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A|Q A R C H I T E C T U R E P O RT F O L I O


HELLO, My name is Andrea Quinn and I am currently working to obtain my Master of Architecture at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture, in Ontario, Canada. I am passionate about design, it’s relationship to our environment, and the way it can positively influence a society, not only addressing a basic human need, but also having the potential to break through differences to unite a common people. Whether for good or for ill, I believe in the power of spaces to be psychologically transformative. I love finding the potential in neglected, forgotten, or unattractive spaces and restoring or instilling beauty. The following is a collection of work from my five years studying architecture and my co-op work terms, as well as some of my personal work. I hope you enjoy it!


Imagination is not only the uniquely human capacity to envision that which is not, and, therefore, the foundation of all invention and innovation. In its arguably most transformative and revelatory capacity, it is the power that enables us to empathize with humans whose experiences we have never shared. - JK ROWLING


CONTENTS

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CURRICULUM VITAE

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R E F E R E NCE S

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ACADEMIC JUNK OASI S WO O DY EXPLO RATI O N S TH RI VE TRAN SI EN T DWELLI N G S TESTI N G G RO U N D S

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EMPLOYMENT EMI : CH ERI SH H I G H SCH O O L EMI : AMAZI MA SECO N DARY SCH O O L CO RN ERSTO N E

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PERSO NAL D RAWI N G / PAI N TI N G J EWELLERY/ BEAD I N G MU SI C


CURRICULUM VITAE SKILLS Technical Adobe Suite ( Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign) Autocad 2D Rhinoceros V-Ray Revit Microsoft Office ( Word, Excel, PowerPoint) Sketchup

Physical/Fabrication Hand-drafting Hand-modeling Sketching and drawing Painting (acrylic and oil) Woodworking Laser Cutting

Languages English French Spanish Italian

EDUCATION 2008-2012

Ontario Secondary Central High School

2012-2017

Bachelor of Architecture Studies, Honours Co-op, University of Waterloo

2018-Present

Master of Architecture, University of Waterloo

School

Diploma,

Catholic

Gregory McCart Memorial Award | 2012 Ontario Scholar | 2012 Principal’s Honour Roll | 2009-2012 Junior and Senior Letter | 2010, 2012 Provost’s International Volunteer Award | 2016 ‘Junk’ project exhibited at Cambridge Galleries | Spring 2013 Merit Scholarship | Fall 2012

EXPERIENCE January-April 2017, October-August 2018

Student Architect at studio|Brehaut, Guernsey Cove, PE, Canada

Small architecture firm with majority of projects in residential design.

June-August 2016, January-April 2014

Junior Designer at Cornerstone Architecture, London, ON, Canada

Medium sized architecture firm with projects in education, childcare, healthcare, and administration .

January-June 2016

Volunteer Architecture Intern at Engineering Ministries International, Kajjansi, Uganda

International non-profit development organization with offices around the world composed of engineers, architects, and other design professionals who donate their skills, providing design services for facilities like schools, hospitals, churches, orphanages, water/wastewater management systems, etc. which serve the poor in the majority world.

May-August 2015

Architectural Assistant at Derek Venter Architecture Design, Whistler, BC, Canada

Small architecture firm with projects in retail and residential.

September-December 2014

Intern Architect at Kobayashi + Zedda Architects, Whitehorse, YK, Canada

Small architecture firm with a variety of projects from residential to healthcare to infrastructure.

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PERSONALITY Extroverted

Introverted

Intuitive

Observant

VOLUNTEER

Thinking

INFJ

Judging

Feeling Prospecting

University of Waterloo St. George Catholic Church, ON Upper Room PEI St. Mary Catholic Church, PE Cherish Uganda High School Haven Preparatory School Doors Ministries Whistler Community Church Ilderton Skating Club CanSkate Program Assistant

Peer Mentor | 2018 Various activities and events | 2013-Present Founding member of a young adult Christian ministry | 2018 Children’s choir director, cantor and choir member| 2018 Music instructor | 2016 Art instructor at local village primary school (Uganda) | 2016 Teaching assistant (Uganda) | 2016 Worship team member | 2015 Design/creation of backdrop for Ilderton Ice Show | 2010-2012, 2014 Skating Instructor | 2007-2012

Music/Art

Vocal/Choral Music | 2004-Present Cellist | 2004-Present Drawing, painting, jewelry making, soapstone carving, woodworking Restoration and renovation of historic structures Potential psychological and social impact of architecture, particularly in rural and impoverished communities Integration of vernacular design with modern sustainability techniques Bamboo and its potential as a sustainable and versatile building material Innovative timber construction, particularly CLT and other engineered wood products Architectural history and research Uganda, England, Italy, France, Ireland, Northern Ireland, Scotland | 2016 Guatemala | 2014 Mexico | 2013 Dominican Republic | 2012 United States Canada

EXTRACURRICULAR/ INTERESTS

Architecture

Travel

Reading World Issues & International Development Athletics

classic, philosophy/religion, history, (auto)biography, fantasy, mystery

Figure Skating | 1999-Present Cross Country & Track and Field | 2004-2012 Gymnastics, running, hiking, cycling/biking, yoga

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Vanderford Design & Consulting (for Engineering Ministries International)

941.592.7579 Vander4d@yahoo.com February 15, 2017 Re; Andrea Quinn

To Whom it May Concern, This letter is to serve as an enthusiastic endorsement for my former Intern and good friend Andrea Quinn. From the summer of 2015 through the summer of 2016 I served as an Associate Staff Architect with Engineering Ministries International/East Africa. Andrea served as an Intern in the East Africa office for several months in the spring of 2016 as well. In addition to our official roles, my wife (who also worked for eMi as an administrator) and I took it upon ourselves to play host to the intern teams often taking them on outings or to social gatherings. We would also help assist them with some of the day-to- day challenges of living cross-culturally. As such we both became very close to Andrea and consider her a lifelong friend. I worked closely with Andrea nearly every day for the duration of her internship. We shared an office and as such were in almost constant collaboration. Our team spent a week together near the Rwandan border performing a site assessment and developing master planning concepts for Cherish High, a large boarding secondary school. We also worked together on the construction drawings for the Amazima Secondary School in Jinja, Uganda. Both of these projects were designed to accommodate over 500 students. During this time, I found Andrea to be extremely capable and a valuable team player. Working in a third-world environment often requires the design professional to step outside their comfort zone, many times being tasked with assignments far beyond their level of experience. Andrea never shrank from these challenges and consistently delivered professional results. As her immediate supervisor, I was required to perform a mid-term and end of term review. I am including a few excerpts from these evaluations for your review. • • • •

Excellent understanding of the need to balance good design with relevance and respect to the needs and desires of the client Excellent presentation skills! Displays good judgement with her comments and suggestions and is not afraid to speak up! Andrea is a terrific asset to eMi and the profession in general.

I also offer this summary from her end-of-term evaluation: “Andrea is a joy to work with. She is focused and competent, cheerful and hardworking. She is not afraid to speak up and offer her opinions when appropriate. Many of her concepts have been embraced by much more experienced team members, and her positive influence is evident in each project she has been assigned. I would gladly hire her for any position in the future.” In the course of my career, I have hired and supervised dozens of interns. I can tell you that Andrea is exemplary! I highly recommend her for any position for which she may be in consideration. Sincerely,

Scott A. Vanderford Registered Architect Arizona #30462 Tennessee #100757 (Inactive)

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JUNK IN COLLABORATION WITH CHARLES KIM, AMBER LECLAIR, AND NICOLE RATAJCZAK. Located in downtown Cambridge, ON, this project is composed of multiple self-contained residential spaces on a site that would otherwise be considered useless or “junk� space. In our design, we focused on providing the opportunity for a strong community life to develop among the residents, and on providing green space because we were on a parking lot site. As a result of these decisions, the inner courtyard became central to our design, and the point around which the entire project developed.

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SITE PLAN

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

2nd FLOOR PLAN

3rd FLOOR PLAN

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4th FLOOR PLAN


SITE SECTION

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EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

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P2 JUNK EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC


VIEW OF COURTYARD FROM REAR

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OASIS Located in the lush rainforests off the coast of Gabon, Africa, in the province of OgoouéMaritime, lies an oasis high up in the trees. This light, wooden structure, made of mostly bamboo is the perfect escape from the extreme heat and humidity of this African climate, which has an average yearly temperature of 26°C. As you climb the hanging ladder, you ascend into an open and airy space, high above the predators on the ground. You can choose to walk along the 360° lookout, or fall into a hammock to escape the many insects. No matter where you are in this oasis, you are open to the air. Each material used in this structure can be found in the surrounding rainforest. The roof is made of small pieces of bamboo, which allow the rising hot air to escape, while at the same time providing shade and protection from rainfall. The soothing sound of falling rain can be heard during the frequent showers in this area, which produce 1500mm to 2000mm of precipitation per year.

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The bamboo used for the roof allows for maximum air circulation, while still providing protection from the rain and sun.

The bamboo walls are made up of rotating doors, which can be used to make the space either completely open or closed off. Even when closed, there are still gaps between the bamboo to allow for air circulation.

The ladder and hammocks are made of vines from the rainforest.

The mesh netting around the entrance provides a view straight down to the forest floor and gives the illusion of sitting or standing in midair. It also allows all the vines attached to the ladder to swing from the roof.

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Relative Humidity

A I R C I R C U L AT I O N D I A G R A M Air can penetrate every part of this oasis, except a portion of the floor.

Humidity Ratio

Dew Point Temperature °C

Wet-Bulb Temperature °C

Dry-Bulb Temperature °C

This is the ultimate refuge for a jungle explorer, particularly one who likes to climb. With vines used for many parts of construction, there are plenty of things to climb on or hang from, including the ladder that takes you up to this oasis. In addition, no matter where you are, there is always a view to the surrounding environment.

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WOODY EXPLORATIONS The typical format of the botanical garden id challenged in the function and layout of this design, focusing more on the plants as a resource as opposed to simply an aesthetic experience. The intention behind species selection relies upon its function as a resource, and the diversity of its uses. Combining bamboo and native Canadian tree species, a fully immersive experience is created for visitors, absorbing them into the life cycle of the plants from seed to final product. The architecture acts as an exhibition space and a centre for learning, with areas for cultivation and growth, alongside a research facility, treatment centre (including a wood workshop), and lecture hall as the main program elements. The purpose of the facility is to explore the new possibilities of the timber industry in Canada. Bamboo is a material with seemingly endless possibilities when it comes to commercial use, used for anything from structural framing to musical instruments to blankets, but unfortunately for Canadians, since we have a colder climate, bamboo does not grow naturally here. We have alternative tree species instead. However, the unsustainable use of wood products is an issue, and since trees do not have the same rapid growth rate of bamboo, the forests being cut down for timber are not being replenished quickly enough. The tree species located on this site, which are willow, cherry, tamarack, poplar, aspen, and birch, were selected because they all have similar characteristics to bamboo. They are fast growing and have a number of different uses, both in construction and other areas. Each type of wood and timber bamboo grown on the site is used in at least one part of the building construction.

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Woody ExPlorATions

BAMBoo And TrEEs - CollABorATion for diVErsiTy And susTAinABiliTy

ConsTruCTion: Timber Panels light framing CrAfT: Paper furniture Weaving Musical instruments Boats

ChinA south Western

VEnEzuElA

south Central

Eastern TAiWAn

ColuMBiA

MAlAysiA ECuAdor

ingEsTion: Medicine food

indonEsiA

guadua Angustifolia

gigantochloa Atter

Acidosasa Edulis

Phyllostachys nigra

fargesia dracocephala

Paper Birch

Trembling Aspen

Balsam Poplar

Tamarack

Peachleaf Willow

Black Cherry

PlAnTing disTAnCE

TEMPErATurE (° C)

rAinfAll (mm)

sunlighT

soil

60 <1000-1500 sandy

40

1500-2000

20

silty

0 2000-2500 Clay

-20

2500-3000

-40

Peaty

-60 3000-3500> Acidic

SPECIES INFOGRAPHIC

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

Black Cherry Balsam Poplar Paper Birch Trembling Aspen Tamarack Guadua Angustifolia Gigantochloa Atter Acidosasa Edulis Phyllostachys Nigra Fargesia Dracocephala Peachleaf Willow

UPPER LEVEL PLAN

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TREATMENT PROCESS The treatment centre is where the wood and bamboo treatment and production would occur within the building. The room houses various machines for both wood working and bamboo production, including a cleaning station with power washers and scrubbing racks, drying and storage racks, corrugated press machine, particle board press, wood chip machine, bamboo splitting machine, a drill press, various saws (both hand-held and machine operated), and sanding machines. Below is a quick description of the harvesting and treatment process of bamboo.

#1 HARVESTING

#5 CLEANING

#2 CUTTING

#6 TREATMENT AND LEACHING

#3 CUT TO DESIRED LENGTH

#4 PUNCTURE NODES

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#7 DRYING

#8 LABELLING


The main structural columns throughout the building are made of mostly bamboo, with a weaved willow element on the top of the structure. They were designed to be a water collection and ventilation system in addition to their structural requirements. There are split bamboo canes at the top of each column acting like an eavestrough to drain rainwater or melted snow down through the bamboo poles and into the large water basin in the ground beneath the building. Each of the eight poles on each column used for water collection, are coated with beeswax on the interior to prevent rot and decay, thus maintaining the integrity of the structure.

Strips of willow wood would be stretched across the top of the column, between the larger square frames of the bamboo, in a loose basket weave. In the gaps between the weave, ETFE (ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) would be used instead of glass, since it will still allow sunlight penetration, but also provides better insulation and is much less heavy than glass would be.

EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

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COLUMN PARTI DIAGRAMS

WELDED STEEL CONNECTION

WATER CIRCULATION

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WATER CIRCULATION


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THRIVE: TIMBER SKYSCRAPER Located in the Liberty Village region of Toronto, this high-rise timber building is designed to be a social hub for the area. With program including a public farmer’s market, large interior garden, cafeteria, restaurant, cafe and retail on the ground floor, a fitness centre, sky bar, public library, ballroom, multiple interior gardens, and multiple conference rooms, located throughout the three office towers, along with a number of roof terraces, there is somewhere for everyone to enjoy. Being constructed mainly out of mass timber, the materiality of the interior spaces are warm and aesthetically pleasing. It is an ideal location for large events such as weddings, conferences, galas, etc. because of its ability to hold high occupancy levels and it’s access to both interior and exterior event spaces (like the ballroom, conference rooms, roof terraces, and interior gardens). The schematic design of the building was intended to form interlocking spaces, with horizontal and vertical bars intersecting in plan to create feature amenity spaces at each intersection. I wanted to spread the public amenities throughout the towers, so the spaces for public interaction and community were not all concentrated on the first few floors. Integrating social space throughout the office towers is meant to encourage a healthy work habit with spaces both for solitary work, collaborative work, and leisure. There are places ideal for extroverted people, who work best in an environment surrounded by others, and also for more introverted people, who often work best in more solitary spaces or in small groups. It was important to me when designing to provide multiple types of office space to accommodate a wide variety of working styles, giving every occupant equal opportunity to succeed. Another key component of this design are the large number of green spaces both across the site and throughout the interior of the building. This area of Toronto currently has a very limited number of public green spaces, which is a problem given the high density residential population. I have provided open grassy spaces in the park for the many dog owners in the area to make use of, in addition to the more built-up landscaping. Given that we live in Canada, it was also important for me to include green spaces that can be accessed and enjoyed all year ‘round. There are interior gardens in every office tower, with the largest garden located on the ground floor running down the centre axis of the site from east to west. Almost every amenity space in the building has access to a garden, either inside or outside the building.

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Glulam Member Cross-Bracing (First two building floors)

Mass Timber CLT Panels (Exterior)

Mass Timber CLT Panels (Interior)

Mass Timber CLT Panel Cores

Glulam Columns (500mm x 500mm)

Composite Floor Slabs (CLT mass timber panels and concrete slab)


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MARKET GREEN SPACE RESTAURANT/CAFE

CORE

FLOOR PLAN PARTIS

PROGRAM

CORES

SHARED AMENITIES OFFICE

6TH FLOOR 4TH FLOOR

4TH FLOOR

5TH FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

4TH FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

3RD FLOOR

2ND FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

CIRCULATION PATHS

GROUND FLOOR

GROUND FLOOR

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SITE PLAN

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KEY MARKET SECTION DETAIL

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SKY BAR FLOOR 1

SOUTH FACADE TOWER 2

NORTH FACADE TOWER 1

The South facades of every tower are composed of a curtain wall system, supported by large glulam columns. There are large pieces of timber attached on the exterior of the curtain wall system, acting as fins providing some solar shading and creating the pattern featured on the left.

Each of the North facades of the towers are a hybrid of the two systems used on the East/West or South facades. The north used tall vertical panels of CLT, increasing structural strength and reducing the amount of sunlight penetration.

WEST FACADE TOWER 3 On the East and West facades of each of the towers and the lower podium of the building, solid CLT prefabricated panels are used as lateral load-resisting elements. They each have specified openings cut out for windows throughout. These panels also block most of the undesirable solar radiation from the East and West, while still allowing some views throughout the offices in these directions.

TOWER 2 INTERIOR GARDEN

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TRANSIENT DWELLINGS Located on the periphery of Rome, Italy, in the Parco di Torre Fiscale along the Acqua Felice, these small dwellings are designed to be a resting place and a refuge for transient peoples, those looking for a simple shelter or a place to call their own for a season. With refugees specifically in mind, these small dwellings were designed to be easily assembled, and adjustable, accommodating the diverse spectrum of people and cultures sure to inhabit them and able to nestle into the arches within this ancient aqueduct at varying points along its length. Each dwelling is made to sleep two people, and includes furniture that can be modified in several ways, creating a variety of spatial layouts. With the safety and security of the inhabitants in mind, they do not have obvious entry points when the walls are erected, and are small in size, integrating easily and inconspicuously into the existing site. The permanent building housing the necessarily services for anyone making use of these temporary havens, has been located next to an existing restaurant. With bathrooms, showers, and a large communal kitchen, it was designed to mimic the vernacular architecture of the area in its form and materials, deliberately simple and minimal, and when these temporary dwellings no longer exist, it would remain a permanent facility for park users and a potential extension of the current restaurant kitchen and dining space. As an exercise in grafting, this structure would be the permanent reminder of this point in time in the long history of the Acqua Felice.

TRANSIENT DWELLING

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PERMANENT SERVICES


SITE PLAN

SITE SECTION 1:1000

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METAL FURNITURE CLIPS

FURNITURE SLIDING TRACK DETAIL

SOLID PANELS

TABLE

BED/BENCH

CHAIR

ENTRY/OUTER WALLS

FLOOR

CANVAS

Canvas Cover

Metal Frame & Sliding Tracks

FLOOR PLAN (HANGING PANELS)

Folding Wooden Furniture Panels

Woven Bamboo Panels

Folding Canvas Panels

Folding Wood Floor Panel

DWELLING SECTION ELEVATION

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FLOOR PLAN (LAYOUT 1)

FLOOR PLAN (LAYOUT 2)


Bathing

Kitchen Washrooms

Temporary Dwellings

Existing Outdoor Dining

Existing Restaurant

PROGRAM DIAGRAM

FLOOR PLAN

SOUTH ELEVATION

EAST ELEVATION

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TESTING GROUNDS: E ducational O utposts

in

N ewfoundland

IN COLLABORATION WITH MADELEINE SLANEY. Education in Newfoundland has been growing and developing for the past 300 years, and in more recent history, their post secondary schools have been strengthened enough to compete with some of the best institutions in North America (particularly when it comes to marine studies). In this project, we are proposing to partner with the Marine Institute at Memorial University of Newfoundland to develop several outpost campuses, each exploring a specific area of marine education and research. These new campuses will be spread throughout the province and will partner with local industries to provide a unique educational experience. We have selected 6 sites based on either a strong existing presence or a need for improvement in certain industries, as a start. With a focus on hands-on learning at each specialized campus, the students will learn directly from, and work alongside, local experts like fishermen, craftsman, etc., while also introducing new economies based on innovative research and collaboration. A relationship with local communities is key to the design and development of this project. By partnering with locals as both educators and neighbors, we hope to engage the communities in each location and involve the students in community life. We are addressing the problem of low youth populations across Newfoundland by drawing young people into these new education hubs, introducing them to many different parts of the province, and helping them gain an understanding of the rich culture and wealth of knowledge to be found here. Through research and experimentation, the goal is to merge traditional knowledge and skills with modern technology to create new innovations in new, specialized areas of marine studies.

MAKING LAB SECTION VARIATIONS (DEPENDENT ON SITE)

MAKING LAB EXPLODED AXONOMETRIC

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The Making Lab is designed to show building as machine. It integrates machines for making directly into the architecture, such as a boat lift, moving hydraulic floor, rolling hydraulic pedestrian bridges, and a traditional lift system for material transport within the building. Combining the vernacular with a more modern architectural language, the shape of the building section mimics the traditional saltbox shape of Newfoundland architecture and uses wood as the main structural material, in combination with the modern minimalistic forms of the interior, and exterior glazing creating a strong relationship between interior and exterior space.

SITE PLAN (ARNOLDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COVE, NEWFOUNDLAND)

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The interior program spaces are attached to, and hung from a large wooden superstructure using steel cables, and can be reconfigured depending on program needs at each outpost location. The workshops and key making spaces are located within the larger interior space, with the supplementary programs being located within the more climate controlled hanging pods, such as meeting rooms, offices, specialized labs, etc. Views into the central making space were important in creating connections between interior spaces and are featured in every enclosed pod. Vertical circulation has been pushed to the outer edges of the building within the space frame, while horizontal circulation is threaded throughout the large open interior allowing pedestrian access at varying levels all around the making space.

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We have designed three different building types to suit the needs of each outpost, a Land Lab, a Water lab, and a Making Lab. Each site would either have one of these buildings or a combination of two or more. The Land Lab focuses on land-based research and programming. Its physical relationship with the land was an integral part of the architectural design; how it cuts into the land, sits on the land, or rises above it depends on programming needs. Changing levels are articulated through interior spatial requirements and physical site. The main arterial spine is the key program area in the building, altering depending on site location and the curriculum focus of each outpost. Two additional bars can be added to the spine with supplementary program. The aquaponics lab cuts through all of the bands, creating a spatial relationship between the local people of Southbrook and the students. This public space throughout the building folds and bends along the bands flowing through laboratories, greenhouses, flume tanks, holding tanks, and finally ending outdoors at the waterfront.

Green Roof System

Shou Sugi Ban Wood Cladding

Aquaponics Greenhouse

Vertical Spruce Paneling

Community Kitchen Holding Tank Net Loft Lounge Flume Tank

Salt Water Necropsy Laboratory Histopathology Laboratory Live Food Culture Laboratory

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EMI: C herish H igh S chool While volunteering with Engineering Ministries International (EMI) in Uganda, I had the privilege of working on two secondary school designs. One of them was for a ministry called Cherish Uganda, who work with HIV positive children, providing support, a safe home, and schooling, as well as helping the children reintegrate into their families and communities whenever possible. In addition to the health clinic, homes, and primary school they already run, Cherish is planning to build a new secondary school campus in Rakai, Uganda, near the southern border with Tanzania, which will educate up to 600 students, both from Cherish and from areas around the country and the rest of East Africa. This new campus is a boarding school (like most secondary schools in East Africa), meaning the design not only included regular and specialty classrooms and administration offices, but also boarding houses, a health clinic, a large covered gathering space, agricultural land, and recreational facilities. I had a chance to travel to the site with an international team of EMI architects and engineers, taking part in the initial schematic design concepts, participating in extensive discussions with our representative from Cherish, and later working on the specific programming and cost analysis, as well as the drawings, renders and other documents for the initial design proposal. Construction is planned to begin sometime in 2017.

Specialty Classrooms

Recreational Fields

Classrooms

Agriculture

Chapel/Dining Female Dormitories Male Dormitories

Student Sick Bays

Short-Term/Mid-Term Housing

Vocational

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Library

Admin


s

nistration

Senior Staff Housing

Teacher Housing

Health Clinic

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EMI: A mazima S chool The other secondary school design I had the opportunity to

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work on with Engineering Ministries International (EMI) while

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in Uganda, was for Amazima Ministries. Amazima Ministries

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is a non-profit organization who’s mission is to empower some

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of the most vulnerable and impoverished people in Uganda

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

through sponsorship and education. The new Amazima School is











a secondary level boarding school located just outside of the town

ROOM FINISH SCHEDULE



#





of Jinja, Uganda, on a 67 acre site, and will eventually be the

INTERIOR WALL FINISH

EXTERIOR WALL FINISH

CEILING FINISH

A/V ROOM

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

TRUSS

STORAGE

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

TRUSS

STORAGE

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

TRUSS

904

STORAGE

NAME

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

TRUSS

905



906



















home of 800 students and staff. The school opened its doors in

FLOOR FINISH

901 902 903

COMMENTS





STORAGE

PLASTER

POLISHED CONCRETE POLISHED CONCRETE

STORAGE

EXPOSED BRICK EXPOSED BRICK

PLASTER

907

STAGE

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

908

BACKSTAGE 1

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

909

BACKSTAGE 2

POLISHED CONCRETE

PLASTER

EXPOSED BRICK

910

CHAPEL ASSEMBLY AREA

POLISHED CONCRETE

TRUSS TRUSS TRUSS TRUSS TRUSS TRUSS

NOTES: FLOOR FINISH: POLISHED CONCRETE = GRIND AND POLISH CONCRETE SLAB, 125mm HIGH PLASTER WALL BASE BROOMED CONCRETE = CONCRETE SLAB WITH BROOM FINISH (NO SCREED), 125mm HIGH PLASTER WALL BASE PAVERS = 400x400x50 CEMENT/SAND PAVERS SCREED = FLOOR SLAB TO RECEIVE CEMENT / SAND FLOOR SCREED

















WALL FINISH: EXPOSED BRICK PLASTER

= EXPOSED BRICK WITH POLYURETHANE COAT = PLASTER WITH LIME SLURRY AND PAINTED FINISH

CEILING FINISH: INSULATED ROOF TRUSS

= PROVIDE ADDITIONAL ROOF SHEET AND INSULATION BARRIER TO UNDERSIDE OF ROOF PURLINS = ROOM OPEN TO EXPOSED TRUSSES ABOVE

February 2017. The second phase of the project is currently under











construction, with the remaining phases to follow. While working



 

 

 

with EMI, I had the privilege of collaborating on the detailed design

  





  

  



   



 



of buildings for phase two as well as completing the construction



 





  



 













 

 

 



 

  



 











  



  











 



  

 



 

 



 















 

 









 



  

  



  







 

 







 















 











  

(the feature building of the campus). I was able to make several

 





 



classrooms (music, art, science), and the chapel and dining hall

 



 

  







site visits to Jinja to check out the progress of construction with



 

  

 









 





  









   











other members of our team during my work term, and participate

A



 







 









drawings, including another regular classroom block, specialty



 

 



 



     





in several meetings with representatives from Amazima, including



















 

 













the core faculty of the school. The images to the right are photos



 







from the first phase of construction (clockwise from top: completed











 



  







  

 









 











 





 

 



staff housing, completed classrooms, phase 1 site construction),











 





and the drawings below are for the chapel and specialty classroom











 







 





 



 





 

  

 























buildings in phase 2.



 







 

 

 

  

 



 



 









 

- 50 -





A1.1


Image property of Amazima Ministries

Image property of Amazima Ministries

- 51 -


CORNERSTONE: F ront D esk While working for Cornerstone Architecture in London, Ontario for my first co-op term, I had the opportunity to work on a renovation project at the Canada Games Aquatic Centre. I was asked to design the new front desk for the facility. The client provided a basic concept for the desired design, and I was left to work out the final design and help choose materials. When choosing materials, the intention was to have a colour scheme that fit in the with aquatic environment and also with the existing colour palette of the building. Since completing my work term, the desk has been constructed. The photo on the right is an image of how the desk currently stands in the facility.

- 52 -


- 53 -


DRAWING/PAINTING

Andrea Quinn, Basilica di Santa Maria in Aracoeli

Andrea Quinn, Ceiling of the Pantheon

- 54 -


Andrea Quinn, The Baths of Caracalla

- 55 -


JEWELLERY/BEADING

- 56 -


- 57 -


MUSIC COMPOSITION (selection)

The Making of Diana From Muse the Play Edited by Lara Isaac

Lisa Huang, Andrea Quinn, Crystal Yung

q = 72

œ œœ œ œ œJ œ œ œ 4 J ‰ ‰ œJ J ‰ ‰ œJ J ‰ ‰ œ J ‰ ‰ œ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ J ‰ ‰ J &4 Œ ‰ J ‰ ‰ J J J ? 4 Œ Œ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ ‰ œJ œJ ‰ 4

{

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5

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œœœ œ ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ™ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ œ ™ œJ œ J & œœœ œœœ œœœ œœœ œ œœ œœœ œ œ œ œ œ ? œœœœœœœœ œ

9

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13

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- 58 -

∑ œ œ œ œ œ œ œœ œ œ œœœ œ œ œ


ARRANGEMENT (selection)

- 59 -


THANK YOU

andreaquinn94@gmail.com | 1-519-319-0794

Profile for Andrea Quinn

Andrea Quinn | Architecture Portfolio 2018  

University of Waterloo School of Architecture, Undergraduate

Andrea Quinn | Architecture Portfolio 2018  

University of Waterloo School of Architecture, Undergraduate

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