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Raw Synergy

an inner city food hub MASTERPLAN DESIGN & ACCESS STATEMENT

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Andreas Leonidou | 12024840 Final Year Project | BA Hons Architecture & Planning University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol


Our legacy to those who inherit the earth will be determined by how we eat now – their future lies in our knives and forks and fingers. – Carolyn Steel


Introduction

Raw Synergy: an inner-city food hub The food hub is a response to the industrialised food system that concurs our lives today. The system is characterised by a lack of transparency that results to the deception of the consumer and further associated with high product prices, low health status and low food quality. A new food system for the city of Newport and its surrounding region is proposed, which is informed by practices of the past. It is looking back before agriculture became industrialised and globalised and applies the simplicity and transparency of it, while focusing on the people rather than economic gain. The new system is informed by practices used in Newport, back when it was a humble town, when rail and car where unknown to the people. To the centre of the proposed system lies the direct and physical connection of the consumer and producer of food. This is achieved by bringing back the canal in the centre of the city as a means for food transportation, something that bridges the gap within town and countryside. At the core of the system lies the new food hub, split into two markets that serve the retailing and wholesaling purposes of the city through two markets residing next to one another. The aim is to educate people and open their eyes into what exactly is it they put onto their plates. The food hub is to become a centre and anchor point for the area, where exchange and social interaction coexist interdependently.

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contents

PART A: THE PROBLEM 10

PART C: PLANNING POLICY STATEMENT 30

PART E: MASTERPLAN public consultation 38 group masterplan 40 regional scale 42 city scale 43 local scale 44 masterplan 46 removal of Usk Way 48 food coming on water 50 proposed canal extension 52

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

introduction 60 the proposal: region to building 61 the site in the past 62 the site today 63 understanding the site 64 site analysis 68 use 70 schedule of accommodation 72 scale & amount 74 layout 78

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

PART D: THE VISION 34

PART F: THE BUILDING 55

layout development 80 appearance 86 landscaping 94

the city of Newport 16

services and infrastructure 100

Pillgwenlly 18

access 102

employment 20

community safety 105

immigrant population 21

planning application form 106

separation 22

drawing sets 108

deprivation 23 Montmouthshire & Brecon Canal 24 agriculture 25 food in the area 26

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PART A

THE PROBLEM -9-


the problem

food fraud

food origin

“Food fraud is committed when food is deliberately placed on the market, for financial gain, with the intention of deceiving the consumer” -FSA

Eating food from abroad is a fact of life for people living in the UK. World food shops and specialised isles packed with foreign products are so common that their absence within out daily lives seems absurd.

Food fraud is estimated to cost the global food industry £10bn per year. Food fraud is not standard in every case, as it can occur many different situations. A case is made when food or food ingredients are substituted for lower-quality, inferior ingredients, or one species for another when it comes to live animals. Food ingredients may be diluted with water, or main ingredients may be omitted or removed. Unfortunately food fraud is extremely popular in the UK following numerous incidents, main ones including the horse meat scandal three years ago, and the South Wales e.coli disease spread in public school in 2005. Producers deceive consumers, manufactures, retailers, and governments for the sole purpose of making money. The lack of transparency within the food chain makes it more convenient for the different bodies to cheat one another. Consumers are not interested on the food they eat, or how and where it is produced but only concerned about being able the lowest price possible. People are deceived every day due to their ignorance, and they end up funding the big faceless companies that make them.

products substituted with a cheaper alternative

recycling of animal byproducts back into the food packing and selling of beef and poultry with an unknown origin

In 2009, 49.5% of all raw food, the majority of which are meat and dairy products. The UK imports from a total of 167 countries, which makes the tastes and the country truly global. Food importing dates back to Ancient Rome, when the Romans discovered that importing food is cheaper than producing it. That moment in time has completely shaped the world we live in today. This maximum gain mindset, has forced the industrialisation and globalisation of agriculture to happen and our natural environment changed forever. This change has vastly increased the number of resources required to sustain this global food system, from production to transportation. The UK’s weather is not suitable for producing a large number of food groups, similar thing goes for other countries with minimum sunshine hours. Food imports are a global phenomenon though. Warmer climate countries, such as Spain import a great number of products as well. There are often two different kinds of tomatoes or oranges or anything else: the cheap and the expensive. We tend to go for the cheapest possible, perfectly aware that the country of origin is not the one we are located at the moment, but we do not have a problem with it, or feel guilty at all? Why should we? “Its all the same anyway”.

knowingly selling goods which are past their ‘use by’ date

UK

recycling of animal byproducts back into the food chain

U.S.A. Apples

Canary Islands Cucumbers

Spain Oranges Broccoli Morocco Tomatoes

Russia Wheat

Israel Egypt Potatoes Saudi Arabia Grapes Tomatoes

Ghana Pineapple

India Bananas

China Sweet Potatoes Thailand Spring Onions Canned Tuna

Peru Asparagus

making false statements about the source of ingredients

Chile Nectarines

Argentina Beef

South Africa Carrots Pears New Zealand Lamb Kiwi

PART A: THE PROBLEM

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from market to supermarket

the industrialised food system

Markets were once the centre social and physical centre of towns, where people went not only to buy fresh food, but to exchange the daily gossip and news. They were the spaces were the countryside met the city. Spaces were events and meetings of all scales were happening. Spaces made just for the people and their needs. True public spaces.

Until early 20th century, food systems operated primarily on a local and regional level.

The introduction of railway and later the car fundamentally changed our lifestyles and the way we inhabit our towns and cities forever. “Instead of heading into town to buy food, we drive out to large, anonymous boxes. The civic aspect of food selling has disappeared, and along with it, much of the character and purpose of our town centres”, Carolyn Steel from ‘Hungry City’ 80% of the grocery trade in the UK is controlled by just 4 supermarkets. This gives the supermarkets incredible power over our economic and health status. Hundreds of markets are closing down at a steady rate every year in the UK. Supermarkets are located on every corner of every city and town today providing us with our survival needs with minimum social interaction. The public life is lost from the centre of the cities as the supermarkets have altered their true essence.

ALDI 5%

OTHERS ICELAND 5% LIDL 2% 5%

Since WWII, the growth of large-scale, food production businesses has been encouraged advanced technology, agriculture policy and the globalization of trade and market competition. This led to the development of a global, industrialized food system which has an impact on every matter involved with what we eat, how we eat it and our relationship with where it comes from. Further, it has negatively impacted our health, environment and local economies heavily. The food system is a great challenge facing communities, towns and cities today, and the aim is to reconstruct it by looking in the past, on examples of successful systems on a local and regional level.

Farmers’ Markets make up just 1.7% and the number is declining ever year

TESCO 29%

WAITROSE 5% CO-OP 6%

MORRISONS 11%

ASDA 17% SAINSBURY 16%

“Independent food shops are closing at a rate of 2000 a year and the total number has fallen by half in just over a decade. One recent study predicted that by 2050 there won’t be any left at all”.

GROWING

HARVESTING

TRANSPORTING

heavy equipment is used to prepare the soil and plant and maintain crops huge farms and fields workers in industrial farms owned by big corporations are exposed to long hours of extremely hard work and hazardous pesticides and end up receiving low wages

the ripened crop from the field is gathered using large machinery, harvesting large quantities at once much of the imported food in the UK is harvested before it is even close to the time of harvest and ripened using toxic gases during overseas transportation

food is moved to factories and processing facilities by air, truck, train, ship or barge this process often happens at multiple steps and for very long distances, where vast amount of food is discarded for multiple reasons

-Carolyn Steel in Hungry City -11-

PROCESSING

PACKAGING

WHOLESALING

heavy factory machinery is used to chop, grind, dry, boil, can or freeze food to preserve it or make it more convenient this is the process where most of the food fraud accidents take place and result in great alteration of the natural state of food

heavy machinery is used to place food into cans, bags, plastic containers or boxes for sale. packaging preserves food for longer and helps sell more of it packaging of food is accompanied by preservatives in liquid or gas form. these most often alter the natural state of the product

large quantities of food are sold and distributed to stores or other private businesses more transportation, more food miles. this is the point where the original origin of the product gets swapped with the processing or packaging one

RETAILING

CONSUMING

DISPOSING

food is sold to food is bought, individual customers, prepared and eaten usually inside at households, supermarkets restaurants and many people are takeaways unaware of how britain’s cookery their food is actually skills and habits are in produced and the cost decline, with the least of real locally sourced well-off consumers food, that puts increasingly turning to them in a position to a diet of calorie-laden demand more at lower convenience foods prices and fatty ready meals to beat austerity

leftover food and packaging is discarded. while most of it is recyclable or compostable, much of it ends up in landfills. every year some 2.9 trillion pounds of food—about a third of all that the world produces—never get consumed.


the problem

eating habits in the UK People living in the UK are more informed about diet and nutrition more than ever before, but their love of fast food hasn’t diminished, as sales have sky-rocketed in the past 40 years. Data published by the FSA in February 2016, has revealed that the reliance on convenience foods such as frozen pizzas and ready-made meals has greatly increased during the last decade. At the same time, the traditions of tea and toast are decreasing year by year. Environmental secretary Truss E. said that these results reflect the fact that the UK has undergone a “food revolution” in the past 40 years. In a food system controlled by big corporations, practical food eduction is absent as it is simply not of their economic interest. The seek for food convenience matches perfectly the need of the corporations for maximum economic gain match perfectly. The change of people’s eating habits and lifestyle have been attempted by many organisations, through the promotion of healthy products and diets. This has had an effect on people, one part of the food system to change is not enough.

PART A: THE PROBLEM

21% of people have a weekly takeaway meal

people are eating less fruit and vegetables than ever before

5.54bn visits to UK fast food restaurants per year

1.05bn meals sold by McDonald’s each year in its UK outlets

1/3 of meals consumed are ready-made

11p of every £1 of income is spent on food

sales of microwave meals have doubled since the 80s’

people pay for but do not eat up to £9bn of good food each year

households with a freezer 50% of schoolchildren buy their lunch at fast food outlets

1974 15%

2010 98%

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learning from the past

supplying the city Over the years, the way food is arriving at our cities has been changed dramatically. Animals walking from countryside to town and horses dragging big carts full of fresh produce were the only way to do it, and it have been done that way for hundreds of years. This period in time has shaped the cities we inhabit today and its marks are still visible today. The introduction of rail, has changed this process dramatically, as the animals and produce could be transported a lot more quicker thus making the whole process more efficient. The delivery was replaced by large vans during the 1960s, which has been one of the biggest steps towards the industrialisation of the supply chain. The system became more complex than the ever as more members have been added within it. We no longer get food directly from the farmer. There are so many people involved in secrecy between us and the farmer that we are not sure anymore whether what we are consuming is the exact produce that got harvested.

PARIS MAIN PORT, 17th CENTURY

ROADS WITHIN LONDON ARE SHAPED AROUND OLD FOOD TRAILS

ON THE WAY TO MARKET - CHARLES JAMES ADAMS

Imported goods were historically transported around the world by boats, a method that still remains the most popular due to its low costs. THE GREAT WESTERN RAILWAY IN 1840 CARRYING ANIMALS BOUND FOR THE CITY

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PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

PART B

ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT -15-


the city of Newport

Newport was created after the Normans conquered Gwent in the 11th century. During the 12th century they build a castle, the remains of which still exist today, and soon a small town was formed around it. By the 15th century, Newport was a notable trading port. With the arrival of the Industrial Revolution at the end of 18th century, Newport changed completely. Later, during the Industrial Revolution, late 18th and 19th centuries, the city experienced significant growth, achieved by the development of the canal network at first and then the railway lines that enabled huge quantities of coal, iron and steel products, all locally sourced and manufactured, to be exported. By the 1850s, Newport has grown to exceed Cardiff and Swansea in both power and wealth. This was the most proud period in the history of the city. During the 20th century, steel making and the city’s port were the main drivers of the economy during the 20th century, until the heavy industry in the city went into decline with the last blow being the termination of steel-making at the Llanwern Steelworks in 2001. Newport has gained city status in 2002 and this makes Wales’ newest city. It forms the gateway between Wales and England and it is geographically positioned between Cardiff and Bristol. The city is currently undergoing big changes, as numerous regeneration schemes have been both recently completed or proposed for the following years.

160000

120000

NEWPORT BRIDGE AND CASTLE 1784, PAINTED BY PAUL SANDBY

80000

40000 THE CITY DOCKS, 1910

0

1750 1830 1851 18801900 1920 1930 1960 1990 2011

POPULATION GROWTH 1750-2011

VIEW OF THE LLANWERN STEELWORKS PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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UK

WALES

NEWPORT

N AVE RG ABE NY m 32k

FF RDI

CA

x

EDINBURGH

m

k L 50 O T S RI

B

m

23k

x

x

BELFAST

POPULATION 3,065,000

POPULATION 146,000

x x M4

CARDIFF

BRISTOL

x

LONDON

POPULATION 64,000,000

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LONDON 220km


Pillgwenlly

The Pillgwenlly (Pill) ward of Newport once used to be a thriving, housing much of the dock activity and its workers at the start of the 20th century. Newport owes much of its growth to the dock industry and Pill was central to this and the wider development and growth of Newport as a whole. As Newport’s docks expanded during the first quarter of the 20th century, Pill witnessed rapid growth, expanding northwards towards the centre of the city. Due to the investment and confidence in the area, Pill saw several landmark buildings built along Commercial Road, reflecting the wealth and status of the area. With the decline of heavy industry in South Wales and the subsequent decline in dockland activity, Pill has undergone a marked change. The wards of Newport

Today, Pill is among the most deprived wards in Wales, with high rates of unemployment, economic inactivity, health issues and low levels of academic achievement. In addition to its social and economic issues, physical evidence of its decline is manifest through reduced building maintenance and occupancy, leading to high levels of building vacancy and dereliction.

PILLGWENLLY

POPULATION

AREA

PILLGWENLLY 6.43km2

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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NEWPORT 217km2

PILLGWENLLY

NEWPORT 145,000


LOWER SUPER OUTPUT AREAS WITHIN PILLGWENLLY

CITY CENTRE

4

3 1

THE CHOSEN SITE INDUSTRIAL

2

RESIDENTIAL NURSERY RECREATION OTHER PROPOSED DEVELOPMENTS BROWNFIELD COMMERCIAL EDUCATION

pillgwenlly land use -19-


employment The area of Pillgwenlly suffers from unemployment. The figure has increased dramatically over the past 10 years, while during the same period it has decreased in the majority of wards in Newport. Within the local area, the main reason for this increase, is the lack of jobs and qualifications. This is apparent in the case of the immigrant population where the majority do not have any qualifications and find themselves employed in part-time or other low wage jobs. The amount of jobs available at Pill is decreasing every year as more shops are closing down. It is expected that the regeneration of the city centre and opening of the new Friars Walk will have a further negative impact on the local businesses as fewer people would travel down to the neglected part of the city.

UNEMPLOYMENT (%)

ECONOMICALLY INACTIVE

ECONOMICALLY ACTIVE

RETIRED 32%

EMPLOYEE

68%

PART TIME

LONG TERM DISABLED SELF EMPLOYED LOOKING AFTER HOME

UNEMPLOYED

STUDENT

STUDENT OTHER

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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FULL TIME


0%

0 LQ

ity

immigrant population

al

0.79 LQ

55.5%

0.86 LQ

60.1%

0.93 LQ

64.8%

Average

69.5%

EMPLOYMENT [% OF ECONOMICALLY ACTIVE PEOPLE] 0 LQ

2001

0.79 LQ

55.5%

0.86 LQ

60.1%

0.93 LQ

64.8%

Average

69.5%

1.1 LQ

74.2% 2001

1.1 LQ

78.9%

1.2 LQ

83.6%

CITY CENTRE

gained

0%

PILL

2001

1.1 LQ 1.1 LQ 0 LQ

gained

pillgwenlly

1.2 LQ 0.26 LQ

Data geography: OA

EDUCATION [% OF PEOPLE WITH NO QUALIFICATIONS]

aged 16 to 74. ffice of National Statistics. Crown copyright & database right 2014-5.

2011

city centre

100%

2001

2001

Scale 1:21200

0 LQ 0.26 LQ

CITY CENTRE

2011

0%

0.51 LQ

6.1%

nts aged 16 to 74. t Office of National Statistics. (c) Crown copyright & database right 2014-5.

74.2% 78.9% 0% 83.6% 6.1% 100% 11.8%

or

city centre city centre

0.75 LQ

11.8% LQ DataShine is produced by 0.51 the BODMAS project at UCL. Visit http://www.datashine.org.uk/ for an interactive version. 0.75 LQ

17.5%

Average

23.2%

1.2 LQ

28.8%

1.5 LQ

34.5%

1.7 LQ

40.2%

,c11_ew_-QS601EW0002-QS601EW0001-oa-standard_dev-0.695630000-0.093639700-cb-YlGnBu-8-0

PILL

2011

2011

17.5%

pillgwenlly pillgwenlly Data geography: OA

Scale 1:2120023.2% Average

1.2 LQ

28.8%= 1000 people or

1.5 LQ

34.5%=

city centre white group

100%

pillgwenlly

Data geography: OA

= immigrants DataShine is produced by the project at UCL. 40.2% 1.7BODMAS LQ Visit http://www.datashine.org.uk/ for an interactive version.

Scale 1:21200

,c11_ew_-QS601EW0002-QS601EW0001-oa-standard_dev-0.695630000-0.093639700-cb-YlGnBu-8-0

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city centre city centre

or

100%

= 1000 people = 1000orpeople


separation

M CO

Pillgwenlly is separated from the city centre economically, socially and even physically. This separation has been caused by the area being neglected for many years while multiple attempts, both succesful and not, to redevelop the city centre have been taking place. When walking on the Commerical Street, from the city centre towards the area of Pillgwenlly on the south, you clearly notice all the commercial activity right at the top, people walking shopping and working. At one point, and almost at the middle of the Commercial Street, you reach Emersons Green and the infrastructure junction heavy with traffic. George Street is a main road in the city running across the city from east to west, over a bridge on the River Usk. It is a physical barrier in the case of accessing either side, and this caused the need to regenerate the square and its nodes. Once crossing across, it almost feels like you have walked into a different part of the city. The shops are either closed down, or empty with customers, pavements and walls are all dirty. This immediately creates a feeling of insecurity and makes the whole area eem unwelcoming.

IAL

RC

ME EET

STR

RS

S ON

E EM

CITY CENTRE

GR

N EE

ES

G OR

GE

ET

E TR

PILGWENLLY LLY

EN LGW

PI

SEPARATION LINE

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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deprivation

PILLGWENLLY DEPRIVATION WELSH INDEX OF MULTIPLE DEPRIVATION PILLGWENLLY LOWER SUPER OUTPUT AREAS

1

2

3

4

WIMD RANK

12

202

93

10

Income

21

183

134

22

Employment

53

390

356

10

Health

10

490

231

25

Education

81

443

36

68

Access to Services

312

260

434

911

Community Safety

96

205

167

50

Physical Environment

106

88

76

307

Housing

30

61

4

17

top 5% most deprived in Wales

top 10% most deprived in Wales

top 20% most deprived in Wales

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Montmouthshire & Brecon Canal

Built between 1792 and 1812, the Monmouthshire and Brecon Canal linked landlocked Brecon with Newport and the Severn Estuary. No longer a route for transporting fresh produce, stone and processed lime, it is now affectionately known as the Mon & Brec, and is one of the most picturesque canals in the UK. Initially food and coal was transported from the valley into the city via horse-drawn trams, which were later replaced by canals as the demand was growing, making the exchange more efficient. The new extension of the canal within Newport will provide a new waterfront for the city, freeing up a lot of land previously taken up by the Usk Way. These pieces of land have great potential for canal front development and the Newport Council will create a new specific masterplan covering them.v

PHOTOS OF THE CANAL IN THE PAST AND PRESENT

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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Agriculture

py of Monmouthshire, Brecon & ergavenny Canal

als All items

tled layer All items

map

BRECON

TALYBONT-ON-USK LLANGYNIDR CRICKHOWELL LLANGATTOCK GILWERN ABERGAVENNY GOVILON LLANFOIST LLANELLEN LLANOVER MAMHILAD

GOYTRE

PONTYPOOL

CWBRAN CANAL NEWPORT

TOWNS ALONG THE CANAL

INDEPENDENT FARMS ALONG THE CANAL -25-


food in the area

The ward of Pillgwenlly and particularly the southern part of Commercial Street, is characterised by the number of independent food shops available. Hot food takeaways, grocery stores and restaurants are owned by the immigrants that live in the area. Most of them sell food of particular country, either in raw or cooked form. These food shops are facing a crisis and are on the verge of extinction. The crisis started by the opening of the ASDA superstore which serves the shopping needs of most of the population of the area and even beyond. The independent food shops characterise the area and they should remain open. They need to be supported by the council but they are not. A £6m regeneration scheme took place in the area, but the money was mostly spent on improving some green and public space and other minor road improvements. Nothing was done on bringing more life to the neglected southern part of Commercial Street, and if nothing is done soon it will eventually ‘die’.

PART B: ANALYSIS OF NEWPORT

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restaurants

local food shops

hot food takeaways

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PARTPART C: PLANNING B: ANALYSIS POLICY OF NEWPORT STATEMENT

PART C

PLANING POLICY STATEMENT -29-


planning policy statement

This section responds to current policy and the context in which the masterplan has been formulated. For the development of the masterplan and building proposal the following documents were taken into consideration: the Planning Policy Wales (PPW) January 2016 on a national scale, the Newport City Council Local Development Plan (LDP) January 2015 on a local scale and the Technical Advice Note (TAN) 12. APPROPRIATE POLICY PLANNING POLICY WALES (PPW), 2016 This is a document that helps and guides Local Planning Authorities (LPAs) to draw up their own local development plans. It sets out the Welsh Government’s views and aspirations.

THE PROPOSAL It is though important to consider the wide and more specific objectives of both the PPW and the NDP in thinking th

NATIONAL LEVEL Relevant aims and objectives that LPAs should consider under the PPW: new sites should be identified in city for retail development and that any large scale outof-centre food supermarkets should not be allowed

THE SITE The proposed site is included in the Newport 2020 masterplan as a mixeduse development opportunity that also has the potential of becoming the city’s south gateway. The potential of the site is more than a private mixed-use development that sets its back on Newport’s industrial world. It is central within the ward of Pill and surrounded by tiny broken up communities that need to be stitched together. The retail activities are encouraged to stay active on the lower part of the commercial street

walking and cycling to be turned into the most attractive option for shorter journeys reducing the need to travel, especially by private car, by locating development where there is good access by public transport, walking and cycling; locating development near other related uses to encourage multi-purpose trips and reduce the length of journeys;

NEWPORT LOCAL DEVELOPMENT PLAN (LDP) . 2015 Every LPA in Wales has a statutory duty to prepare a LDP within the framework set by the PPW. Planning applications must be decided in accordance with the adopted LDP unless material considerations indicate otherwise.

inland waterways in Wales are principally for recreation purposes include policies and proposals relating to the development of transport infrastructure other than roads align jobs and services with housing, wherever possible, so as to reduce the need for travel, especially by car

TECHNICAL ADVICE NOTE 12 - 2014 DESIGN This document provides advice on achieving good design for people involved with the design development.

adopt a positive approach to development associated with farm diversification in rural areas

NEWPORT 2020 A masterplan for Newport’s city centre prepared by a private regeneration and planning consultancy company, hired and supported by Newport Council, Newport Unlimited,.

PART C: PLANNING POLICY STATEMENT

concentrate development that attracts large numbers of people, including retail and offices, in city, town and village centres; promote the re-use of previously developed, vacant and underused land

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NATIONAL LEVEL The Technical Advice Note 12 the scale and physical dimensions of the development should be decided in relation to its surroundings the development should be orientated in such a way as to integrate with its surroundings, maximise connectivity between the different spaces and at the same time maximise energy efficiency potential change in the needs of the users within the proposed development should be anticipated and designed for the development is to be designed in such a way that it provides safe spaces for people to use meanwhile improving safety on of the community surrounding it nationally recognised environment and sustainability standards should be incorporated as design solutions into new developments, maximising in this way energy efficiency and protecting the natural resources developments should exploit existing natural features, such as wind, sun and views people should have the choice of cycling, walking and using public transport to access the development while reducing the reliance on the car development has to meet any parking requirements and manage them appropriately


LOCAL LEVEL At a local level the NDP:

PROPOSAL LEVEL The proposal addresses the NDP because it:

encourages and supports any development that falls within the A3 Food and Drink use class as it supports that it has the potential to improve the city’s shopping and tourism role

it includes the creation of development falling within the A3 Food and Drink use class, such as cafes, hot food takeaways and a restaurant

development proposals should protect and enhance the appearance and connectivity of existing gateways into the city, routes include the Usk Way, M4 and others encourages the provision and enhancement of water based activities especially with the restoration of the Monmouthshire and Brecon canal encourages the public access to the riverfront in the form of footpaths and cycle routes promotes the enhancement and protection of existing green spaces that contribute to the visual character of an area promotes the reuse of underused or derelict land aims for the increase of active ground floor uses within the city centre under its local development order The Newport 2020 masterplan: divides the city centre into six districts that that focus on its redevelopment; Newport Gateway, Market, Retail, Riverside, Arts and Creative and Clarence Quarters. includes the chosen site as a mixed-use development opportunity that has the potential of becoming the city’s gateway on the south

it increases active ground floor uses by placing the surrounding the retail market with small food and drink shops on the ground floor joins the site and wider area to the River Usk through a network of pedestrian pathways the previously underused site has been fully reused into a world where the private meets the public reduces the carbon footprint of the building by selecting sustainable materials for the construction, such as engineered timber will attract further development and regeneration within the surrounding area encourages farm diversification and agricultural intensification in rural areas through the introduction of the canal extensions and the connection of the farms to the city reduce the use of car, as new convenient pedestrian and cycling paths are used, and also for the fact that it is located close to the city centre. walking and cycling are turned into the most attractive option for shorter journeys improves the safety of the community around it, by improving the quality of the public spaces and paths, and also by encouraging people to use the site at late hours goes along with the quarters’ division and introduces a new, sixth, one

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PART D

THE VISION -33-


the vision

The “Raw Synergy� project aims to create a centre for the ward of Pillgwenlly where both immigrants and locals are brought together through the common need of exchange and nourishment. It aims to create a meeting point and place of social interaction where people can buy food that can be tracked all the way back to the local farmer. The project proposed a new food system for the city of Newport, one that can stand as an example for other cities to follow.

Within the Newport 2020 masterplan document, the division of the city centre into five quarters is introduced. The quarter were formed according to the expertise or popular activity of the areas. This plan aims to give the city centre a distinctive character and attract potential investors and developers wanting to add to this vision.

MARKET GATEWAY

QUARTER

RIVERSIDE

QUARTER

I am proposing a sixth quarter that extends the city centre on the south, all the way until the chosen site. I believe that the area and Pillgwenlly should have a unique character, that will not only encourage a sense of belonging to its residents but also help to regenerate the area. The inner-city food hub will become the centre of this quarter, and will act as the supplier and provider for the rest of the activities and events that are to happen on it.

QUARTER

RETAIL QUARTER

what is Raw Synergy? RAW

CREATIVE

adjective not cooked

QUARTER

Raw, in terms of my proposal, has a double meaning: 1) fresh, raw produce sold in the market 2) raw food stripped out of all packaging and processing SYNERGY noun the interaction or cooperation of two or more organizations, substances, or other agents to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects

PILLGWENLLY REGENERATION FRAMEWORK

OLD DOCK REGENERATION PROJECT

Its all about bringing the people together, interacting and collaborating in achieving a common goal. For the system to work there has to be cooperation between the public and the private

PART D: THE VISION

QUARTER

-34-

FOOD


the proposed food system

the food system now harvesting

harvesting

growing

growing

transporting

ncparent tra

transparent

eating

transporting

packing

eating

retail

C O M M E R C I A L

retail

CITY CENTR

E

S T R E E T

CITY CENTRE

THE PROPOSAL C O M M E R C I A L

x packing

C O M M E R C I A L

S T R E E T

CITY CENTR

E

S T R E E T

-35-

THE

CITY


-36-


PART E

THE MASTERPLAN -37-


public consultation

A public consultation was held at the stage of identification, where I worked together with members of the public belonging to all classes and ethnicities. It proved to be a really successful exercise, for all of us. It was the first time we put our heads to work in the context of Newport both as a city but also through its diverse neighbourhoods. As a group, we identified some key characteristics and aimed to derive potential strategies out of them. These are presented to the column on the right. The main ideas we picked out were the connection of the farms to the city through a farmer’s market and a landscape strategy that wraps around the River Usk, acting as an inner-city park but also as flood attenuation. After this exercise with the public I got really inspired to look more into how the food system actually works and whether a potential alteration to it could benefit the region. It has sparked the big idea of reconstructing the food system and provided me with a need to identify and solve a serious global problem.

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-38-


FARM

urban farming boundary of Newport allotments farmers markets

FLOOD ATTENUATION

linear green space along river natural and softer flood measures retaining water body in old town docks

Year 25

Year 20

ZEBRA CROSSINGS

usk way redevelopment mixed transport use with traffic calming measures high street pedestrianisation reduce physical barriers

UNIVERSITY/RETIREMENT HOMES

mixed use tenure home-zones inner-city centre development development along riverside on available land densify city centre reduce car dependency

MIXED UP

diversity of uses within home-zones diversity on employment multi ethnic population to be addressed

-39-

Year 15

Year 10

Year 5

Re-Zoning

pedestrian routes intensification of green spaces links to wider green spaces along the SSSI riverside green line bus only routes tram system west to east link

Compulsory Purchase

GREEN

Comm.

High Density Resi.

Enterprise Zone


group masterplan

Following on the public consultation, the common ideas and goal set out by the representatives of the people of Newport were put together to form a single masterplan for the area. We called this “The People’s Masterplan”.

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-40-


-41-


regional scale diagram

The extension of the Montmouthshire & Brecon canal all the way to the south end of the Usk Way within Newport, will provide the existing farmers with a great opportunity of selling their produce to a larger population, while at the same time encourage new ones to be established. All the farmer based on the towns along the canal are to be included in the scheme. The development will strongly support and promote the small, independent and familyowned farms which are nowadays mainly supported by small town food shops. Under the scheme the farmers will be provided with the tools and knowledge on increasing their crop yield and intensify their agricultural methods . The idea is for the majority of the produce grown and harvested within the towns and villages along the canal to be transported and sold into Newport. The produce is moved on boats along the canal and includes everything but not meat, as the meat is processed on-site at the small slaughter house where animals are transported by motorised vehicles in an attempt to minimise potential health threats. Proposing this development, means that the farmer deals directly with the consumer, therefore completely removing all the unnecessary processes in between. The consumer knows exactly where the food is coming from, how it was grown and harvested and he/she can socially interact with the farmer for any further queries and requests. Once delivered, the scheme will become an example of alternative food transportation methods within a restructured food system. With the assistance of a dedicated team, the model can be applied on any city.

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-42-


city scale diagram

Newport City Council has set up a board on crafting a masterplan for the city centre, fulfilled by the year 2020. The board is made up from members within the council and by private commissions of independent specialist teams. The board “Newport Unlimited” has drawn up the “Newport 2020” masterplan for the city centre where key aims and objectives are stated. The masterplan introduces a division of the city centre into five different ‘quarters’. The creative and arts, riverfront, market, retail and gateway quarters. The proposal for a new Food Hub introduces a sixth quarter that fits in with the masterplan for the city. The “Food Quarter” includes the part of the Commercial Street south of the city centre that extends all the way to the food hub.

-43-


local scale diagram

The food hub acts as an anchor point for the area and a centre for the quarter, which includes all the independently owned food retail shops, restaurants and hot food takeaways along the city’s main street. The aim of the quarter is to provide the area of Pillgwenlly with a unique identification and create a sense of belonging for its people. Through this, the area will be known for its diversity in different flavours and ways of treating food. Further, the food hub is going to act as a local and private distributor for the members within the quarter. Commercial Street is visibly divided into two parts, the retail city centre and the Pillgwenlly area. The aim is to unify these two parts by creating a balance between them in terms of public activity. The close proximity of the site to the city centre allows for the two parts to collaborate and work together, making the city’s main street the social centre of the city.

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-44-


PILLGWENLLY PROPOSED CANAL EXTENSION WITHIN THE CITY

CITY CENTRE

COMMERCIAL STREET

RIVER USK THE FOOD HUB NEW CANAL EXTENSION

-45-

SEVERN ESTUARY


EET

masterplan COMMERCIAL STREET PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLING PATHS ALONG CANAL BELLE VUE PARK

BELLE VUE PARK

CITY CENTRE

PEDESTRIAN AN PATHS ALONG GREEN CORRIDOR

GREEN CORRIDOR

CANAL CROSSINGS MONTMOUTH & BRECON CANAL EXTENSION

RAW SYNERGY: THE INNER-CITY FOOD HUB

RAW SYNERGY: THE INNER-CITY FOOD HUB

THE SITE

THE SITE RIVER USK

RIVER USK

BELLE VUE PARK

RIDOR MONTMOUTH & BRECON CANAL EXTENSION -46-

M C

RAW SYNERGY: THE INNER-CITY FOOD HUB

THE SITE

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

CITY CENTRE

MONTMOUTH & BRECON CANAL EXTENSION


100m

COMMERCIAL STREET

PEDESTRIAN AND CYCLING PATHS ALONG CANAL

CITY CENTRE

CANAL CROSSINGS

BELLE VUE PARK

GREEN CORRIDOR MONTMOUTH & BRECON CANAL EXTENSION

RAW SYNERGY: THE INNER-CITY FOOD HUB

THE SITE

RIVER USK

scale 1:10000 -47-


removal of Usk Way

There is a strong desire of cities to accept the mistakes of the past, and push forward to correct them. This means taking a lot of risks and making sacrifices but as we can see on these three examples the results are always successful and doing something for the people, has numerous social, mental and physical benefits to the public health, the environment and the appearance to place. These three projects have been very inspiring to the development of my proposal, and it would not have been the same without them. They made me step out of my imagination and look at the proposal in real terms and picture it the Newport of today. A city on the rise, like all these three presented here.

UTRECHT, THE NETHERLANDS Similarly to Newport, the city of Utrecht is undergoing a huge regeneration with an aim to bring back its former glory. A big part the masterplan for the city is the restoration of the former canal that was running within the city, that was replaced by a motorway in the 1980s. The process of restoration has started in 2002 and it will be delivered in 2019. Utrecht has been the main source of inspiration for my bold proposal for the city. It proved to me that it is possible to bring back the canal, and the benefits and opportunities of it are unlimited.

1968

1983

2015

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-48-


PARIS, FRANCE

LONDON, UK In 1986 Richard Rogers proposed a visionary scheme, “London as it should be�, for the city of London. The proposal was to redesign the Embankment between Westminster and Blackfriars as a new riverbank and pedestrianised park. This meant for the replacement of a four-lane motorway that still exists today.

Major parts of the motorways making up the river-front of Paris have been dismantled in successful attempt to give back the banks of River Seine to the people. Public spaces, parks and cycling and walking paths have replaced the motorway.

-49-


food coming on water

BANGOK, THAILAND

VENICE, ITALY

Food is exchanged from boat to boat along the canals. It is celebrated running along the canal, moving from village to town. It is almost a holy ceremony that nowadays leaning towards the tourist side. It is a prime example that food can be more than a supermarket. More than buying and selling.

The city of Venice has a long tradition of trading with other parts of the Mediterranean. It was once the most powerful city on the sea and unlike most of the cities, almost nothing change in the way the city’s supplies are brought in. Although not self sufficient everything has to travel on a boat to reach the people of the city. Fish Market Fish are brought to the market via the canals, unloaded and sold directly at the stalls. This has inspired me to think that the food system could lose the process between sourcing the food and consuming it, the “middle-man”.

PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

-50-


PARIS, FRANCE

NEWPORT, WALES

The city of Paris has placed extremely strict constraints on road transport in a bid to make the city greener. Due to this a lot of pressure has been put on companies depending on road transport and large vehicles. The government’s decision has inspired the French supermarket chain Franprix to shift to the River Seine for a solution. Franprix now delivers to 135 of its 350 stores using the river. They claim that this initiative takes as many as 2,600 lorries off the city’s roads each year. The French are definitely seeing the River Seine as a great opportunity for both leisure and commerce.

The Montmouthshire & Brecon Canal in Newport was primarily introduced to assist the coal industry but it was soon discovered that it could be used in other ways as well. Farmers discovered that they could sell their produce to a greater market by transporting them through the canal. It was a lot quicker than walking and more convenient. This was the case until the railway was introduces and took over. My proposal for the city looks back at this precise moment. That was the golden era for in terms of trade and food supply. The canal extension i am proposing will provide the farmers with immense opportunities on exchanging on a city scale and the gap between the city and the countryside will be bridged.

-51-


the proposed canal extension

THE SITE

THE CANAL TODAY PART E: THE MASTERPLAN

THE PROPOSED CANAL EXTENSION

MOTORWAY -> CANAL

-52-


POTENTIAL SITE OPPORTUNITIES CREATED AND OPENED UP BY THE NEW CANAL EXTENSION AND REMOVAL OF THE MOTORWAY

RAW SYNERGY

-53-


-54-


PART F

THE BUILDING -55-


PART F: PLANNING THE BUILDING POLICY STATEMENT

-56-


“RAW SYNERGY” an inner-city food hub

RETAIL

FOOD

-57-

WHOLESALE


-58-


PART G

DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT -59-


introduction

This Design and Access Statement has been prepared in support of a full Planning Application and a Design Portfolio for “Raw Synergy”, a wholesale and retail food hub. As previously discussed, the food hub will be separated into two parts, wholesale and retail, and aims to reinstate food in the core of the people’s social life. The food system processes, from harvesting to consumption, become transparent and meantime encouraging a celebration of food and its values. “Raw Synergy” will provide consumers with fresh produce and meanwhile becoming a local centre and meeting point for the people of Pill. A place that brings together the world of immigrants and locals, two long-separated sides within Newport. PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

The proposed project has been formed around an understanding of the processes that make the food system and the implications resulting from the lack of transparency within it. The project is approached and developed by looking back in time on how the market was the social centre of towns and how food was celebrated within them. The design of this project is inspired by the collision of residential, commercial and industrial activities, that together form the immediate surroundings of the site. This document has been prepared in accordance with the Design and Access Statement guidelines specified by both the Welsh Government and CABE. It will outline and explain the proposed development and all the thinking involved behind all the decisions taken during the design and planning process in appropriate detail.

CONCEPT SKETCH OF THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT

-60-


the proposal: region to building

TRANSPORTING

BREEDING

THE FARMER

PRODUCTION

HARVESTING

LOCAL FOOD

PROCESSED

INDUSTRIES

FOOD PRODUCTS

TRANSPORTING THROUGH CANAL

RETAIL MARKET

SORTING

SELLING

STORAGE

WHOLESALE MARKET

LOCAL GROCERY STORES

RESTAURANTS

UNLOADING

SLAUGHTERING

THE “RAW SYNERGY” FOOD HUB

STALLS

HOT FOOD TAKEAWAYS

WASTE

PEOPLE

-61-


the site in the past

1800s-1900s The site used to be a muddy Pill/water inlet. This gave the name of the ward of Pillgwenlly also called “Pill” by its locals

1900s-1920s The Pill was covered, preparing for the Dry Dock creation

mark Information Group Ltd and Crown copyright 2016. FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY.

0

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60

80

100

120

Feb 28, 2016 20:12 140

160

Andreas Leonidou

200 m

180

University of the West of England

1900s-1960s The “Tredegar Dry Dock” was created and after a while it was surrounded by industrial specialists. It was firstly put to business in the 1900s and dismantled in the beginning of the 1960s due to the rapid decline of Newport’s port industry.

mark Information Group Ltd and Crown copyright 2016. FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY.

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Feb 28, 2016 20:13 140

160

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Andreas Leonidou

200 m

University of the West of England

1960s-1970s The dry dock has been dismantled and filled due to the rapid decline of Newport’s port industry. It gave way to two warehouses.

mark Information Group Ltd and Crown copyright 2016. FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY.

0

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60

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PHOTO OF THE DRY DOCK LOOKING NORTH (1914) WITH THE SITE HIGHLIGHTED

Feb 28, 2016 20:13 140

160

Andreas Leonidou

200 m

180

University of the West of England

1970s-TODAY One of the warehouses still exists on the site today along and houses kitchens and doors sold by a furniture company. A small scrapyard also exists on the site next to the warehouse on the northern end.

UCATIONAL USE ONLY.

0

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900

1000 m

Andreas Leonidou

PHOTO FROM A SHIP ON THE DRY DOCK LOOKING WEST TOWARDS THE COURTYBELLA TERRACE (1955)

University of the West of England

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

© Crown copyright and database rights 2016 Ordnance Survey (Digimap Licence). FOR EDUCATIONAL USE ONLY.

0

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60

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Feb 28, 2016 20:15 120

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200 m

Andreas Leonidou University of the West of England

-62-

PHOTO OF A SHIP WITHIN THE DRY DOCK, (1925)


the site today

THE UK

SW ENGLAND AND SW WALES

NEWPORT

-63-

PILLGWENLLY

THE SITE


understanding the site

The site is mostly surrounded by residential buildings but a substantial amount of industrial warehouses and sheds are located on the east and south.

RESIDENTIAL

This makes it clear that the site needs to responds to its context, basing the understanding of its surroundings on both activities. A division can be distinguished by this analysis that creates a unique importance on all sides of the site. 2 sides respond to the adjoining terrace houses 1 side faces the green space and car park 1 side faces the river and industrial activities The east side can be said to be the PUBLIC side as it forms the end of the city’s main street, the Commercial Street, and the west is the PRIVATE side due to the industries. The attempt to connect the site and users of the Food Hub to the River Usk will have to stitch the two divided parts of the city. The stitching can happen by informing the building of local building typologies, materials and appearances on both residential and industrial scale.

SURROUNDING BUILT ENVIRONMENT

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

-64-


UNDERSTANDING THE SCALE OF THE SITE

INDUSTRIAL

FLOATING HARBOUR, BRISTOL

NEWPORT MARKET

R-BLOCK, UWE, BRISTOL

SANTA CATERINA MARKET, BARCELONA

-65-


2 STOREYS

2 STOREYS

3 STOREYS

2 STOREYS 3 STOREYS

RE

SID

EN

TIA

L

COMMERCIAL

THE SITE TODAY

RESIDENTIAL

L

RESIDENTIA

L

ENTIA

RESID

L

ERCIA

COMM

RIVER USK

THE SITE

VIEWS FROM SITE

VIEWS FROM SITE

2 STOREYS 4 STOREYS

RESID

2 STOREYS

ENTIA

L

IAL

RESIDENT

THE SITE

IAL

RESIDENT

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

THE SITE

PUB

-66-

L

ENTIA

RESID

THE SITE


THE SITE PROTECT EXISTING TREES OUSE

H WARE

THE SITE

PARK AND GREEN CORRIDOR OPPORTUNITY

4 STOREYS

4 STOREYS

2 STOREYS

CITY ICON

4 STOREYS

L

ENTIA

RESID

RESIDENTIAL

RESIDENTIAL

THE SITE

VIEWS FROM SITE

3 STOREYS

2 STOREYS RESIDENTIAL

INDUSTRIAL GRADE II* LISTED PUBLIC REST ROOMS

-67-


site analysis city centre 1.2km

city centre 1.2km

I ERC MM CO

AL

AL

I ERC MM CO

EET STR

EET STR

The site is situated between two worlds; industrial and residential. It could potentially address both and attempt to bridge the gap between them

The linear car parking/green space offers an opportunity into connecting the site directly to the sports centre and majestic Belle Vue park on the west. The car parking can be removed and give way for a formal park and green corridor.

High amount of traffic on two major roads around the site create heavy noise and air pollution

Neglected land offers great opportunity of expanding the area towards the river

SO U

TH

DIS

TRI

BU

TO R

RO AD

CO M

ME

RC I

AL

ST

RE

ET

The city centre is located within a close range from the site, something that offers an opportunity to expand the centre and attract activity to the are around the site

the site has the potential to become a mediator for all physical and social traffic types

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

-68-


-69-


use

The site’s main use is the distribution of food to the people. This is done through either a retail or wholesale way. The site is key for a food hub as it is at a junction of some of the most important routes of Newport: Commercial Street, South Distributor road, the new green corridor from Belle Vue Park and the newly extended Montmouth & Brecon canal. The people living in the area around the market have the worst health status of all Newport, caused by bad lifestyle and dietary choices Through its division between retail and wholesale, the food hub will not only benefit the individual residents of the surrounding area by providing employment and locally sourced food, The farmers who up until now had limited distribution options are benefited from the production of more food for a bigger market, as well as the local food shops and restaurants which can now reduced their expenses by buying locally from the wholesale market. Food is arriving through the canal and unloaded in the sorting space, located between the retail and wholesale markets. It is then distributed to each of the markets according to the needs of the day. At the end of the day, whatever is left on the retail market is stored to the wholesale market.

PUBLIC PRIVATE

On the other side of the canal, animals arrive on lorries, from the same towns connected to the canals, and unlodaed directly in the leirage part of the abbatoir. They are then slaughtered and move on to be distributed through the small retail and wholesale markets. Whatever is left at the end of the day is given to the restaurant and hot food takeaways. PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

-70-


RETAIL MARKET SORTING AREA

WHOLESALE MARKET

PROPOSED PARK

CANAL WHOLESALE MEAT MARKET RETAIL MEAT MARKET ABATTOIR

-71-


schedule of accommodation

COMMERCIAL STREET

Ancillary Uses The building includes spaces that are not related directly to buying or selling but are of great significance to its everyday running for both the visitors and employers. Two offices exists on the ground floor, and support ordering system and stock taking for both the retail and wholesale markets. Further, two rest-room spaces are located on the ground floors, one serves the visitors and the other the employers. Adjoining the rest-room, a small pantry and an outdoor courtyard is situated, and serves the needs of work and lunch breaks for the employers on both markets. Another rest-room space is located on the upper floor, that serves the visitors of the bar and restaurant. The employers of these two facilities have access to a small outdoor courtyard that connects directly to the ground floor courtyard.

NEWPORT MARKET

PROPOSED CANAL EXTENSION

Raw Synergy does not compete with the Newport Market located on the north end of Commercial Street, but supports it through providing it with daily produce. This creates two major food points serving both the north and south of the city. The site also has an industrial side to it, responding therefore to the industrial context on the south. On this part, an inner-city abattoir is introduced, where live animals are brought, slaughtered and then sold both retail and wholesale. This process takes place within the site, in support to the proposal’s aim of creating a transparent food system for Newport, where the people know exactly what they are eating and where it came from.

RAW SYNERGY FOOD HUB

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

-72-


-73-


scale & amount

The building’s size on the ground is driven by the aim of the site on becoming the centre of the new “Food Quarter” in the city. This results in large and open interior spaces. On one part, people have to be able to move freely and stand and stop as they wish within the retail market, either they are shoppers or plain visitors. In the interior, more space is given to circulation rather than to the market stalls, and this allows for the unexpected social interactions to happen in an unobstructed manner between the people. The kind of interactions where you stop in the middle of whatever you are doing just to talk and communicate with someone. Specifically, the area will benefit from 95 new jobs covering a wide range of qualifications. The number is brought up to 115 when temporary events and activities happen on the flexible corridor and main square outside.

The highest part of the pitched roof being 11m above the ground. The tall element of the building has the intention to reflect the existing industry surrounding the site on the south combining it with the typology of traditional indoor markets. The highest point of the building is 2m higher than the highest residence on the north of the site. This decision has been made with the intention that the market will be seen not only by the people being within the site but also be visible from all the way up the Commercial Street and the City Centre. This will create a symbol for the area, higher than anything else around it. A symbol that creates muchneeded identity for the area and promotes a sense of belonging for its people.

The market stalls are designed to be small and intimate spaces where the public meets the private and exchange happens. Their scale has been designed according to the needs of the employer, giving him space to move freely between the products while providing space for seating. As most of the products are located outside the stalls, the area inside is designed as small as possible to maximise the circulation around them.

The new canal extension has divided the site into two parts. This physical division sets up clear restrictions for the proportions that the buildings can take up on the ground. The size of the building is following these restrictions, and squeezes between the canal on the south and the residential developments on the north, taking up the maximum space possible while providing room for circulation and access wrapping around it.

SLAUGHTER HOUSE

Except from the visual impact explained earlier, Raw Synergy’ effect and impact on the area is immense. For the first time since the closure of the dry dock, people actually have a reason come down at the most south part of Newport’s main street. The large scale of the food hub and the diversity of uses within it, provides people with multiple reasons for being within this area.

-74-

The jobs created within the building are just a small number of the improvement in employment rates across the city and region on the north of it. The development of the food hub predicts the creation of around 300 more jobs supporting the food supply chain, from the intensification of the farms to the expansion of small local food shops in Newport.

The local and independent food shops are going to benefit from being supplied with lower cost products, directly from the wholesale market. The shops are also benefited from the pedestrian traffic increased in the area and especially along Commercial Street.

RETAIL MARKET

11m

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

IMPACT ON WIDER AREA

The open public areas of leisure and circulation are large and open while at the same time high enough to promote a friendly and open atmosphere where people feel comfortable using this space for their everyday shopping or leisure.

WHOLESALE MARKET

TERRACED HOUSE

6m

8.5m


GROUND FLOOR

PUBLIC

UPPER FLOOR

PRIVATE

PUBLIC

PRIVATE

STAIR AND LIFE ACCESS TO UPPER FLOOR

9 sqm

47 x MARKET STALLS

407 sqm

SEATING SPACE ABOVE STALLS

50 sqm

RESTAURANT KITCHEN

25 sqm

STAIR ACCESS TO UPPER FLOOR MARKET SEATING SPACE

4 sqm

CLEANING CLOSET

12 sqm

FLEXIBLE CORRIDOR

165 sqm

STORAGE

10 sqm

REST ROOMS

35 sqm

EMPLOYEES PANTRY

22 sqm

2 x RESTAURANT SEATING

77 sqm

BAR

8 sqm

RAMP ACCESS TO UPPER FLOOR

45 sqm

EMPLOYEES COURTYARD

33 sqm

BAR SEATING SPACE

50 sqm

EMPLOYEES OUTDOOR BALCONY

10 sqm

CIRCULATION

385 sqm

WASTE

13 sqm

REST ROOM

30 sqm

STAIRS TO UPPER FLOOR BALCONY

4 sqm

REST ROOM CORRIDOR

8 sqm

REST ROOM

14 sqm

CORRIDOR

55 sqm

2 x OFFICES

50 sqm

SORTING ROOM

67 sqm

CIRCULATION

55 sqm

REFRIGERATED ROOM

50 sqm

PLANT ROOM

15 sqm

MAIN WHOLESALE MARKET

380 sqm

SUBTOTAL TOTAL

478 sqm

1177 sqm

380 sqm

NIA 1655 sqm

53 sqm

NIA 433 sqm NIA 2088 sqm 11% DROP

SUBTOTAL TOTAL

GEA 1860 sqm

GEA 487 sqm GEA 2347 sqm

S

* NIA = NET INTERNAL AREA GEA = GROSS EXTERNAL AREA

BUILDING FLOOR AREA -75-


scale & amount

PEOPLE The overall daily footfall within the site, on both retail and wholesale markets, averages at 1000 people during the day, and 200 during the night with an assumption of an extra 300 and 200 during the weekend and public holidays accordingly.

675 450

The footfall will be far greater on the retail market as it is not only used by regular shoppers but also by visitors and other people during work breaks.

225 0 04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00 04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00

These numbers are expected to rise in the future as more farmers and traders are signed up to the hub, and also the tourist destination side of it will start to have an impact attracting visitors from other parts of the country and beyond.

Sorting

20 15 10 5

Flexibility of opening times was a major driver and shaped a lot of design related decisions. The aim was to make the retail side of the building available and open to the public even after the market is closed in the afternoon. In this way there will be life on the site and surroundings until the late hours of the day, making the area a lot safer while giving more options to the people during the night. This was achieved by the introduction of an exterior ramp that gets you from the square outside of the retail market, up its second floor where the restaurant and bar is located. The building immediately becomes more diverse in its use as it serves the needs of a wider range of people during both night and day.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

Retail

900

0 04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00 04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00

Wholesale

40 30 20

Amount 10 of people 0

04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00 04:00 07:00 10:00 13:00 17:00 21:00 01:00

Time of the day weekday

-76-

weekend


FRESH PRODUCE MARKET STALLS 24 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED AT 16 MARKET STALLS AS VENDORS SELLING FRESH AND RAW PRODUCE

OFFICE SPACES 10 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED AT 2 OFFICE SPACES IN CHARGE OF THE MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

INDEPENDENT FOOD SHOP WORKERS ARRIVE AT THE WHOLESALE MARKET TO COLLECT THEIR ORDERS

FOOD AND DRINK MARKET STALLS 38 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED AT 28 MARKET STALLS PREPARING HOT FOOD FOR TAKEAWAY AND CONSUMPTION ON THE OUTDOOR TERRACE

MAINTENANCE AND CLEANING 5 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED

WELSH RESTAURANT 4 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED AS WAITERS SERVING 44 WHEN AT FULL CAPACITY

WHOLESALE MARKET 8 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED AT THE WHOLESALE MARKET AND IN CHARGE STORING THE PRODUCE TAKING CARE OF ORDERS

BUILDING USERS -77-

SOCIAL INTERACTIONS PEOPLE COME TO THE MARKET IN ORDER TO INTERACT WITH ONE ANOTHER

WELSH RESTAURANT 2 CHEFS AND 1 COOKING ASSISTANT ARE EMPLOYED PREPARING FOOD FOR 44 WHEN AT FULL CAPACITY

SHOPPING PEOPLE COME TO THE MARKET IN ORDER TO DO THEIR FOOD SHOPPING

SORTING SPACE 3 PEOPLE ARE EMPLOYED UNLOADING THE BOATS STORING AND CLEANING PRODUCE

FOOD AND DRINK PEOPLE COME TO THE MARKET IN ORDER TO ENJOY FOOD AND DRINK


layout

The layout of the building within the site is associated with its context, the canal and existing residential development. It echoes the layout of the terrace houses on the north side in order to blend in with its surroundings without having an unnecessary impact on the road system layout around it. Such an impact is of not benefit as it will alienate the site to the people living in the area. The building also follows the layout of the canal with the purpose of creating a prominent public walkway along it, supported by ground floor retail activity. Trees and hedgerows and small public green spaces are laid out in such a way within the site in order to hide the private activities from direct public view. This separation has been generated from the need to visually identify the public and private use within the site. To achieve this greenery has been chosen over something more physical and opaque to allow for views upon personal decision.

The buildings are orientated along the canal. Also the wholesale is placed on the industrial side of Newport, and the retail is placed on the residential. The long side of the market spaced is orientated south so as to get maximum light in through the openings on the facade above the food stalls. Everything is orientated in linear form to create a physical and also visual connection from the park through the proposed project and onto the River Usk. Physical because you can physically walk it and visual because there is a clear view from the park, over the canal and onto the river. The wholesale market has been shifted slightly towards the north, to create a corner on the upper floor that offer unbeatable views. The corner is sitting right at the end of the flexible corridor where informal is located.

The main entrance of the retail market is placed at the junction between the end of Commercial Street and the newly developed park both of which are the most popular access routes to the site. The canal acts as a divider within the site, separating the market building with the meat facilities across the canal. It is purposely further divided into two more parts, the retail (public) and wholesale (private). This way the site gives way to some industrial activity, strengthening the big goal of food transparency. The connection between the two buildings is via the front of the site on the west or through a pedestrian bridge over the canal which closes the “public loop�.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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20m

MAJOR PUBLIC ACCESS POINTS

PUB

LIC

BOTH PROPOSED BUILDINGS ARE FOLLOWING THE LAYOUT OF THEIR SURROUNDING

SID

E

main entrance

PRI

VAT ES

RESIDENCES ON EITHER SIDE

IDE

THE CANAL DIVIDES THE SITE INTO TWO PARTS

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layout development FOOD PORT, WEST KENTUCKY, USA OMA, 2015

TRANSPARENT FOOD SYSTEM The food port combines all the processes within the food system that i have analysed earlier, all into one site. The space required to do this is huge, and extremely difficult for a similar project to happen in Newport, as there is no land available in that size. The project has been a great inspiration for me and made me look more on the way the public world comes together with the private and coexist perfectly under one roof.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

ANCIENT AGORA OF ATHENS

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This image shows OMA’ Food Port deconstructed and placed within one of the initial sites of my selection within Newport. The food system processes could potentially broken apart and placed with such a manner or split between a number of sites covering the city. This will result in a closed innercity food system, which will indeed become transparent for the people.

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layout development

I have identified sites that were either neglected or misused and applied the concept of OMA’s Food Port. This image shows the deconstruction of the project within a city scale this time. Each site holds an individual process within the food system. In an attempt to make the food system transparent and give the power to the hands of the people, education centres are included were both professionals and members of the public can inform and educate themselves for various food-relating issues and solutions ranging from healthy eating to intense agricultural methods. Each centre relies on another to complete the cycle of the system.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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VALPARAISO, CHILE

THE CONCEPT OF HAVING MULTIPLE NODES PLACED ALONG MAJOR INFRASTRUCTURE

CONNECTING THEM VIA AN ARTILLERY ELEVATOR

VISION reconstruct the industrialised food system and support the local farmers

DESIGN ONE PART OF THE PROCESS ON ONE SITE

FOOD DISTRIBUTION= MARKET, WAREHOUSE, GROCERY STORE

connect once again the city and countryside CANAL INTRODUCTION where is it going to end? in the site? on the river? tidal water?

THE BUILDING ON THE PARTICULAR SITE CAN MARK THE BOUNDARY OF THE CITY AND CREATE A NEW EDGE ON THE SOUTH

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layout development

Integrating all the sites into on area, open for people to investi

An attempt to turn the canal into a space for recreation and leisure, surrounded by a public square and market on either side

The corridors within market stalls turn into extensions of the streets surrounding the site on the ground

The canal is an extension of the river. The idea of a tide-pool which filled up every time the tide of the river was highwas tested, which was adjoined by a curve shaped market building that makes space for a public square in front

The idea of a “double loop” The buildings on the site have two sides, a private and public side. All the sides join together to create a “private loop” and a “public loop” The concept remains within the proposed site plan

Green spaces are strategically used to block noise and views of the motorised roads The tide-pool is surrounded by buildings on two sides, and create beautiful canal side spaces of recreation and leisure. which accommodate a raw produce market and a Market stalls are placed on both sides of the canal, and the triangular shaped building cooked food market, that create public squares at is the community space and auditorium. their entrances.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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The introduction of a Food Port on a secondary site close to the original one was soon put down as there was no need of having a port where food is dropped off and then transported to the market. It can all happen within the original market


Following the industrial building typology of the built surroundings

ne, brings a complete food system all in one large igate without having to travel.

The canal is not connected to river usk anymore, but it is a branch off the wider, extended canal .The concept of the loop is still carried along by the introduction of bridges along the canal.

The idea of creating a “public” and “private” loop became fundamental to my design development. Splitting the side, and bringing together the private with the public world, strongly supports the aim of the proposal, to create a transparent food system. Interaction between the two sides can happen all within the site.

Small hills are added to the site to create a boundary to the west and enclose the activity within the centre where the canal gets wider. This drawing sparked the concept of creating an enclosure within the site

The functions of the site at this moment were as follows: RETAIL MARKET WHOLESALE MARKET SLAUGHTER HOUSE RESTAURANT The typology of buildings and layout within the site has changed in the final proposal, but the driving concept still remains.

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appearance

Looking back at traditional town markets, the pitched roof is seen as the main element of the market, creating a flexible and airy interior space underneath. This element is applied onto the retail market building, but rotated 90 degrees, in an attempt to rethink the market building in a more contemporary way. This way the roof is facing both the city centre and adjacent terraced houses. The roof further creates a visual link between the park on the west and river on the east, and extends to cover the whole retail market. The form of the roof and building in general is echoing the industrial buildings located on the south, taking the materiality, simple rectangular forms and the pitched roofs. The wholesale market follows the same rectangular form but unlike the retail market, it has a flat roof to support the green roof on the top. The green roof provides the building with great thermal performance, much needed to keep the stores produce in a steady cool temperature during both summer and winter.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

Openings The openings on the facade of the building are drawn upon the function of each floor and space within it. On the ground floor, market stalls make up three sides of the building, and the openings are designed according to them. Each market is designed individually to be flexible on its opening times and therefore has its own door and an unglazed opening allowing for retailing. The north facade (fourth side) is carved is such a way to allow for people using the ramp to be able to look inside the market as they are going up or down. The upper floor features multiple openings to allow for specific views towards the river and park, something which creates a contrast between the enclosed ground floor. Apart from the internal function, the purpose of this contrast is to act as a visual cue for people approaching from afar. Just like the openings along the ramp, it is an interpretation of what they can expect when the enter on either floor level.

Summer/Winter At winter time the roof of the retail market keeps it form by having all the windows closed with the purpose of reducing heat loss. During the summer though, windows are opened on either sides of the pitched roof to allow for warmer air to escape. Secondly, the glazed main entrance of the building is kept closed during the winter and it only opens by people when they want to enter. During the summer the doors are kept open, something that activates the public square outside and creates opportunities for activities. Further, this feature makes the whole market more inviting while at the same time allowing for cross ventilation across the openings on the upper floor.

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Day/Night The time of the day has a major impact on the appearance of the building. During the ground floor is active on both the retail and wholesale markets and this means that entrances and market stalls are open. All of which are closed during the night where all the activity is transferred to the upper floor. At that time the ground floor becomes a border where people can sit at night-time and enjoy the canal. This border creates a physical pedestrian path which is lit by the building during this time. At night the main facade is still the one on the east, but the entrance is shifted on the side, as the ramp is the only way for people to get up and in the upper floor. The ramp is brightly lit and the main market entrance is not lit at all, in order to allow for clear identification of access points.


UPPER FLOOR

The building is designed around internal and external views. It responds to the natural environment while blocking out unnecessary views towards the slaughter house and terraced houses on the south. On the exterior, the openings are sculpted in such a way so as to allow for direct views just to the River Usk, canal, and new green spaces.

Views towards newly redeveloped park are offered from the upper floor

On the interior, the upper floor is used as a viewing platform where people have views inside the market stalls on the floor below, able to look at and even talk to other people.

FLE

XIBL

E CO

RRI

DO

On the south elevation, the openings are take the form of the roof and run continuously from the structure of the building to the screed floor of the floor above the market stalls.

R

RES SEA TAURA TIN NT G

Residents of the houses on the north of the market are offered views inside the market space from their bedrooms. The openings are located high enough so as for users of the market People standing on the deck above not to be able to look the market stalls have views on inside the houses every corner of the market and also views of the flexible corridor which is at the same height

OPENINGS / VIEWS STRATEGY

CA

FE/

BAR

ARE

A

Views towards canal, green space, river usk and transporter bridge GROUND FLOOR

While people are walking up the ramp they are offered small glimpses of the internal market space. Each step they take the perspective changes, therefore every view is unique

RAMP

A small opening is placed on the wall dividing the market stalls so as to allow for visual connection to happen for visitors standing on either end.

MARKET SPACE

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appearance MATERIALITY

The building has been designed to stand out both from a distance and from within the local area. Due to the fact that the building is located between industrial and residential neighbourhood it addresses both through its typology and materiality.

LeMay CAR MUSEUM, TACOMA, USA LARGE ARCHITECTURE, 2012

The surrounding industrial warehouse buildings have an impact on both the materiality and appearance of the building, on the exterior skin. The idea of a contrast between exterior and interior

Viewing the building from afar one can see a metal building with two large openings, and subconsciously expecting to find something similar inside. A typical industrial shed where cars are just dumped around, but instead what you find is this timber frame structure that makes the interior space look nothing like the exterior faรงades. I was intrigued by the element of surprise within this project and applied a similar concept on my proposal.

THE RIVERSHED, CEREDIGION, WALES FRESHWEST, 2016

Similar concept exists on a much smaller scale, within this office space. Hard and cold on the outside. Soft and warm on the inside.

In this 1:1 drawn detail section i have applied the concept of a contrast between interior and exterior materials. Metal rainscreen dresses the building on the outside, and timber is composing the interior spaces. The visitor cannot see what the user sees. They both perceive two different buildings in a sense. THE CONCEPT

SCALE 1:1 (REDUCED TO FIT) PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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THE EAST ELEVATION OF THE BUILDING OCCUPYING THE SITE

THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE SITE

THE BUILDING OCCUPYING THE SITE

The proposed building addresses the industrial side of its context not only by applying the typology of the industrial shed pitched roof, but also by following the material palette of these buildings on the exterior skin.

LEARNING FROM THE SITE AND ITS SURROUNDINGS -89-


appearance MATERIALITY

The exterior skin of the both the retail and wholesale markets reflects the typologies of the industrial sheds and warehouses located adjacent to the site. Metal panels are used for the skin of the retail market, and corrugated metal sheets for the wholesale markets. The facades of these two parts are not the same so as to create the division between private and public that can be identified easily by the users. The cold materials is what you see on the outside, approaching the building, touching the building. The warm materials form the internal spaces, and reflect the environment of the space and the change between outside and inside. The contrast aims to stand as a symbol for the people of Pillgwenlly as it is their hidden secret of the area and one has to explore in order to fully experience and understand what the space really is about.

EXTERIOR

INTERIOR

ROOF aluminium insulated panels

WHOLESALE MARKET SKIN corrugated aluminium sheets

RETAIL MARKET SKIN aluminium panels

TERRACES red cedar decking

FLOOR screed

CLADDING western red cedar

The internal spaces are made out of glulam and crosslam timber structure which are left exposed. The stalls made out of crosslam timber which is left exposed on the areas within the market space. The remaining walls on the upper floor feature timber cladding. The retail market has been designed to be a continuation of the street, and this everyday informality is carried inside the building and extended to its bare concrete floor. All materials are sourced within 25 miles from the site in an attempt to reduce the carbon footprint of the building during its construction.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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STALLS CLT panels - spruce

ROOF aluminium insulated panels


EXTERNAL VIEW OF THE BUILDING

APPROACHING THE SITE FROM COMMERCIAL STREET

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INTERNAL VIEW OF THE BUILDING

FLEXIBLE CORRIDOR ABOVE MARKET STALLS

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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landscaping

Aims: -to inform the user of the different levels of privacy and accessibility within the site -to block unwanted noise and views -boost the wildlife population in the area -increase the accessible green areas of the surrounding areas -create a direct link from the green corridor to River Usk, through the site -improve the visual and sensory qualities of the area GROUND Green corridor On the end of the site, the former car park is redesigned as a linear green space that connects directly to the Belle Vue Park, therefore becoming the green corridor to the site. All the trees within it have been protected while the car park spaces gave way for more green space and pedestrian paths. The permeable surfaces hard landscaping surrounding them, bleed out into the impermeable paths in an attempt to encourage the everyday use of the green surfaces. The green link transfers pedestrians into the site through two zebra-crossing that lead directly to the main entrance of the retail and meat market on either side of the canal on the east.

The wholesale market and its car park are surrounding by a small scale linear green space of leisure and environmental purposes. On one side, bound by the canal’s pedestrian paths, it serves leisure purposes acting as a park with views of both the canal and River Usk and also a place of shade during the summer. Further, the evergreen trees, of height 6-8m, shade the wholesale market all-year-round in order to reduce heat gain, allowing it to maintain its cool storing temperature without the consumption of substantial energy. They also hide the parking space out of view from the canal and its paths. Narrow paths make the green space and pedestrian path accessible from the canal side. They also bring the public right on the south facade of the wholesale market where small windows are located allowing for views inside it. A similar landscape strategy takes place on the other side of the canal where trees hide the abattoir and meat market for the both the people on the ground and residents inside their houses. The evergreen trees of height 8-10m protect the building, and specifically the animal carcasses from getting contaminated due to direct sunlight.

Canal routes The paving of the pathways along the canal within the site, is different than the rest of the hard surfaces so as to be a clear route for emergency, waste collecting and earlymorning delivery vehicles. These surfaces are covered with impermeable materials which allow water to be easily drained into the canal.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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A

E

B

F

C

G

D

H


20m GREEN PEDESTRIAN BOULEVARD

B

RETAIL MARKET G

WHOLESALE MARKET

F

A

E

D H

C

views towards the

parking and private facilities are filtered by the greeneries

noise from the motorised road blocked by the greeneries surrounding it

B G

ABATTOIR

MOTORISED ROADS GREEN AREAS GREEN PEDESTRIAN BOULEVARD

PEDESTRIAN ONLY AREAS [IMPERMEABLE]

PRIVATE PARKING PUBLIC PARKING

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landscaping

The wholesale market needs to be kept cooler than the retail market. Food products stored in the market need a lower temperature to be preserved for longer. It has been designed with an extensive green roof on the top, that not only boosts the biodiversity of the place, increases the thermal performance of the interior storage spaces. This lowers significantly the use of mechanical cooling. The green space adjacent to the market follows the same principles where, evergreen trees block direct sunlight to the market. The only openings on the south elevations are the ones located close to the ground to allow for people to look inside. It is naturally illuminated by larger openings placed on the north elevation.

ASH

1

The trees surrounding the building have been carefully selected so as to provide shade at all times on the wholesale market and shade upon the pedestrian paths just on the sunnier days during the summer.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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MAGNOLIA GRANDIFLORA ‘GALISSONIÈRE’

SEDUM

2

3

RUPESTRE

BOMBUS TERRESTRIS

3

4

SEMPERVIVUM

GREAT TIT

3

5


W

E

S

green roof

3 1

deciduous trees

2

pedestrian path shaded in the summer not shaded in the winter

evergreen trees CANAL

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4

5


landscaping MODEL AT SCALE 1:500

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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FLOODING AND DRAINAGE

The site is prone to flooding and a low risk flooding event occurs every 5-10 years. The strategically placed green space and the new canal extension are to fight against flooding in the area and bring it down to extremely low risk. In case of a flooding, all the excess water is attracted by the green spaces and put back to the ground. The water that remains on any impervious surface is drained by flowing into the canal.w

FLOOD RISK

TAKEN FROMENVIRONMENTAL AGENCY

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The main aim of the proposal in terms of infrastructure is to reduce the trafffic in the area, and especially on the two major roads that make the site’s boundaries, on the southeast and northwest. These roads cause a substantial noise problem for the area which is the main reason people do not use it regularly today.

LE

VU

EP AR

K

GR

EEN

CO R

RID

OR

PED

EST

The aim of the proposal to connect people back to River Usk from the site and beyond was made possible through he introduction of pedestrian paths that run all the way from Belle Vue Park, through the site and connect to the newly developed pedestrian walkway by the river. This pedestrian path was made possible by removing two of the four lanes of the South Distributor road that run along the river on the city of the city. The road is a major barrier that blocks the city away from the river and by removing two lanes, it is possible to be accessed more conveniently through various pedestrian crossings along its length.

RIA

NIS

ED

RO AD

WHOLESALERS PARKING

CANAL

MEAT WHOLESALERS PARKING

PUBLIC PARKING

SL

The traffic in the core of the site is pedestrian only for the reason that two pedestrian paths have been created along the canal the lead to the square in front of the retail market. These paths connect to the existing canal ones that run all the way to Brecon.

R TE

H

G AU H O E

US

RR OA D

INFRASTRUCTURE DIAGRAM

BEL

IM

AN DIS SOU

G IN

TH

AD LO

UN

TRIB

AL

UTO

services and infrastructure

NEW MOTORISED ROUTES EXISTING MOTORISED ROUTES NEW PEDESTRIANISED ROUTES

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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RIVER USK


SERVICES AND FACILITIES

NON-FLEXIBLE SEATING FLEXIBLE SEATING PUBLIC REST ROOM BOAT LOADING/UNLOADING BICYCLE PARKING BUS STOP PRIVATE CAR PARKING PUBLIC CAR PARKING WALKING/CYCLING PATH

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access

The close proximity of the site to the city centre, makes it convenient for people to access it by the preferred means of walking and cycling. Two new bus stops are included in the proposal and are located on the west side of the side, in front of the main entrance of the retail market. The bus stops connect the site to the north of Newport, via a new linear bus line starting from the city’s main bus station. Three new parking lots are included in the proposal, where the biggest one, on the southeast corner of the site, serves the needs of public. The parking lot is accessed via the South Distributor Road only, which has been turned into a dual-lane road to give way for the new pedestrian path along the River Usk. The other two parking lots are private and serves the needs of the two wholesale markets on either side of the canal. These are used only by delivery vehicles and local business owners desiring to buy their supplies in wholesale form.

HOW PEOPLE ARE TO ARRIVE AT THE SITE?

12%

24%

48%

16%

Walk Cycle Bus Car

TO THE SITE

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE RAMP

day

night

WHEELCHAIR ACCESSIBLE INTERIOR LIFT MAIN ENTRANCE IS STEPFREE AND ACCESSIBLE BY ALL

TO THE BUILDING

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access WASTE COLLECTION AND EMERGENCY VEHICLES ACCESS

In case of emergency, the vehicles are to use a small part of the pedestrian path along the canal to access the secondary entrance to the retail market, and entrance to the sorting space. In case of emergency within the retail market itself, the vehicles arrive in front of the retail market and use the motorised road. The market is placed adjacent to the road, with open space between them which makes it easier for the vehicles to access the building.

WASTE VEHICLE ROUTE

WASTE POINT

Waste is placed on the back of the building and on a separate closed space attached to the wholesale market, in order to hide it from plain view and prevent any bad odours to escape on the surroundings. Waste is to be collected on early morning when the number of users within the site is at a minimum. This allows the waste collection vehicles to access the waste point via the new pedestrian and cycle road on the north and back of the building.

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

EMERGENCY VEHICLE ROUTE

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E TRE

EYE

NT

HE

STR

EET

NG

PO IN

T

SO

ETI

EET

ME

STR

IN

WEL L-LI T PA THW AYS

SO

HE

EY E

NT

V

WELL-LIT PATHWAYS

ES

EY O N TH E ET

RE ST

By becoming the food quarter of the city, the area of Pill is given a unique identification and character, with the new food hub as its centre point. This promotes a sense of ownership and responsibility within the people living in the area, and by feeling the new building their own, they protect it and everything associated with it. Residents of the area are given employment and a place to connect with their friends and neighbours. Such a place is worshipped within the community, something that turns it into more than it actually is.

SO

MA

The introduction of the green corridor, canal pathways and river pathway means that more people are brought not only to the building and site, but to the surrounding area. The paths and surrounding minor pedestrian corridors are going to be well-lit during the night to improve the feeling of safety during the night. Additionally, some neighbours would decide to walk more now that the area they live is more accessible, so that increases the number as well.

EYE

S HE NT

The building is open 21 hours per day, from 04:00-01:00. The schedule is 12 hours longer than the one of the warehouse on the site today. There will always be somebody at within the building and the site. The number of people using an watching the streets and circulating on the surrounding area will be much greater than today. The more eyes on the street the safer the street is and the safer people feel to use it.

T

community safety

It is not just a place of exchange but also a place for people. The people will keep its activities safe through natural surveillance.

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planning application form FRONT PAGE

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets site plan

scale 1:1000

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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20m

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drawing sets ground floor plan

B

scale 1:200

B

A

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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A

N PUBLIC PRIVATE

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drawing sets upper floor plan scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets upper floor plan scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets east elevation scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets west elevation scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets south elevation scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets north elevation scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets section AA scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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drawing sets section BB scale 1:200

PART G: DESIGN AND ACCESS STATEMENT

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Raw Synergy - Masterplan - Design and Access Statement - Planning Portfolio - UWE BA Architecture  

Final Year Project - BA Architecture at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, UK Project Title: Raw Synergy: an inner-city...

Raw Synergy - Masterplan - Design and Access Statement - Planning Portfolio - UWE BA Architecture  

Final Year Project - BA Architecture at the University of the West of England (UWE), Bristol, UK Project Title: Raw Synergy: an inner-city...

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