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PORTFOLIO Selected works 2013-2016

Professional Projects decameron - competition project for the Parco Centrale in Prato like a rolling stone - project for Boarding Houses typologies, exhibition at the Venice Architectural Biennale 2016

Academic Projects “a bigger wall�, frames of Addis Ababa Rothko - project for a museum inflatable compromise - experiments on adaptable architecture retreat into nature - a productive garden enveloped - technological upgrading of an existing building art pavilion

Andrea Migotto


Andrea Migotto Architecture and Urban Design Contact Via Piave 4, 21013, Gallarate (VA) Lombardy, Italy Tel. +390331786081 Mob. +393462610239 / +32489157295 Mail: andrea.migotto.am@gmail.com Content This dossier presents a selection of projects designed between 2013 and 2016 and is split into two parts. The first part consists of the professional works developed as a collaborator at the Brussels based architectural office DOGMA, founded and directed by PierVittorio Aureli and Martino Tattara. Working at the office has allowed me to continue my development as an architect both theoretically and practically, by designing and developing projects and research materials for commissions and international competitions. The second part focuses on academic projects developed during my formative years at the Politecnico in Milan (Italy) and at the TU Delft (the Netherlands). The first three academic projects aim to show the main trajectories of architectural design and research that I have enquired in these years. These are followed by three projects that aim to integrate the main design directions explored in the former by concentrating on smaller scale intervention and more specific technological solutions. Ranging from the urban realm to the size of a building and eventually to the conception of a construction technology, the projects presented transversally touch on a wide variety of scales, issues and ideas - all of which constitute the body of architecture. Above all lies the idea that architecture doesn’t simply imply aesthetic solutions and design as outcomes of contingent situations, but strategic and formal decisions that are the outcomes of an overall personal project, on the continuous redefinition of social contracts in everyday spaces and a neverending theoretical reassesment of ideas. For me, only by conceiving architecture in such a way, we can work to redefine its role and our role as architects within the environment in which we live.


Curriculum Vitae Professional experience

Competitions

Feb. 2016-Dec.2016 Collaborator at DOGMA, Brussels

Individual: - Europan 14, “The adaptive city” (2013) Schiedam, the Netherlands “The missing link”

Education 2013-2015

Master in Architecture Techniche Universiteit Delft Msc1, Why Factory Sudio “Transformer The Exhibition” Tutors: Winy Maas, Ulf Hackauf

Msc2, Public Buildings Studio “On Site. M+ Museum in Hong Kong” Tutors: Michiel Riedijk, Stefano Milani, Niklaas

- LIXIL Student Competition (2014) Hokkaido, Japan “Retreat into nature” - Vision 42 Design (2015), New York “Leviathan” As collaborator for DOGMA: - Il parco centrale di Prato (2016), Prato, Italy “Decameron”

Deboutte, Sien van Dam

International competition, finalist project

Msc3-4, Graduation Studio Dwelling/ Methos and Analysis Thesis: “a bigger wall”, Frames of Addis Ababa

Skills

Tutors: Dick van Gameren, Tom Avermaete, Nelson Mota, Klaske Havik

October 2015, Graduated cum honours

AutoCAD 2D and 3D Modeling, Archicad, Rhino 3D Modeling, Grasshopper (beginner), Adobe Suite: Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Premiere Pro Model making

2010-2013

Bachelor in Architecture

Languages

Politecnico di Milano, Scuola di Architettura Civile

Italian - native speaker

July 2013, Bachelor Diploma

English - proficient in writing and speaking (TOEFL - Level C1)

Exhibition and Awards

German - basics in writing and speaking

Individual: TU Delft Archiprix Exposition, Oct. 2016, Delft, the Netherlands - Selection of best graduation projects

Best of TU Delft (Faculty of Architecture) - Best Graduate 2015/2016

YTAA (Young Talent Architecture Awards) 2016, Barcelona - Participant project

Dutch National Archiprix 2017 - Shortlisted project

As collaborator for DOGMA: Venice Architectural Biennale (2016), Venice, Italy British Pavillion “Home Economics”, “Like a Rolling Stone”


Professional projects Projects carried out as a collaborator in the studio DOGMA, Brussels (Belgium). All the following drawings are property of DOGMA and are published in this portfolio under the consensus of DOGMA.

DECAMERON a park for Prato International competition 2016

Location: Prato, Toscana (IT) Role: Design leader, design and illustration Team: PierVittorio Aureli, Martino Tattara, Elia Zenghelis, Andrea Migotto, Tommaso Meregalli, Elena Calafati Type: International competition, finalist Year: 2016

The competition for the new central park of Prato aims to design a new public venue within the historical wall of the old city centre. The area, currently occupied by the hospital which would soon be demolished, is adjacent to the 14th century city walls which became one of our main points of interest in the project. Our proposal celebrates the theme of gradient and the architectural archetipical form of the “room”.

The built part is minimal and located adjacent to the plot boundaries in order not to break the strong geometry of the park. The building itself is divided into a sequence of rooms and on the north side it turns into an open canopy surrounding a secret garden, a ninfeo. The building is constructed in red painted steel, with cheap materials that can be dismantled and reused elswhere.

By rediscovering the interest in the garden as a formal entity, fostered by the historical background of the area, we opposed the current fashion of informal and nature-like environments that has become a dogma in the design of parks. The size of the plot and its irregular limits supported our decision to design a garden more than a park. Following the ortogonal direction of the cardo-decumanus geometry of the city centre in Prato, the park unfolds in a gradient, from a wide open space (adjacent to the historical walls on the south) to intimate and dense natural strips to the north.

Trees and pergolas

Gradient

New trees

Existing trees

Pergolas

A second geometry, orthogonal to the longitudinal one of the gradient, allowed us to create the idea of “rooms”. Divided by strips of nature, these open “rooms” grow bigger as we get closer to the ancient walls where they open up completely. Each strip is strongly characterized by a specific type of vegetation defining the architectural qualities of each room. To the north, we have a forest-like strip, followed by a productive strip with alternating fruit trees and vegetable patches, then a strip of square-shaped lawns divided by rows of perennials, a strip for activities and games and finally an open field against the southern wall. The overall composition works as a geometrical outline to define areas, suggesting but never forcing the use of it, always trying to make clear its entire extension and thus the innumerable possibilities it allows.

“Rooms”

Paths network

“Parterre” with trees Vegetable Gardens Sportfields Field

Lawns

Vegetal masses Forest

Fruit trees

Main Path Secondary path Existing path

Street

Buildings Perennials

Pergolas

Main Building 500 smq

Possible enlargments

Open canopy


Plan and section

Axonometry


View of the park through the forest

View of the park through the productive strip

View of the park through the lawns

View of the pool in the activity strip

The canopy and the ninfeo behind

Detail of the amphitheatre


The park


evel plan

LIKE A ROLLING STONE Revisiting the architecture of the Boarding House Exposition at the British Pavillion “Home Economics” at the Venice Architectural Biennale 2016

Location: London (UK) Role: Design and illustrations Team: PierVittorio Aureli, Martino Tattara, Luciano Aletta, Ezio Melchiorre, Andrea Migotto, Stephanie Savio Type: Exhibition for the Architectural Biennale in Venice Year: 2016 60 cm

60 cm

2

The project has been developed as a research and design for the British Pavilion at the 2016 Architectural Biennale of Venice, under the theme of “Home Economics”.

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The overall exhibition aims to portray the bad condition of dwellings and the lack of affordable housing in the UK, commissioning five architecture offices and artists to develop projects to cope with the issue. Our office was confronted with the theme of “house for months”, the idea of a housing typology that would allow young people and artists to rent spaces for monthly periods in order to stay, work and live in the city of London. Our aim was to investigate the historical and typological 2 possibilities of the Boarding House in order to derive a dwelling typology that would respond to contemporary needs and market requests driven by young people, students, workers and artists who cannot afford the increasingly high rents of the city central areas. The design work has therefore been supported by a deep research about living and working typologies conceived throughout the last centuries.

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Sleeping alcove Shelf / hanger 60 cm Technical shaft Storage

Inhabitable core, first level plan

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6. 7. 8. 9.

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The core of the project is a single cell, a minimum space for the individial, equipped with a space for sleeping, a toilet, a kitchen 6 Sleeping alcove and shelves. This space is conceived as a separated place, where 7 Shelf / hanger the person can develop his own life and passions. 8 Technical shaft 9

Storage

The prefabricated cell would later be inserted into generic buildings that could be built in vacant areas we have mapped all around London, preferrably in the mid range6 suburban areas of the metropolis, allowing students, artists and young workers to have a place in the city. These buildings have been designed in different typologies to fit the variety of vacant plot found in the metropolitan area of London (towers, linear buildings, courtyards). The exhibition in the British Pavilion consisted of a book which summarized our research and explained the developed project and a 1:1 scale model of the individual cell.

Inhabitable core, second level plan

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Entrance Storage Bathroom Technical shaft Kitchen

Inhabitable core, ground floor plan


View of the 1:1 model of the Totem, exhibited in the British pavillion at the 2016 Venice Biennale

Plan of a typical floor plan of a generic Boarding House


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b.

Interiors a. View of the interior space between two inhabitable cores b. View of the interior space with sofas and desks embedded along the perimeter


Longitudinal section

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d.

Exteriors c. View of boarding house in Goswell Road, Londons d. View of boarding house in Boreham Avenue, London


Academic projects

A B I G G E R WA L L frames of Addis Ababa Graduation research and design 2014-2015 TU Delft, the Netherlands Tutors: Dick van Gameren, Tom Avermaete, Nelson Mota, Klaske Havik

Pa r t 1 Research Phase ■ Three dominant typologies ■ Forms of exclusion ■ Site survey / Kerkos area ■ Case study analysis Individual project Role: Design and representation

To work in an environment different from our Western cultural background requires the developement of new attitudes and tools to disect and analyze non-familiar urban dynamics. The complex and multi-layered reality of Addis Ababa appears chaotic and often hardly comprehensible; this is the reason why an inter-cultural and inter-disciplinary research can be an effetive method to create a solid backbone to approach the architecture and to highlight valid trajectories to follow. This hybrid kind of research involves the study of architectural figures, typologies and morphological transformations, as well as social and spatial dynamics influenced by political and economic issues. The corpus of the research can be divided into four main parts: an initial analysis of architectural typologies and their roles in the layered construction of Addis Ababa’s urban environment, a second phase of socio-spatial analysis focused on the topic of inclusive city and spaces of exclusion, followed by research on case studies which can be consider significant to understand the topics at stake in designing within developing countries, and finally, a site survey in Addis Ababa. All the parts of the research are fundamental for getting in touch with Ethiopian reality, highlighting dynamics and means of transformation that are completely different from the ones in the regulated Western world. Attention has been paid mainly towards dwelling issues: the roles of informal dwellers in the city, the means of expropriation and relocation, the relationships between working and living as well as the different habits of the locals and their ways of public life.

The issue of housing is not understandable if not contextualized in a wider panorama, which not only questions architectural issues like space, form and technology but also political and social problematics, from governamental decisions to everyday life practices. Aknowledging the possible existence of different forms of construction, commonality and, eventually, living, I was tasked to take a specific position about the pressing issues that characterize the Ethiopian reality. Research and architecural design became ways to understand and propose a clear statement about these topics, allowing me to take a position as expert.


1 / T H RE E D O M IN A N T T Y P O LO G IES (TA X O N O M Y A N D M O R PH O LO G Y )

Ras Palaces

The orignal scheme: Addis as a constellation of royal compounds

The palace and the walls - Compounds as territorial entities

Menelik’s Prayer House and sleeping chamber under construction English mission attending a ceremony in the Ghebbi

Informal settlement

A typological microcosm: street79shops, rooms, internal courtyard Informal Housing

A sea of urbanization

Small scale implementation in the inner city

Strength - collective memory Even though existing socioeconomic structures are disrupted by the relocation despite the intention, the contour of the previous land tenure will remain visible. This way the Condominiumscollective memory of the informal is still present. Weakness - loss of social network Inception of condominium typologies, replacing informal settlements Even though existing social structures are disrupted by the relocation, the contour of the previous land tenure will remain visible. This way the collective memory of the informal is still present.

A framed view - the new modernity of Addis?

Facilities connected to the street network

Small scale implementation as urban strategy

Opportunity - inclusiveness Repeating the process of negotiating land tenures on small scale can result in small patches of condominiums throughout the city. The new boundaries do not only establish new spatial but also new social configurations which could enhance economic development instead of economic segregation. Threat - lack of infrastructure The problem of infrastructure will not be solved with this strategy and will stay behind which will hamper further economic development. New economic development due to new infrastructure and inhabitants

Scheme and images Presented in the form of a settlement scheme and its accompanied image, the analysis of the three fundamental typologies seeks to highlight the social and spatial qualities of Addis Ababa’s built environment throughout history


er streets

2 / F O R M S O F EX C LU SIO N

Real Estate developments - Private villas Private villas estate are the most striking form of exclusion performed nowadays in Addis Ababa. Gated communities gather only high class dwellers

Deletion of the typological figure to reveal an image of the urban grammar they create

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New the n the b cial b cons inde

GLOBAL HOUSING

CROSS-CULTURAL METHODS AND POSITIONS / ADDIS ABABA MSc 3 graduation design studio | 2014 / 2015 _ 1st Semester TEACHERS: DICK VAN GAMEREN, TOM AVERMAETE, KLASKE HAVIK, NELSON MOTA

Condominium Housing estate While the Condominiums allow for services and modern dwellings, their urban strategy doesn’t provide for convincing public spaces and inclusive solutions

The urban layout becomes one of the major problems of the Condominums Housing project

Schemes and Interpretations Informal settlements Within informal areas mixity and sociality have higher levels of intensity, in contrast with lack of services and low quality of the built environment

An exploded image shows the conformations of a typical Addis Ababa street: contrast of different materials, typologies and ideas of city

A study on socio-spatial solutions in the built environment of the city helps to understand the practices of exclusion of different urban actors from the possibilities of everyday life

STRIP

Students : Juan Camilo Arboleda, Chiara Cirrone, Jules Gallissian, Andrea Migotto, Wei Song


3 / S IT E SU RV EY - K ER K O S A R EA CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

PATTERNS OF INHABITATION

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES

PATTERNS OF INHABITATION

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES

PATTERNS OF INHABITATION

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

w patterns of urbanization are developing in the area alongside new contemporary infrastructures. Speculation and density are best terrein for popping up of high rise offices and commerbuildings. Modern tecniques based on column-beam concrete struction are used to create generic plans that accomodate an ex of almost infinite use possibilities.

The new developements of Addis Ababa are based on density and congestion of activities. While high rise manages to respond to the hybrid request of modernity within buildings, streets are being transformed to become tools for flux exchanges: light railway, streets and sidewalks are showing the Western growth of the African city.

Modernity imposes new typologies, living patterns but also materials. Standars constructions and finishing elelments are used generically all over the area. Glass and cladding resemble of International Style solutions, filled with the the only speculative desire for income generation. Although modern industrial materials, the quality and mainteinance of such is low quality.

The area of the old Station is currently a space of exceptions and fluxes. More than typological repetition, the “ethos” of this portion of space is given by a juxtaposition of multifaceted situations., singular objects rather than typological figures. The old station and the void of the not used railway, a crossing bridge, ephemeral hangar for new construction and fences are the emblems of an area that strongly shows all the dynamicity and ambiguity of Addis.

The area works as an hinge between simultaneous forces of the urbanizing condition. A multifaceted frame to new modern activities and lifestyle in the centre of the city, but also crossing entities to connect modernity and rural environment. By being a network hotspot, the area works mainly as transit space on the north side, while the unusual extension of the void provides a strong and not designed limit on the south side.

Ambiguity between old and new socio-spatial relationships provides a wide variety of materials used in the area. Instead of a concrete material, the real matter that characterizes the area is the void where flux, exchange and also dynamics are materialized. As regards buildings, material range from cheap metal sheets and light construction elements (out of steel) to concrete and plaster for the station. Green areas play a fundamental spatial role.

The actual edge of the Kebele of Kerkos is characterized by so called “informal housing”. Life here comes back to semi rural condition within a suddenly urbanizing area. Infomal housing create a dense, low rise and generic network of spaces, connections and living conditions that strongly influence life of the lower classes of the city. Informal housing are organized in compounds, with maximum 15 families each, where people share basic services and common spaces. The street limit is characterized by shopping zones.

While being defined by the generic typology of Kebele housing, the north area of Kirchos present inhabitation patterns that differs from the central part of the Kebele. The proximity to La Gare and the presence of newly built infrastructure give this section interesting features of social exchange, urban dynamics within a generalized ephemerality. Here, housing are characterized by a higher standard of commercial and trade street life, being the arrival point of product from the city centre and facilitated by new infrastructures.

Construction methods are typical of rural conditions, generalized in the slum areas, while the materials used are cheap and easily available, or recycled. Fabric,earth, corrugated metal sheets and wood dominate construction and extension of the existing buildings, determining also the living habit of the area. Metal sheets are used for roofs, wall customization and to build fences that surround internal compounds. Light built elements are added to the houses to accommodate commercial activities along the main roads.

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES

PATTERNS OF INHABITATION

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

The market built in the last years in the centre of the Kirkos slum, works today as a single powerful typology within the rural area. A mixture of modernity and bottom up agency has led to the construction of this outstanding building. It manages to provide space for hundreds of shops, by a clever use of internal courtyards and corridors. The ground floor, the most expensive one, is a fantastic example of rural activities colonization of the modern buildings.

The construction of the market has surely influenced life and exchanges inside the slum. While in the beginning people were skeptic about its value, little by little they are appropriating it and learning how to get benefit from. The market works not only for the Kebele housing inhabitants, but has a wider influence towards the richer neighborhoods of the city centre. Activation of the ground floor plays a fundamental role in the connection with the surrounding.

Modern construction methods were needed after the fire had destroyed the previous constructions present on the site. The new market is made out of a concrete structure that allows for flexibility and stability, also on a curvy landscape. Finishing is made out of brownish plaster. What really interest, beyond the function of the market, is also the difference in the architectural image it provides, in the middle of a rurally built informal area.

TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES

PATTERNS OF INHABITATION

MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES

Kebele informal settlements at the centre of Kirkos are based on strong people relationships and communal life. Compounds are the basic forms of inhabitation, based on the combination of various single houses. Internal spaces are used as communal area for celebrations, funerals, or simply semi-public meeting and leisure. Fences are the materialization of the limits between the private compound and the narrow streets of the Kebele.

The Kebele housing provides extensive patterns of inhabitation, due to the low rise typologies used. Internal street are populated and lived as inside an enormous village in the heart of the city. Here people walks and children play, while women sells agricoltural produtcs. Living conditions are very low, services are often lacking and people try to find jobs in the building site in the central developing areas of Addis.

Material are very cheap, as found objects or recycled elements. Wood, metal sheets, fabric and earth are the basic materials used everywhere in a deeply generic but multifaceted way.

THROUGH “LA GARE”

ON THE EDGE OF KIRKOS

AROUND THE MARKET

THE HEART OF KIRKOS

Transformations of modernity

Dynamics from and across the old station urban void

The limits of the Kebele housing as exchange zones

Inception of modernity with the “informal settlement”

Deep into the Kebele housing settlement

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

THE FACE OF A NEW ADDIS ABABA

Territorial section of Kerkos north area / a story of conflicting spaces

Informal settlements and street lifestyle Office buildings OF and new infrastructures FIGURES PATTERNS INHABITATION AND TECHNIQUES TYPOLOGICAL TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES MATERIALS PATTERNS OF INHABITATION MATF PATTERNS OF INHABITATIONTYPOLOGICAL MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES New patterns of urbanization are developing in the area alongside The new developements of Addis Ababa are based on density and Modernity imposes new typologies, living patterns but also materiThe area of the old Station is c

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CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

ons and portion ons., sinon and the hangar rea that

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

YPOLOGICAL FIGURES

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

CREATO CON LA VERSIONE DIDATTICA DI UN PRODOTTO AUTODESK

STRIP

Students : Juan Camilo Arboleda, Chiara Cirrone, Jules Gallissian, Andrea Migotto, Wei Song

THROUGH “LA GARE”

THE FACE OF A NEW ADDIS ABABA

Transformations of modernity

Dynamics from and across the old station urban void

Contradictions Kerkos, one of the central subcities of Addis Ababa, can be taken as a sample for reading the layerization and contradiction of contemporary urbanization. The old informal settlement is being replaced by the modern buildings

The urban void of the former train station A new market building among informal housing TYPOLOGICAL PATTERNS TYPOLOGICAL OF INHABITATION ATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES TYPOLOGICAL FIGURES TECHNIQUES PATTERNS OF INHABITATION MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FIGURES MATERIALS AND PATTERNS OF INHABITATION MA

The actual edge of the Kebele Thegeneralized area works in as an hinge between simultaneous forces of the dernity new being typologies, living but typology also materiThehousing, area of the oldConstruction Station is currently a space of exceptions Ambiguity between old and new socio-spatial relationships by so imposes While defined by patterns the generic of Kebele methods are typical of rural and conditions, The market builtframe in thetolast in the centre of the Kirkos slum, The construction of the market has surely influenced life and exMode called “informal housing”. Life A multifaceted newyears modern activitStandars elelments areinhabitation used generi-patterns fluxes. More than typological repetition, of this provides a wide variety of materials used in the area. Instead of a ural con-constructions the northand areafinishing of Kirchos present that differs the slum areas, while the the“ethos” materials usedportion are cheap urbanizing and easily condition. availworks today as city, a single powerful typology within concrete the rural material, area. A thechanges inside thecharacterizes slum. While the in the beginning people were askeptic dition within suddenlystroye urba ies and lifestyle in the centre of the but also crossing entities ycreate all overa the area. Glass and cladding resemble of International of space is given by a juxtaposition of multifaceted situations., sinreal matter that area is the from the central part of the Kebele. The proximity to La Gare and able, or recycled. Fabric,earth, corrugated metal sheets and wood mixture of modernity and bottom up agency has led to the conabout its value, little by little they are appropriating it and learning marke dense, low rise and generic n to connect modernity and rural environment. By being a network e solutions, filled with the the only speculative desire for ingular objects rather than typological figures. The old station and the void where flux, exchange and also dynamics are materialized. As


4 / CA S E S T U D IE S (S TEV EN H O LL A N D M IC H EL EC O C H A R D )

Michel Ecochard / plan for Casablanca Steven Holl / proposal for Manila


ECOCHARD / HO ECOCHARD / HO Michel Ecochard / plan for Casablanca

A research by A research by Jules Gallissian Jules Gallissian Steven Holl / proposal for Manila Thijs Huisink Thijs Huisink


Part 2 Design Phase ■ Frames - Neighborhoods ■ Walls ■ Rooms Individual project Role: Design and representation

The proposed architecture is a project of spaces and forms which envisions a possible future for the city. To link the urban scale with the spaces of everyday life becomes an urgent necessity for Addis Ababa, in order to guide its evolution towards modernity. On the other hand, architecture has to deal with its apparent lack of any roles within such a transformation, which is suggested by the current status of urban developments. Instead of considering these facts as limitations, they can become starting points for an alternative approach to the city and to its design. This thesis proposes an urban strategy performed through architectural intervention. “Urban frames” are positioned on the existing informal urban tissue. This first and formal act defines the twofold means of the project. The frame works as a form of architecture, as a new measurable dimension of the city that allows its growth as a modern capital. At the same time, the frame also works and appears as infrastructure. It introduces the measurable unit of the neighborhoods and creates the prerequisites for the urban environment to evolve within the limits of the transformation itself. The intervention enables the relocation of slum dwellers within the wall itself, freeing land, through time, at the centre of the urban block. These new areas can be thus sold and developed by private developers or by the government with different typologies for living and working. An inclusive environment is then created by a strategy that spans through time and that is, pragmatically, perfromed by a simple architectural gesture. Being an infrastructure, the frames not only provide dwelling spaces, but also commercial areas and services on the ground

floors. These can develop over time, creating the new urban realm of Addis Ababa, empowering the cacophonic but fascinating spaces of african streets. This project seeks to be as economical as possible. Structure and spaces are exactly the same thing: rammed earth walls and bamboo floors are cheap materials that aim to develop innovation in the field of construction and a redefinition of building aesthetics. The repetition and tectonic variations of walls create simple and generic rooms. They provide a limited but significant solutions for dwellings, in order to respond to the lifestyle of the locals. Through the use of simple formal and spatial devices, this project aims to make sense of the environment of Addis Ababa and to subsume them into architecture.


1 / U RB A N F R A M ES (N EW N EIG H B O R H O O D )

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The intervention proposes an inception of a new urban scale, trying to link together the ambitious plans for Addis Ababa’s future with the pragmatic issues of its present condition d an

d an

e th

e th

// Urban amenities // Urban amenities By basing its definition on the existing The in between areas are not simply roads, By basing its definition on the existing The in between areas are not simply roads, networks of small streets and voids of the but also public spaces for everyday life networks of small streets and voids of the but also public spaces for everyday life area, the project presents an adaptable performance. area, the project presents an adaptable performance. geometry. Refusal of a dogmatic or geomeSome of these areas can can accomodate geometry. Refusal of a dogmatic or geomeSome of these areas can can accomodate tric form is the key answer to the creation urban facilities, other simply becomes square tric form is the key answer to the creation urban facilities, other simply becomes square of a wide variety of urban spaces in order or gardens to enhance the creation of a of a wide variety of urban spaces in order or gardens to enhance the creation of a to answer the soecific needs of each locamodern public environment. to answer the soecific needs of each locamodern public environment. tion. tion.

w ne

w ne

t tric dis al ntr ce

t tric dis al ntr ce

// Street network - main streets // Street network - secondary streets // Street network - main streets // Street network - secondary streets The main infrastructural network will connect Smaller street allows to enter the new neiThe main infrastructural network will connect Smaller street allows to enter the new neithe area to the city. Wide paved road will ghborhoods and connect also the framed the area to the city. Wide paved road will ghborhoods and connect also the framed create a modern urban environment, develodwellings. In such a way the project is not create a modern urban environment, develodwellings. In such a way the project is not ping activities and connecting Kerkos to the simply a linear solution along the main ping activities and connecting Kerkos to the simply a linear solution along the main surrounding environment. Primary street streets, but allows to experience and live the surrounding environment. Primary street streets, but allows to experience and live the frames the intervention and connect it to the territorial depth typical of african cities. frames the intervention and connect it to the territorial depth typical of african cities. wider Addis Ababa street system. wider Addis Ababa street system.

s ard tow

s ard tow

re squa kel Mes

re squa kel Mes

and St. George’s ca thedralSt. George’s cathe dral Arada and towards

tow ard s

the

tow ard s

Ne w

Gh eb i

the

Ne w

Gh eb i

ds ar

ds ar

w to

w to

is ch an as K

is ch an as K

od ho

od ho

or hb ig ne

or hb ig ne

e th

e th

// Street network - main streets // Street network - secondary streets // Street network - main streets // Street network - secondary streets The main infrastructural network will connect Smaller street allows to enter the new neiThe main infrastructural network will connect Smaller street allows to enter the new neithe area to the city. Wide paved road will ghborhoods and connect also the framed the area to the city. Wide paved road will ghborhoods and connect also the framed create a modern urban environment, develodwellings. In such a way the project is not create a modern urban environment, develodwellings. In such a way the project is not ping activities and connecting Kerkos to the simply a linear solution along the main ping activities and connecting Kerkos to the simply a linear solution along the main surrounding environment. Primary street streets, but allows to experience and live the surrounding environment. Primary street streets, but allows to experience and live the frames the intervention and connect it to the territorial depth typical of african cities. frames the intervention and connect it to the territorial depth typical of african cities. wider Addis Ababa street system. wider Addis Ababa street system.

w ne

w ne

t tric dis al ntr ce

New infrastructures

t tric dis al ntr ce

Monuments

d an

d an

// Monuments // Monuments The areas is costellated by religious or The projects preserve the existing buildings The areas is costellated by religious or The projects preserve the existing buildings hystorical meaningful buildings. Some of them and integrates them within the urban idea. hystorical meaningful buildings. Some of them and integrates them within the urban idea. relics of a layered past, other contemporary It tries to create an urban network that relics of a layered past, other contemporary It tries to create an urban network that active hubs of urban life, like the market connects the monuments of the area: active hubs of urban life, like the market connects the monuments of the area: and Kerkos church. preserving their identity, but keeping them and Kerkos church. preserving their identity, but keeping them toghether. toghether.

// Urban amenities // Urban amenities By basing its definition on the existing The in between areas are not simply roads, By basing its definition on the existing The in between areas are not simply roads, networks of small streets and voids of the but also public spaces for everyday life networks of small streets and voids of the but also public spaces for everyday life area, the project presents an adaptable performance. area, the project presents an adaptable performance. geometry. Refusal of a dogmatic or geomeSome of these areas can can accomodate geometry. Refusal of a dogmatic or geomeSome of these areas can can accomodate tric form is the key answer to the creation urban facilities, other simply becomes square tric form is the key answer to the creation urban facilities, other simply becomes square of a wide variety of urban spaces in order or gardens to enhance the creation of a of a wide variety of urban spaces in order or gardens to enhance the creation of a to answer the soecific needs of each locamodern public environment. to answer the soecific needs of each locamodern public environment. tion. tion.

New public spaces


/ Neighborhoo

Plan Urban room - 1 The frame defines a measurable and recognizable territorial unit. The interior urban courtyard becomes a “sample” of Addis Ababa’s urban development


/ Neighborhood 1

/ Neighborhood 2 / urba

Plan Urban room - 2 Within adjacent urban frames, different kinds of urban environments can be “isolated� and developed from within


#1 - Existing informal settlements

#2 - "Terrein vague"

#3 - new common facilities

#4 - new workshops areas

#5 - parking areas

#6 - dwelling typologies

stage 1 - Inception of the urban perimeter

stage 2 - Urban block development

The new urban infrastructure frames the land and creates a new urban form which also act as an interactive equipment for development.

The "frame" starts to develop the urban block, beginning by “absorbing� the slums and enhancing the possibility for land development.

At first, the "frame" presents itself as a generic repetition of walls - modules that will be later appropriated.

The project assures the provision of common spaces and urban order, where new typologies can be constructed from within.

Crono-perspective Towards an evolutionary urbanism. This project works with temporality and attempts to incept a new urban strategy to develop central Addis Ababa areas, with the aim to create integrated inclusive environments


#7 - dwelling typologies

#8 - workshop spaces

#9 - dwelling typologies

#10 - communal facilities

stage 3 - Integration of wall and public spaces

stage 4 - Final development

Through time, people from the informal dwellings will be relocated within the urban frame. The structure then starts to integrate the slums at the ground floor, by creating pocket of spaces dedicated to work and common activities.

The completion of the intervention aims to create a strong integration of the “wall� and the remaining informal settlements at the ground floor as well as a wide urban mixity with the new added typologies.

New modern typologies are inserted into the freed land.

This solution will enable relocation of the slum dwellers within the same area which they were previously living in, increasing the city centre density and creating inclusive urban environments.


Developed ground floor Due to the new urban infrastructure, the ground floor can become a palimpsest of activities which links the buildings of the old informal settlements to the new scale of the metropolis an index of urban evolution


Triptyc #1 / the evolution of street life

Tryptic #2 / the evolution of an urban block


2 / WA LLS

longitudinal section - 1:250

longitudinal section - 1:250

Longitudinal section longitudinal section - 1:250

second floor plan - 1:250

Second floor plan

second floor plan - 1:250

second floor plan - 1:250

First floor plan

first floor plan - 1:250

first floor plan - 1:250

Structural is spatial

first floor plan - 1:250

Cores and walls

Cores and variating walls

Loadbearing structure is made out of rammed earth. Materiality influences directly the structural and spatial qualities of the building. Structural is spatial and viceversa. A total unity between two aspect of the project. The rammed eart structure work only for compression loads, that is why only structural walls and core can be built out of this material. Cores are thicker elements which contains stairs and infrastructural services, they allow for accessibility to apartments and for the staility of the overall building.

Floors

Floors: layers of bamboo structure

Given that rammed earth works only under pressure, floors share the same material and technique of the vertical structure. Bamboo is a cheap material, easy to find and construct in Ethiopia, and which is suitable for floor construction. Advantages are of two kinds. Firs of all the facility of bamboo construction, in particular in environments where construction knowledge is not advanced.

A standard spine

A generic spine: architecture as structure

The final combination of these two constructions and material creates and stable overall structure. The side towards the street is made stiffer inserting a perpendicular wall to prevent wals to fall laterally. The facade will present only small opening for areation reasons, allowing the structure to reach the needed stability. In the project structurality is not simply a problem/solving issue. It becomes the project itself, from the deep "rationalie" to the final aesthetic qualities.


is spatial

Floors

med earth. Materiality influences directly the structural and ture is made out of rammed earth. Materiality influences directly the structural and l is spatial and viceversa. A total unity between two aspect the building. Structural is spatial and viceversa. A total unity between two aspect work only for compression loads, that is why only structural rammed eart structure work only for compression loads, that is why only structural terial. be built out of this material. s stairs and infrastructural services, they allow for accessibielements which contains stairs and infrastructural services, they allow for accessibihe overall building. and for the staility of the overall building. Thickness and height of walls varies according to different es are a series of wall. Thickness and height of walls varies according to different its structural behaviour. ifesting in a formal way its structural behaviour. and thickness allows for a direct variety of interior spaces, ntiation of walls height and thickness allows for a direct variety of interior spaces, nd uses. ith different qualities and uses.

A standard spine

Floors

Given that rammed earth works only under pressure, floors share the same material and technique Given that rammed earth works only under pressure, floors share the same material and technique of the vertical structure. of the vertical structure. Bamboo is a cheap material, easy to find and construct in Ethiopia, and which is suitable for floor Bamboo is a cheap material, easy to find and construct in Ethiopia, and which is suitable for floor construction. construction. Advantages are of two kinds. Firs of all the facility of bamboo construction, in particular in environAdvantages are of two kinds. Firs of all the facility of bamboo construction, in particular in environments where construction knowledge is not advanced. ments where construction knowledge is not advanced. Second is the lightness of the material. Rammed earth walls are thin and can't bear too much presSecond is the lightness of the material. Rammed earth walls are thin and can't bear too much pressure: it would be absolutely critical to insert concrete floors on them. sure: it would be absolutely critical to insert concrete floors on them. Bamboos beams allow for stability and lightness. Bamboos beams allow for stability and lightness.

A standard spine

The final combination of these two constructions and material creates and stable overall structure. The The final combination of these two constructions and material creates and stable overall structure. The side towards the street is made stiffer inserting a perpendicular wall to prevent wals to fall laterally. side towards the street is made stiffer inserting a perpendicular wall to prevent wals to fall laterally. The facade will present only small opening for areation reasons, allowing the structure to reach the The facade will present only small opening for areation reasons, allowing the structure to reach the needed stability. needed stability. In the project structurality is not simply a problem/solving issue. It becomes the project itself, from In the project structurality is not simply a problem/solving issue. It becomes the project itself, from the deep "rationalie" to the final aesthetic qualities. the deep "rationalie" to the final aesthetic qualities. Consistency of the proposal is achieved through semplicity of constructing elements, material and Consistency of the proposal is achieved through semplicity of constructing elements, material and techniques. Whithin these limits, a given standard, the project tries to envision further ways for diftechniques. Whithin these limits, a given standard, the project tries to envision further ways for differentiation within the given standard. ferentiation within the given standard.

ction / fragment

tures

Walls and variations Primitive and modern Urban frames are composed by a repetition of structural walls. Being built out of rammed earth, these structures become architecturally defined by their tectonics: lighter and less intense in rhythm according to loadbearing necessities. The floor structure is made out of light and cheap bamboo beams.

Everyday services

Everyday services

The core as service infrastructure

The project works as an urban and dwelling infrastructure, and equipment for development of urban life. InfraThe project works as an urban and dwelling infrastructure, and equipment for development of urban life. Infrastructural qualities of the proposal are mainly present in the cores. Far from being simply structural elements structural qualities of the proposal are mainly present in the cores. Far from being simply structural elements allow to bring services, water, gas and electricity to every dwelling unit. allow to bring services, water, gas and electricity to every dwelling unit. Exploiting a cavity created in plan, tubes run through the whole height of construction. Exploiting a cavity created in plan, tubes run through the whole height of construction.

Vertical distribution

Vertical distribution

Core accessibility

The cores are inserted at regular rhythms, allowing for accessibility and services supply to the dwellings. They also provide a more stiff and stable structures.

Cores are, simply, also the way through which apartments can be accessed. Self standing concrete stairs are locaCores are, simply, also the way through which apartments can be accessed. Self standing concrete stairs are located in a cavity, not bearing on the rammed eart structure. ted in a cavity, not bearing on the rammed eart structure.


Street facade / “objects against a bare wall”


Interior blok facade / “a palimpest of everyday life”


Perspective section / “two spaces and a wall in the middle”


3 / ROOMS

.d .a

.d

Second floor dwellings Apartments”

.a .d .d

.c

.a

.b

.a

.a

.a

.a

.a

.b

.a .a

.a

.c

First floor dwellings “Living together”

Exploded Axonometry The central core becomes the fulcrum of a generic sequence of rooms, as an enfilade of spaces. The genericity of the structure allows for a reasonable degree of flexibility; the variations of wall heights and thicknesses create smaller or bigger living spaces.

.a


A

B

A

B

A

B

C C C

A

B

C

A A A

B B B

C C C

A

B

A A A

B

second floor plan - 1:50 second floor plan - 1:50

B B

second floor plan - 1:50

A A

B B B

second second floor floor plan plan - 1:50 1:50 second floor plan - 1:50

A

C

C

Second floor plan / fragment

second floor plan - 1:50

A A A

C

C

B B B

C C C

C C C

A

B

C

A A A

B B B

C C C

A

B

A

B

A A

B upper first floor plan - 1:50

B

C C C C

upper first floor plan - 1:50 upper first floor plan - 1:50 upper first floor plan - 1:50 A A A A A

upper upper first first floor floor plan plan - 1:50 1:50 upper first floor plan - 1:50

A

B B B

C C C

B

C

B B

C C

A

B

C

A A A

B B B

C C C

A

B

A

B

A A

B lower first floor plan - 1:50

B

lower first floor plan - 1:50

C C

Upper and lower first floor plan / fragment C

C

lower first floor plan - 1:50 A A A

lower first floor plan - 1:50

A A A

B B B B

lower lower first first floor floor plan plan - 1:50 1:50 lower first floor plan - 1:50

B B

C C C C C C

A

B

C

A A A

B B B

C C C

A

B

A

B

A

B

C C C

A

B

C

A A A

B B B

C C C

ground floor plan - 1:50 ground floor plan - 1:50 ground floor plan - 1:50 ground floor plan - 1:50

ground ground floor floor plan plan - 1:50 1:50 ground floor plan - 1:50

Ground floor plan / fragment


Common room


Double room / working and living

Single rooms / minimum individual cells


empty space

service core

empty space

empty space

service core

empty space

empty space

service core

empty space

empty space

service core

empty space

A mute structure open area

garden loggia

double bedroom

living room

living room

service core

double bedroom

garden loggia

open area

garden loggia

double bedroom

garden loggia

double bedroom

living room

living room

double garden bedroom loggia open area

service core

living room

living room

double bedroom

service core

garden loggia

open area

garden loggia

double bedroom

garden

living room

living Apartments loggia for a couple

III. rent III. rent III. rent III. rent

rented studio

room

double bedroom

garden loggia double rented bedroom studio garden loggia double rented bedroom studio

garden loggia double rented bedroom studio

living room

service core

double bedroom

double bedroom

double bedroom

garden loggia rented studio

open area

living room

double bedroom

service core

living room

garden loggia rented studio

open area

living room

service core living room

garden loggia rented studio

open area

living room

service core

living room

garden loggia

garden loggia rented studio

open area

living room

double bedroom

service core

open area living room single bedrooms

double bedroom

service core

living room double bedroom

single bedrooms

living room

service core living room

single bedrooms

double bedroom

open area

“rent it out� single bedrooms

living room

double bedroom

single double bedrooms bedroom open area

living room

service core

double bedroom

single bedrooms

open area living room single bedrooms

double bedroom

The standard and the customizable The genericity of wall repetition allows the rooms to adapt according to life necessities. Internal partitions are made out of bamboos panels which are easily intercheangable, allowing one to define the internal aesthetic qualties of the living environment

The family is finally complete!

living room

service core

double bedroom

single bedrooms


building technology section - 1:20

Detail 1 - Roof -

corrugated iron sheet removable earth layer waterproof membrane earth base interior waterproof membrane bamboo infill layer tertiary bamboo structure secondary bamboo structure main bamboo structure - beams

Detail 2 - Putside floor - outdoor finishing layer - stone tiles - waterproof membrane - removable earth base - structural earth base - waterproof membrane - bamboo infill layer - tertiary bamboo structure - secondary bamboo structure - main bamboo structure - beams

Detail 3 - Floor -

tile finishing layer removable earth layer structural earth base waterproof membrane bamboo infill layer tertiary bamboo structure secondary bamboo structure main bamboo structure - beams

Detail 4 - Foundation and storage -

stone finishing layer screed layer earth layer with services waterproof membrane concrete foundation structure waterproof membrane finishing layer - interior plaster


ROTHKO project for a museum Msc2 Project 2nd Semester 2014 TU Delft, the Netherlands Tutors: Michiel Riedijk, Stefano Milani, Niklaas Deboutte, Sien van Dam

Group project, team: Andrea Migotto, Jules Gallissian and Luca Vacchini Role: Design and representation

This project investigates the role of museums in contemporary society, taking one of the most famous recent competitions (M+ Museum in Hong Kong) as the starting point for reflecting on complex program buildings and typological contextualization. In recent years, museums have had much more to do with the image and advertisment of cities and architecture than actually dealing with the changes that are affecting the perception, consumption and reproduction of art in our daily lives. Today, art has not only lost the “aura”, but it has also become a fundamental aspect of capitalist reproduction and, eventually, has become life-capital itself. The promotion of the artist as a common and desirable form of life can be recognized as one of the most explicit outcomes of such a transformation. Entertainment has become a fundamental category in a world of interaction and indissoluble identity between life and its expressions where the production of art itself has competely been blurred. In the present, when the “aura” of art seems to have become valueless and art itself is almost not recognizable anymore, museums are no longer only the places to create social cultural knowledge, but also the places where art is demistified to become a common practice, a craft. The proposed museum design acknowledges the contemporary shift in typological requirements dealing with huge briefs for a building which would work as a showcase and factory at the same time. The final design aims to formalize the recognition of the current status of art by creating three spaces with specific programmes and spatial qualities. The museum is composed of two boxes cut in the middle by a void horizontal space. Like in a Rothko painting, the horizontal line not only becomes the climatic moment of tension, but also the space where the top and the bottom parts meet.

The lower box accomodates public related activities like workshops, theatres, libraries and retail areas. This functions as a factory where art and performances are not simply enjoyed but actually produced, performed as an integrated part of common life experience. The upper box is defined by an outer red wall and contains free spaces for exhibitions and storage. This part is the area where art is still presented and exhibited, recognizing the possibility for it to still exist as a valuable entity, nevertheless its status. These two parts are mediated by the central void, that works as central plaza and as a belvedere towards the bay of Hong Kong. Through it people can access the museum and the workshop areas, but it can also work as a free configurable space for activities and temporary exhibitions. The museum is conceived as a building as dense and compact as possible, avoiding formalism and free expressionism. The use of red concrete panels as cladding gives the building an abstract and unique character in strong contrast with the generic skyline of Hong Kong.


a. Exhibition and storage spaces

b. central covered “square”

c. “factory”, interaction and productive spaces

Three different spaces The appearently simple vertical differentiation of spaces is solved in plan and section by three different spaces: the two lower levels works as cultural production spaces, retailing and public interactive activities. The upper levels contain the exposition spaces, controlled and easily interchangeable. The central “covered square” works as a logistic architectural spaces, hinge between two different worlds.


“The factory� The basement of the building is occupied by cultural production spaces (theatres, workshops, library ) as well as office spaces and retail spots. The plan attempts to create separate but visually interconnected functional areas such as fixed function rooms as well as open occupiable spaces.


Peripheral gallery of the basement floors


Horizon emphasized! Two horizontal planes and twentyfive character-like columns create a surface free for life to happen and for temporary exhibitions. An outer open-air belvedere allows for a complete view of Hong Kong’s roaring skyline


a.

b.

Three impressions a. View towards the bay of Hong Kong from the open peripheral belvedere b. Entrance to the public covered square, with possibility of temporary exhibitions c. Possible conformation of a free public exposition in the central area

c.


Outer wall as surreal infrastructure Exhibition spaces are contained in the lifted box. The outer wall provides a specific spatial feature containing office rooms and services. Inside, the area is free and ready to accomodate every sort of exhibition


Peripherical wall framing the exhibition rooms


INFLATABLE COMPROMISE experiments on adaptable architecture Msc1 Project 1st Semester 2013-2014 TU Delft, the Netherlands Tutors: Winy Maas, Ulf Hackauf

Group project, team: Andrea Migotto and Nicola Campri Role: Design and representation

This design studio is based on the idea of transformable and adaptable spaces conceived through the use of innovative material qualities and alternative architectural conceptions. Can we think of spaces and architecture that are not fixed in their conformations, but vary depending on our wills, our necessities or our desires? To what extent can this happen, taking into consideration the issue of individual freedom and contrast between different desires? The material chosen for this project is latex and the idea of space is based on techniques and theories about inflatable spaces. Inflatable membranes have great possibilities for transformation: however these transformations are often confined to on-off configurations, which are quite limited. Many artists and architects have already tried to use inflatable membranes to propose alternative visions of future living (the ‘60s were a particularly fruitful period) or to create interesting works of art. In the same vein this proposal questions the way inflatable membranes to best suit their properties. To exploit pressure and membranes in a very innovative way, it is necessary to define a new logic of intervention and different ways of conceiving living spaces. The project consist of an intial exploration of material features and their spatial possibilities. Following that, a series of interconnected and contrasting rooms are created, linking the abstract studies to a real architecture situation. The use of non standard geometries implied the use of parametric sofwares and technologies to connect the physical model to virtual reality. The end result is an interactive model, which best express the aims of the project.


65 4.2 Inflatable rooms - drawing 3

4.2 Inflatable rooms - drawing 2

4.2 Inflatable rooms - drawing 1

a.

Section scale 1/20

c.

Section scale 1/20

Experiments - Testing materials

5.1 How to control the Voronoi geometries

Nb: To obtain the section of a livable room space is necessary to obtain floors and walls as much as possible orthogonal. To do this, relatively to the Voronoi Diagram, it is necessary that the two generators points that Reduction to a geometrical identify a division are model mutually orthogonal. You The research on material is can see thisby process intothe followed a translation geometrical scheme table.and mathematical

models. The geometry of a “Voronoi� allows one to describe and control the changes of contrasting rooms.

63 4.2 Inflatable rooms - model

b.

67

59

Section scale 1/20

d. 75


meditation

daily life inside the Inflatable House in del. The simulation shows each family flects their needs within the house. A e possible choice of room request. The some simple chosen parameters (volume, location of the room. To do this the necessary pressure to make the chosen more complicated when more players re that every choice is fulfilled and that the limits of the total volume.

INFLATABLE HOUSE - the game -

4.

3.

dojo

2.

kitchen

1.

living room

Conformation of exchanging rooms Through manual or laptopcontrolled inputs, the dimensions of rooms can be modified. This allows the materialization of possibilities for rooms to expand and the interaction between contrasting spaces.

The model The exhibition model proposes a fragment of a possible dynamic of interaction between inflatable spaces. Fans on the top and the bottom af a perspex box are the mechanical means that allow the activation of the spaces. The overall object is controlled through a manual pad but also with the use of computer softwares


RETREAT INTO NATURE a productive garden International competition 2014 Hokkaido, Japan

Group project, team: Andrea Migotto and Geerte Baars Role: Design and representation

The third edition of the LIXIL competition was based on the idea of “retreat into nature” with the aim of designing a “productive garden”.

The central open space is tiered, with different levels appropriated for specific functions. The ground is covered with tatami, recreating the traditional Japanese interior.

Gardens, through history, have always represented philosophical concepts of domination of men over nature and manifestation of divine presence on Earth. However, at the beginning, in particular in medieval Italy, gardens developed from orchards as places where cultivation of nature could be maintained all year long.

One enters the pavilion at its deepest, descending through steps into the sunken ground at either end of the entrance. Here, produce harvested from the garden is stored. Stepping up a few steps is the cooking area where one prepares food and tea from the harvest. This culminates in the dining area, where the food and tea is enjoyed with distant views of the vast landscape.

This project seeks to create an experiential encounter with the nature of Hokkaido, Japan, at its best. This not only means weather conditions but also a relationship with the wide variety of herbs and produce that can be cultivated in the area. Defined by two parts, the project consist of a linear elevated garden and a pavilion. The garden is designed in a very simple and functional way: a stone base separates the cultivated areas from the surrounding meadows, in order to protect the plants from snow, water and wind throughout the seasons. The linear garden is subdivided into quadrangular green pockets, each of them with different depths, according to the types of plants that are going to be cultivated. These green pockets are also provided with removable recycled-wood shelters to protect them in the cold season or from direct sun. Constructed with locally sourced Larch timber, the pavilion is positioned at the end of the garden, emphasizing the linear link between the two elements, both formally and functionally. The stone socle from the garden continues inside the pavilion, sinking down to create a central open space with services along its perimeter.


on it, we purpose a new way of living Meme as an identity and not a mix of fragmented parts.

ņńŐōŐňŚġńŚńōņ

SITE PLAN

ňųŰŸŪůŨ

őŭŢůŵŪůŨ

250 cm

320 cm

ŔŵŰųŪůŨ ńŶŭŵŪŷŢŵŪůŨ

80 cm

80 cm 80 cm

ńŰŰŬŪůŨ

5 SENSES EXPERIENCE

Sun Shading

ņŢŵŪůŨ

Linear econology diagram Supporting Structure and Shading

Time Spring

Five Senses

ŕũŦġŪůŵŦųŷŦůŵŪŰůġűųŦŴŦůŵŴġŪŵŴŭŦŧŵġŢŴġŢġŤŰŮűŭŦŵŦġŪůŵŦŨųŢŵŪŰůġţŦŵŸŦŦůġũŶŮŢůġŭŪŧŦġŢůťġ Fatsia Japanese Butterbur Bracken Fern Bitter Melon Soy Beans Summer Autumn Parsley ůŢŵŶųŦġŪůġŢůġŦŤŰŭŰŨŪŤŢŭġŴŦůŴŦįġŕũŦġťŦŴŪŨůġŪŴġŤŰůŤŦŪŷŦťġŢŴġŢġűŰŴŴŪţŭŦġŤŭŰŴŦťġŤźųŤŭŦġ ŸũŦųŦġ űŦŰűŭŦġ ŶŴŦġ ŵũŦġ űųŰťŶŤŵŪŷŦġ ŨŢųťŦůġ ŢŴġ űŰŴŴŪţŪŭŵźġ ŧŰųġ Ţġ ůŦŸġ ŸŢźġ Űŧġ ŭŪŷŪůŨġ ŎŦŮŦįġ

Ostrich Fern

Udo

Wasabi Horseradish

Adzuki

Winter

ŃŖŊōŅŊŏňġńŐŏńņőŕ Spaces Path

Linear garden A linear sequence of green pockets allows for a direct connection between the production and the consumption area. Activities

Wandering

ŊůŴŵŦŢťġŰŧġţŦŪůŨġŢġűŶůŤŵŶŢŭġŦŭŦŮŦůŵġŪůŵŦųŤŰůůŦŤŵŦťġŸŪŵũġŵũŦġŴűŪůŦĭġŵũŦġţŶŪŭťŪůŨġũŢŴġ Ground Low ţŦŦůġŤŰůŤŦŪŷŦťġŢŴġŢġŭŰůŨŪŵŶťŪůŢŭġŦŭŦŮŦůŵġŵũŢŵġţŦŤŰŮŦŴġűŢųŵġŰŧġŵũŦġŨŢųťŦůġŴźŴŵŦŮįġ ŊŵġŪŴġűŶŵġŢŵġŵũŦġŦůťġŰŧġŵũŦġŴűŪůŦġŢŴġţŰŵũġŪťŦŢŭġŢůťġűųŢŤŵŪŤŢŭġŢŪŮġŰŧġŰŶųġŢųŤũŪŵŦŤŵŶųŦįġ ŕũŦġŧŭŰŰųġűŭŢźŴġŸŪŵũġťŪŧŧŦųŦůŵġũŦŪŨũŵŴġŢŴġŢġŮŢŵŦųŪŢŭġŢůťġŴŵŦųŦŰŵŰŮŪŤġŤŰůŵŪůŶŢŵŪŰůġŰŧġ ŵũŦġŴŤŶŭűŵŶųŢŭġŧŭŰŰųġŭŦŷŦŭįġŕũŦġųŰŰŧġŪůŴŵŦŢťġţŦŤŰŮŦŴġŢġŴŰųŵġŰŧġŴũŦŭŵŦųġűŰŴŦťġŶűŰůġŵũŪŴġ ţŢŴŦĻġ ŪŵŴġ ŴũŢűŦġ ŪŴġ ťŦųŪŷŦťġ ŧųŰŮġ ŪůŵŦųůŢŭġ ŴűŢŵŪŢŭġ űųŰţŭŦŮŢŵŪŤŴġ ŢŴġ ŸŦŭŭġ ŢŴġ ŤŭŪŮŢŵŪŤġ ŤŰůťŪŵŪŰůįġŕũŦġŴũŢűŦġţŦŤŰŮŦŴġŢŵġŵũŦġŴŢŮŦġŵŪŮŦġŮŪůŪŮŢŭġŢůťġŪŤŰůŪŤĭġťźůŢŮŪŤġŢŴġŪŵġ Cultivating Dinning ŤũŢůŨŦŴġŧųŰŮġŵũŦġŧųŰůŵġŵŰġŵũŦġţŢŤŬġŨŪŷŪůŨġŵũŦġŢųŤũŪŵŦŤŵŶųŦġŪŵŴġŰŸůġųŦŤŰŨůŪŻŢţŪŭŪŵźġŪůġ ŵũŦġŭŢůťŴŤŢűŦġŰŧġŎŦŮŦġŎŦŢťŰŸŴį

GARDENS

Up

Plant shelters

Viewing

Lateral Sun Shading

Greenhouse Protection

MATERIALS Pallet

River or Sea Stones

250 cm

320 cm

80 cm 80 cm 80 cm

Shelters

Sun Shading

Due to climate changes in the Hokkaido area, gardens may need protections from cold and snow in winter, or sun in summer. Shelters are provided through cheap and easy buildable modular elements.

Supporting Structure and Shading

Fatsia

Japanese

Butterbur

Bracken Fern

Bitter Melon

Soy Beans

Udo

Wasabi

Adzuki


đĎēĊĆėåĊĈĔđĔČĞ đĎēĊĆėåĊĈĔđĔČĞ ÷ ÷ ĎijĹĪķijĦĹĮĴijĦıåĚijĮĻĪķĸĮĹľåĆķĨĭĮĹĪĨĹĺķĦıåĈĴIJĵĪĹĮĹĮĴijå “ēĪĽĹåČĪijĪķĦĹĮĴijåĘĺĸĹĦĮijĦħıĪåčĴĺĸĪåĮijåęĦĮİĮòĈĭĴ”

ĎijĹĪķijĦĹĮĴijĦıåĚijĮĻĪķĸĮĹľåĆķĨĭĮĹĪĨĹĺķĦıåĈĴIJĵĪĹĮĹĮĴijå “ēĪĽĹåČĪijĪķĦĹĮĴijåĘĺĸĹĦĮijĦħıĪåčĴĺĸĪåĮijåęĦĮİĮòĈĭĴ”

ŃŖŊōŅŊŏň ŃŖŊōŅŊŏň

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Cross section

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Plan


Linear ecology

Pavilion


ENVELOPED project for reabilitating an existing cinema Project / Design and Building Technology 2014 TU Delft, the Netherlands

Individual project Role: Design and representation

Pathè Cinema used to be one of the main entertainment venues in the city of Rotterdam. Located in a central area of the city, in the famous Schowburgplein, and just a few steps away from the vital district of Ljinbaan, the cinema was built as one of the symbols of renovation in the area after decades of abandonment. Through time, the surrounding urban environment continues to evolve and reinvent itself, while the cinema remains in its original state. Bad quality of materials and technological solutions are only part of the decay of the cinema. This, toghether with an aesthetic that look old, results in the displacement of the building in a square bustling with activities and full of potential. The proposed intervention focuses technological innovations to empower the building, at the same time providing an alternative image and architectural role in the city. The existing weathered and inefficient polycarbonate sheet membrane is substituted with a new double skin facade: a glazed inner layer with an ETFE (Ethylene tetrafluoroethylene) panel outer layer. The new membrane creates a new image for the cinema both architecturally and spatially. This is in line with the modern experimental ethos of Rotterdam identified by the use of highly technological and transparent materials. At the ground floor, a more welcoming entrance is provided, also with the intent of protecting people from rain and wind. The ETFE panels have LED illumination situated on the interior so that the facade can become an interactive and changing backdrop for the square and its activities. In regards to its building technology, the double skin facade allows the building to save up to 70% of its energy costs. This is the result of the possibility of pre-cooling the air in summer

and pre-heating it in winter. The rain water collected is used to pre-cool the air in the buffer zone as well as for flushing in the toilets. The ETFE panel works as an active sunshading membrane: through the laserprint pattern on the plastic surfaces, it can reflect up to 80% of the sun’s rays, allowing for a direct control of the illumination of the building and its heating.


(AR1A075) (AR1A075) (AR1A075) 2013/14-Q1/2 2013/14-Q1/2 2013/14-Q1/2 (AR1A075) 2013/14-Q1/2

Fig. 1.1 Fig. 1.1 Fig. 1.1 Diagram of Structural Diagram of Layers Structural DiagramL credits: own drawing credits: own drawing credits: o The diagramThe splits diagram the structurale The splitsdiag th desin into three desin steps: into three desin steps: int 1. Primary steel 1. Primary structuresteel made 1.structu Primar of tu lar steel prole; lar steel prole; lar steel 2. Second layer 2. Second with horizontal layer 2. with Secon side h maintenance;maintenance; maintena 3. Final composi� 3. Final on of composi� the structure 3. Final on ofc aluminium frame aluminium for theframe ETFE aluminiu foils. for th

Fig. 1.2 Fig. 1.2 Fig. 1.2 Diagram of Structural Diagram of Layers Structural Diagram - ZoomL 1. Detail of the 1. Detail connec� of on the 1.betwee Detail conne structure column structure and the column can� structure and lever support the ETFE support facade. the ETFE support facadt 2. Detail of the 2. Detail secondary of the frame 2.second Detail str sidewalks for sidewalks maintenance. for maintena sidewalk 3. Detail of the 3. connec� Detail ofon theof 3.connec Detail the al for ETFE and the for ETFE structure. and the forstruct ETFE

a. loadbearing structure

b. secondary structure for

Working on an existing building, the project acts as an addition on a present organism. Different layers ensure feasability and technical performances. A new buffer zone is created for climate control and energy efficiency. At the same time a new architectural image is created in response to the modern and evolving environment of Rotterdam.

Fig. 1.1

Fig. 1.1

Fig. 1.2

Fig. 1.2

Fig. 1.2

c. ETFE diagonal frame

Fig. 2.1 Fig. 2.1 Fig. 2.1 Assembling ofAssembling the Facade: ofAssembl Construc the Faca velope velope velope credits: own drawing credits: own drawing credits: o Axonometric Axonometric exploded of the exploded Axonome differe layers of the ETFE layersenvelope. of the ETFE layers enve of The primary steel The primary structuresteel is The made struc primo can�lever for can� hanging leversidewalks. for hanging can�leves The inner partThe of the inner double partThe of skin the inne fac d in glass, with in a curtain glass, with wall.aincurtain glass, On the steel can� On the lever steel is hang can� On lever an theals on which the on ETFE which sheets thecan ETFE onbe which shee mo ETFE foils represents ETFE foils therepresents outer ETFElayer foil th it creates theit middle createsbuff theeritmiddle zone, createh proper�es, and proper� therees, areand photovolta proper� there ae on it. on it. on it.

stabilization and maintenance

Layers

Fig. 1.1

Fig. 2.1

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Fig. 3.1 Fig. 3.1 Fig. 3.1 Climate Concept: Climate Summer Concept: Climate Sum credits: own drawings credits: own drawings credits: o During summer During the summer air ows During the intoaist through metal through tubes inside metalthrough water tubes in p is collected when is collected it rains,when and is collect from it rai stored in the stored basemente).In in the basemen stored this wa in down and with down a ven� andla� with ondown system a ven� anl Fig. 2.1the foyer andthe thefoyer auditorium. and the the In foye aud th outer temperature outer of temperature 28-30,outer the of insid tem 2 is about 18-20is degrees. about 18-20isdegrees about Fig. 3.2

Fig. 3.2

Fig. 3.2


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DelŌ DelŌ Seminars Seminars on on Building Building Technology Technology (AR1A075) (AR1A075)2013/14-Q1/2 2013/14-Q1/2 DelŌ Seminars on Building Technology (AR1A075) 2013/14-Q1/2

Andrea AndreaMigoƩ MigoƩoo--4317025 4317025

The TheenergeƟ energeƟcal calpossibiliƟ possibiliƟes esof ofan an“enveloped” “enveloped”building building--Project Project Andrea MigoƩo - 4317025

The energeƟcal possibiliƟes of an “enveloped” building - Project

Andrea MigoƩo - 4317025 The energeƟcal possibiliƟes of an “enveloped” building - Project on Pathè Cinema, RoƩerdam

Building technology ETFE technology allows for light control in the building. The buffer zone provides a tool for energy efficiency and climate control. A glazed ground floor allows for direct access to the foyer and the main projection rooms.

Detail #1

Detail #2

Detail #3

Cross section, plan and facade


g - Project on Pathè Cinema, RoƩerdam

Horizontal section


P AV I L I O N project for an art gallery Project / Design and Building Technology 2013 Politecnico di Milano, Milano

Group project, team: Andrea Migotto and Francesco Colosimo Role: Design and representation

The brief for this project is the renovation of a given small art pavilion and its surrounding garden. The design is based on revising the plan (redistributing spaces for services, reception, a bookshop and an exposition gallery) and on defining the technical solutions and materiality that are used in the construction. Working with a sloping site, the service areas such as toilets are located in the underground area where natural light is not required. An elevator and a bookshelf separate the space into three rooms: the first is dedicated to reception activities, the second is a double height permanent exhibition room and the third houses a bookshop as well as a space for temporary activities. The proposed design is simple and pure, made with two materials (COR-TEN steel and white-washed concrete) to emphasize the simplicity of the program. The use of material determines the colour of the design: the red COR-TEN steel of the pavillion contrast with the pale, white washed, concrete of the external space. The pavilion is constructed through dry technologies, such as steel floors and cladded insulated exterior walls. This allows the structure to remain light and cheap, whilst opening up the ground floor. The entrance area outside also acts as a space for temporary exhibition with a resting garden on the side. This area is paved with precast concrete pavers, while the garden is lined with wooden planks and gravel surrounding two sloping water features.

Night illumination is carefully placed on the external walls, on the ground in between the concrete pavers and also in the water features. On the ground floor, the COR-TEN panels tilt up, allowing the outdoors to spill indoors, blurring the distinction between the outside and the inside. The tilted up panels also create sunshaded areas.


Site plan

Entrance A small space with concrete floor is framed by the main entrance of the gallery. The side garden is a sculpture garden with lights and water.


L

E

D

B

C

A

I

I 370

258

70 210

POLITECNICO

Facoltà di Architettu Corso di Architettura del a.a. 2011

165

70 210

70 210

70 210

244

320

120

110 210

70 210

70 210

237

G

120

557 80 210

123 345

Laboratorio di P dell'Archit

Locale tecnico

130

437

860

Prof. Stefano Guidari Fabio Maroldi, P

Insegnam

Architettur

Prof. Stefan Arch: Cristin

90 200 810

PRIMA ESER

917

Ridisegno di edificio

790

RILIEVO GEO RAPPRESEN DEGLI EL ARCHITE

F

Brusa

180 200

547

450

100

1400

180 200

180 200

7621

Colosimo F

7613

602

Andrea M

7630

100

N

647

1296

PLANIMETRIA Piano T

SCALA

H

L

Ground floor plan

Section through the gallery

E

D

C

B

A

H

ES


L

E

D

B

C

A

I

I

POLITECNICO

Facoltà di Architettu Corso di Architettura del a.a. 2011

596

917

124

234

G

Laboratorio di P dell'Archit

483

100 210

122

501

550

Prof. Stefano Guidari Fabio Maroldi, P

618

Insegnam

290

Architettur

870

140 293

Prof. Stefan Arch: Cristin

454

PRIMA ESER Ridisegno di edificio

RILIEVO GEO RAPPRESEN DEGLI EL ARCHITE

501

F

Brusa

7621

Colosimo F

7613

Andrea M

601

1390

7630

124

N

PLANIMETRIA Piano P

SCALA

H

L

E

D

C

B

A

H Upper floor plan

ES

P

Faco

+9.85m

+7.70m

Lab

Prof. S F

A

+4.00m

PRIM

Ridise

RILIE RA D

0.00m

C

Cross section through the gallery


Written and designed by Andrea Migotto 2016


Andrea Migotto_Portfolio 2016