must be Beyond Retro on the selection is impeccable. Most items are Cheshire Street- a 5,000 square foot ware- sourced from markets in and around Paris, house store stocked with racks upon racks with each piece feeling like it has its own of vintage garments. Ten years after openlittle story behind it; Annie’s has to be the ing, it still holds the title as London’s largest epitome of classic vintage. Make sure you and most diverse vintage store; an East End potter around the rest of Islington too, as institution worshipped by stylists, if you’re there’s a cluster of carefully sourced designin the mood for a rummage you’ll no doubt er vintage in the area.


Next on the agenda- markets. Camden, Portobello and Spitalfields are the three mustknow collection of stalls. It’s usually best to head down at weekends; each market has its own website though so check online for the best times to go. Boasting more than just clothes, these markets are the perfect rummage-fest for quirky interiors too! A lot of the vintage you come across in the capital can be horrendously overpriced so this is your best chance at getting a real bargain so don’t be afraid to do a little haggling either. You can find a handful of vintage shops in the city centre too. Try Pop Boutique and Blackout II in Covent Garden, a smaller Beyond Retro and Marshmallow Mountain in Soho, and definitely any charity shops you pass along the way. They’re a little more expensive than what you’re probably used to in your hometown, but they can house designer pieces at snap-up prices. If you’re eager enough, get there at opening time for the best choice. Tube maps at the ready, before you head off, here’s a few little tips to claiming the perfect find. When you’re heading to these areas keep a lookout for little signs stating ‘vintage’; they often lead to hidden treasure troves of cheap, quality vintage. Also, make sure you have enough cash on you. Some stores do take cards but it’s usually when you find the gem that they don’t, so to save you traipsing around for a cash point that charges ridiculous amounts for withdrawals, keep some notes on you. And last but by no means least, take your time and enjoy it- you’re in London baby! Even if your boyfriend has to go and find a chair to cure his boredom (and aching feet), flick through each rail and if you’re not sure, don’t buy it; they’ll always be something waiting for a new home in the next shop.


How to Shorts Scallop detailing was a big hit on the catwalks; we love it because it’s so easy to recreate! These suede shorts are great for the festival season and also look great worn with tights for when the British summer lets us down.

Make It What you’ll need - A pair of suede trousers - A needle (or sewing machine) and thread, as similarly-coloured as possible - Fabric scissors - A tape measure - A 30cm ruler --Side bar / box out *TRASHION found suede trousers for £6.99, brand new with tags, eBay, size 12 Top Whack £915*, Maison Martin Margiela @ net-a-porter.com Treat £36*, Miss Selfridge


Let's Get Started

1

2

Take your trousers and lay them on a Find a circular object to draw around for large flat surface. Turn them inside out the scallop edging. We used a can of and make sure they are fastened. To hairspray with a 5cm diameter. Draw full make the measurement for the length of circles along the edge of the cut trousers so the shorts, use a tape measure and mea- they are just touching. Do this slightly away sure from the top of the trousers on the outer from the edge (about 1⁄2 centimetre). seam. We measured 35cm for these. The rise of the trousers (the degree to which the trousers are highwaisted or not) will make a difference to the length. To make sure they’re not too short, measure from the bottom of the fly too. Ours measured 18cm from the crotch. Use a large ruler to draw a straight line across the legs (use chalk or something that will come off in the wash if you can). Cut across your line with fabric scissors. Don’t throw the cut-off legs away, you’ll need them later! Turn back the remaining trouser legs and trim the lining (if there is one) to a few centimetres above where the legs are cut.

3 look!

Next, cut around the edge of your markings with with fabric scissors. The more carefully you do this, the better it will


4

Now make the belt. Gather the legs which were cut off earlier and cut along one of the seams so that they open out. Our belt is 4cm wide. The easiest way to measure it is to find a 30cm ruler which is approximately the same width and use it as a template. You’ll need to create a few of these as the cut of legs will not be long enough. We did this 4 times; the waist size of the shorts will depend on how many you’ll need. Then you need to sew the strips together. You can do this by hand but it’s better to use a sewing machine if using suede, as it is a tough material. We found it easiest to slightly overlap the strips by around 2-3cm then sew two lines at each edge.

5

Once you’ve sewn the belt together. Cut out some belt loops from the leftover leg fabric. Double the width of your belt and measure a few centimetres across (our belt loops measure 8cm x 2cm). Make 4 strips. Then sew these strips onto the shorts. Again, it’s best to use a sewing machine

here- though make sure not to sew through both sides of the shorts at once! They need to be a few centimetres from the top to get the ‘paperbag’ effect we’ve achieved. Position them in the middle of either side of the fly. Do the same with two at the back.


TRASHION!