Page 1

I N F O R M I N G FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T P R O F E S S I O N A L S

fm-world.co.uk / November 2016

HEART OF THE MATTER — THE 2016 BIFM AWARDS | NUTRITION & COGNITION | FM’S WONDER WOMEN | OPEN-PLAN BACKLASH fm-world.co.uk | November 2016

HEART OF THE MATTER Facilities management’s lead role, as evidenced at the 2016 BIFM Awards

Cover__FM World 1

28/10/2016 16:36


Beautifully engineered facilities experiences.

A leading professional workspace not only looks sharp, it contributes to the sharpness of the high performing teams that use it. At Interserve our insight driven approach to facilities management delivers on what matters to your business, people and customers. Taking the opportunities others miss and innovating to help you boost productivity – making places work better. CAPITAL PROJECT WORKS, CATERING, ENERGY, MAINTENANCE AND SECURITY

FMW.NOV16.002.indd 2

26/10/2016 16:08


F M WO R LD NOVEMBER 2016

CONTENTS COM M UNI TY

2 2 PE R SPE C T IV E S The four most interesting and insightful opinions on FM this month 24 T HINK TA NK The connection between cognitive performance and consumption?

3 5 D RY BE FOR E YO U B U Y ? The possibility of hand drying as a revenue stream from Savortex

26 NOV E M BE R @ BIF M The people and projects currently informing BIFM activity

A NA LYS I S

7 LI F TI NG THE N E IGHBOURHOOD The British Council of Offices reports on the social value of office buildings

3 6 P OW E R E D G AT E S A F E T Y How to comply with the safety code on using powered gates

27 A BIT A BOU T YOU Bernard McPhail on playing for Integral UK’s ‘Golden Team’

8 O P EN-PLAN OPE N TO QUE STION An open-plan office can work if data on the space and its staff is used shrewdly

KNOW LE DG E

3 2 C A LL S TO AC T ION The events, surveys and discussions that deserve your attention

3 7 SWITC H OR N O SW I TC H ? The water market deregulates in April. What should your firm do?

10 JA IL BRE AK THROUGH Better design and operation of prisons could reduce strife for staff and inmates

3 8 C A R E E R D E VE LO P ME N T Power points on presenting projects and initiatives to potential clients

12 T HE POLYMATH FM FMs in retail will soon be managing complex systems generating big data

3 9 E X PLA INE R – E - C I G A R E T T E S What you should know about the use of e-cigarettes in the workplace

13 N E WS MAK E RS The stories proving most popular with FM World’s online visitors this month

42 C RYSTA L CL E A R What’s next for PV solar panels as a renewable energy option?

FM World’s in-depth analysis section 46 FM’S FIRST LADIES Meet the new BIFM leader and manager of the year, Katy Dowding and Suzanne Beck respectively. They have quite different roles, but plenty in common when it comes to how they see the FM profession developing.

52 IMPAC T AS S E S S ME N T An evaluation of this year’s BIFM awardwinners in the impact categories shows how facilities management is increasingly seen to be at the heart of successful organisations.

60 WONDER WOMEN Four women made up the finalists for the Newcomer of the Year award. We catch up with winner Pleun van Deurssen and the other finalists to find out more about the people set to take the profession forward.

fm-world.co.uk

Contents__FM World 3

3

60 HIGH TECH SOLUTION As this year’s award winners and finalists clearly demonstrate, innovation in FM services is being driven by mobile technology and the devolving of data down to individuals.

N OV E M B E R ’ S TO P I C

THE 2016 BIFM AWARDS

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:41


The electrical inspection and testing specialists • • • • •

Electrical Installation Condition Reports Portable Appliance Testing Load Monitoring Recording Thermographic Surveys Electrical RectiÀcation Works

As a leading key service provider we operate throughout the UK and Channel Islands providing a very competitive “best value” service which has become very well recognised throughout the Facilities Management market Please contact us for immediate attention Email: qcltd@quantectest.co.uk Phone: (01634) 865750 Fax: (01634) 861195

www.quantectest.co.uk Dec15.indd 1 Quantec Nov13.indd

17/11/2015 09:55 12:26 31/10/2013

A CHRISTMAS GIFT We are offering 25% discount on the following programmes in December. If you would like to receive a quote and detailed course programme please just email us on info@quadrilect. co.uk quoting XMAS2016 and provide the course date and title.

DECEMBER 6-7

IOSH Risk Assessments

7

Waste Legislation & Resource Management

8

Negotiating to Win

6-8

Professional FM1*

7

Waste Legislation & Resource Management

13-15 Understanding FM* 14- 15 Essentials of Property Management 15

Advanced Sustainability

*Discount does not apply to accommodation bookings or qualification application fees

020 7248 5942 facebook.com/bifmtraining

twitter.com/bifmtraining

fm-world.co.uk

FMW.NOV16.004.indd 4

info@bifm-training.co.uk | www.bifm-training.com

4

linkedin.com/company/bifm-training

November 2016

31/10/2016 14:41


w

LE A D E R COMMENTS

MA RTI N R E A D

JU LIE KO RT E N S

Our strategy is in place

FROM THE EDITOR

D

Adapting to circumstance has always been a critical part of the facilities manager’s skillset, and so it is that we at BIFM are rolling up our sleeves and adapting following the recent mutual decision that Ray Perry would step down as CEO with immediate effect. A changing of the guard, perhaps, but far from a change in strategy. The work we’ve put in over recent years to ensure a vigorous development strategy continues, and we’ll be building on it through our membership team, research and information programme and qualifications network in 2017. The board and I have appointed our director of professional development, Linda Hausmanis, as acting chief executive officer. Anyone who’s worked with Linda knows just how instrumental she has been to BIFM’s development. Over the past decade she has overseen the development of our qualifications infrastructure and helping to professionalise FM in all its many facets. Linda has also been the guiding force behind the FM Professional Standards. Working with Linda, former CEO James Sutton will be assisting our team in delivering the Institute’s strategy as we recruit the permanent CEO. So while there may be change at the top, our programme of activities in support of you, our members, remains in place. Most immediately, in the near future you can expect our annual members’ survey. Please do complete it to help us to understand your needs and priorities. Finally, this edition of FM World focuses on the many great stories of high performing FM individuals and teams from another successful BIFM Awards ceremony. Many congratulations to all of our winners, and here’s to seeing more great examples of FM recognised in 2017.

emographic data is curious, not least because of our tendency to understand the message they convey while almost immediately putting it to the back of our minds. We know, for example, that the nation’s green belt cannot survive the need for new housing that dramatically shifts in the population make-up demand, yet spend huge amounts of time and money pretending other solutions are viable. Similarly, we know way in advance about the change in age make-up of the typical workforce, yet all too often we wait until way after the fact to address the issues and service requirements raised. Or how about thid one: Life no longer has three ages, but four. Average life expectancy for men and women has increased by two years since 2005. Think about what that means if trends continue. From an FM perspective it’s clear that workplaces need to meet the requirements of these four generations in the same space – a workspace catering for these groups’ differing accessibility, nutritional and cultural requirements. The need for flexible workspaces to adapt to accommodate multiple generations is as much a driver of the wellness agenda as the need to address more immediate well-being requirements. A CBRE report on all of this – ‘Wellness in the workplace: Unlocking future performance’ – feeds in to all of thise. The global property consultancy makes the link between an organisation’s wellness offering and its influence on staff recruitment and retention. If the report is to be believed, workplaces will increasingly need to assist individual users with their personal health management regimes, aided by the devices we’ll all be using as a result of a wearable health tech revolution projected to be a market worth $70 billion by 2025. Developing and maintaining the corporate Internet of Things infrastructure to support all of this will be vital; that’s where the FM profession comes in. The state of our individual health, performance and productivity will be something we each have far greater personal control over in future – and the most attractive facilities will be those that help us in maintaining that control.

JULIE KORTENS is chairman of the BIFM

MARTIN READ is editor of FM World magazine

“FROM AN FM PERSPECTIVE WE NEED WORKPLACES THAT NURTURE THE REQUIREMENTS OF THESE FOUR GENERATIONS”

fm-world.co.uk

Leader__FM World 5

5

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:13


One solution that empowers industry Tomorrow’s manufacturing industry demands much more. ENGIE is a new kind of energy and services company – a strategic partner to help you meet today’s needs and tomorrow’s challenges.

engie.co.uk

FMW.NOV16.006.indd 2

27/10/2016 09:59


INSIDE 07 08 10 12 14

Creating social value during a building’s life cycle Open-plan working is open to question Designing and operating new prison buildings Shopping for multi-talented future FMs he month Supply Side: th the month’ss FM business news

FRONT DESK THE MO N TH’ S MOST I MP O RTA N T F M STO R I E S

CR E ATI N G S OCI A L VA L UE

SOURCE: MEASURING THE SOCIAL VALUE OF OFFICES BY THE BRITISH COUNCIL OF OFFICES

IMAGE: SHEPPARD ROBSON

PLANNING IN SOCIAL VALUE FROM THE OUTSET

C

ommercial property development could add from £15 to £20 billion into the community in which it is sited, suggests research by the British Council of Offices (BCO). How? Through Section 106 agreements – part of the Town and Country Planning Act associated with financial contributions made to mitigate the detrimental effects of a commercial development on the local community. According to a BCO report, s106 could be the start of how a development puts back into the community within which it sits. The research, in partnership with Legal & General

For 245 Investment relationships with Hammersmith Management local communities. Road, which is still in the planning Real Assets and Debbie Hobbs, head stage, taking the Social Value of sustainability at the measures in the BCO’s report Portal, claims that LGIM Real Assets, said: could equate to an additional £78 social value could “In the current context million of social be created at every of diminishing local value benefits over seven years stage of a building’s government grants, of occupation and life cycle, and that striving to unlock more than £300 million over building managers greater social value a 30-year period could play a from development significant part is a very important in this. Building managers, consideration. Collaboration the report suggests, could is key to realising this unique focus on local sourcing, opportunity, and can be a community employment and prosperous route to making engagement programmes for public sector budgets go their development. further and for those involved But the main opportunity in development to make a resides in the way building greater contribution to the managers are able to support environments in which they occupiers in building operate.”

fm-world.co.uk

FrontDesk_Lead__FM World 7

7

REAPING THE REWARD Total social value accruing during manufacture, materials sourcing and building compared with s106 funds

£7.1m £1m

£0.6m

Section 106

Business as usual

Stretch

£6.5m Social value add (SVA)

Total social value that could be generated over a 7-year lease period compared with s106 contributions

£134m £78m

£56m £1m Section 106

Business as usual

Stretch

SVA

November 2016

31/10/2016 09:55


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

O PE N FOR BUS I N E S S

OPEN-PLAN WORKING IS OPEN TO QUESTION W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY

O

pen-plan offices can work if data about a workplace, organisation and its employees is used appropriately and shrewdly, an academic presenting new research told last month’s Workplace Trends conference. Dr Kerstin Sailer, a lecturer at the Bartlett School of Architecture, said open-plan offices were experiencing a renaissance as technology companies in Silicon Valley were setting the trend for “increasingly large open floor plates”. While the downsides of open-plan offices related to noise, lack of concentration and privacy

are well documented in other evidence, Sailer’s research suggested that it is a more complex scenario and that it depends on the spatial openness of the floor and how it is used which could lead to better communication and collaboration. Sailer told FM World: “It also boils down to the details of the floor plan as that’s one of the levels we hardly look at to see what departments like, for example, advertising might need or there might be different cultures within advertising which may indicate there needs to be another kind of floor plan. What is the effect

Open-plan offices are often blamed for making us more antisocial

of that layout option on that organisation? So the nuanced view is very important.” Sailer added that the complexity and nuance of what was required to make an open-plan office work was often what hindered their potential success. She said: “The difficulty is [that] there’s not a predictive model, it’s not like a machine and that’s

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Sto__FM World 8

8

why it’s slightly difficult to enact. If you have a big floor plate, then it is likely interactions will not reach across the boundaries of the unit whereas if you are in a small one it’s very likely communication could reach out – but if it’s a medium one it’s harder to say. That lack of predictive power makes it difficult to implement in practice.”

Could better understanding of data from openplan metrics ease co-worker clashes and improve productivity?

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:35


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

DE S K S E T

Trying to mend open-plan fences Dr Kerstin Sailer and Ros Pomeroy, co-founder of Brainybirdz, a spatial configuration blog, looked at two sets of data about one organisation of about 250 people before and after an office relocation and radical redesign. The organisation moved from a cellularised two-floor, single-tenanted building to a singlefloor, open-plan, multi-tenanted building. One of this organisation’s main objectives was to improve collaboration between key departments. Departments had fixed locations, with staff having assigned desks, both before and after the move.

Results? The new office provided much higher levels of spatial integration, which means shorter paths through the office (and thus higher levels of proximity), which in theory should make it easier to see and interact with others. But in practice the average number of ties in daily face-to-face interaction fell by about 6 per cent, meaning that on average every staff member in the new office talked to seven of their colleagues each day rather than 7.5. Departments who were no longer next to each other lost a disproportionately high number of connections. In one example, staff in one department spoke on average with 0.7 people from another adjacent department in the old office space, yet only with 0.1 people in the new space, thus reducing connections between the two departments by 85 per cent. But these problems may have had more to do with the culture of the organisation rather than the office design.

Connections between the two departments decreased by

Daily face to face interaction decreased by

85% 6% Source: Kerstin Sailer and Ros Pomeroy

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Sto__FM World 9

9

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:35


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

P RISO N SYST E M

JAIL BREAKTHROUGH W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

D

esigning and operating prison buildings in specific ways could halve assaults on staff and significantly reduce the stress under which staff work, according to a panel of experts including prison managers, psychologists and criminologists. The panel’s report, entitled Rehabilitation By Design: Encouraging Change In Prisoner Behaviour, was presented to MPs, peers and industry experts last month at a reception at the House of Commons. It sets out recommendations ahead of a £1.3 billion prisonbuilding programme planned by the Ministry of Justice – the biggest shake-up of the UK’s prison system since the Victorian era.

The report asserts that the primary aim for any new prison programme must be to address the huge reoffending rate and suggests that this could be achieved by making cost-effective changes to the built environment. Could this idea really work? The authors investigated the ways in which behavioural policies and clever design principles have benefited prison systems abroad, and how these initiatives could

A far cry from Porridge: the Ministry of Justice plans the biggest shake-up of the prison system since Victorian times

fm-world.co.uk

FrontDesk_Prisons__FM World 10

“CLEVER DESIGN PRINCIPLES HAVE BENEFITED PRISON SYSTEMS ABROAD… THESE INITIATIVES COULD BE IMPLEMENTED IN THE UK”

10

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:14


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

DR A F T OBJE C TI VE S

be implemented in the UK. These changes, they say, could reduce overall life cycle costs, see prisoners rehabilitated and cut reoffending rates in England and Wales – some of the highest in Europe. Figures show that just under half of all adult prisoners are likely to reoffend within a year of release – costing the taxpayer £13 billion a year.

Let there be light Professor Keith Humphreys of the University of Stanford and one of the report’s contributors, told FM World that prison managers and FMs of these buildings “can be quite influential in setting clear rules, ensuring that staff and inmates are aware of them, and creating a system in which the consequences of rule-breaking are clear, fair and promptly administered”. One of the recommendations includes managing light – an area facilities managers often regulate – in a way that reduces stress and depression. The report says sunlight is “frequently a scarce commodity in prisons and artificial lighting is often either unnecessarily harsh or too dim to carry out tasks”. Because of light’s role in regulating circadian rhythms, people need both good light during daytime hours and good darkness at night in order to sleep well. The study points out that prisons lack both, and this can lead to insomnia. In some cases, this can result in higher rates of irritability, aggression, depression and even self-inflicted death. The report was produced by property and construction consultancy Gleeds, and features contributions from a number of academics, including Professor Humphreys and Professor Yvonne Jewkes from the University of Brighton, with the support of management consultancy PwC.

Building in changes to prisoner behaviour Using design to reduce anger, frustration and violence Pervasive levels of noise in most prisons can have profound effects. Damage to, or loss of hearing may be a serious and undertreated problem. There is little research on the psychological effects of noise in prisons, but findings in other settings show that noise can: Damage mental and physical health; Affect the amount and quality of sleep; Increase levels of annoyance, frustration and aggressive behaviour; Reduce pro-social behaviour and meaningful interactions with others; Interfere with concentration and patience during focused activity (e.g. education); and Result in higher levels of medication being prescribed for health concerns. Therefore, avoiding auditory overload should be a key concern for prison architects. This will benefit both prison staff (including teachers, physicians and therapists) and prisoners alike.

A new prison model A fundamental consideration is how prison sites are laid out. The report recommends a ‘campus model’ (or doughnut configuration), which instead of single prison blocks, incorporates different blocks with various levels of security and replicates features of a normal environment. It allows for a ‘step up, step down’ approach towards preparing for the outside world. This will help prisoners to improve their behaviour and creates a more flexible environment. With careful management, the campus model can support a safe environment for prisoners, staff and visitors.

fm-world.co.uk

FrontDesk_Prisons__FM World 11

11

appropriate to the risk posed by the prisoners;

Site and design considerations Facilities should be built to provide a minimum basic standard of living – access to daylight, sanitation, nutrition, physical exercise, and health care. The design of a new prison should consider: Allowing the segregation of prisoners according to sex, age, criminal record, offence and current behaviour; Providing spaces for work, educational, recreational and creative activities;

CCTV systems and fire detection and control systems; Potential for expansion; Incorporating a ‘no-man zone’ or ‘buffer zone’ to reduce the potential for contraband being thrown into the grounds; The location and proximity of rooms and spaces (e.g. a staff room should be central and kitchens and workshops should be near the delivery entrance); Ease of access for the emergency services;

Deterring and preventing prisoners from escape by providing a level of security

Lots of open, external space so prisoners can walk between buildings (from housing to school, work, meals, family visits, therapy);

Typical life-cycle costs for prisions and jail

Landscaping to include green spaces, trees and plants; Indoor spaces that provide ample natural light;

5% 21%

Excellent sightlines within buildings and around the estate; Ample and secure access for prison vehicles;

74%

Staffing costs Other ongoing costs Initial costs

Convenient access to the site for staff, visitors and volunteers; Pleasant and supportive work environment for staff; and Parking for staff and visitors.

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:14


F RO NT D E S K A N A LY S I S

£1.4bn

is to be spent on doubling the size of the 40-year-old Brent Cross shopping centre in North London to 1.9 million square feet

RE TAIL

SHOPPING FOR MULTI-TALENTED FUTURE FMS

IoT, cyber security, the digital ceiling, augmented and virtual reality, and nanotechnology are all factors driving retail FM

W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

ILLUSTRATION: IKON

A

report by the Professional Retail Store Maintenance Association about the trends for facilities management in the retail sector describes the FM of the future as someone who is no longer a skilled tradesperson. Instead, facilities managers will have to manage multiple complex systems generating big data that must be analysed, sorted and interpreted. It also says training and recruiting future FMs is “critical to the industry”. The report, an annual review of the state of retail facilities management and key trends affecting retailers and suppliers, talks of organisations in America – but the lessons are transferable. Other trends that the report identifies will change the FM industry and how an FM goes about their job include decisions being increasingly driven by technology because of the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT) and the evolution of the retail landscape from indoor shopping malls into “highly specialised, trending stores, pop-ups, outlet centres and high-end malls”. Are these trends applicable to FMs in the UK’s retail sector? Mark Rycraft, centre manager at Middleton Grange Shopping Centre in Hartlepool, thinks so. He told

RETAIL GAME-CHANGERS A breakdown of the major trends includes: Training and recruiting future FMs is critical to the industry. Relationship selling: The trend in successful retail FM marketing and sales is built on understanding retail FM needs, psychology, vertical markets, and establishing relationships, using case studies and testimonials, while delivering value – not selling products and services. Technology – data-driven decisions: The Internet of Things, cyber security, the digital ceiling, augmented and virtual reality, and nanotechnology are all driving retail facilities management. Technology that delivers a proven return on investment will continue to influence FM. The evolution of the retail environment: During the past 20 years the retail landscape has evolved from hundreds of indoor shopping malls into specialised trending stores, pop-ups, outlet centres and high-end malls. Retailers depend upon the FM to play a key role in transforming the retail environment, enticing customers to shop in physical stores instead of online.

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Sto__FM World 12

12

FM World: “The report is pretty accurate. As a shopping centre manager, you have to have a wide and varied experience – you have to tend to operational and retail functions.” Rycraft thinks the changes identified in the report have been happening in the industry “for a long time”. He says: “Customer service is key to running an establishment such as a shopping centre. It’s not just about people who are dressed the part and dealing up front with customer’s queries, but also about cleaners and security personnel also being able to deal with these.” Rycraft says he regularly trains people in customer services about “going the extra mile”. This is even more vital because of social media, he points out. “Long gone are the days that if you get bad service you tell nine people – now because of social media if you experience bad service you can tell nine million people,” says Rycraft. “Your brand identity can be damaged without you knowing exactly what you have or have not done.” Shopping centres are also becoming places to do more than just shop. “Millennials have changed the way people shop,” continues Rycraft. “There is more time spent doing different activities within shopping centres and eating out, going to the cinema.” Being a shopping centre manager is no longer just about “selling goods, but also about windowdressing, product design, marketing and handling cash”. Rycraft says it is also his role to reach out into the surrounding community. “I work a lot in the community and integrating the local school’s curriculum with what FM is. My role is widening their view of shopping centres.”

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:15


F M -WO R L D.CO.U K / N E W S

Ten of the top stories from FM World online last month

F RO NT D E S K TOP STORIES

NEWSMAKERS

33%

Centre of excellence

5/9

... is the amount of work the government hopes to target at SME companies through the tender process for its new Estates Professional Services agreement. The framework, starting in April, covers central and local government property. The government plans to reduce barriers to SME participation and has set a target of 33 per cent of spending to be through SMEs by 2020. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-framework

7/9

Lettings bounce

Wasting away Calderdale Council is fining Suez Recycling & Recovery UK over “unacceptable” waste and recycling collections. The service began in August. Suez replied: “During the first four weeks, the success rate for completed household collections of recycling & waste was 98.7% and 98% respectively.” tinyurl.com/FMW1116-calderdale tinyurl.com/FMW1116-suez

GREEN = KEEN

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY, ISTOCK

Working in green-certified buildings leads to higher cognitive function scores, academics have found. Researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and SUNY Upstate Medical University studied 109 workers at 10 buildings in five cities across the US, and discovered that working in green-certified buildings was associated with fewer sick building symptoms and higher sleep quality scores as well as leading to better cognition. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-greenperformance

24%

of fire and smoke detector installers surveyed across EMEA and India by fire detection product manufacturer Hochiki Europe believe that the FM sector will feel “the greatest impact” of the Internet of Things and the way it integrates into the next generation of smart cities. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-smartcities

29/9

3/10

6/10

13/10

Carbon date Current policy in the UK is not enough to deliver the carbon budgets that Parliamentt has set to cut greenhouse gas emissions, with new w measures required, warns the Committee on Climate Change, a quango established under er the Climate Change Act. It says “currentt policies would at best deliver around half of the emissions reductions required to 2030”. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-carbon

14/10 1/2

14/10

30% of corporate real estate portfolios will be flexible space incorporating IoT automated technology by 2030, claims a report from JLL entitled Workspace Reworked: Ride The Wave Of Tech Driven Change. The study also suggests that fast connectivity will become the ‘fourth utility’ driving location decisions. tinyurl.com/FMW116-jllreport

Take-up of London office space rebounded in Q3 of 2016 after a weak Q2, says property adviser CBRE in its latest report. And Bilfinger GVA’s quarterly review of the UK regions says demand is back to prerecession levels, with economic growth set to drive more letting across the ‘big nine’ markets. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-bilfingergva tinyurl.com/FMW116-bignine tinyurl.com/FMW1116-q3demand

17/10

18/10

of English councils now belong to the he government’s One Public Estate programme. ogramme. Run by the Cabinet Office Government ent Property Unit and the Local Government ment Association, the scheme brings together ether local and central government departments nts to make the use of the public sector estate more efficient. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-publicestate

70bn tonnes of carbon dioxide could be removed from the atmosphere by 2050 by a global agreement to phase out use of hydrofluorocarbons, the gases used in air conditioning and refrigeration. Delegates from 150 countries met in Rwanda in October to agree on this amendment to the 1987 Montreal protocol – an international treaty to protect the environment against the impact of harmful substances. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-hfc

l @fm_world f fmworldmagazine g +FM-WorldCoUk fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Sto__FM World 13

13

70bn

The Enterprise Centre in Norwich, profiled in last month’s FM World, was named ‘best of the best’ workplace at the recent British Council for Offices’ annual National Awards. Judges praised the University of East Anglia’s building for being “low carbon and sustainable design at its best”. tinyurl.com/FMW1116bestworkplace

fm-world.co.uk/news

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:15


INSIDE 16 16 18 18 19

Weeks to view: A month of expansion A pick ’n’ mix service: Sam Hurst, Grazing Catering Comment: Mitie and Capita face period of adjustment Report: Sodexo buys Peyton and Byrne’s public catering contracts Your round-up of contract wins in the sector

B OARDRO O M NEWS

MCGREGOR-SMITH TO STEP DOWN AS MITIE HEAD W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

M

itie has announced that Ruby McGregor-Smith is to step down from her role as a director and chief executive. McGregor-Smith will bow out on 12 December. Phil Bentley has been appointed to succeed her in the role. McGregor-Smith has been a director of Mitie since 2002, and was appointed chief executive in 2007. Bentley, who takes up his post on 1 November, said McGregor-Smith had built the organisation into an “admired industry leader”. He has previously held executive and leadership roles at Cable and Wireless Communications, British Gas, and Centrica. McGregor-Smith said: “It has been a real honour to serve on the board of Mitie, and in particular to hold the role of chief executive.”

Mitie chairman Roger Matthews ng CEO said: “Since becoming as doubled [McGregor-Smith] has revenue and profits, built a marketleading UK facilities management business, and been an inspiration to Mitie’s employees.” nouncement Just before the announcement of McGregor-Smith’ss resignation, Mitie’s trading update reported thatt its operating profit for the d full year is “expected w to be materially below ous management’s previous se of expectations” because ty. economic uncertainty. ed: The company stated: “Mitie has secured some important new contracts in its core facilities management

McGregorSmith’s tenure as CEO has seen a boost in demand for its integrated services

business, where our long-term strategic positioning, order book and pipeline remain strong. “However, in the short term we continue to experience the effects of significant economic pressures. These include lower UK growth rates, changes to labour legislation and further public sector budget constraints, and uncertainty both pre and post the EU referendum. We have taken strong action to counter the impact of these pressures by making changes now to the way we operate, and are initiating costefficiency programmes across the group.” The company said it expected that the pressures it faced would “impact our trading results during this financial year ending 31 March 2017, most significantly in the first half”.

COMPANY RESULTS

£453m Robertson Group has reported a yearly turnover

81% on previous year

Robertson Group

Peartree

Robertson Group has reported a yearly turnover of £453 million, according to its audited accounts (12 months to March 2016). The Stirling-based infrastructure, support services and construction group has reported a profit before tax of £21.4 million, an increase of 81 per cent on the year before. This profit growth has added value to its balance sheet, with “net worth increasing by 17 per cent”. Robertson Facilities Management, which employs 700 people, has a UK order book of £1.13bn.

Corporate cleaning company Peartree Cleaning Services has reported growth in the business in its 2016 figures. After 13 per cent year-on-year growth in 2015, Peartree has continued on this course – releasing 2016 figures closing at £15.8 million. This is a 16 per cent year-on-year growth representing £2.1 million. Peartree has recently won contracts with organisations including Debenhams, Penguin Random House and KKR.

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Bus__FM World 14

14

£15.8m After 13 per cent year-onyear growth in 2015, Peartree has continued its growth

16% on previous year

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:37


SUPPLY SIDE

ACQ U IS ITION

O U TS O U RCE D S E RV I C E MA RK E T N E WS

SERVEST BUYS ARTHUR MCKAY & CO LTD W O R D S : H ER P R EE T K AU R G R E WA L

F

acilities management service provider Servest has acquired building services contractor Arthur McKay. Servest identified the contractor, which has offices throughout the UK as “a good strategic fit for their existing building services division”. Arthur McKay delivers services ranging from mechanical and electrical to networks and FM services. The acquisition will help Servest expand and develop its technical expertise and extend the FM company’s geographical reach. Rob Legge, group chief executive UK and Europe at Servest, told FM World: “As a group we had been

looking to bolster our M&E capability over the last few years… we had been negotiating with Arthur McKay since January last year and we are pleased that we have concluded the acquisition.” Legge added: “We want to grow a significant facilities management group within the United Kingdom and Europe and we see Arthur McKay as being a very key reputable business that will help us achieve our goals.” The senior management

Servest CEO Rob Legge says buying Arthur McKay’s business fits his company’s strategy

team will remain in place to facilitate the transition. As FM World went to press Legge also revealed that the company had just completed a deal to acquire a “significant” catering business.

APLEONA IS NEW NAME FOR BILFINGER’S REAL ESTATE BUSINESS

KIER FINALISES £75M SALE OF MOUCHEL CONSULTING TO WSP GLOBAL

Bilfinger GVA’s parent Bilfinger Real Estate has rebranded as Apleona. The UK property advisory business will remain as Bilfinger GVA until an expected rebrand over the coming months. The two most likely rebrand names are Apleona GVA and GVA. The announcement of the new parent name for what was the Bilfinger Building and Facility segment – under which Bilfinger GVA operated – follows its recent sale to private equity firm EQT. Apleona, headquartered near

Construction and support services firm Kier Group plc has completed its sale of Mouchel Consulting to WSP Global Inc. for £75 million. Mouchel Consulting, bought in June 2015 as part of Kier’s acquisition of Mouchel, provides engineering, environmental and asset management consultancy services, mainly to infrastructure markets. On 4 July, Kier said it was evaluating the strategic options for the Mouchel Consulting business including a possible sale.

Frankfurt, is active in more than 30 countries and has a broad real estate and industrial advisory service. It generated €2.5 billion in revenue in 2015, has 22,000 employees, and serves major corporations, banks and insurance businesses as well as investment companies and the public sector. CEO Dr Jochen Keysberg said the company would now grow its international business, deliver more integrated services to clients, and expand its technical competences in energy efficiency.

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Bus__FM World 15

15

For the financial year ended 30 June 2016, Mouchel Consulting reported revenue of £125 million, generating an operating profit contribution of £8 million and a before-tax profit of £5 million. The gross assets of the company, the subject of the disposal, were £29 million at 30 June 2016. The sale is expected to result in an immediate profit of about £40 million, subject to post-completion adjustments. Kier will use the net disposal proceeds for investment and to reduce debt.

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:37


S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS

Weeks to view A month of expansion

Week commencing 12 September Babcock International has added Australian airline Qantas to its roster of clients to whom its offers asset management services. A five-year deal with an optional two-year extension will see Babcock help Qantas manage its ground support equipment in 60 locations across Australia. Babcock already services similar contracts in London, Amsterdam, Rome and Rio de Janeiro. Such global expansion may help to mitigate any potential weakness in UK markets in the coming months.

Week commencing 19 September Interserve’s diversified portfolio of operations is coming into its own as it announced two contracts worth a combined £92 million. First, it won an £11 million contract with the Environment Agency in the UK, which built on its two years supplying FM services across 100 sites. At the other end of the scale, it also won an £81 million contract through its Khansaheb construction joint venture in the Middle East to expand the City Centre Ajman mall in the United Arab Emirates.

Week commencing 26 September The National Health Service’s ProCure 22 revealed the six successful bidders for work on a framework that could deliver up to £5 billion worth of contracts over the next five years. The work is mainly replacing, renewing or refurbishing NHS capital assets, but could also lead to follow-on FM contracts as the NHS wrestles with budgetary constraints to more efficiently manage its estate. Named bidders were Kier, Interserve, BAM Construction, Graham Construction, Galliford Try and a joint venture between Vinci and Sir Robert McAlpine.

Week commencing 3 October The Conservatives held the first party conference under new Prime Minister Theresa May, but gave away little in terms of policy plans. Chancellor Philip Hammond hinted that the Autumn Statement could see an uptick in infrastructure spending while the tone adopted by May over Brexit negotiations suggested that Brexiteers may pursue a ‘hard’ Brexit. This sent the pound into a tailspin and UK equity markets racing to new highs as investors sought exposure to firms that do big business in overseas currencies. This will only benefit FM operators with global reach, though.

Q&A

A PICK ’N’ MIX FOOD SERVICE INTERVIEWEE: Sam Hurst, managing director, Grazing Catering ISSUE: The changing face of catering

What is so unique about this service model? It’s a flexible solution that allows clients to pick and choose the catering services they need, when they need them, and only pay for what they need – without the commitment and burden of a traditional catering contract. We have a young and dynamic team which can provide services ranging from full service in-house workplace restaurants to regular or ad hoc breakfast and lunch deliveries, prepared off-site at our 5,000-square feet kitchens.

How does it fit the changing needs of catering in the workplace and what niche is it exploiting in the market? Office rents in London are only ever going in one direction and that’s why our off-site production model can ensure that clients can get the same quality food in their workplace as they would with a traditional in-house caterer, without devoting space to kitchens. It also responds to the variety available to consumers by providing a flexible ordering model; it gives clients options to eat what they want, when they want, and not forcing them to have a fixed single operator for ‘X’ many years. Johnny Dunford, senior director at BNP Paribas Real Estate, has said he wouldn’t be surprised to see this kind of delivery system coming to people’s desk, meaning in-house canteens will be much reduced. I agree. The high street is no longer the single biggest threat to traditional business caterers; technology is now an even bigger threat. With the likes of Deliveroo moving into the corporate sector and offering an array of choices

fm-world.co.uk

Front Desk - Bus__FM World 16

16

delivered to people’s desks in 30 minutes, along with countless other platforms and technologies shaking up the market – this is a game-changer for the B&I sector. Given the productivity benefits we see from the communal environment, I don’t believe that we will literally only see desktop eating; it will be more even more important to get teams together during mealtimes to aid engagement and productivity. The difference will be the flexibility of how food is be delivered, served and prepared.

“IT GIVES CLIENTS OPTIONS TO EAT WHAT THEY WANT, WHEN THEY WANT, [RATHER THAN] FORCING THEM TO HAVE A FIXED SINGLE OPERATOR” How does not being tied into contracts benefit you? Caterers need to adopt more adaptable models. The traditional model will never die, but the business climate is moving at pace and fewer clients want to commit to long-term deals.

What has been the response from customers/clients so far? Our clients love it. They can flex their service to meet their ever-changing business needs and, as their catering partner, we work with them to fit around their business.

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:17


E IS T R E V D A U O Y N E H W E IS W E B BE WISE WHEN YOU ADVERTISE

SIONALS G E M E N T P RO F E S AC I L I T I E S M A N A I N F O R M I N G FA

INFOR

TIES M ANA

GEMEN

T P RO FE

SSION

ALS fm-world.c o.uk / July 2016

CEO RAY PERRY LOOKS

GROW

DATA How FM DRIVE is bec both a peo oming ple and data bus iness

ECTS SURVE

AND PARTNERSHIP TO THE FUTURE | FM

– BIFM PAY & PROSP Y 2016

MAKING AN IN-OUT Choosing DECISION between client and sup ply-side roles

GING FACE

HIGH-PERFORM STATUS | SUPPORTING

| THE CHAN OF FMS | ON-SITE

H OUGH HROUG S THROUG SS ROGRES PROGRE PRO PROGR H IP RSHIP RSH A PARTNE P PART come become Ms becom When FMs Wh the o th rs of ne ners rt owners part-ow se they serve firms th

ANCE ORGANISATION

WASTE MANA GEMENT

We can prove your advert will reach a qualified targeted audience.

FA C I L I

NEW HORIZONS — BIFM

PAY AS YOU

FM WORLD IS THE ONLY OFFICIALLY AUDITED TITLE IN THE MARKET

MING

2016 fm-world.co.u fm-wo fm-world.co k / August

ANAEROB ICS CLA The evo SS lving for a new market managem waste ent form

S

GA H GAP? HE D:: THE ND: MIND: he healtt tthe mental health Is m h n health ‘forgotten’ sue? issue? y issu ssafet safety nd sa nd an and

NEW HO HORIZONS prop itions, tte propos a ate r ora orpora Corpo Corpor C long careerca a alue alues, values, rand v brand bran b Incom ng CEO Ray g: Incomi ng: arrnin earnin ea e learnin lle future B ooks to BIFM’s e llooks erry Perry P

CE A N CE MAN MANCE RMAN E RFORMA PERFOR P PERFO PE S LE L LES IPLE CIPLE PRINCIP P PRIN PR m from FM fro or F ns ffor sons essons e Les Lessons L p ports ntt ssports ent ment ement evemen e h-achiiievemen igh-ac high-a high-ach high-ac

2016 fm-world.co.uk | August

PAY AS YOU GRO W

What res Younger, earch says abou better qu t alified, inc the typical FM pro reasingly fes female – sional in 2016: and earni ng more . rld cover ug

fm-world.co

Our ABC Certificate provides accurate, independently verified circulation figures, giving you confidence in your advertising investment.

uk |

p01 01 FM world

If you want to reach 13,326* facilities professionals contact: jack.shuard@fm-world.co.uk or call 020 7880 8543

cover July

16 FINAL

F.indd

29/07/2016 11:33

1

28/06/2016 12:37

CIRCULATION UP 7% YEAR ON YEAR *Circulation figure relates to period from Jul ‘14 to Jun ‘15

For more information visit www.abc.org.uk or email info@abc.org.uk

fm-world.co.uk

FMW.NOV16.017.indd 17

17

November 2016

31/10/2016 14:48


S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS For more FM business news, analysis and contract wins, sign up for the FM World daily newsletter at www.fm-world.co.uk/news/e-zine

+

CO M M E NTARY

G R A E M E D AV I E S newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk

I

nvestor confidence in the support services sector that FM firms occupy has been rattled after two established players issued profit warnings that laid waste to their share prices. While both Mitie and Capita have their own issues there were common themes running through their trading updates, not least of all uncertainty among customers either side of June’s EU referendum. Both companies suffered during the weeks around the vote as customers sat on their hands and held off from committing to new business. This is not unique to the sector or these companies as many areas of the economy slipped into a temporary lull in May and June, but for Mitie and Capita this was compounded by problems within their own businesses. Both companies have in recent years pursued growth organically and through acquisition with some success. But costs associated with such growth have begun to bite as revenues have come under pressure as demand has slowed. And both firms accompanied their profit warnings with news of costcutting measures designed to realign their businesses. This will incur more costs in the short term, but should leave the businesses in a better state for current market conditions. The problem with the relatively low-margin business that many support services companies do is that the margin for error is minimal, so when a hike in costs such as the National Living Wage is introduced, margins rapidly dwindle. And individual contract issues can have a significant effect. Capita has stumbled over the delivery of a contract for Transport for London for its Congestion Charging scheme, where delays are likely to lead to one-off costs of between £20 million and £25million. Its woes have raised wider concerns among City analysts about the company’s business model and its means of achieving the growth rates investors have become used to through acquisitions. Some analysts have questioned how they can value the true underlying company, such are the adjustments made to its accounts to reflect acquisitions. The scale of the sell-off in Capita shares following the profit warning reflected this concern – it lost a third of its value in one trading day. Mitie and Capita are likely to hold back on acquisitions and prune their costs bases to return to an even keel. Ironically, this could give investors a more accurate view of the real health of the underlying businesses.

MANY AREAS OF THE ECONOMY SLIPPED INTO A TEMPORARY LULL IN MAY AND JUNE

GRAEME DAVIES writes for Investors Chronicle

fm-world.co.uk

FrontDesk_Supply_18_19__FM World 18

18

F M MA R KE T

Sodexo buys Peyton and Byrne’s public catering contracts Sodexo has bought the public catering contracts business of Peyton and Byrne, which operates food and drink outlets at several visitor attractions in London. Peyton and Byrne was founded in 2005 by restaurateurs Oliver and Siobhan Peyton. The company has expanded organically over the past 11 years, operating both a British retail bakery and café business as well as a separate public catering contracts business. The public catering business runs contracts at locations such as the National Gallery, the Royal Academy of Arts, the Imperial War Museum, the ICA and the Wallace Collection. These public catering contracts will be operated by Sodexo Sports & Leisure, Sodexo’s catering and hospitality division for sporting venues, events and visitor attractions in the UK and Ireland. The newly acquired public catering contracts will continue to be led by Oliver and Siobhan Peyton. The acquisition follows the news that Neil Murray, Sodexo’s UK regional chair, is to leave the company. Murray joined the business in 2009 from GSH Group. He is leaving “to pursue opportunities outside the group”, according to a Sodexo statement. He is to be replaced by Sean Haley as regional chair for Sodexo UK and Ireland, while David Bailey has taken on the role of CEO for Sodexo’s corporate services division, also vacated by Murray. Having been with the firm since 2004, Bailey has held numerous roles, including managing director of corporate services and global account director for its GSK account.

PHOTOGRAPHY: ISTOCK

MITIE AND CAPITA FACE PERIOD OF ADJUSTMENT

November 2016

31/10/2016 09:57


S U P P LY S I D E BUSINESS NEWS

F M -WO R L D.CO.U K / N E WS

CONTRACTS DEALS Mitie lands £60m airports contract Mitie has won a £60 million FM deal with Manchester Airports Group (MAG). MAG is consolidating its FM services across Manchester, London Stansted, and East Midlands Airports into one integrated contract, set to run over five years. It is an expansion of Mitie’s original Manchester Airport contract, which it has had since 2008.

Sodexo earns extra credit at Oasis Sodexo has renewed its catering deal with academy operator Oasis Community Learning until 2020. Oasis will add six schools to the deal. Oasis Community Learning operates more than 40 academy schools across the UK. John Barneby, CEO at Oasis, said: “We believe that having access to good, healthy food is really important to help our students learn.”

CONTRACTS TICKER

Carillion strikes £350m bond with Nationwide Carillion has a new £350 million, seven-year deal with Nationwide Building Society to provide a range of hard and soft FM and workplace services at the society’s HQ in Swindon, its 15 corporate offices, critical data centres, and 700 retail branches across the UK. The deal could be extended for a further three years.

Carlisle tends to Wolverhampton NHS deal Carlisle Support Services has landed a three-year security contract with Royal Wolverhampton NHS Trust. Under its terms, Carlisle will provide CCTV surveillance, patrolling, visitor assistance and car parking management at New Cross Hospital in Wolverhampton.

OCS caters to the GLA The Greater London Authority (GLA) has awarded a minimum six-year catering contract to OCS. The firm, which has supplied food services at the GLA, home to the Mayor of London, since 2006, will carry on catering at City Hall café and the Café on Trafalgar Square.

Servest mops up at Great Western Servest Group will provide full cleaning services for 102 stations and 150 trains for the Great Western Railway franchise. About 350 staff will be involved in the three-year deal to clean stations and trains across a large geographical area.

Emprise takes spots on two frameworks Emprise Services has won places on two separate framework agreements. It will provide a ‘one-stop shop’ for three years to London Universities Purchasing Consortium members for cleaning, pest control, washroom services, porterage, and waste management. It will also supply cleaning services to Eastern Shares Purchasing Organisation’s (ESPO) national Total Cleaning Services Solution framework (263), for three years.

Kudos coins it at conference centre Kudos Delivered has renewed its contract with development trust and social enterprise Coin Street Community Builders (CSCB) in London. The company will continue to provide fresh food to users of the Coin Street Conference Centre, which it has done since 2014. The conference venue has roof garden with a range of event spaces. The service includes a range of breakfast items, finger food, working lunches, buffets, canapés, light bites and bowl food.

DE A L OF TH E MON TH

Ampersand nurtures catering at Kew Ampersand has been appointed as catering partner to the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, in a five-year contract worth £28 million. Ampersand will provide all catering at venues across the Kew estate including the White Peaks café, Victoria Plaza café, and the Orangery restaurant.

INTERSERVE SHOPS AT LAND SECURITIES FOR WORKS WORTH £37.5M Interserve has won a three-year deal to provide security, cleaning, customer service support and waste management at eight of Land Securities’ shopping centres. A ninth centre, Westgate in Oxford, will be added to the contract next year. The UK’s largest listed commercial property company will work with Land Securities and its existing mechanical & electrical supplier NG Bailey “to deliver an enhanced customer experience and establish best practice across centres nationwide”. Some 560 employees will transfer to Interserve.

Selfridges picks G&H for Leicester support centre deal • Office concierge services London’s Verde SW1 •

Richard Irvin in service with Falkirk Council • CIS Security retained as LUPC supplier • Churchill adds catering at Wiltshire College • Serco rides ahead with TfL bike scheme • Interserve cleans up at energy and gas sites

fm-world.co.uk

FrontDesk_Supply_18_19__FM World 19

19

November 2016

31/10/2016 09:57


Hand hygiene where you need it PURELL ES™ Everywhere System – Designed to fit… …your health & well-being needs

…your world

…your way of life

Combining premium aesthetics with the trusted PURELL® Advanced Hygienic Hand Rub, the PURELL ES™ Everywhere System offers innovative placement options and is ideal in a variety of settings. For more information on the PURELL ES™ Everywhere System contact your local GOJO Sales Representative or visit www.GOJO.com

© 2016. GOJO Industries – Europe Ltd. An affiliate of GOJO Industries, Inc. All rights reserved.

'ULYHIRUZDUGWKH)0FDSDELOLW\LQ\RXURUJDQLVDWLRQ DQGDFKLHYHZRUOGFODVVSHUIRUPDQFHZLWK %,)04XDOLILFDWLRQVLQ IDFLOLWLHVPDQDJHPHQW 'HYHORS\RXUZRUNIRUFHWRDGYDQFH \RXUEXVLQHVVSHUIRUPDQFH !8VH WKH IUDPHZRUN WR GHYHORS WHDPV DW HYHU\ OHYHO !&XVWRPLVHWKHTXDOLILFDWLRQVWRPHHW\RXUEXVLQHVVQHHGV !8VHUHDOOLIHZRUNSURMHFWVDVDVVHVVPHQWV !5HFRJQLVHDQGPD[LPLVHWKHYDOXHRI\RXUVWDII 7   (TXDOLILFDWLRQV#ELIPRUJXN Z ZZELIPRUJXN

ZZZELIPRUJXNVWDIITXDOLILFDWLRQV BIFM Staff Qualifications HPH.indd 1

FMW.NOV16.020.indd 20

fm-world.co.uk

20

November 2016

29/06/2016 12:12

31/10/2016 14:51


INSIDE 21 22 24 26 28

The brain game Perspectives - four original opinion pieces ThinkTank - Nutrition Seen and heard this month | A bit about you November @ BIFM and Calls to Action

VIEW POINT

B U Z Z WORDS

THE BE ST O F THE S E C TO R ’ S DI S CU S S I O N A N D DE B AT E

COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE OK, so what is cognitive performance? You’re performingly cognitively right now. It’s ‘the mental action or process of acquiring knowledge and understanding through thought, experience and the senses’. Basically, it’s anything that helps turn brain power into action. Countless factors have an impact on how well people’s brains work, such as how well you sleep and the environment in which your brain is functioning. This invariably includes several workplace factors.

Each month we explain the background to phrases you may be seeing or hearing as you go about your work

provider Interserve has been working with the workplace consultancy Advanced Workplace Associates, taking as their starting point that in a knowledge or service-based industry the cognitive performance of employees is fundamental to productivity. (There’s a report – ‘Decoding the workplace experience: how the working environment shapes views, behaviours and performance’

Just this month, researchers at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and SUNY Upstate Medical University found that working in green-certified buildings leads to higher cognitive function scores. They studied workers at 10 buildings in five cities and found that working in these buildings correlated to higher sleep quality and better cognitive performance scores than in similarly highperforming buildings that were not green-certified.

In many ways, yes. Cognitive performance also manifests itself through mindfulness, in particular ensuring employees feel both engaged and challenged in the work they are doing. So it’s much more than ensuring service line availability; it’s also, for example, about maintaining a ‘social infrastructure’ to help people to share their knowledge and work collaboratively. Quality of information sharing, perceived supervisory support and clarity of work goals are also factors. Ultimately, cognitive performance feeds in to the great British productivity debate – in which FMs can have a crucial role.

Why is it so high profile now?

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

Sensory design inputs such as noise, light, scent and temperature are all in the FM’s purview and can be crucial, as can FM’s input into daily activities. AWA suggests that factors influencing cognitive performance such as nutrition, hydration and increased physical activity can be boosted in the workplace through education and the promotion of increased activity levels.

There’s clearly a strong HR element to all of this

Give me a topical example

In the last couple of years, the question increasingly being posed is this: is your cognitive performance the best it could be – and can FMs do anything about it? There are a number of initiatives, but to isolate one, FM service

tinyurl.com/FMW1116-cognitive Cognitive science is a huge field, taking into account neuroscience, psychology, anthropology and linguistics

fm-world.co.uk

Viewpoint - Lead__FM World 21

What can I do?

21

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:43


V I E W P O I NT Have your say

P ER S P EC T I V E S – B I F M AWA R D S 2016

Can you see yourself in these pages? Get in touch by email – editorial@fm-world.co.uk Topical, inspirational, angry or amusing – we consider all relevant comment

PERSPECTIVES 1

2

Taking social impact literally

Leading a search from the front

MARTIN PICKARD was lead judge for the Societal Impact category

JOANNA LLOYD-DAVIES was Lead Judge for the Leader of the Year category

T

he BIFM Awards is an occasion that always inspires and excites me. When I look at that glittering ballroom packed with 1,200 facilities professionals I reflect on our modest FM gatherings in the 1980s, when an event like that was beyond our wildest imaginations. It drives home just how big FM is and how far we have brought the profession. This was my first year as a BIFM lead judge and I was delighted to be judging the Societal Impact category. The influence that great FM can have on communities and individuals is huge and I found the range of issues covered by the entrants provided a fascinating reminder of its reach and effect. The winning entry was an impressive initiative tackling illiteracy in some of London’s poorest areas. Vinci, working with their client, Peabody Housing Trust, the initiative has already touched the lives of 400 children and 320 parents, providing books and learning support in dedicated reading corners within community centres. The scale and ambition of the project impressed us most. Illiteracy is a root cause of poverty, where

“THE ‘READING FROM THE START’ INTERVENTION IS MAKING A REAL DIFFERENCE” We saw other remarkable projects addressing a range of health, education, and employment issues where FM teams are influencing outcomes in positive, responsible and innovative ways. It is clear that businesses are getting better at supporting transformational change through CSR, although many struggle to effectively measure the social value they create. The measuring of FM’s impact on society requires a similar approach focusing on the chain of events that lead to an improvement in the well-being, inclusion or environment of communities and individuals.

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_Perspectives__FM World 22

T

he BIFM Awards 2016 has demonstrated an exceptional uplift in the calibre of all entries. Of course, this is only possible when the process is run in parallel with our markets, our clients and the considerable activities we undertake. Each year, after the Awards ceremony there is a full, deep review of the year’s of 14-month process. This is conducted by the Awards Process Improvement Team (PIT) and comprises the Chair of Judges, two Lead Judges, BIFM Chair, CEO and Awards Team. It looks at all categories across the three main headings (Impact, Innovation and People).

poorly educated children become adults struggling with unemployment, and the cycle continues. The ‘Reading from the Start’ intervention is making a real difference and has been structured in a sustainable and effective model.

“OUR DECISION TO ANNOUNCE ONLY THE WINNER WAS AN OVERRIDING FACTOR” We must ensure that we are confronting market relevance and appropriateness, together with significant development in our profession. Following the 2015 PIT review we created the three new categories of Leader of the

22

Year, Manager of the Year, and Impact on Organisational Performance. Being a Lead Judge is a privilege, and the preeminent Leader of the Year category generated additional responsibilities. The lead judge is accountable for the entire judging process, including the category criteria. This has to be crafted to encompass the vital essence of leading businesses and people, attracting the attention of the principals in our industry while developing robust measures for the judging process. To provide an appropriate level of review for these outstanding leaders, it was decided at the outset that external judges would be appointed. Our decision to announce only the winner was an overriding factor. We received 11 entries from an international spectrum. Having met and interviewed the selected entrants, it was clear that the external judges had a materially challenging contest on their hands. Feedback is now being provided to all entrants. The PIT team is now preparing its 2016 review. We appreciate all comments and suggestions, as this is part of the continuous improvement process.

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:17


V I E W P O I NT P ER S P EC T I V E S - B I F M AWA R D S 2016

3

4

Driving competency from the ground up

It’s important to develop people

ANDY KELLY was lead judge for the Impact on Customer Experience category

JANE SANSOME was Lead Judge for the Impact on Organisational Performance category

I

’ve been judging for the BIFM Awards ever since I was fortunate enough to be voted Facilities Manager of the Year in 2007. Over the years I have supported many of the award categories, which has given me a really good insight into the way our sector is continually evolving and developing to strive to deliver customer excellence in the operational theatre. This year I was struck by the potential of data, and its timely delivery, to put FM in the operational spotlight – all through Carillion’s customer experience centre. When a helpdesk service is transformed into one where all manner of operational needs can be met through a single information delivery platform, you can see how the true value of FM can be realised by clients. But it’s also about driving competency from the ground up. They’d stripped the service requirement back to really understand the fundamentals of what was required. It’s not just about having people at the end of phone; it’s about training people to understand all of the potential touchpoints when a customer calls. In the winning submission, this is

“HERE THEY CAN ALL MULTI-TASK; THEY GET TO KNOW EACH OTHER’S CONTRACTS” operative, you’re much more than just a person dealing with data. Here they multitask, getting to know each other’s contracts and feeding back on what might work from one contract to the next. That’s real empowerment at the coalface, and we may see service providers employing more extrovert individuals so that they can engage with customer contacts across the spectrum. My key takeaway from this year’s process? That it’s all too easy to develop strategy across the boardroom table, when actually it’s through your frontline troops – the people already delivering great customer service – that your best service development decisions can be made.

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_Perspectives__FM World 23

T

he key truth about FM revealed to me through this year’s process surrounds the role that people development experts can play in bringing two organisations together to create and develop a collaborative working partnership. It takes courage and commitment, but the Kentish & Co entry clearly demonstrated how it can lead to transformational change and the basis for a new era of collaborative working in which the FM provider and FM client representative don’t spend their working days arguing over the rights and wrongs of the contract because they are jointly

work being undertaken by those delivering the service themselves, with call-takers given greater autonomy to customise the service as the customer requires. As an

“THE CATEGORY… IS NOT ABOUT FM PERFORMANCE – IT’S MUCH BIGGER THAN THAT!” focused on achieving results for the overall business that they are both there to serve. The way in which this programme was developed and delivered would hugely benefit other organisations, particularly where there is a complex contract structure

23

that absorbs much nugatory management effort in trying to ascertain the contract intent! So well done to Kentish & Co for their Highly Commended award, along with their partners Johnson & Johnson and Sodexo. The Organisational Performance category is not about FM performance, it’s about how FM can have an impact on the performance of the overall business that the FM team is supporting. The winners, National Grid Smart Workspace, working with 14forty, clearly evidenced that their collaborative working had delivered an inspirational working environment that, in turn, led to an 8 per cent improvement in employee performance, a 5 per cent increase in productive time and a 5 per cent increase in collaborative activity. The critical success factor was clear metrics against which the impact could be assessed. This was incredibly powerful. People development and collaborative working: it’s all about the FM provider and the client FM representative coming together to create an insightful, coordinated, committed and enthusiastic team that continues to deliver a long-lasting impact on organisational performance.

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:18


V I E W P O I NT T H E T H I N K TA N K

FO OD O D & WE LL- B EIN EING G

NUTRITION AND COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE

ILLUSTRATION: GETTY

Earlier this year, the government launched a Smart Working Code to help businesses ensure better and more flexible working practices. It’s indicative of how employee health and well-being is rising up the public policy agenda. Ahead of a catering special next month, we asked you whether your organisation is making the connection between cognitive performance and food consumption SADAF SAIED

ROBIN HAY

EMPLOYEE WELL-BEING IS WORTH INVESTING IN

NUTRITIONAL INITIATIVES IN ORGANISATIONS

Food affects how the brain and the body work. There is much emerging research on this: Omega-3 oils improve cognitive function; fibrerich food makes you feel fuller, and helps avoid a sugar spike at lunchtime, so you are able to concentrate in the afternoon; keeping hydrated improves concentration and reduces confusion; and caffeinated drinks increase alertness. The data is all out there and looks promising. Using this knowledge, caterers should consider a range of nutritionally balanced products that reduce the chance of sugar rushes. Offering oily fish regularly, providing fresh chilled water and encouraging full lunch breaks are all things that organisations can do as part of a health initiative that

do not require major investment. Additionally, shift workers should be offered breakfast on-site to ensure that the entire demographic is covered in any health drive. The biggest hindrance to organisations that are looking to adopt these changes is changing the culture of how businesses and individuals work: the disassociation of top management with health of the workers; ending misconceptions that healthy means more expensive; and the challenge of promoting the vital link between food, mood and health for a happy and healthy workforce. Investment in the physical and mental well-being of employees is worth the investment if that means having fewer accidents at work, increasing efficiencies and improving job satisfaction. SADAF SAIED, head of dietetics at G4S FM

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_ThinkTank__FM World 24

As a bespoke hospitality provider that offers contract catering, we focus a lot of our well-being efforts on nutrition. Scientific research and feedback from academic studies has inspired us to create our own nutritional programme ‘Restore’. We introduced a diverse food and drink offering that helps people counter the stresses of modern life and feel good throughout the working day. Restore aims to help people stay hydrated, maintain healthy sugar levels and consume more antioxidants, which in turn helps boost their immune system. The range is popular with our guests and teams alike. Increasingly, leading property developers and building owners are embracing the nutrition idea of the WELL Building Standard to create environments that positively influence good health. ROBIN HAY, co-founder, Bennett Hay

24 November 2016

28/10/2016 14:19


V I E W P O I NT

+

T H E T H I N K TA N K

Join the Think Tank to have your opinion reflected here — editorial@fm-world.co.uk

R E A DE R P O L L

SURVEY RESULTS

JULIAN FRIS

MAKING CATERING A FOCAL POINT AGAIN Are you seeing organisations making a connection between cognitive performance and consumption?

buy in to the benefits. Clients will need to consider the additional subsidy costs vs the increases in productivity.

This is something we are seeing more of from across industries, in varying degrees. There are anecdotal examples we can point to. In one academy we support a ‘family dining’ model has been introduced where everyone eats together, no food is brought in and pupils can’t leave the premises to buy food elsewhere. The school has repeatedly achieved Ofsted outstanding ratings, seeing an improvement in results since the idea was introduced. One can attribute the learning outcomes to the new methods but it is difficult to quantify fully. Elsewhere, clients are measuring higher sickness and absence levels where there is a poorer food service provision. This isn’t an exact measure but can be seen as one of the contributing factors. The challenges of measurement are being explored by different bodies, with varying success.

We are seeing a move back to hot food provision, which is more easily achieved with advances in technology, e.g. induction and combi-ovens can reproduce a contemporary offer that appeals to customers without the massive energy and space-consuming kitchens from the past. Customers see more value in hot meals and this is helping with engagement with their employers. Better engagement, as we know, leads to better productivity. In the NHS there’s an initiative called the CQUIN, a clinical quality measure of health and well-being of staff and patients – trusts that achieve this are paid an incentive. And our research has found that there is a significant resentment about workplace dining areas that charge too much. ‘Value’ and ‘price’ are key issues. Those who want to encourage people into their venues need to look at significantly reducing tariffs. It’s worth noting that nutrition is only one part of the equation. It is equally important to look at social interaction and engagement alongside this to aid productivity and workplace strategies.

What does this mean for catering? It could put catering back as a focal point in the workplace and, after years of costcutting, we might see the resurgence of the subsidy from companies who really

Has your organisation made a connection between cognitive performance and consumption?

37%

Any other significant shifts?

JULIAN FRIS, director of Neller Davies

63%

If yes, what has this meant with your catering?

50% We have changed our catering offer to reflect this

50% We have yet to make any changes What have the results been?

44%

12%

Greater A slight productivity increase in and employee productivity well-being and well-being

44%

No tangible results yet

If your organisation is not working on nutritional initiatives, why not?

86%

7%

7%

Not as important as other areas

We don’t believe there is an overwhelming correlation

The cost exceeds the potential returns

WENDY BARTLETT

HOW WE ‘DARE’ CLIENTS TO PROMOTE HEALTHY EATING We are supporting many of our clients in delivering their workplace strategies focusing on this subject. A large part of our input concentrates on providing nutritional education alongside our clients’ existing workplace activity. While few are currently able to make a direct and scientific link between cognitive performance and consumption, we are seeing wellness in the workplace as an increasing strategic priority. Often driven

by HR, clients are looking at programmes that support the improvement of employee engagement, which aids productivity and ultimately delivers better business success. As part of DARE (Delicious and Responsible Eating), a programme we’ve designed to promote healthy eating, we’ve worked with clients to introduce initiatives such as ‘Wellness Wednesdays’, and ‘Healthier meetings’ that both look at the educational piece alongside the introduction of more nutritionally balanced food. We have also rolled out campaigns that reward

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_ThinkTank__FM World 25

loyalty and healthier food choices. For example, one client introduced additional fitness classes as part of their existing activity; those who attended were given a voucher to use in the restaurant to obtain discounts and offers on DARE foods. Our nutritionist Penny Hunking is holding workshops with clients and customers on the importance of eating foods that address key nutritional issues such as eating for ‘healthy brain function’. WENDY BARTLETT Executive chairman, Bartlett Mitchell

25 November 2016

28/10/2016 14:19


V I E W P O I NT SEEN AND HEARD

Ideas and comments made around the sector this month

Freakonomics is an awardwinning series of books by journalist Stephen n Levitt, Dubner and economist Steven hi ” from f covering “the hidden side of everything”, what schoolteachers and sumo wrestlers have in common to the truth about estate agents. Dubner has since started up Freakonomics Radio, a podcast series that explores similarly baffling questions with a connection to the behaviour of humans and society. Last month, however, Freakonomics Radio released an episode titled In Praise Of Maintenance. It considers (predominantly US) culture is “obsession with innovation” and whether that has led people to “neglect the fact that things also need to be taken care of”. FM World readers are likely to be well aware of the importance of maintenance of buildings and assets. Readers will also resonate with this quote from the episode – perhaps the value of FM is becoming apparent to those outside of it: “Once in awhile, I take the time to marvel at the fact that so many people do so much work behind the scenes to keep the world humming. Whether it’s the internet, the roads, the electricity grid, you name it. Of course it’s easy to point out the failures – they’re visible, whereas the bulk of maintenance is practically invisible. But, in praise of maintenance, let me just say this: it’s necessary work; it’s hard work; and for people like me, who are always in a hurry to make the next new thing, it can be really unappealing work.” Stephen J Dubner, Freakonomics Listen to this episode, and the Freakonomics Radio archive, at tinyurl.com/FMW1116-freak

Now we’re learning about the psychology of the workspace. Humans don’t always make decisions driven by logic or value! LUCY JEYNES (@LARCHLUCY) BELIEVES FM NEEDS TO TAKE INTO ACCOUNTS WORKPLACE MAVERICKS...

GE FM@LARGE GE In Japan, having a 30-minute nap at work is a sign of commitment #wtrends

30

@SUBUTCHER - LAST MONTH’S WORKPLACE TRENDS CONFERENCE DREW INSPIRATION FROM ABROAD

“A FACILITY BASED ON CHANGE” 1968... SEDENTARY POSITION ISSUES #NOTHINGNEW @M_BUCHAN NOTES HOW A 48-YEAR-OLD REPORT DISCUSSED WORKPLACE WELL-BEING AND PRESENTED STANDING DESKS AS A VIABLE OPTION

NOTED&QUOTED @British_Airways staff on my flight said that they’ll be my “customer service” team for the evening. A new spot for this #Facman trend FM WORLD’S @JAMIEFMWORLD FINDS THAT “CUSTOMER SERVICE” GETS EVERYWHERE...

THE WORKPLACE INDUSTRY DOES KNOW HOW TO CREATE GREAT SPACE. IT’S BAD MANAGEMENT THAT WASTES THEIR TALENTS #WTRENDS @ANTONYSLUMBERS

Love the idea that with an office built for comfort, you should feel better when you leave than when you arrived #wtrends NEIL USHER @WORKESSENCE

ViewPoint_AtLarge__FM World 26

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY, ISTOCK

IN PRAISE OF MAINTENANCE

31/10/2016 09:57


V I E W P O I NT BERNARD MCPHAIL is a national account director at Integral UK and a finalist in the 2016 BIFM Awards for Manager of the Year

What do you do? I am head of national commercial refrigeration and account director for The Co-Operative Group’s food, funeral care & regional distribution centres bundled services contract.

BEHIND TH E JOB

BERNARD MCPHAIL

What attracted you to FM, and how did you get into the industry? After leaving

Which “FM myth” would you most like to put an end to? “Energy reduction

HM Forces, I started in the facilities management industry as an electrician/ refrigeration engineer, moving through the ranks quickly.

does not start with changing assets” – it’s about establishing a robust process within your building to reduce energy consumption and ensuring you have a robust maintenance strategy that works for your assets. Why clean condensers on a Monday when another department has arranged for the grass to be cut on a Tuesday, blocking the cleaned condenser and thus increasing energy consumption for the next six months?

How long have you been in your current role? Three years.

Do you see yourself predominantly as a task or a people manager? Both. I identify the good people to complete the task.

Would you describe your role as predominantly operational or strategic? I see operational and strategic as one; managers deal with situations reactively. Operations managers are a business’s pathfinder, managing pro-actively, reducing reactive risk and strategically navigating a business to success.

How many people are there in your FM team, and who does the FM team ultimately report to? There are 135 people reporting to me. Nationally, there are 1,200 reporting in through our national branch network.

My top perk at work is…

of challenges and dynamic environments.

If you could change one thing about the industry, what would it be? Apprenticeship training. Not just technical improvement, but attitude and the importance of great customer service.

“THE GOLDEN TEAM ENABLES REDUCED HEADCOUNT NATURALLY, PICKING UP EACH OTHER’S WEAKNESSES AND SUPPORTING EACH OTHER”

Any interesting tales to tell? The Golden Team: Anyone who knows me will know of the golden team. When you work hard to pull the correct people together, then one day magic happens. The golden team enables reduced headcount naturally, picking up each other’s weaknesses and supporting each other. Less overhead with greater output, which then delivers increased margins? A team that works “Smarter not harder” and says thank you!

account, with the wide variety

ViewPoint_AtLarge__FM World 27

and go – protect your integrity, stand up for what is right, and be honest, work hard and always take time to say thank you.

What was the weirdest day you’ve had in the office? A phone call at 2300 hours in November 2013 from my MD asking me to meet him at 0500 hours to buy a new company – day two of the job.

Early bird or night owl? Early bird

What FM job in the world would you love more than anything? To implement robust processes and troubleshoot failing companies/departments with European or world travel.

And where would FM be an absolute nightmare? When you have passion for your work, location doesn’t matter.

To whom would you most like to say thank you, and why? HM Forces – for

Your life outside FM mostly involves…

If I wasn’t in facilities management, I’d probably be… Back

Family. All sports, especially running and squash.

working in the military in some form or other.

fm-world.co.uk

What single piece of advice would you give to a young facilities manager starting out? Jobs will come

pointing me in the correct direction.

My company car.

What has been your biggest career challenge to date? Managing the Co-op

A B IT AB O UT YO U

27

November 2016

31/10/2016 09:58


NEWS DIRECT FROM BIFM

F M -WO R L D.CO.U K / N E W S / B I F M - N E W S

NOVEMBER@BIFM Triple Effect

Consultation on new apprenticeship standards

BIFM members highlight three useful ideas they latched onto at a recent members’ event PRESTON GAN is head of quality and performance for the facilities and estates sector at NHS Grampian; he sits on the BIFM Scotland Region Committee representing the North of Scotland. Recently elected to the BIFM Scotland Region Committee, I set as my first task organising a CPD event. I wanted to showcase FM in healthcare, and working on Europe’s largest healthcare complex gave me the opportunity of doing so at the new Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health building. By engaging with the University of Aberdeen (UoA), we were able to see the building in its entirety prior to occupation. UoA project manager Kenneth Blackburn and director of estates Angus Donaldson, along with the David Foote of architects Halliday

Fraser Munro, undertook to give a dual presentation. In the end, the event attracted a great turnout of professionals from sectors across the built environment, with the audience learning about how the building achieved BREEAM Outstanding for sustainable design. This event wouldn’t have been possible without the help of my fellow committee members such as Jenny Crocker and Sandy McNaughton (Chair). Here are the three main points I took away from the process:

1 2 3

Always have your audience at the heart of what you plan to do. Ensure your event is themed to address the competencies that attendees would wish to learn and take away.

Things don’t always work out as you want, so work with your collaborative partners on a Plan B for how the event can be delivered differently while still keeping to the theme.

ViewPoint_BIFM__FM World 28

28

Have your say on future FM changes and developments by taking part in the survey. Find the details here: tinyurl.com/BIFMAppConsult

CPD System updated to reflect FM Professional Standards

Be a good host - first impressions count! Build relationships with your collaborative partners to deliver the event and follow through every detail from reception to closing.

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM has been working with employer ‘trailblazer’ groups to develop new standards in facilities management to help FMs gain relevant industry skills. Two standards have been accepted for development for FM Supervisors (level 3) and Senior FMs (degree apprenticeship) designed and conceived with FM employers to provide longevity within the industry, both for employers and employees. The FM Supervisor standard has already been approved and published on the gov.uk website, and will commence in 2017. The proposed degree apprenticeship standard that is currently out for consultation will enable apprentices to gain a Bachelor’s degree in FM and achieve BIFM Certified grade. Linda Hausmanis, acting CEO at BIFM, said: “Apprenticeships provide great benefits to both individuals and employers, culminating in a skilled, motivated and loyal workforce. These proposed changes will ensure that FMs of the future have the knowledge, skills and behaviours required by industry.”

The continuing professional development (CPD) online portal is being updated to enable BIFM members to assess, plan and track their career development against the FM Professional Standards. The CPD system is one in a series of key benefits that allows BIFM members to identify their career goals and make plans to fill in the gaps in their development. The online record will still enable users to log CPD events and activity as well as any BIFM qualifications and training, but instead of assessing progression against the former competences users will now be able to measure their achievements against the industryrecognised FM Professional Standards. The Institute’s policy on CPD is set out in accordance with the Construction Industry Council’s best practice guidance for employers / professionals. BIFM supports an output rather than input based approach to CPD, with the chief consideration being the learning gained rather than the amount of time spent learning. Use of the institute’s post-nominals is linked to active commitment to CPD on a regular basis. The new Self-Assessment form will be available shortly on the account – with this you can assess yourself against the FM Professional Standards. Start your development plan today. bifm.org.uk/cpd

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:38


V I E W P O I NT NOVEMBER@BIFM

BIFM Health & Safety SIG specialist volunteers have presented at various events this year, including at the British Medical Association in London for the Independent Schools Bursars Association’s Health & Safety Conference. B IFM HEALTH & SA FETY SIG

Health & Safety SIG gets ready for transition to ISO 45001 Group activities In past year we have provided speakers for the BIFM Channel Islands Branch event and Facilities Management Ireland. We have also represented the BIFM at the Independent Schools Bursars Association Health & Safety Conference, which was held at the British Medical Association in London. In addition the SIG has directly supported BIFM members by providing a service answering ad hoc questions covering a range of safety-related topics.

Hot topics for 2017 We foresee exciting times ahead with the publication of ISO 45001 – the new standard for occupational health and safety, which will replace the existing OHSAS 18001. Although the standard has been delayed because of some national standards bodies failing to give their approval, the required two-third of votes in favour were recently acquired, and as a result the standard is now at draft international standard stage with the final international standard expected in February 2017. Being an international standard, it has been designed to integrate with existing standards such as ISO 9001 for Quality and 14001 Environmental Management. We believe the standard will have considerable impact through the reduction of workplace injuries globally. There are a number of additional requirements in the standard over and above the current OHSAS 18001, such as Understanding your

Organisation, Hierarchy of Controls, Change Management, Consideration of Outsourcing, Procurement and Contractor Management.

‘New challenges for FM companies – local service style of delivery’ The SIG took an active part at the recent BIFM Members Council Planning Afternoon and it was agreed that we would provide legislative input at catering and hospitality events planned for 2017. There does seem to be a trend for organisations to revert back to in-house delivery of a number of non-core activities such as catering to provide them with more control and a much more personal, localtype service. In practice, though, this is rarely achieved owing to the requirements for understanding the complex procedures and legislation involved in management of a catering environment. The challenge faced by the large total FM providers is to provide a global service, but with a truly local service style of delivery! Brexit is also a hot topic and there seems to be the misapprehension that our UK legislation will be repealed post-Brexit! Not true, as even without membership of the EU well over 90 per cent of our legislation would still be in situ. Although the structure of how our legislation is made will change, the requirements for a safer healthy workplace will remain. CONTACTS: Chairman: Robert Greenfield Deputy chairman: Michael Morgan

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_BIFM__FM World 29

29

Changes in BIFM Training Delivery and new Academy launch The current training partnership between BIFM and Quadrilect Ltd will end in September 2017 when BIFM will launch a new training scheme. BIFM will establish the BIFM Academy and offer their own BIFM courses. Quadrilect also plans to develop and grow their own courses for the future and build an online resource for FMs. Current BIFM Training learners studying for a BIFM qualification with Quadrilect will be pleased to know that this will not impact their studies, as Quadrilect will remain a BIFM recognised centre and continue to deliver BIFM qualifications, just without the BIFM Training brand. The BIFM Academy’s core goal is to become the central hub for disseminating continuing professional development (CPD) content and training to FM professionals through a mixture of face-toface and online training. To this purpose, the courses will be aligned with the industryrecognised FM Professional Standards and will integrate with the BIFM CPD provision. The Academy is also looking to strengthen the already extensive BIFM qualifications programme to support FM professionals around the world and bolster BIFM’s existing training services.

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:39


V I E W P O I NT NOVEMBER@BIFM

BIM introduced into FM Professional Standards

Interest in facilities management’s role in the construction chain was a key concern for exhibitors and visitors alike

UK Construction Week Highlights FM professionals and construction experts shone a light on the evolving construction process and the vital role of facilities management professionals as key innovators and practitioners at UK Construction Week last month. The event attracted over 20,000 visitors and over 600 exhibitors, including BIFM’s very own FM experts who met with FM professionals and businesses at the Business Advice Centre to give 20-minute consultations on lifecycle costs and how to build your brand with FM. The connection between the two industries was highlighted in the FM media just before the exhibition took place when BIFM and UK Construction Week released the results of the FM Professionals Survey. The survey was conducted in order to understand more about the current interaction between the construction process and facilities management, and how FM operates within businesses to meet sustainability and energy-efficiency targets. The results show that more than 80 per cent of FM professionals believe more needs to be done to take whole life cycle costs into account and that only 16 per cent of respondents use Building Information Modelling (BIM) technology in their job. The findings also emphasised the readiness for FMs to embrace BIM, with 73 per cent agreeing that BIM can support the delivery of facilities management and ongoing operational delivery.

STAT S

SURVEY RESULTS What is the main purpose you use BIM for? Improve efficiencies Lifecycle management Other Cost reductions Carbon reductions

Do you believe more needs to be done to take whole life cycle costing into account as part of the construction process?

bifm.org.uk/FMStandards

81%

4%

15%

Yes

No

Unsure

Do you agree that qualifications are becoming more prevalent in facilities management and add value to the construction industries? Strongly agree Agree Disagree Strongly disagree

56%

30%

12%

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_BIFM__FM World 30

23% 16% 7% 6% 2%

The FM Professional Standards have been updated to include Building Information Modelling (BIM) as an integral component. This change recognises BIM technology as a prominent and growing part of the FM profession as it enables FM teams to be actively involved in the construction process and the ongoing lifecycle management of a building or asset. The progressive BIM digital model has been shown to give assets a greater life value and reduce the risk of mistakes or discrepancies by allowing teams to manage and monitor the lifecycle of a project. This move highlights how the FM Professional Standards now work as a living and breathing framework that provides the basis for all facilities management professionals to measure, review and plan their career development, at all levels. As the core document for the training and progression standards of FMs it is crucial that it reflects the evolving role of FMs as both the technology and the environment changes around them.

2%

30

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:39


7 THE ALL NEW BUYERS’ GUIDE TO FM SERVICES The 2017 Buyers’ Guide is the most comprehensive directory of suppliers to the UK FM marketplace. Now in its 12th year with a new design and new promotional opportunities - don’t miss out.

READ BY 33,315 FM PROFESSIONALS The 2017 Buyers’ Guide provides a new range of advertising opportunities which is a simple and effective way to get your company in front of potential clients who are actively seeking suppliers. The FM World Buyers’ Guide will be distributed to over 15,000 key industry personnel throughout the year. In addition to this, all entries will be automatically hosted online at www.fm-world.co.uk

Out February 2017 Endorsed by the British Institute of Facilities Management

• Contact details for all major FM suppliers

• Handy A5 format

Advertising opportunities available: Standard quarter page

£695

Overall publication sponsorship £15,000

Premium quarter page

£895

Sector sponsorship £2,995

Premium half page

£995

Premium full page

£2,295

Double page spread

£4,995

For more information contact Jack Shuard • 020 7880 8543 • jack.shuard@fm-world.co.uk Jemma Denn • 020 7880 7632 • jemma.denn@fm-world.co.uk

FMW.NOV16.031.indd 2

27/10/2016 10:03


V I E W P O I NT T R A I N I N G & P U B L I C AT I O N S

CALLS TO ACTION Events, activities and publications worthy of your attention KE Y E V E NT

BIFM TRAINING COURSES

A really bright idea Event: Lux Live Venue: ExCeL London Date: 23-24 November

(All in central London unless advised)

IFM is supporting this year’s Lux Live, which with close to 60 speakers is Europe’s biggest annual lighting event. For busy FMs, the reason for attending can be summed up as this; you can question the experts in the market, see who’s coming through, get to understand current and emerging technology, and compare advances with those from previous years. Highlights include: an explanation about how the lighting across London’s new Elizabeth Line is being integrated into architecture; how the transmission of data over lighting works; and a slew of lighting entrepreneurs pitching their lighting ideas to a panel of seasoned industry professionals, while refreshingly there’s also a session exposing the worst of lighting –

N OVE M B E R

B

7 Exploring Innovation in FM Executive Programme 8-10 The FM Business School – Advanced FM 9-10 Fire Safety Law & Fire Risk Assessment “the overlit, underlit, glary, shadowy, ugly, unsound and plain weird lighting installations”. There’s a dedicated zone for architectural lighting and for retailers, while there are also some decent compliance topics (emergency lighting). You can register in advance for free entry. www.luxlive.co.uk

PUBLICATIONS & WEBINARS

OC TOBER 2016

SE P TE MB E R 201 6

This webinar explores some of the key areas covered in BIFM’s winter maintenance Good Practice Guide. Steve Webb, commercial director at gritting and snow clearance professionals GRITIT, presents on the dangers of an ad hoc approach to winter maintenance, while Tony Hall, customer service account manager for Noonan, talks about keeping people and places safe in winter. A case study references Noonan’s experience in tackling the winter maintenance challenges of the South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive (SYPTE). This content covers the following FM Standards: Project Management, Property & Asset Management, Stakeholder Relationships and Contract Management. Listen to either of these webinars by visiting bifm.org.uk/bifm/ knowledge/webinars

BIFM Sustainability Survey: Where are we 10 years on? The 10th annual BIFM sustainability in FM survey was published in September. It’s the longest-running report of its kind, and this webinar saw BIFM sustainability SIG chair Sunil Shah together with Graham Scott, senior account manager at WCRS, discussing the issues raised in the report’s assessment of how far sustainability has come over the past decade and what is likely to affect sustainability best practice in the decade to come. Differences in best practice between in-house and supplyside FMs are discussed, as is engagement up the supply chain to cut out waste and the key drivers (legislation, attitude and investment). There’s also a lively Q&A session at the end of this 45-minute on-demand audio event. This webinar content covers FM Standards: CSR, Energy Management and Environmental Management.

Winter risk: The cold, hard facts

FEATURED COURSE 23 NOVEMBER

Powerful presentations This one-day course is perfect

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_CTA__FM World 32

for those who want to convey an effective message in meetings, bids and presentations. Whether you’re an experienced presenter or new to the game, this session is aimed at those who need to tell a concise story to senior stakeholders, dealing with issues such as body language, presentation construction and ensuring that your audience stays captivated. The course contains a selection of real-world tips that will make a tangible difference in your presentations. By the end, you will be able to: Structure your presentations as a story, creating maximum buy-in; Build rapport with an audience by controlling their presence and space; Use structure and pace more powerfully; Add power to a message with creative language; Use the right presentation style for the audience; and Tell the ‘what’, ‘how’ and ‘why’ of your story, with gravitas and impact. Find out more by emailing kay@quadrilect.co.uk

32

15 Managing Remote Teams NEW 15-17 Understanding FM Foundation 16-17 Property Management & Maintenance Strategy for FM Executive Programme 17 Managing FM Performance & SLAs 23 Powerful Presentations NEW 23-24 Making Catering Contracts Work 24 Legionella Awareness, Responsibilities & Compliance 29 Influencing New Projects 29-30 Project Management 29-1 December The Professional FM 2 Intermediate Module II DE CE M B E R

7 Contract Management 7 Financial Management 1 – The Essentials 7 Waste Legislation & Resource Management 8 Negotiating to Win 13-15 Understanding Facilities Management 13-16 IOSH Managing Safely Certificate 14 BS11000 Collaborative Business Relationships 14-15 The Essentials of Property Management 15 Advancing Sustainability To book, and for more listings, visit tinyurl.com/bifmtraining

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:20


V I E W P O I NT DIARY

+

EVENTS

KEY Site Visit Conference / Seminar Workshop / Presentation Social / Networking

INDUSTRY WIDE 1 4 - 1 8 N OV EMBER

Partner event: Workplace Week A week-long event putting some of the UK’s most innovative and creative workspaces in the spotlight, whilst raising money for BBC Children in Need. Highlights include: a oneday convention (taking place at Aviva’s St Helen’s London headquarters); a programme of 90-minute ‘working workplace’ tours involving some of the UK’s most innovative workplaces; and a selection of inspirational fringe events at exciting workplace venues around London. yourfriend@advanced-workplace.com www.workplaceweek.com 1 5 N OV E MB ER

People matter: Designing environments as if people matter? How can we design environments to take account of everybody’s individual needs? That’s the theme of this one-day conference taking place at the Coin Street Conference Centre in London. mail@mem-events.co.uk 1 6- 1 7 N OVEMBER

Partner event: EMEX 2016 Housing more than 100 exhibitors and 80 seminars / training sessions EMEX – the Energy Management Exhibition – is the event for anyone wanting to increase their buildings and organisation’s energy efficiency. It is a free-to-attend annual event for FM professionals, energy managers and all those involved in energy bill reduction and procurement. The programme is spread across 4 free-to-CPDaccredited seminar theatres. This content, curated by the Energy Managers Association and its board, will include the chance to hear from industry experts and peers, and to meet with the many leading suppliers that have sponsored and endorsed the show. Key show zones will address Energy Use in the Built Environment, the Human Factor

in Energy Efficiency, Flexibility in Energy Supply (DR, storage and renewables), and Energy Management Innovation & Technologies in FM. www.emexlondon.com sales@emexlondon.com

8 N OVE M B E R

Managing diversity – learning from FM in South Africa John Samuel of J-Maynard, Rowland Gurnell from Sunbird group, Paul M’Crystal from ABSA, Akona Ngcuka from Bidvest FM and Nathanial Reddy from LDM group all of whom are on the SAFMA (South African Facilities Management Association) will join in at Polycom’s London offices on a live link to share their experiences of managing diversity in the workplace and the trends within the facilities management market in South Africa. sellickc@aol.com tinyurl.com/z66t5or

24 NOVEM B E R

Corporate members’ event: Internet of Things Hosted at Wembley Stadium, this event will focus on the systems used to operate the stadium and on the Internet of Things, building information modelling and predictive analytics. bifm-cme-nov16.eventbrite.co.uk 7-8 DECEM B E R

Facilities management in airports The International FM Airports Conference brings together airport decision-makers, operators, technology providers and world FM experts to exchange knowledge, network and find new business partners. The conference takes place in Düsseldorf, Germany. www.euroforum.de/fm-airports

PEOPLE MANAGEMENT 15 N OVE M B E R

Celebrating people Annual event to celebrate the achievements of the winners and highly commended individuals of the 2016 BIFM awards in the people categories. To be held at OrangeBox Showroom, 38 Northampton Road, London. tahera.hammond@investecmail.com tinyurl.com/zgdaa6z

13 DECEM B E R

NHS Innovation in Facilities Management Expo 2016 This event is driven by a desire to challenge the norms in FM and find innovative solutions to issues faced by those working in FM, in healthcare and further afield. It’s to be held at Barts Health NHS Trust in London. www.ascentevents.co.uk/ifm-expo info@ascentevents.co.uk

SOUTH WEST 18 N OVE M B E R

Quarterly training day: Hard services technology Held at the Bristol Hilton Hotel, Woodlands Lane, Bradley Stoke, Bristol BS32 4JF nicholasjamesfox@outlook.com tinyurl.com/zkgy9du

7 FEBRUA RY 2017

Workplace Futures

NORTH 8 DE CE M B ER

Key learning event: The evolving workplace A North West branch event. Mark Catchlove and Ian Ellison are the confirmed keynote speakers at the event, to be held at the Alan Turing Imaginarium, BBC, Dock House, MediaCityUK, Salford. mark.a.whittaker@integral.co.uk tinyurl.com/hp24hph

SCOTLAND 2 DE CE M B ER

Quarterly Training Day 4 A half-day training session providing an overview of strategic asset management linked to ISO 55000, targeted lifecycle strategy, best practice FM delivery and benchmarking. Craig Little and his team at Aecom will deliver this seminar. it’s to be held at the Hilton Strathclyde, Phoenix Crescent, Glasgow. isabel.brown@glasgowlife.org.uk tinyurl.com/hv9g5ja

HOME COUNTIES 3 0 N OVE M B ER

Workplace Futures provides a unique opportunity to identify – and help shape – the future of FM. Its 2017 theme is ‘Challenging conventions’. Workplace Futures 2017 will challenge the prevailing ‘think office’ convention: “There is so much to be gained from looking at how FM operates in unusual places”. The event is held at The Crystal, the conference centre located at the western end of the Royal Victoria Docks in London. www.fm-conference.co.uk

fm-world.co.uk

ViewPoint_CTA__FM World 33

INTERNATIONAL

HQ of the Belgian Social Security Ministry in Brussels. Speakers are from diverse organisations including LinkedIn; Guinness Storehouse; Designer Group and Mountjoy Prison. Business and FM professionals will exchange knowledge, information and ideas on the many facets of one of Ireland’s fastest growing professions. irelandinfo@bifm.org.uk www.bifmireland.org.uk

IRELAND 25 N OVE M B E R

BIFM Ireland Region Conference: Workplace partnerships – rethinking FM Frank van Massenhove, chairman at FOD Sociale Zekerheid – SPF Securite Sociale in Belgium, will be the keynote speaker at the event at Croke Park, Dublin. He and his team have created a revolutionary workplace at the

33

Leadership skills: Unlock the skills to be a world-class leader 90 per cent of bosses believe they are excellent managers. 70 per cent of employees say that the worst aspect of their job is their boss. Yet a great leader can give their team the desire to achieve success, inspire each individual to make the most of their talents and enhance their contribution to the core business. ian.r.fielder@gmail.com tinyurl.com/zeoykl9

November 2016

28/10/2016 14:21


Are you ready to move up? We’re here to help you progress $UH\RXVWLOODWWKHULJKW%,)0PHPEHUVKLSJUDGHWRUHĆƒHFW \RXULQFUHDVLQJDFKLHYHPHQWVLQWKH)0LQGXVWU\Ĺ?RULVLW time to progress? 7RXSJUDGHWRWKHQH[WOHYHORUWRILQGRXWPRUHplease XSJUDGH XSJUDGH XSJUDGH visit: ZZZELIPRUJXNX XSJUDGH or contact the Membership Team on:    or email membership@bifm.org.uk BIFM Upgrade HPH.indd 1

31/10/2016 16:26

*HWDKHDG LQ\RXUFDUHHUZLWK D%,)0TXDOLILFDWLRQ LQ}IDFLOLWLHV}PDQDJHPHQW $GGYDOXHWR\RXUFDUHHUDQGVWDQGRXW IURP}WKH}FURZG ! <RXFKRRVHWKHVL]HFKDOOHQJHDQGXQLWVWRVXLW\RXUJRDOV ! <RXFDQOLQN\RXUOHDUQLQJWROLYHEXVLQHVVSURMHFWV ! 4XDOLILFDWLRQVDUHGHVLJQHGE\IDFLOLWLHVPDQDJHUVIRUIDFLOLWLHV}PDQDJHUV

ZZZELIPRUJXN\RXUFDUHHU

fm-world.co.uk

FMW.NOV16.034.indd 34

7   (TXDOLILFDWLRQV#ELIPRUJXN ZZZELIPRUJXN

34

November 2016

31/10/2016 16:28


INSIDE 36 37 38 40 42

Powered gate safety – what you need to know Water Deregulation 2017 Career development: presenting your case Plants, indoor air pollution, and NASA Photovoltaic glass: integrated solar technology

KNOW HOW THE L ATE ST L E A RN I N G A N D BE ST P RAC TI C E

WA S H ROOMS

DRY BEFORE YOU BUY?

H

ere’s something interesting – the possibility of hand drying as a revenue stream. Manufacturer Savortex has developed a dryer that delivers 10-second long silent videos to people as they dry their hands. The company has partnered with an out-of-home media buyer which can deliver adverts to its adDryer units that are compatible with whatever the client’s brand guidelines are for the estate in

which the dryers are situated. Clients can also include their own internal messages alongside the commercial ones – for example, reminding users of forthcoming fire alarm tests or special discounts in the canteen. Using an Intel processor, the adDryer has a sensor that triggers a signal to Savortex’s own server, sent over WiFi. This data allows for clients to set a threshold, say 200 cleans, at which point the dryer triggers a

fm-world.co.uk

KnowHow_Lead__FM World 35

35

message to the Savortex server, which in turn messages the FM team to go in and clean the washroom. Once it’s cleaned, a text is sent to the server to close the loop and add data on cleaning time. The company’s algorithms calculate how much energy is used (motor watts vs. drying time, typically 11 seconds, divided by kilowatt hours) allowing clients to see both cost per dry and energy per dry. www.www.savortex.com

November 2016

31/10/2016 09:59


K N OW H OW EXPL AINER

70%

of powered d gate gate gat e iinstallations nst stalla llatio tions are considered unsafe, according ed du nsa safe e, a cco cordi ding g to to industry e estimates sttimate ma es

GAT E SAFE T Y

Some 500,000 powered gates and barriers are installed in the UK with 12,000 added yearly, and many FMs have them on their property without knowing the responsibilities that come with them. The problem isn’t the number of powered gates, but the poorly understood risks associated with them, writes NSI’s Graeme Hazlewood

POWERED GATE SAFETY: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW

D

eaths and serious injuries from powered gates are rare, but minor injuries and damage to property are frequent; powered gates are exposed to frequent use and the elements. If they are not properly installed and maintained they may become unsafe.

The law As a landlord or agent running a business, you have responsibilities under the Health & Safety at Work Act requiring you to keep your premises safe, including gates and barriers on the property. You can meet your obligations by making sure contractors working on the property are technically competent and comply with the law. If you fail to do so you could be prosecuted, be fined and suffer reputational damage.

Who’s responsible? For a new installation the

tinyurl.com/FMW1116-TScode

TS 011: 2016 – WHAT DOES IT COVER? The code explains that new powered gates and barriers must be provided in compliance with the Supply of Machinery (Safety) Regulations, which have brought the European Machinery Directive into UK law since 1995 without significant change. To comply, a gate or barrier must have been risk-assessed to identify all associated

Five steps to gate safety Step 1: Installers must provide user instructions, safety warnings, maintenance instructions and a logbook of maintenance and repairs. The paperwork establishes who the installer was, if the gate has

fm-world.co.uk

Know How - Power__FM World 36

been maintained and by whom. This is especially important if you’ve ‘inherited’ gates. Step 2: All you need to know about powered gates is in the DHF (Door and Hardware Federation) TS 011: 2016: Code of Practice for the Design, Manufacture, Installation and Maintenance of Powered Gates and Traffic Barriers (from the DHF website).

installer will normally be liable for defects in design and installation as the law requires that they are safe when handed to the client. But if the installer can show the incident is a result of poor subsequent maintenance, liability shifts to the owner or facilities manager. After maintenance has been carried out the gate should be safe. If the maintainer identifies a problem that makes the gate unsafe it should advise what must be done to rectify this. If the maintainer fails to do this and keeps the gate operational, it may be liable, but an owner who doesn’t take the advice and operates the unsafe gate regardless will take on liability.

Step 3: Does the gate meet the ‘STARS’ test? Structural integrity: Are all physical stops in place and secure? Are there any cracks in welds or loose components? Technical: Are areas where someone could be hit, crushed, drawn in, cut or trapped by the gate protected by guards, safety devices or motion detectors? Action: Do you know how to manually release the gate’s leaves if they trap someone? Reliability: Does the gate need to be continually repaired? Safety and control devices: Do safety devices (photocells, safe edges and force limitation motors) operate correctly? Step 4: Assuming your gate is being maintained, arrange for the company to come on site to discuss any code concerns. If it is not being maintained you may want to put this on the agenda. Step 5: If you’re looking for a new gate, or need one checked, use firms working to the DHF Code of Practice, including those certified through the NSI Gates Certification Scheme and members of the DHF Powered Gates Group.

36

hazards, which of the Directive Essential Health & Safety Requirements apply, and then explain in detail how they have been satisfied. Once safety has been achieved, the gate supplier must provide detailed instructions on safe use and the continuing maintenance that will be necessary to keep the installation in a safe condition.

The supplier must issue a Declaration of Conformity and apply a CE mark. Detailed evidence of the entire conformity process must be retained by the manufacturer in a technical file to prove compliance to the relevant national enforcement authority in case there is an accusation of nonconformity, or an incident involving the system.

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:44


K N OW H OW EXPL AINER

A

s we enter a more competitive era in the water market, take stock of your costs, customer service experience and water efficiencies.

Checklist Check that you are being billed for sites that actually belong to you, especially if you are a multi-site business. Ask your retailer to confirm which sites they are invoicing you for, then carry out an audit to establish that their data matches yours. Check the data and bills that you receive from your supplier. If you are a seasonal business,

WHAT IS THE 2017 WATER DEREGULATION?

does the water use correlate with when you should be seeing peaks and troughs? Ascertain whether you are being billed based on readings or estimates. Map out exactly which services you are paying for at any given site. You may find it differs significantly, as some may require wastewater/ highway drainage.

The water market in Scotland was deregulated in 2008. Scottish Water remained the sole wholesaler of water and retained control of water infrastructure, but set up a non-domestic division, Business Stream, and joined the retail market with several other bodies as licensed providers. The providers buy water services from Scottish Water and bundle

What’s in it for me? The freedom of choice that comes from market reform provides a chance to access a more tailored service, whether that is a retailer with experience in your sector,

WAT E R M ARKET

or one that specialises in working with businesses of a particular size. Reviewing your current service now could also make paying your bills much more efficient in future. Rather than dealing with multiple bills for multiple sites, you will have access to providers with the infrastructure to service all of your facilities, regardless of region, for a single invoice. Some retailers will offer monthly reports to allow you to identify and respond to anomalies resulting in waste.

WATER REFORMS: TO SWITCH OR NOT TO SWITCH? The water market is due to open in 3 April 2017, so organisations will be able to switch to the water and sewerage supplier that best suits their needs in a new, more competitive market. Geoff Smith, director of business retail at water2business, explains what this could mean for FM, the questions to ask and how to find the best deal for your business

fm-world.co.uk

Know How - Power__FM World 37

this with additional services to sell on to organisations. The market in England, now made up of a number of regional monopolies, is set to follow suit in April 2017. Customers will be able to switch water and wastewater services provider at any time, for any reason, and without penalty. Non-household customers now served by a supplier based in Wales will only be

Choosing the right retailer Some retailers will focus on a simple transactional service, others a more partner-led approach to manage all of your water needs while driving down costs. If you are a multi-site business be

37

eligible to switch if their use exceeds 50 million litres a year. Otherwise they will continue to be served by their regional water company. The deregulation is expected to result in better customer service and more water efficiency savings – and to encourage innovation and competition in the market. Much of this has been documented in Scotland over the past eight years.

sure that your retailer has the infrastructure in place to support you. And if your various sites have differing requirements from a supplier – perhaps one requires access to wastewater solutions and you are looking for a partner that has the expertise to ensure that your water effluence remains compliant – then consider which would provide the most comprehensive service. Not yet ready to change provider? Don’t panic; you will be automatically put on a default tariff as part of a contract with your current retailer until you are better placed to do so. Regulator OFWAT guarantees that you will be no worse off than you were pre-reform. www.open-water.org.uk

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:44


K N OW H OW C AREER DE VELOPMENT JON ISAACSON is director at Local Facilities Manager’s Connection (LFMC), a peer-to-peer networking group, founded in Eugene, Oregon, USA

P RE SE NTAT IO NS

POWERFUL POINTS FOR YOUR NEXT PRESENTATION Getting ‘buy-in’ on a particular project or initiative often rests on how well you present your case. You may also be required to speak to potential clients, or present to an external audience to share best practice with peers. Here, Jon Isaacson shares his tips for creating value rather than wasting time when addressing your audience

A

s a facilities manager, you are a salesperson. You are constantly marketing your value to the organisation and selling the projects that you know are critical to keeping the lights on for your company. It may not be often that the FM department is invited to make a presentation, but these meetings with executives, department heads, team meetings or even to groups outside of the organisation are a great opportunity to get your strategic message across. However, there’s a fine line between an effective presentation and a waste of time. Here are five key points:

1

specific audience. If you have the time, pay more attention to tone and pacing to keep the audience engaged.

2

be most effective to highlight are key components in crafting an engaging presentation. Aim to create value for your audience, and by educating it in an area that correlates to your organisation’s services, you can create indirect value for your organisation.

Who is your audience?

Is this a general audience? Or people that are familiar with your services? Does this group have specific needs that your company specialises in? Who you are speaking to and what areas you believe would

3

A bit about you You might be tempted to talk extensively about

Time is money

Time is critical. Knowing how much time one has is an essential parameter for structuring how many points you will want to focus on. You may have at most 5-10 minutes. Your presentation will have to gain momentum quickly to address a primary aspect of the service. Highlight one aspect of the service and complement it with a story that makes it relatable to the

4

Tailor your style

5

Keep practising

Making use of time and respecting the audience are key components to a good presentation. Know your goal for the meeting. If this presentation is for broad appeal to reach as many people as possible, then humour is always a friend. Your goal in a generic forum should be to create a knowledge void that draws additional interest from as many people as possible. For broad appeal, leave your audience with at least one nugget of value or piece of information; do this by presenting at least three key points that you believe will connect with as many people as possible. If you are aiming to grab a specific demographic or even a single client, then tailor your presentation to target them.

Work on developing your skills in those soft areas such as public speaking, communication and sales. FMs do all the work behind the scenes, so it is valuable to your organisation to be able to explain operations in a clear, concise manner. You are the first point of contact for marketing the services that you and your facilities team provide to your organisation.

fm-world.co.uk

Know How - Career Development -e cigs__FM World 38

your history and explain every detail of what your business does, but the value of this to your audience is inversely proportionate to the amount of time you may spend explaining these personal details. Introduce the organisation with enough personal details to relate to the demographic, before swiftly moving on to the main points.

38

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:40


K N OW H OW FIVE POINT PLAN

E - C IGARE T TE USE AT WORK

E-CIGARETTES: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW Electronic cigarettes, or e-cigarettes, were first introduced into the European retail market in 2006, just one year before Britain’s indoor smoking ban. Paul Adams, marketing manager at Hochiki Europe, explains what you should know about the use of these in the workplace

1

What’s the law?

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

More than two million people in the UK are thought to use these devices regularly. Under the law, smoking tobacco in an indoor workplace is a criminal offence in Britain, regardless of employer attitudes. Breaches of the 2007 smoking ban can result in £50 to £200 fines for offending employees. But e-cigarettes are exempt from smoke-free legislation as no substances are burnt during the inhalation process.

2

It’s not illegal, but should you allow it?

Employers can choose whether or not employees can use e-cigarettes in the

workplace. The Advisory, Conciliation and Arbitration Service (Acas) notes: “Advertising for E-cigarettes focuses on them being substitutes for cigarettes and often they are used as an aid to stop smoking.” Employers should consider the implications for staff who use them, as well as other employees. The long-term effects of e-cigarettes are unknown.

3

4

Impact on smoke detectors

To understand how e-cigarette vapour will affect different smoke detectors, there needs to be a better understanding of the particle size and distribution of the aerosols produced. The Department of Chemistry at Monmouth University measured the particle size of e-cigarette vapour in an undiluted state using

Impact on others

Currently, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) does not advise on prohibiting the use of e-cigarettes in the workplace, but should an organisation prohibit their

fm-world.co.uk

Know How - Career Development -e cigs__FM World 39

indoor use, the employer must ensure that e-cigarette users are not put at risk from secondhand tobacco smoke. Separate smoking and e-cigarette smoking areas are recommended.

39

a spectral transmission procedure. The study found that the particles are typically between 0.25- 0.45 microns, which is actually comparable to tobacco smoke. E-cigarette particles that reach a smoke detector will be diluted, having mixed with saliva in the mouth, creating particle sizes more comparable to steam. This means that if someone is standing under a detector and creating a generous amount of e-cigarette vapour, then the density of particles entering the chamber may set off smoke detectors.

5

Reducing the risk

Should your company allow the use of e-cigarettes indoors, there is a risk of a false alarm. Certain detectors can help reduce false alarms from both steam and e-cigarette smoke; there are detectors that contain a honeycomb-structured mesh designed to maximise smoke flow and improve tolerance against insects, dust and steam. If steam meets the mesh, it is forced to diffuse through it, resulting in the dissipation of vapour particles and reducing the risk of a false alarm. tinyurl.com/FMW1116-ACASecig tinyurl.com/FMW1116-HSEecig

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:41


K N OW H OW

70%

EXPL AINER

nearly 70 per cent of office workers in a recent poll said that poor air quality in their buildings is having a negative impact on day-to-day productivity

ENVIRONMENT

PHOTOGRAPHY: ALAMY / GETTY

I

n 1989, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Associated Landscape Contractors of America (ALCA) published a research paper, Interior Landscape Plants for Indoor Air Pollution Abatement. The report, by BC Wolverton, Willard L Douglas and Keith Bounds, researched methods of cleaning the air in space stations. NASA said: “If man is to move into closed environments, on Earth or in space, he must take along nature’s life support system.” The paper is now 27 years old, but it references building performance issues that are still relevant today: “During the late 1970s, when the energy crunch was being felt at both the gas pump and in heating and cooling costs, buildings were being designed to maximise energy efficiency to alleviate spiralling energy costs.” The authors noted that building design changes implemented that improved energy efficiency at the time included “super-insulation and reduced fresh air exchange”, but occupants of these more efficient sites complained of health problems, including itchy eyes and skin rashes. The research determined that “the airtight sealing of buildings” and the materials used to make office equipment, furnishings and synthetic building materials affected workers’ health. NASA had identified indoor air problems within sealed space habitats in 1974. Wolverton et al explained that these factors all contribute to “sick building syndrome”, a term first used by the World Health Organisation in 1986 when it found that

AIR FILTERING INDOOR PLANTS “almost 30 per cent of all new or remodelled buildings had varying degrees of indoor air pollution”. And the problem has not gone away; a YouGov survey published in August 2016 says nearly 70 per cent of office workers feel poor air quality in their buildings has a negative impact on day-to-day productivity. A study by researchers at Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health and SUNY Upstate Medical University published in October 2016 shows that working in green-certified buildings is associated with fewer sick building symptoms and higher sleep quality scores, as well as better cognition.

The NASA study The NASA study pointed to a number of steps to reduce indoor air pollution, including reducing off-gassing from building materials and furnishings before installation. But it also pointed to “the use of plants and their associated soil microorganisms”. While all plants absorb carbon dioxide and release oxygen into the environment, the report found that a number

fm-world.co.uk

KnowHow_IndoorPlants__FM World 40

of plants have air-filtering qualities that help to eliminate toxic chemicals from the local atmosphere. Wolverton has published further papers and books on this subject, including Plants And Soil Microorganisms: Removal Of Formaldehyde, Xylene, And Ammonia From The Indoor Environment in the Journal of the Mississippi Academy of Sciences (1993) and How to Grow Fresh Air (1996). In the NASA paper the authors tested the air filtering qualities of several indoor plants against toxic chemicals found in home and working environments, including: Benzene – a solvent present in gasoline, inks, oils, paints, plastics and rubber. It is also used to make detergents and pharmaceuticals. Short-term exposure to benzene can result in irritation to eyes and skin, drowsiness, headaches. Trichloroethylene – used in the dry cleaning industry, in printing inks, paints and adhesives. Short-term exposure to it can result in dizziness and nausea. Formaldehyde – found in “virtually all indoor environments”, including

40

Why do some plants improve air quality better than others? A NASA paper from 1989 is still relevant today

PLEASE NOTE! Several of these plants are known to be toxic to cats, dogs and other pets. It’s worth considering if you read this and then think of introducing these plants into your home.

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:44


K N OW H OW

What’s in our air?

EXPL AINER

T

B

X

A

Benzene

Xylene

Ammonia

F

Trichloroethylene Formaldehyde

in some foam insulations, plywood panelling, synthetic fabrics, paper bags, facial tissues, napkins and common household cleaning agents. Short-term exposure can result in irritation to nose, mouth and throat. More severe cases can include swelling of the larynx. [The following chemicals were tested as part of Wolverton’s later study in 1993]: Xylene – found in printing, leather and paint industries, tobacco smoke and vehicle exhausts. Short-term exposure can result in irritation to mouth and throat, headaches, dizziness and heart problems. Ammonia – found in window cleaners, floor waxes, smelling salts and fertilisers. Short-term exposure can result

T

F B X A Peace Lily

T F B X Red-Edged Dracena

(Spathiphyllum ‘Mauna Loa’)

(Dracaena marginata)

T F B X Varigated Snake Plant

T F X Barberton Daisy

(Sansevieria trifasciata ‘Laurentii’)

(Gerbera jamesonii)

F X A Flamingo Lily

T F B X English Ivy

(Anthurium andraeanum)

(Hedera helix)

T F B Cornstalk Dracana

T F B X A Florist’s Chrysanthemum

(Dracaena fragrans ‘Massangeana’)

(Chrysanthemum morifolium)

tinyurl.com/FMW1116-NASAair tinyurl.com/FMW1116-Wolverton1993

fm-world.co.uk

KnowHow_IndoorPlants__FM World 41

Air filtering plants

in irritation to eyes and throat. Each plant was subjected to each chemical while placed in a sealed chamber. Researchers monitored the level of the chemical in the chamber over the course of 24 hours, the total plant leaf surface area and the total amount (in micrograms) of each chemical removed per plant. Houseplants that need little light were found to show the potential for removing trace pollutants from indoor air. Researchers also noted that the plant root and soil area was the most effective part of the plant at removing pollutants from its environment.

41

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:45


K N OW H OW TECHNICAL EXPL AINER

CRYSTAL CLEAR Photovoltaic (PV) solar panels are well established as a renewable energy option. But what’s next? FM World spoke to Dr Chris Case, chief technology officer at Oxford Photovoltaics, a spin-off of Oxford University, about the possibilities

How do they work?

When did PV technology first come onto the market? Dr Chris Case (CC): The first commercial silicon solar cells were invented in 1954 at Bell Labs in the US. The first products were called ‘solar batteries’ and used to power telephone systems in remote areas. For the next 20 years, PV panel applications were limited to applications

CC: PV or photovoltaic solar panels are traditionally assembled with glass front sheets to protect the solar cells. A typical panel contains 60 solar cells, and has an approximate overall dimension of 65 x 39 inches and can weigh up to 40 pounds. The solar cells are typically made from silicon that has been purified from sand, and operate by converting photons from the sun into electrons that can be used for electrical applications.

Oxford Photovoltaics (Oxford PV) was founded in 2010 after a breakthrough in solar technology using perovskite-based solar material. What is this, and why is it so exciting?

Perovskite solar cells are most commonly made using a hybrid of lead or tin halide-based material and a crystal structure. This type of cell tends to be far cheaper to manufacture in comparison with more traditional silicon solar cells. The efficiencies of solar cells using this material have risen from around 4 per cent in 2010 to 22.1 per cent in 2016, according to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Oxford PV believes this will improve the aesthetics, performance and cost of both current solar panels and BIPV systems. Essentially, the coating can be printed directly onto office windows, which Oxford PV says would cost a fraction more than the cost of the windows or façade. Developing perovskite thin-film solar cells has delivered a route to boosting the efficiency of current commercial cells; using a highefficiency coating in a multi-junction or ‘tandem’ cell architecture.

tinyurl.com/FMW1116-OxfordPV tinyurl.com/FMW1116-OxDepPhysics

And the maintenance of these is straightforward? CC: PV panels have no moving parts and have a long life with typical warranties of 25 years. The cells themselves never wear out, although the power degrades over time. For optimum performance, the panels should be cleaned regularly and any obstacles

fm-world.co.uk

Know How -PV Glass-Case in point__FM World 42

PEROVSKITE SOLAR TECHNOLOGY: WHAT IS IT?

CC: We developed a coating that goes on top of the traditional silicon solar cell and boosts the efficiency by up to 25 per cent by using more of the solar spectrum. Once the coating has been applied to the silicon cell, it is assembled into a standard 60 (or 72) cell module and looks and operates like a regular PV panel. There is also an emerging market known as Building Integrated PV, where the solar panels can be integrated into buildings directly. In future, the building glass could also incorporate solar cells. The Oxford PV perovskite technology can be adapted to produce transparent PV layers on building glass that produce electricity. One day virtually all our energy will be supplied by PV or other renewable sources.

P V SO LAR PANEL S

such as satellites. It was the oil crisis in the 1970s that triggered the beginning of the modern PV era. Over 40 years, PV installations have grown exponentially and now about 2 per cent of energy worldwide is supplied by PV panels.

that may shade the panels should be removed. There are automated and manual brush systems to help with cleaning.

42

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:42


K N OW H OW CASE IN POINT Want to be featured? Do you have a case study to showcase your products and services? Get in touch by email – sales@fm-world.co.uk or call 020 7880 7633

CASE IN POINT FE AT URE CASE STUDY

FLEXIM keeps brewery plant safe Problem In a brewery, energy is the second most important resource after water. This applies for process heat and also for cooling required during the fermentation process and finally for the storage cellars. Within the scope of an integrated energy management system the continuous monitoring of the chiller’s efficiency is mandatory. Besides the measurement of the electric power use the generated cooling power has to be recorded

by measuring flow, pressure and temperature of the cooling agent.

Outcome Solution Ammonia is often used as a refrigerant. Measuring the compressed and hot ammonia gas streams with conventional inline metering technologies poses a high risk of contamination. But with FLEXIM’s non-invasive FLUXUS gas flow meter, the gas stream can be measured from outside the pipe wall, eliminating these risks.

Pressure and temperature are recorded at the same time, so FLUXUS can directly calculate the plant’s cooling power, allowing the operators to constantly check the efficiency of the compressor and find starting points for further optimisation of the plant. Moreover, FLUXUS shows no wear and tear, does not require any opening or costly emptying of the pipe, and rules out potential leaking and pressure losses. www.flexim.com

MIKROFILL SUPPLIES BOILERS TO BEDFORDSHIRE HOSPITAL

MIKROFILL UPGRADES PLANT AT LEASOWES HIGH SCHOOL

LUCECO ILLUMINATES CHURCH-TO-OFFICE SCHEME

Problem

Problem

Problem

Following an initial feasibility study and financial appraisal by Eta Energy Systems Ltd, it was concluded that Bedfordshire Hospital needed to reduce its reliance on its existing steam plant and improve its overall system efficiency.

A dilapidation survey at Leasowes High School in Halesowen by Dudley Metropolitan Borough Council concluded that the existing LPHW and HWS equipment needed upgrading.

Owing to its success, Technology Management has moved to new premises, St Mark’s Church in Wolverhampton – a former church with stunning architectural features. But converting it into office space posed lighting challenges.

Solution Solution The new installation combines 3No Mikrofill Ethos 130kW stainless steel condensing boilers to primarily serve the hospital’s HWS demand. The new equipment was configured to provide LPHW into the main heating system when the HWS requirements are at a minimal.

The installation carried out by TDR Mechanical included 6No Ethos 130kW condensing boilers with a total modulation of 60 > 1 (780 > 13kW) that ensures the buildings’ heat load is constant. The HWS requirement for the kitchen/main block is catered for by an unvented Extreme 500-litre loading cylinder that can produce 2500 l/hr.

Outcome

Outcome

The scheme is sequenced to ensure that the condensing boilers also provide heating in preference to the operation of the existing steam plant. This has cut the steam plant requirement and improved the overall system efficiency.

Leasowes site manager Rob Upton said: “I’d like to thank both Mikrofill Systems and Dudley MBC for all their help during the design and installation phase… this has made a huge difference to the school.”

Solution Luceco supplied cost-effective, energy-saving LED luminaires to light the tiered office spaces. LuxPanel offers up to 50,000 hours’ working life with no maintenance or re-lamping requirement benefiting the environment in energy efficiency.

Outcome

www.mikrofill.com

www.mikrofill.com

fm-world.co.uk

Know How -PV Glass-Case in point__FM World 43

St Mark’s Church is an elegant office space lit with Luceco LED LuxPanels and Platinum LED Downlights, providing operational savings of 80 per cent when compared with traditional fluorescent luminaires – and an effective solution to meet the demands of this environment. zoe.nh@luceco.com

43

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:42


“We commissioned PTSG’s High Level Cleaning Division to undertake the external cleaning of this prestigious development in the centre of Sheffield. The first clean in a number of years has been successfully completed, with a huge amount of positive feedback from residents. We intend to use PTSG for all future external façade cleaning and maintenance works at City Lofts.” Will Hallworth from Premier Estates

A view from one of the 150,000 assets we care for Training Solutions Ltd

Safety Testing

Lightning Protection

High Level Window Cleaning

Access & Safety Training

Safety Installation

Electrical Testing

Gutter Cleaning

Electrical Services Training

Cradle Maintenance

Dry Riser & Fire Services

Building Cleaning

Insurance & Compliance

Cradle Installation

Steeplejack Services

Pressure Cleaning

Working at Height Training

01977 668 771

www

PTSGGroup

@PTSGPLC

www.ptsg.co.uk

info@ptsg.co.uk

Memorable Outstanding Unique Service Experience

13 - 14 Flemming Court, Castleford, West Yorkshire, WF10 5HW With service centres throughout the UK, PTSG offers full nationwide coverage. FMW.NOV16.044.indd 2

26/10/2016 16:10


ENABLING PRODUC TIVE ENVIRONMENTS FOR PEOPLE AND BUSINESS

IMPACT STUDIES The growing influence of FM within organisations FUTURE SHOCK The dynamic new generation of award-winning FMs MIND THE APP The increasing effect of IT on defining FM’s true value

Winning formula In this 2016 BIFM Awards special, Manager of the Year Suzanne Beck and Leader of the Year Katy Dowding discuss their success, their roles – and FM’s future

Facilitate Cover__FM World 45

31/10/2016 12:05


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

Katy Dowding (left) and Suzanne Beck (right) may have different types of day job, but many common themes emerge when they’re asked about the way they work and the future of the profession. Martin Read met the newly crowned leader and manager of the year in the days after the 2016 BIFM Awards ceremony

F

or 2016, BIFM decided to stop running a single Facilities Manager of the Year award and introduced Leader of the Year and Manager of the Year. It’s an understandable and perhaps overdue recognition of what can be very different FM roles; many highquality professionals dealing with the day-to-day delivery of facilities service deserve recognition, while others with a more strategic business role have a greater public profile and deserve accolades for their own work. Two different roles, but both very much about best practice in FM. 2016 Leader of the Year Katy Dowding already has a high profile. She was appointed MD of Skanska Facilities Services in 2012, since when the firm has grown from a £65 million to £102 million

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Le__FM World 46

46

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:06


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY: JOHN ENOCH

“PEOPLE ONLY WANT TO TALK ABOUT WHAT GOES WRONG – BUT THERE’S SO MUCH WE DO THAT REALLY PUSHES THE BOUNDARIES” turnover. Dowding has clearly been an effective leader as well as an advocate for diversity issues. Seen as a woman breaking through a traditionally male-dominated sector to reach a senior level, Dowding also runs Skanska’s facilities services leadership team, increasing the number of women involved to more than 50 per cent. She’s also set up a diversity and inclusion working group with the aim of ensuring that Skanska is “recognised as a leader in diversity and inclusion in all home markets”. More broadly, Dowding is a regular at BIFM’s Women in FM events. And it doesn’t stop there. Dowding is also a member of Skanska’s Senior Women Advisory Group’ (SWAG), a group of women in senior positions at Skanska that meets to provide input to Skanska’s global executive team on matters related to an inclusive culture. Judges cited Dowding’s “exciting and contagious” passion for the industry”. As for Suzanne Beck, the first BIFM Manager of the Year manages Carillion’s account with Barts Health Trust, the largest NHS Trust in the UK serving a population of 2.5 million in East London and beyond. Beck manages teams across five sites – Mile End Hospital, The Royal London Hospital, Newham University Hospital, St Bartholomew’s Hospital and Whipps Cross University Hospital. Both women meet at FM World’s offices exactly a week after the awards ceremony. Beck explains how she’d only just come back from her honeymoon on the night of the

ceremony. “I’d gone straight into work on the Monday not expecting to win – so talk about the icing and cherry on the cake!” As for Dowding: “After all the celebrations I completely lost my voice by Wednesday – but I’ve had a deluge of congratulations, which is lovely.” It turns out that Dowding and Beck already knew each other by name, from when Skanska was deliveing hard FM services at the time Beck was providing soft FM services at Barts in 2005. What, I wonder, do they have in common today? For example, do they both accept that clients

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Le__FM World 47

47

are becoming more expectant of what FM can deliver? “I think yes,” says Beck, “especially with regard to renewables and the sustainability and health and safety agendas. And in my sector, it’s facilities driving those things forward. I guess the challenge in a client-provider relationship is when people only ever want to talk about the failures. Too often, people only want to talk about what goes wrong, but actually there’s so much we do that really pushes the boundaries.” Dowding cites the rise of social media and review sites such as TripAdvisor in

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:06


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

“WE NEED TO FOCUS ON CREATING AN OUTCOME MINDSET. ULTIMATELY, PEOPLE WANT A MORE PRODUCTIVE WORKING ENVIRONMENT”

BIFM LEADER OF THE YEAR 2016

BIFM MANAGER OF THE YEAR 2016

Katy Dowding, managing director, Skanska Facilities Services

Suzanne Beck, facilities general manager for Carillion, Barts NHS Trust contract

Category description: “The winner is an outstanding, recognised business and people leader in the FM profession, as well as an ambassador for FM, acknowledged by peers, having shown support of the wider FM profession” Katy Dowding’s ambition was always to become MD with a global company, a goal she has since achieved at Skanska.

Suzanne Beck is enjoying being an FM specialising in healthcare, “a great business to make a real difference”.

Dowding spent 15 years with Tarmac/ Carillion before working with Skanska for the last 13 years in a number of roles.

She started out in the hotel business, before moving into healthcare FM.

Starting out as a quantity surveyor, her career has spanned operations, development and strategic roles.

particular. “Booking a holiday, concert tickets, a restaurant –we live in an age of constant feedback, and in FM we have to respond to that. And actually, I think for FM it’s a positive that there’s nowhere for us to hide anymore.”Beck agrees. “In the good old days you’d have to wait for a letter, but today someone might post something negative about the FM service. That said, others may then post to say that was not their experience. It’s just something you now have to subsume into your normal day. “Yes, and it would be a lot worse if you only heard about tjose problems at contract renewal,” agrees Dowding. Beck worries that FM is still too often seen as that old cliché of a Cinderella service. “We need to do more as a profession to promote what we do as something a bit more exciting than just ‘I’m a cleaner, I’m a caterer’, etc.” “Absolutely,” agrees Dowding. “We should talk more about how FM is improving the environment, for example by making air quality better. We need to send a stronger message about our wider impact.”

Focussing on outcomes Both Dowding and Beck see the move to assessing FM performance from the outcomes achieved as a crucial trend. Beck says: “As soon as a patient comes into the hospital, our job is to help the trust to get them home. So that whole

As managing director for Skanska Facilities Services, Dowding oversees and manages more than 800 employees and a turnover of more than £100 million across sectors ranging from healthcare and defence to local authority and commercial. She has a BSc (Hons) and an MSc, and has obtained a Fellowship in the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors. In 2013, Dowding won the Women in the City Woman of Achievement Award. Dowding chaired the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) for eight years.

outcome objective is definitely there, and it’s an important shift.” As for personnel, Dowding and Beck are keen to see more done to make FM a career of choice. Says Beck: “It’s about attracting people to show that you can move on, that there’s a clear career path. I think a lot of people still fall into FM because someone in their family may have done something similar. But it’s not an accident, actually. FM is an industry that provides everything for everybody – we just haven’t articulated it that well. People who work for me who came in as ‘just a cleaner’ are now running sites, or have become training managers, or gone back to university – FM having given them confidence for a number of reasons.” “Maybe there’s a career marketing

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Le__FM World 48

Category description: “The winner is an experienced FM exponent who has delivered a cutting-edge service, is a team player and is responsible for managing others and steering them to success.”

48

Beck spent 12 years in a variety of roles with Sodexo Healthcare. Her last role was as director for the University Hospital of North Staffordshire, where she mobilised and transitioned three old hospitals into two new ones with a thousand people. Beck has also worked at Stoke Mandeville Hospital, Northwick Park, and Central Middlesex in London. She was also the regional manager in smaller specialist acute hospitals including Papworth, Birmingham Children’s Hospital, and Mental Health Trusts including the Anglia Support Partnership (ASP). Before Sodexo, Beck worked for Somerset County Council DSO for school catering and cleaning. She was operations manager for the county.

campaign here,” suggests Dowding. “How about ‘I choose FM’?” Although fighting different fights each day, both FMs are constantly reappraising how they go about their day-to-day work. “You need to be intellectually restless to keep moving forward,” argues Dowding. We provide services to a world that is constantly changing, so we’ve have to think about what’s going to be needed tomorrow. You’ve got to be adaptive. My challenge is to stop and admire the view rather than just going ‘brilliant, OK, that’s done – what’s next?’” Two FM professionals with two different day jobs - but it’s clear that both Katy Dowding and Suzanne Beck share similar visions for FM’s future.

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:07


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

Is the FM sector ready for BIM? Dowding: It’s slowly coming together, but I don’t think we have harmonised our approach yet. I think Darwinian principles will eventually rule some people out. I don’t think things like mandating COBie have achieved what government hoped they would. We need our customers to be demanding better quality of information, but I also think we need better collaboration across the sector. Does FM struggle from a lack of definition or character? Dowding: I’m not sure people from outside the sector really get what FM is. As a profession we need to position ourselves correctly. It’s all too easy just to say that we’re all about keeping the lights on, etc. I think we should position ourselves more broadly as being about delivering a better environment. Beck: A focus on outcomes is definitely the right direction of travel, and people with an outcome-focused approach is definitely the way forward. It’s not about how many times you do a piece of maintenance on a fan core unit; what they want is a more productive working environment; it’s about having an outcome mindset. Where are you focusing your efforts right now? Dowding: The challenge for me is growing my business within Skanska in a sustainable way – financially, of course, but also in terms of people and succession. Anyone can go and win contracts, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll be making any money or delivering a great service. What one thing would give the FM sector greater credibility? Dowding: Some magic tool that would measure the impact of what we do. If you take all aspects of sustainability, our impact economically, on the community and environment – there’s a positive impact we have on all three of those areas. If there was some common way of measuring or expressing that… Beck: It’s got to be around clarity of messaging. Every organisation has their own values, missions and goals – there’s got to be something we can do that’s about communications and developing a common way of detailing what FM does. What do you bring to your roles from your home life / external activities? Dowding: I’m a very bad triathlete; I’m a terrible swimmer, a slow runner, and I’m not even great on a bike, but I don’t let that put me off. But despite my complete lack of natural aptitude, I doggedly press on with things. And that’s valuable. As wonderful as this industry is, sometimes it can be difficult and frustrating and it’s that persistence to see yourself through. Beck: If you spoke to my family they’d say I’m the goto-person for any activity. I planned my own wedding, baked my own wedding cake, enjoy crafting, spend a lot of time with my friends’ children and I’m also a dementia friend. I care about my family and friends and I try to give everybody a fair shot, getting them involved in things they wouldn’t normally do – and I hope that’s what I bring to my work.” fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Le__FM World 49

49

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:07


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

BIFMdaAWARDS shboard

The 2016 winners

Headline sponsor

P E O PL E

T

he winners of the 2016 BIFM Awards were announced on Monday 10 October at London’s Grosvenor House Hotel. More than 50 finalists across 14 categories and near to 1,200 FM professionals came together to celebrate and recognise best practices across the FM sector. Steve Gladwin, chair of the judges, lauded this year’s submissions as displaying “extraordinary levels of innovation, with evidence of FM delivering real impact to business across all of the categories.” For the first time, a series of new categories – leader and manager of the year – were awarded. “The Awards are our chance to showcase FM superstars and reward their hard work, as well as the incredible contribution they have made to the wider economy and society,” said Gladwin. “We take great pride in the strength, independence and rigour applied to the judging process and the wealth of expertise from the sector that come together to be a part of the judging panel. We aim to recognise, celebrate and importantly elevate exemplar FM. Congratulations to all of our deserving winners.”

The individuals, teams and organisations who invest in their people, who lead, are cutting edge and drive improvements Newcomer of the Year

Team of the Year

Winner: Pleun van Deurssen, Incentive FM Ltd Highly Commended: Charlotte Miller, Sodexo Finalists: Kirsty Johnston, Mitie Technical Facilities Management Katie Sparrow, G4S Facilities Management UK

Winner: CBRE Global Workplace Solutions and AA facilities management team Highly Commended: National Grid and 14forty Finalists: EMC Global Real Estate and Facilities G4S Facilities Management University Hospitals of North Midlands NHS Trust EF & PFI Division

Sponsored by

Sponsored by

Manager of the Year (new category for 2016) Winner: Suzanne Beck, Carillion Plc Highly Commended: Cova Montes, Emprise Services plc Finalists: Andrea Best, Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust Bernard McPhail, Integral Sponsored by

Winner: Nationwide Window Cleaning Highly Commended: BT Facilities Services Finalists: Amey Skanska Sponsored by

Leader of the Year (new category for 2016) Winner: Katy Dowding, Skanska

Lifetime Achievement

Sponsored by

Sponsored by

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Da__FM World 50

Learning and Career Development

50

Winner: Keith Glennister, ISS

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:46


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

I MPAC T

INNOVATIO N

Demonstrating the real tangible impact good FM brings to business, the environment and society Brand Impact

Impact on Sustainability

Winner: Gather & Gather Highly Commended: Skanska Finalists: DP World London Gateway and Yoke Premier Technical Services Group PLC Sainsburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in partnership with Nationwide Window Cleaning

Winner: BaxterStorey Highly Commended: The Supply Chain Sustainability School Finalists: Skanska Vinci Facilities Sponsored by

Sponsored by

Workplace Impact Impact on Customer Experience Winner: Carillion Customer Experience Centre Highly Commended: Mitie 1team and Vodafone Finalists: Amey CIS Security Limited Crown Commercial Service - Facilities Management Category Team Premier Technical Services Group PLC Sponsored by

Impact on Organisational Performance (new category for 2016) Winner: National Grid and 14forty Highly Commended: Kentish & Co, Sodexo, Johnson & Johnson Finalists: McCollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Retail Group and Trios Group WM Morrison Supermarkets PLC

Winner: Ministry of Justice and Matrix Booking Highly Commended: AstraZeneca Finalists: Allen & Overy LLP AMAYA BBC and Interserve

Recognising innovative facilities management technology, systems, products and services, and the benefits they bring from cost-savings to enhanced interaction Innovation in Technology and Systems Winner: Humanforce Highly Commended: BAM FM Ireland Finalists: Engie Skanska, Modus Services Ltd, University College London Sponsored by

Sponsored by

New Product or Service of the Year Societal Impact Winner: Vinci Facilities Highly Commended: LB Lambeth & South London & Maudsley NHS Trust Finalists: Emprise Services Plc with the British Library Serco

Winner: Heathrow Airport Limited Finalists: 24 Crown Commercial Service Facilities Management Category Team Durham University Sponsored by

Sponsored by

Sponsored by

Other sponsors: Twitter wall

Charity fundraising

Programme

Guest list

For more information and video interviews with winners, visit: bifmawards.org

WANT TO E NT E R IN 2017? Register interest at: tinyurl.com/bifmawards2017

Photo pod

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Da__FM World 51

Business card draw

51

Celebrity host and entertainment

VIP drinks reception

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:47


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 52

52

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:58


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

IMPACT t n e m s s e s s A Judging the sheer breadth and scope of FM’s impact on organisations has long been a process broken down into distinct BIFM Award categories, and an evaluation of this year’s award-winners shows that, if anything, that impact is ever more profound. Great facilities management is increasingly at the beating heart of successful organisations

A

ll institutes awards programmes invariably climax with an occasion on which to celebrate success. But there’s always been something a bit special about the awards that are presented by BIFM at the Grosvenor House hotel each October. For one, BIFM rightly prides itself on the robustness, independence and scrutiny of a judging process that was recognised this year at the Association Excellence Awards – yes, an awards scheme for awards schemes – where BIFM took top spot in the ‘best awards programme’ category. Further testament to the calibre of the judging process are the many people and projects that have gone on to further success in the international ‘Global FM Awards’. But just as valuable is how each year’s BIFM awards programme acts as a mirror in reflecting the way facilities management is practised in the year in question. Each year we seeing is this still

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 53

53

relatively young sector refusing to rest on its laurels and instead seeking out new ways of responding to the demands of the business and clients. You won’t find people or organisations in FM making wafer thin adjustments to existing services and blithely shouting ‘revolution’; in FM, a sector with so many points of impact on the ultimate success of a business, the sheer variety of service and projects continues to astound. For 2016, there’s little doubt that the winning entries show more clearly than ever the full extent of FM’s impact. Chair of Judges Steve Gladwin professed delight at the many names and companies reflected across all categories: “It shows not only the depth and breadth of FM, but uncovers the activities that FM professionals deliver to bring tangible benefits to the businesses they serve.” Over the next seven pages we tell the stories beind all of the winners in the BIFM Awards six impact categories.

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:00


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

WORKPLACE pact im

Perhaps the most traditional impact of FM is on the way a workplace meets the needs of the workforce. This year, it was the Ministry of Justice’s (MoJ) scheme to bridge the gap between home and work for its employees through its Commuter Hubs project that took the plaudits in this category

T

he MoJ is a large, diverse government department made up of operational and frontline services including prisons and courts. As part of the Civil Service Reform Plan, the MoJ undertook a programme entitled ‘The Way We Work’ (TW3) with the headquarters functions of its business, one with around 5,400 staff largely working in central London. The project focused on transforming the workplace, improving technology and helping staff to work more flexibly. The subsequent introduction of the Commuter Hub initiative has succeeded in decreasing commuting time and increasing staff satisfaction and retention, reducing the demand for desks within its central London properties. Previously, MoJ computers and telephony required staff to be in the main office to work effectively. But to get to that office, many were travelling several hours each day. Work was flexible from the perspective that open-plan working meant no employee had a designated desk – but they still had to be present. The Commuter Hubs project was created to address these problems and support the TW3 principles of “creating a decent working environment for all staff, with modern workplaces enabling flexible working, substantially improving IT tools and streamlining security requirements to be less burdensome for staff”. Commuter Hubs are bookable desks and meeting rooms, located principally throughout the South-East, although with some coverage throughout the rest of the country. They were intended for use by MoJ staff as an alternative to travelling in

The MoJ’s central London offices are now just one part of the staff workplace experience

For full details of this year’s winners, previous years’ recipients, or to register for next year’s entry details, head over to www.bifmawards.org

“THE INITIATIVE HAS NOT ONLY HELPED STAFF IMPROVE THEIR WORK-LIFE BALANCE – IT’S HELPED IMPROVE THE LIVES OF THOSE AROUND THEM TOO” to a central London office. In practice, they have allowed some teams to work remotely for most the time and provided a means by which team spaces for agile projects can be rapidly created. The MoJ team set out to source a software-as-a-service system that would suit the requirements of a large mobile workforce while providing the necessary controls empowering staff to take full

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 54

54

control of their bookings. Matrix Booking by Keytree provided a platform that included web and mobile apps designed to give an enhanced user experience without the need for user training. The initiative has not only helped staff improve their productivity and work-life balance, but also helped to improve the lives of those around them. It’s helped cut commuting time while increasing staff satisfaction and retention, further reducing the demand for desks in expensive central London properties. Over a year, the Commuter Hubs network has grown to handle 2,000 bookings a month across 33 MoJ sites, as well as libraries in two London boroughs, the National Archives and the Food Standards Agency. Other government partners, including the Crown Prosecution Service, are preparing to go live in 2016.

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:01


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

“THE ORIGINAL SMART WORKSPACE SITE AT WARWICK IS NOW FREQUENTLY VISITED BY BOSSES FROM FTSE 100 FIRMS SEEKING TO APPLY ITS LESSONS TO THEIR OWN BUSINESSES” accommodated 1,850 people; now its capacity is 3,000. Dedicated workstations are a thing of the past, staff use any nearby desk when in the office. Collaborative workspace has been introduced to reduce pressure on meeting rooms, despite 140 new meeting rooms being created in Warwick by the new SWS design standards. These are essential spaces as the number of visitors, mainly consultants and clients working with National Grid on projects, has increased to more than 400 a day in Warwick alone.

IMPACT ON l a n o i t a s ani

Org e c n a m r Perfo fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 55

55

Additional provision has been made in 10 business lounges and 80 touchdown spaces for visitors working individually. SWS has since been rolled out to other head office sites, including Osprey House in Derbyshire, which houses 400 National Grid and partner employees. National Grid was recognised as a regional British Council for Offices ‘Fit Out of Workplace Award’ in 2013. It has now been rolled out to the company’s ‘big fleet’ buildings and today more than 6,000 people work in the SWS way.A schedule of FM services supports the development of workspace strategies, managing the customer experience and SWS facilities, using derived usage data and intelligent analysis to maximise the investment in SWS and Visibility of events and conferencing utilisation has management. 14forty made a positive difference to teams have a customer the overall liaison role, ensuring management of the estate and users can function well in the customer experience the work space provided.

Innovations initiated by FM can have a significant effect on the performance of the organisations they serve, the difficulty typically being in quantifying that impact. No such trouble for National Grid’s Smart Work Space project with 14forty

PHOTOGRAPHY: NATIONAL GRID

N

ational Grid property team’s Smart Work Space (SWS) scheme, supported by facilities service provider 14forty, was selected by judges in the organisational performance category for its “huge impact” and the evidence it offered of “increased collaborative activity, improvements in productive time and overall business performance”. National Grid operates the UK’s highvoltage electricity transmission network and the high pressure gas transmission system, as well as half of the regional gas distribution network. Its estate comprises 1,460 UK sites covering the whole of the UK, from Scotland to England’s south coast. The estate comprises electricity substations, gas compressor stations, major office locations and depots, vacant land and vacant property. A workforce of 10,000 people is based at its main offices and depot sites around the UK, and there are 7,000 remote workers within the main fleet. Operating such a sprawling estate conflicted with the requirements of an increasingly diverse and agile workforce. The corporate property team structure had to reflect these different needs and devise a strategy to meet the needs of internal customers and service users and reflected a strategic change in supply chain management to focus on creating long-term strategic partnerships. Over time, several initiatives were launched, but SWS has had the biggest impact on improving workplace productivity, driving down costs and supporting the company’s sustainability agenda. The SWS scheme was introduced at National Grid House in Warwick. Before its deployment, the building

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:02


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

B

axterStorey’s ‘Food Waste Costing the Earth’ initiative went live across all of the food service provider’s locations in July 2014 and today more than 600 locations are segregating food waste by plate waste, production waste and spoilage waste. Initial trials across a selection of client locations in 2014 saw managers first tasked with segregating, weighing and reporting the food waste arising in these three categories, which can be defined as: Plate – ineffective portion control; any food left on a customer’s plate that could have been re-allocated as another portion. Production – unavoidable but overproduction can be reduced using production records. Spoilage – produce that has been spoiled during production, gone out of date or spoiled through incorrect storage. During the trial, one central London location recorded a reduction in food waste of 82 per cent in just six weeks. The impact of the trial also saw an increase in profit margin by 6 per cent and a sales increase of 8 per cent. ‘Food Waste, Costing the Earth’ has now been rolled out across every BaxterStorey

location. This segregation, weighing and reporting process, along with interactive training sessions, has resulted in: A 35 per cent reduction in food waste since the beginning of the project; Savings in food and beverage purchases; A reduced environmental impact equivalent to nearly 16,000 tonnes of CO2e – the equivalent of taking more than 4,000 cars off the road for a year (based on average of 25,000km driven per annum at average of 140g/km CO2); and The cost per kilo of disposal of waste (from general waste collection, to separate waste collection of recycling and on-site macerators) equates to about 35p a kilo. Based on these numbers, the project has saved clients more than £600,000 in disposals costs. Today, 70 per cent of all food waste generated by BaxterStorey is recycled through either its clients’ or its own contracted waste streams, with 60 per cent of this achieved through anaerobic digestion. The company also developed an online accounting package, called ‘Evolution’, to capture the results of the scheme. It collates all data from waste for recycling or macerating, from food production, unsold leftover food, customer

“MONTHLY FOOD WASTE STATISTICS ARE NOW PRESENTED ALONGSIDE THOSE ON CARBON IMPACT TO FORM PART OF BUSINESS REVIEWS AT ALL LEVELS” leftovers, and out-of-date stock; weighing each sector and recording weight data became the strategy. Monthly food waste statistics are now presented alongside those on carbon impact to form part of business reviews at all levels of the business, as well as forming part of monthly and quarterly client meetings. The increased focus on management of waste has led to some creative opportunities, one location now using the peel from its freshly squeezed orange juice to make marmalade, which is sold on site to raise money for charity. Judges called the idea one that was “simple, scalable and can be replicated across not only the UK, but also the globe”.

IMPACT ON y t i l i b a n i usta s

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 56

There’s a wider test for FM’s impact on sustainability these days as the ever more important topic’s economic and social components become more tangible. But for this year in the ‘impact on sustainability’ category the winning story is very much an environmental one, involving BaxterStorey’s crusade to cut all forms of food waste — spoilage waste, plate waste and preparation waste

56

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:03


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

l a t e i Soc

IMPACT

The broadest impact of a facilities service is one that delivers an exceptional benefit to society. This year’s winner for societal impact is one of those stories that can genuinely be described as ‘inspirational’

I

n 2013, a team from Vinci Facilities entered into a 10-year contract to provide FM services at Peabody’s housing estates across London, where it began the largest single social initiative undertaken by the company, investing funds over three years into developing an early intervention literacy programme called ‘Reading from the Start’ (RftS). Peabody is one of London’s oldest and largest housing associations. It owns and manages more than 29,000 homes in the capital and invests around £5 million a year into community programmes like RftS. The initial terms of the contract had assigned funds to apprenticeships, work placements, community fun days, school visits and training. But, spurred by the passing of the Social Value Act in 2013, a year into the partnership, the team decided a larger sum should be directed to a single initiative to tackle a long-term issue to reach more people over time. Matchfunded by Peabody, Vinci could deliver a three-year literacy campaign in addition to promises in the initial tender – supporting the client’s philanthropic mission and improving the communities on the estates while achieving its core business values.  Children receive a book every month

Children receive a book every month until their fifth birthday, which is theirs to keep for use in group sessions or at home. They receive two hours of teaching a month from parents and professionals (both partner teams and local residents have taken part to date)

For full details of this year’s winners, previous years’ recipients, or to register for next year’s entry details, head over to www.bifmawards.org

until their fifth birthday, which is theirs to keep for use in group sessions or at home. They then receive two hours of teaching a month from parents and professionals (54 vetted and trained volunteers, from both partner teams and local residents, have taken part to date) at dedicated reading corners in local community

“THE PROGRAMME, NOW IN ITS SECOND YEAR, HAS ALREADY TOUCHED THE LIVES OF MORE THAN 400 CHILDREN AND 320 PARENTS” fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 57

57

centres. Reading sessions are backed up by activities such as trips to local parks, libraries, storytelling and art classes. Through the RftS scheme, youngsters develop social and literacy skills to start school on a level playing field. Parents also receive support in adult literacy and parenting. Judges were impressed with “the originality of the concept and with the plans for its sustainable future”. The programme, now in its second year, has already touched the lives of more than 400 children and 320 parents across three Peabody boroughs in Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Islington. The joy of both contractor and client at winning the award was clearly evident on awards night.

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:04


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

e c n IMPACT ON e i r e p x e r e m o t s cu Carillion has transformed the customer experience of its FM clients – and others who use the sites it maintains – and has led to the company making customer experience a differentiator through its Sheffield-based Customer Experience Centre (CEC) – a facility the company has dubbed “the heartbeat of Carillion”

Y

ou could argue that this award was a long time in the making. Carillion won in the “Innovation in Customer Service” category back in 2011 for an early version of its “ServExcel” model, Carillion’s customer satisfaction measurement toolkit that has since been integrated into the CEC operation last year. The CEC itself was highly commended in the “Impact on Customer Experience” category just last year. Today, the CEC serves the more than 100 facilities management clients and circa one million people that every day work in, shop in, visit or in any way use the 100,000 buildings and sites the company maintains and supports for its clients. The company launched its Customer Experience Centre (CEC) in Sheffield in October 2013 and began to use it as the focus of its FM services. Up until then, it had had a standard helpdesk model, but it wasn’t working to its full potential. The largest of the helpdesks provided services for a number of client accounts, but was performing below expectations. Crucially, there had been no direct link between the helpdesks across the business and customer experience model; they had different teams and were housed in

“TODAY, CARILLION’S ORGANISATION-WIDE CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE MODEL IS CENTRED AROUND THE CEC” different parts of the business. The new vision was based upon a new way of doing things, using the existing helpdesk in Sheffield as its core. Today, the company’s organisation-wide customer experience model is centred around the CEC, providing what Carillion believe is an industry leading and unique differentiator. Key to this is the CEC’s partnership with the Institute of Customer Service (ICS), bringing customer experience expertise from retail and other sectors into the world of FM: this has been the real game changer. Separate helpdesks were brought together into a single national FM hub, still with separate sub-teams dedicated to

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 58

58

It’s not just BIFM Awards – Carillion’s Dawn Creighton, Jamie McDonald and Kirsten Thomas of the CEC are pictured here receiving the ICS ServiceMark award from the Institute of Customer Service

each client account to ensure customer and estate knowledge and expertise, but all part of a centre of excellence with consistent, resilient support. Most importantly, Carillion recognised the benefit of positioning the FM helpdesk as “the heartbeat of our service”. Awards judges called the CEC a “really good example of customer servicefocused delivery,” with lead judge Andy Kelly particularly struck by the way in which management of individual accounts has been devolved down to the team answering the calls, turning a one disengaged helpdesk operation in to one in which engaged operatives share examples of best practice with their colleagues across different accounts and can make informed decisions at front-line level.

For full details of this year’s winners, previous years’ recipients, or to register for next year’s entry details, head over to www.bifmawards.org

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:04


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

OTHERd imAWARDS pact

Bran

HOW BIFM AWARDS ARE JUDGED The BIFM Awards judging process is conducted by an independent panel of industry experts. Each category is led by a Lead Judge, who is an expert in their field, and works with a team of support judges Judging consists of two rounds:

1

Written submission

The panel reviews written submissions, scoring each entry against set criteria. In the people and impact categories, written submissions count for 25 per cent of the overall score. For the innovation categories, written submissions count for 40 per cent.

2

Presentation

Applicants successful at the written submission review are invited by the judging panel to present to them in person. For people and impact categories the presentation round counts for 75 per cent of the overall score; it’s 60 per cent for the innovation categories. Throughout, there is a stringent and rigorous conflict of interest procedure to ensure fairness in the process.

In 2011, Mitie’s £34 million catering arm adopted an entrepreneurial business model that in 24 months led to it trebling in size. By 2013, the division was contributing £86 million in annual turnover to the group, but its beliefs and values were getting lost behind its parent’s identity. A heritage in cleaning and security didn’t fit with the fierce competition in the food market. So in 2013, Gather & Gather was launched. Its name encapsulated its ‘special difference’ by adopting the idea

r a e Y e h t f o m a e T International property consultancy CBRE and its client team for the AA won for how FM has been transformed into a ‘leading FM function’. Over three years the FM team has supported the organisation through challenges including flotation on the London Stock Exchange, bulk relocation projects, property rationalisation, the opening of new offices outside the UK and the implementation of a variety of

sustainability and CSR initiatives. Judges noted that the results “demonstrate what can be achieved when the protagonists commit wholeheartedly to the improvement process”. The team’s improvements in core services, ranging from security and cleaning to waste, have led to savings and the partnership between the two organisations was extended for a further three years in 2015.

Learning and ent m p o l e v e D r e e r Ca Nationwide Window Cleaning (NWC) won in this category for its vivid commitment to training in a sector where margins for such programmes are typically hard to justify. The company’s expansion – its business had doubled – necessitated a requirement to recruit and retain a skilled labour force in a “challenging” market. Judges remarked on how NWC had demonstrated how they recruited nonskilled workers, nurturing and training them into skilled window cleaners, before then developing individuals to

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_Impact__FM World 59

of ‘urban hunter gatherers’ exploring the world of food, collecting the latest approaches, and “making them both unique and accessible”. Director of sales and marketing Heidi Stone studied brands that had championed emotional connections and embraced US brands guru Jim Stengel’s theory of setting out business ‘ideals’ – shared goals to improve people’s lives – thereby increasing a brand’s profitability. We’ll be talking more about Gather & Gather in our December 2016 edition.

59

become leaders of the business. NWC runs a continuous training programme which includes training in three areas: personal standards, customer service, and health and safety. ‘Toolbox talks’ and refresher sessions are held during monthly regional meetings. In order to prepare people for roles in management, NWC has a bespoke six-module management development programme, demonstrating its investment in career development for operational middle management and supervisory staff.

November 2016

31/10/2016 13:04


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

FM’S FUTURE n e m o w r e wond Four women made up the finalists for the Newcomer of the Year award this year. Here, we catch up with this new generation of FMs, including winner Pleun van Deurssen, to find out more about the people set to take the profession forward in the next 10 years

2

016 was the third year of a newcomer category in the BIFM Awards and, according to lead judge Sarah Hodge, the calibre was such this year that any of the four finalists could have won. Ultimately it was Pleun van Deurssen’s exposure to a variety of FM that helped her over the line. Said Hodge: “Pleun specifically chose FM at university. She had a definite view of where she wanted to go with it, had exposure of a lot of different elements of FM – hard service, soft service, managing a team – and she has very much been a profession ambassador.” All four finalists were able to provide evidence for their achievements to date, each articulating a clear understanding of the gaps in their knowledge. “They understand that if they have a gap in their knowledge, they proactively find where they can learn and then progress to the next stage in their career. Finalists need to show that they go over and above what their job should be.” Those inspired by this year’s finalists should start their preparation for next year’s awards now, says Hodge. “Begin to gather your story. Throughout the year you’ll be doing things to add to it – think about how what you’re doing is having an impact, and add it to your story.”

PLEUN VAN DEURSSEN, INCENTIVE FM On her biggest career challenge to date: “I started with a client who didn’t understand FM or the possibilities an outsourced FM supplier could offer. I had no office and no staff, nor a building to manage. Everything had to be organised, from client requirement meetings and a budget sheet. Within a few weeks I’d marked my ground and everyone respected me and the position I was in. I have been consistent in my approach, being friendly but direct.”

On her Dutch roots: “Hostmanship (the art of making people feel welcome) is something we learned and is always at the back of my mind in everything I do. Why do something straight forward if you can do it better with the same amount of money and effort?”

On encouraging people to enter the profession: “FM is everywhere, just find out what young people are interested in and link FM to their interest. Someone likes sport? Talk about FM in a stadium. Someone likes to travel? Use the great example at Heathrow Airport.”

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_NOTY__FM World 60

er

Winn

60

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:48


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

y Highnl ded e comm

ist

ist

Final

Final

n CHARLOTTE MILLER, SODEXO

KATIE SPARROW, G4S FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

On her biggest career challenge to date:

On her role at Lister Hospital, career progression and FM knowledge:

“The mobilisation of our CAFM system contract, where I have had to train frontline staff on a new device to communicate with the system and deliver our services. I could tell they were not confident with the new device and needed to understand the reasoning behind the new process. So I had a chat with them to ask what they did, how they currently operated and any queries on the current system and what they would like to see improved.”

“Being at Lister Hospital for 10 years has certainly given me a wealth of information and a deep understanding of the importance of FM at all levels of the business, and of staff needs to client relations. “Earning trust and respect doesn’t come overnight; it takes time. This is one of the best ways to develop transferable skills. But this career path isn’t without its challenges; when you have been in a certain position for some time it can be difficult to establish yourself at a new level and for people to accept you in a more senior role. “It takes time to get the delegating right, as long as you know that the ownership and responsibility ultimately still lies with you. Once I got into this frame of mind I really settled into my role as a manager.”

On her first role in FM: “My first role in FM was operational and it was an intense but fulfilling working environment, where the pace was quick and needed solutions to queries when they arose. My advice would be to fully understand the challenges and to make sure the solutions have been thought through and are not a quick fix but are sustainable.

On clients and their understanding of the value of FM: “All clients have different ways of working, but we are moving to a more streamlined work mode – this can be a challenge when you have so many different services. More investment and time is being spent on how we are able to bring ways of working together more effectively, rather than numerous processes.”

On choosing to enter the FM profession: “It is a great career option for young people who are unsure about which direction to choose, but if you are a people person, it’s a brilliant place to start. It’s also so diverse; it is a career option that can offer you more opportunities under one umbrella.”

On more women choosing to work in FM: “As a strong independent female working in the industry I personally see no challenges for women joining and being see as an equal in the FM world. I’m privileged to be on my journey at a time where I feel women are thriving in our industry.”

To read extended interviews with the Newcomer of the Year finalists, visit tinyurl.com/FMW1116-Fac-NOTY.

fm-world.co.uk

Facilitate_BIFMAwards_NOTY__FM World 61

61

KIRSTY JOHNSTON, MITIE TECHNICAL FACILITIES MANAGEMENT On the skills required to implement new operational initiatives: “Firstly, obtain an understanding of the current ways of working, who is involved and what systems are used on a contract. It’s important to gain the ‘buy-in’ from the colleagues you’re working with. This also draws on your influencing skills; I find that I often need to utilise resource or knowledge from colleagues that are not under my direct line management, which can be difficult if the ‘buy-in’ aspect has not been secured first.”

On intelligent clients: “As technology progresses, our clients are understanding the investment that can be made into their buildings to provide a more comfortable working environment and the potential savings that could be made from investing in their FM delivery and assets. Service providers need to keep on trend in order to meet the expectation of both current and prospective clients.”

On her hopes for the progression of the FM industry: “We need to start moving away from the standard PPM (planned preventative maintenance) frequency approach that many companies supply as part of a service delivery package. Not all assets require the same attention and client needs may differ according to the nature of their business; we need to adapt to this. It will allow us to focus resources on specific areas.”

To watch a video interview with Pleun, visit: www.bifmawards.org

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:48


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

s d n a h l l A

ON TECH

Both innovation categories – Systems & Technology, and Product or Service – were won by IT solutions, suggesting that FM is both leading the way with IT and benefiting from its dissemination

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY

I

t’s a sign of the times that lead judge Lucy Jeynes reported having to separate four “outstanding entries” in the Innovation in Systems & Technology category. Eventually the top spot was secured by a biometric time-clocking system developed by Humanforce and designed for its customer Delaware North. The software records and manages the number of hours worked by both in-house and agency contractors in the client’s catering and events facilities. This has provided a step up for Delaware North, which previously relied on a manual system that made it hard to ensure venues were staffed appropriately. Wage costs were difficult to predict and agency staff had to be tracked using timesheets, resulting in high payroll processing costs. Humanforce’s software reduced the time taken to process and approve timesheets from two to three hours a week to just one, cutting payroll processing time from one or two days a month to just one or two hours. The business has also seen a 20 per cent fall in employee turnover since implementing the system.

Humanforce’s biometric timeclocking system, designed for Delaware North, works on a finger vein scanning system

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Innovation winners__FM World 62

The system not only empowers contract managers, but also devolves power to users. It works through a biometric finger vein scanning system that clocks exactly where and when employees have worked and includes an online self-service tool for staff which allows them to view their timesheets, check future rosters and “bid” for shifts from their mobile devices. This has helped to improve the information the business has about staff availability, resulting in a 20 per cent reduction of cases where staff have been ‘over-booked’ in anticipation of people not turning up. Highly commended was BAM FM’s work on enabling building information modelling in FM through a CAFM system developed with Autodesk Building Ops. For its Schools Bundle 4 project in Ireland, the software was used to ensure that BAM met requirements for the use of BIM level 2, in line with the tender process. The challenge here was to develop a system to transfer information directly from as-built federated models to the CAFM system for the four facilities in question. The finished system also allowed BAM to change over existing projects to the new system,

62

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:09


FAC I LITATE B I F M AWA R D S 2016

Spot & Report, Heathrow’s mobile fault-reporting app, report defects for remedy clearly and concisely

processes have led to a 50 per cent fall in data input times, speedier claims resolution, and a 45 per cent cut in the time taken to process new claims. It is an application of robotic automation by traditional FM players that demonstrates the increasing opportunity that exists for providers to improve efficiencies for client businesses, rather than just replacing existing staff with its own.

Innovation in new product or service

including 9,000 assets from its Schools Bundle 3 programme. The project has also delivered benefits including savings on setup fees of €15,000 on the Schools Bundle 4 programme compared with Bundle 3, and reducing the time taken to import assets from one to two months in a manual process to 30 minutes. This has also filtered through into greater efficiency in the operations team, with quicker logging of any issues. “This is the first demonstration we have seen of a smooth, seamless transition of BIM data (design and construction) to mobile-first CAFM (operation),” said the judges. “The capability demonstrated in this entry is an exemplar of best practice for the FM industry.” The two other shortlisted entries include work between Skanska Facilities Services and its client Modus Services Limited (a body created in 2000 to manage the 30-year pathfinder PFI contract with the Ministry of Defence) who joined with University College London to develop and apply conditionbased maintenance systems to FM in a project expected to deliver combined CAPEX and OPEC savings of £790,000 over the remaining 16 years of the PFI contract. Finally, Engie’s work with North Tyneside Council was to deliver more effective ways of working through the use of robotic process automation. The systems deployed for certain transactional

It was notable that the product or service category was also won by an application of technology, in this case Heathrow Airport’s project to develop a mobile app to integrate with its Maximo asset management system. Spot & Report is a mobile fault-reporting application that enables users to raise a fault while on the move and convey significantly more data about location and defect through the use of pictures and text than they could by reporting it on a phone. The app sits on airport workers’ phones and connects to a cloud back end that stores data such as user details, cached asset information and processes any photography that users generate from the app. The app scans an asset’s barcode, identifies it to the user, and allows the user to select from two options – in service or out of service – so that a technician can be despatched. Its use has been pioneered in Terminal 5, Heathrow’s busiest terminal, where its focus is on maintaining the 372 lifts, escalators and passenger conveyors that are on “the critical path of a successful journey through the airport” – half of all lifts and escalators at Heathrow. Outgoing Facilities Manager of the Year Alan Russell, head of engineering & facilities for Heathrow Terminal 5, says Spot & Report is revolutionising the way the sector raises reactive works. “For far too long we’ve relied on the traditional call centre to provide this service. This product is bringing a new experience and greater levels of feedback than ever before.” Feedback from the team has bred a culture of dealing with issues before they affect customers’ journeys. Crucially, users are reporting faults that may lead to an asset going out of service rather than waiting until it fails.

SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY JUDGES’ VERDICTS: The winner – Humanforce “This system was able to deliver a return on investment in less than six months.” “This entry harnesses high-tech biometric scanning in a simple way to address a challenge common across all FM companies, and has applications throughout the sector.” “This kind of technology will become the norm in our sector in the future.” Overall, the judges were hugely impressed with the standard of entries in this category, and the four shortlisted projects in particular. “The key themes are, as we would expect, technologies to improve productivity, space use and sustainability; effective implementation of BIM as construction projects move into the FM phase; and the internet of things,” said lead judge Lucy Jeynes. All four shortlisted entries would be well deserving of an award; perhaps we are at last becoming a properly hi-tech profession.”

fm-world.co.uk

BIFM Awards - Innovation winners__FM World 63

63

November 2016

31/10/2016 12:10


A P P O I NTM E NT S

Call the sales team on 020 7880 7665 or email jobs@fm-world.co.uk For full media information take a look at www.fm-world.co.uk/mediapack

fm-w world.c o ld.co.uk k jobs.fm-world.co.uk

Estate Manager Technical & Compliance London £34,500 pa

Facilities & Operations Manager Cambridge Competitive salary

Estates Maintenance Manager London £38,428 to £41,655 pa

Estate Bursar Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire Competitive salary

To check out all the latest FM jobs go to:

www.fm-world.co.uk/jobs fm-world.co.uk

FMW Nov16 RECR.indd 64

64

November 2016

28/10/2016 10:02


Accomplished Juggler?

APPOINTMENT OF ESTATES AND FACILITIES MANAGER

Do you have a passion for excellence, a willingness to take responsibility and the desire to become an integral member of a small, committed team?

£ 40,000+ depending on experience

Do you possess excellent communication and project management skills, combined with a logical but creative approach to problem solving? Can you multi-task and prioritise to surpass our clients’ expectations? You must possess the ability to write high quality, informative and convincing reports. You will also be an accomplished ‘juggler’ with the ability to manage diverse projects including FM strategy and procurement.

Reporting to the Bursar the aim of this role is to provide overall management for maintenance and statutory inspection of the school’s estate including buildings, grounds, and infrastructure. We are seeking a well qualified, organised and enthusiastic individual who can lead their team to provide well planned, efficient and safe services to the school community. “Walking the Patch” to monitor, review and plan work priorities is an essential part of the role as is good budgetary control and developing new business.

This Senior FM Consultant will contribute to the continued success of our company. Thomson FM has grown steadily since being established in 2003. We pride ourselves on delivering excellent services to our clients, with the objective of exceeding their expectations. You will be rewarded with a highly competitive salary, company car or allowance, private health care and gym membership. Based in Rossendale, travel throughout the UK is likely to be a regular requirement.

We are a vibrant and lively independent day and boarding school for girls aged 11-19 situated just south of Guildford with good transport links to international airports and London. At the last ISI Inspection in March 2016 the school was graded “Excellent” in all 9 areas. The original building (now Grade II Listed) was designed by Charles Voysey and was subsequently extended by his pupil Tom Munzer with gardens laid out to a design by Gertrude Jekyll. Since then the school has continued to develop and many additions and alterations have been made to the original buildings.

Are you ready for the challenge? Please send PDF copies of your CV and covering letter; outlining the unique skills, experience and qualities you would bring to the role.

There are 44 acres of grounds which provide extensive recreational and sporting facilities including a sports pavilion, an all weather flood lit hockey pitch, heated outdoor leisure pool, six hard courts for tennis and netball, and 18 acres of woodland

Email applications to recruitment@thomsonfm.co.uk

Apply via http://jobs.fm-world.co.uk/jobs/. Please send a CV and covering letter outlining your experience and suitability for the role

Closing date 1pm Wednesday 30th November 2016.

Closing date: Midday Wednesday 16th November 2016

Priors QPV.indd 1

Project Manager

Thomson 11:36 QPV.indd 1 28/10/2016

20/10/2016 16:19

Midlands and South East regions ffFIRIǻXW GEV A global facilities service provider has two excellent opportunities for a Project Manager to oversee multiple projects from £1-3m for a corporate client within the Banking sector. About the role:

The positions will be home-based but still client facing. The successful candidate must be self-motivated and able to work autonomously.

Key responsibilities & duties:

ƽ Successfully delivering multiple projects of a value sub £3m on time and under budget within a corporate environment. ƽ Scheduling and programming works. ƽ*RWYVMRKIEGLTVSNIGXMWVYRIǽGMIRXP]ERHTVSǻXEFP]MRPMRI with client expectations. ƽ)EMP]QEREKIQIRXSJGSRXVEGXSVW QIGLERMGEP-:&(ERH Electrical building services projects. ƽ Ensuring that the design and maintenance of building systems QIIXWPIKMWPEXMZIERHLIEPXLERHWEJIX]VIUYMVIQIRXW ƽ Compliance and Risk Management.

About you:

ƽ Previous experience in the following would FIFIRIǻGMEP 2IGLERMGEP*PIGXVMGEP5VSNIGX Management, overseeing multiple projects of a value of £1-5m. ƽ Essential you’ve managed the full project lifecycle. ƽ6YEPMǻGEXMSRWQIGLERMGEPP]SVIPIGXVMGEPP]UYEPMǻIH MHIEPP]XS-3(-3)PIZIP2IQFIVSJ'.+2 3*'4-UYEPMǻIHSVWXYH]MRKHIKVIIIHYGEXIH ƽ Have excellent client relationship management skills. 8  LIGPMIRXMWSǺIVMRKEWSPMHGEVIIVTEXLMREGPMIRX facing position with an opportunity to develop your career and lead on key projects. We have two positions available, when applying please state which location is preferable to you.

To apply...

Please contact Nicole Buckland to discuss this role on 020 3757 5000 or email your CV to N.buckland@capstone-recruitment.com

fm-world.co.uk

FMW Nov16 RECR.indd 65

www.capstone-recruitment.com

65

November 2016

31/10/2016 11:29


BAC K PAG E

FMWORLD

EPHFMERA

FM World is the publication of the BIFM, the professional body for facilities management. For more information on membership, qualifications and training contact us:

The facilities management stories that just don’t fit anywhere else (Email us: editorial@fm-world.co.uk)

British Institute of Facilities Management Number One Building, The Causeway, Bishop’s Stortford, Hertfordshire CM23 2ER, UK Tel: +44 (0)1279 712 620 Email: admin@bifm.org.uk Web: www.bifm.org.uk

Rewarding experience What’s amazing about the early October BIFM Awards ceremony is its sheer scale; nearly 1,200 people at London’s Grosvenor House hotel, all really getting into the spirit of the evening. Each year, the variety and quality of finalists and eventual winners is truly dazzling, as you’ll have read about in the pages directly before this one. So forgive us if this month we let the pictures do the talking…

Redactive Publishing Ltd 17-18 Britton Street London EC1M 5TP www.fm-world.co.uk EDITOR Martin Read 020 7880 7664 martin.read@fm-world.co.uk FEATURES EDITOR Jamie Harris 020 7880 6229 jamie.harris@fm-world.co.uk NEWS EDITOR Herpreet Grewal 020 7880 8544 newsdesk@fm-world.co.uk SUB-EDITOR Deborah Shrewsbury 020 7880 6223 deborah.shrewsbury@fm-world.co.uk SENIOR DESIGNER David Twardawa 020 7324 2704 david.twardawa@redactive.co.uk PICTURE EDITOR Claire Echavarry 020 7324 2701 claire.echavarry@redactive.co.uk SALES MANAGER Darren Hale 020 7880 6206 darren.hale@redactive.co.uk SENIOR SALES EXECUTIVE Jemma Denn 020 7880 7632 jemma.denn@redactive.co.uk SALES EXECUTIVE Jack Shuard 020 7880 8543 jack.shuard@fm-world.co.uk RECRUITMENT SALES Sabmitar Bal 020 7880 7665 sab.bal@redactive.co.uk SENIOR PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE Aysha Miah-Edwards 020 7880 6241 aysha.miah@redactive.co.uk PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Joanna Marsh 020 7880 8542 joanna.marsh@redactive.co.uk Subscriptions BIFM members with FM World subscription or delivery queries should call the BIFM’s membership department on +44 (0)1279 712650. FM World is sent to all members of the British Institute of Facilities Management and is available on subscription to non-members. Annual subscription rates are UK £110, Europe £120 and rest of world £130. To subscribe call 020 8950 9117 or email subscriptions@fm-world.co.uk – alternatively, you can subscribe online at www.fm-world.co.uk/about-us/subscribe/ Editorial Advisory Board Simon Ball, business development director, Mitie Martin G Bell, global FM development manager, Unilever Peter Brogan, Research & Information Manager, BIFM Georgina Emery, Marketing & Communications Manager, BIFM Lucy Jeynes, Larch Consulting Nick Cook, managing director, Avison Young Rob Greenfield, director, Assured Safety & Risk Management Ian Jones, director of facilities, ITV Liz Kentish, managing director, Kentish and Co. Chris Morris, director, Xenon Group Anne Lennox Martin, FM consultant Geoff Prudence, chair, CIBSE FM Group Jeremy Waud, chairman, Incentive FM group Jane Wiggins, FM tutor and author

Average net circulation 13,326 (Jul 14 – Jun 15)

fm-world.co.uk

EphFMera__FM World 66

66

November 2016

28/10/2016 15:49


G E T Q U A L I F I E D I N FA C I L I T I E S M A N A G E M E N T

STUDY ONLINE ANYWHERE ANYTIME GET QUALIFIED

Study for a BIFM qualification in facilities management with the BIFM online learning platform which can be accessed from anywhere, on any device. Study for Level 2 – new entrants Level 3 – first line management Level 4 – operational management

Call us to find out how BIFM can support you to progress your career, the alternative study and delivery models that are available and for guidance about identifying the right qualification level for you.

w: www.bifmdirect.org t: +44 (0)1279 712 651

DIRECT

FMW.NOV16.067.indd 2

e: qualifications@bifm.org.uk to find out more

27/10/2016 14:09


Luceco product installation guide: 1 Fit 2 Forget

Luceco Platinum Downlights available with gloss or matt reflectors and a range of 10 bezels. Offering zero maintenance and over 60% energy & CO2 savings; Luceco LED luminaires are the perfect cost saving replacement versus fluorescent.

50,000 HOURS

5 year

extended

WARRANTY

Long life LED luminaires www.luceco.com

1 year

on site WARRANTY

LIGHTING POSSIBILITIES

FMW.NOV16.068.indd 2

26/10/2016 16:08

FM World November 2016  
FM World November 2016  

FM World November 2016