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WAYK2 World CafĂŠ Facilitator Handbook

CITY OF KITCHENER 2010 Prepared by Andrea MacArthur and Sue Weare


Table of Contents WELCOME TO THE CONVERSATION! ...................................................................................... 3 WHY WE’RE HERE ........................................................................................................... 3 THE ENVIRONICS SURVEY ............................................................................................................... 3 RESULTS OF THE 2009 ENVIRONICS SURVEY ......................................................................................... 3 WHO-ARE-YOU-KITCHENER? 2 ...................................................................................................... 4

THE WORLD CAFÉS .......................................................................................................... 5 WHAT IS A WORLD CAFÉ? .............................................................................................................. 5 WORLD CAFÉ GUIDELINES ............................................................................................................. 7

WAYK2 WORLD CAFÉ WALKTHROUGH ............................................................................... 7 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................... 7 CONVERSATION #1 ...................................................................................................................... 7 CONVERSATIONS #2-6 .................................................................................................................. 7 CLOSURE .................................................................................................................................. 8

TOUCHING UP OUR FACILITATION SKILLS .............................................................................. 8 FACILITATING DISCUSSIONS ............................................................................................................ 8 ASKING GOOD QUESTIONS ........................................................................................................... 10 GROUP DYNAMICS & PROBLEM-SOLVING .......................................................................................... 11 INCLUSION AND ACCESSIBILITY ...................................................................................................... 12

APPENDIX A: WAYK2 QUESTIONS .......................................................................................13 APPENDIX B: QUESTIONS FOR ALL SEASONS ............................................................................15

THE MATERIAL IN THIS HANDBOOK HAS BEEN ADAPTED FROM THE FOLLOWING SOURCES: “WHO ARE YOU KITCHENER?: A CITIZEN’S WORKBOOK 2010” (© 2010 THE CITY OF KITCHENER – WWW.WHO-ARE-YOU.KITCHENER.CA) “CAFÉ TO GO: A QUICK REFERENCE GUIDE TO PUTTING CONVERSATIONS TO WORK” (© 2008 THE WORLD CAFÉ – WWW.THEWORLDCAFE.COM) "THE ART OF POWERFUL QUESTIONS: CATALYZING INSIGHT, INNOVATION AND ACTION” (© 2003 ERIC E. VOGT, JUANITA BROWN, AND DAVID ISSACS – WWW.THEWORLDCAFE.COM/HOSTING.HTM) ALL GRAPHICS © 2010 NANCY MARGULIES

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WAYK2 World Café Facilitator Handbook Welcome to the Conversation! This handbook is designed to help Who-Are-You-Kitchener? (WAYK2) volunteers prepare for their roles as Table Hosts for the 2010 World Cafés.

Why We’re Here The Environics Survey In late 2009, Compass Kitchener worked with city staff and Environics Research Group to conduct an extensive survey of local residents. The results were benchmarked against the results of a similar survey done in 2005 to determine whether citizen satisfaction in regards to city government and city services had improved over this term of Council. As in 2005, the results of the 2009 Environics survey are the springboard for WAYK 2 – for asking more questions, clarifying survey results and probing deeper into the community priorities and the work that citizens see as important to the city’s future.

Results of the 2009 Environics Survey A number of general themes emerged from the 2009 Environics Survey: • • •

Kitchener residents are largely satisfied with the strategic direction of the city and with the services provided by their municipal government. Citizens’ vision for the future of Kitchener remains the same as it was in 2006 Residents continue to support the six community priorities identified in 2006 – with highest priority given to managing growth, improving quality of life and protecting the environment.

Leadership and Community Development o o o

84% indicated that they “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the City of Kitchener government overall, and 81% indicated that they think the City of Kitchener is heading in the right direction 62% indicated that they are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with public participation in planning and development 60% indicated that they are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with opportunities for citizens to participate in city/community decision-making

Downtown 50% indicated that building a vital and lively downtown is a high priority 59% indicated that they are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the planning and development of downtown Kitchener o 64% indicated that they feel “somewhat unsafe” or “very unsafe” alone downtown after dark

o o

Development o o

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76% indicated that carefully planning neighbourhoods and managing growth are high priorities 72% indicated that in 20 years, they want Kitchener to be a community with a “small city Ontario” feel


o o o

69% are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the planning and development of the City as a whole 30% indicated that traffic control, roads and highways will become important issues over the next 20 years 56% indicated that in 20 years, they want Kitchener to be much the same as it is now

Quality of Life o o o

70% indicated that improving the quality of life in Kitchener is a high priority 90% said that in 20 years, they would like Kitchener to be known for its volunteering and having citizens involved in community activities 66% also said that in 20 years, they would like Kitchener to be known as a community that provides its residents with the greatest number and the highest quality of local services, despite a higher level of taxes than those found in the surrounding municipalities

Diversity 86% indicated that they would like to spend the same amount of money or more on initiatives to increase accessibility such as curb cuts, greater wheelchair access, and automatic doors o 80% were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the accessibility of the City of Kitchener services o 67% were “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the availability of services for new Canadians Kitchener’s “diverse community” was listed as one of the things that people like the most about the city, and was one of the highest ranked reasons why people chose to stay here o 58% indicated that in 20 years, they want Kitchener to be a diverse city in which many different people are encouraged to retain their different cultures, lifestyles, etc. o

The Environment o o o o

71% indicated that protecting the environment and improving sustainability are high priorities 63% indicated that they are “very satisfied” or “somewhat satisfied” with the city’s performance in reducing environmental impacts 40% indicated the City of Kitchener should spend more on walking and bike trails 36% indicated that the City of Kitchener should spend more on parks, playgrounds and natural areas

Who Are You Kitchener? 2 More than 2,000 residents participated in the first-ever Who-are-you-Kitchener? community engagement campaign in 2006. That first campaign – one of the largest grassroots community consultations in the city’s history – was instrumental in developing a shared vision and shared community priorities for the future of our city. Today, that vision and those community priorities are at the heart of the City of Kitchener Strategic Plan – the single, comprehensive framework that directs the work and spending of city government and ensures that we are delivering key results in areas that citizens believe are critical to our city’s health and vitality. Designed and implemented by Compass Kitchener, the purpose of the second Who-are-you-Kitchener? (WAYK2) community engagement campaign is to: • • • • •

Validate the community’s vision and priorities identified in the 2006 Who-are-you-Kitchener? campaign Measure public support for the current strategic direction of the City of Kitchener Identify and explore any new issues or priorities Re-measure citizen satisfaction levels with city services Assist a newly elected Council with setting its shared agenda for the next four years.

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The World Cafés The World Cafés are one of the ways Compass Kitchener will collect comments from residents for the WAYK2 community consultation. Through the World Cafés, we will delve deeper into the Environics survey results and hear from even more residents. The purpose is to help citizens join the dialogue and let their voices be heard. Compass Kitchener will compile all of the feedback and summarize it into a report for Kitchener City Council in June 2010.

What is a World Café? World cafés are an easy-to-use method for creating a living network of conversation around questions that matter in the service of real work. A café conversation is a creative process for leading collaborative dialogue, sharing knowledge, making more intelligent decisions, and creating possibilities for action. This process is built on the assumption that people already have within them the wisdom and creativity to confront even the most difficult challenges. Given the appropriate context and focus, it is possible to access and use this deeper knowledge about what’s important. There are seven important guidelines informing the World Café format:

Set the Context Pay attention early to the reason you are bringing people together. Knowing the purpose of your meeting enables you to consider which participants need to be there and what parameters are important to achieve your purpose.

Create a Hospitable Space Café hosts around the world emphasize the power and importance of creating a hospitable space—one that feels safe and inviting. When people feel comfortable to be themselves, they do their most creative thinking, speaking, and listening. In particular, consider how your invitation and your physical set-up contribute to creating a welcoming atmosphere.

Explore Questions that Matter Finding and framing questions that matter to those who are participating in your Café is an area where thought and attention can produce profound results. Your Café may only explore a single question, or several questions may be

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developed to support a logical progression of discovery throughout several rounds of dialogue. In many cases, Café conversations are as much about discovering and exploring powerful questions as they are about finding effective solutions.

Encourage Everyone's Contribution As leaders we are increasingly aware of the importance of participation, but most people don’t only want to participate, they want to actively contribute to making a difference. It is important to encourage everyone in your meeting to contribute their ideas and perspectives, while also allowing anyone who wants to participate by simply listening to do so.

Connect Diverse Perspectiv es The opportunity to move between tables, meet new people, actively contribute your thinking, and link the essence of your discoveries to ever-widening circles of thought is one of the distinguishing characteristics of the Café. As participants carry key ideas or themes to new tables, they exchange perspectives, greatly enriching the possibility for surprising new insights.

Listen for Insights and Share Discoveries Through practicing shared listening and paying attention to themes, patterns and insights, we begin to sense a connection to the larger whole. After several rounds of conversation, it is helpful to engage in a whole group conversation. This offers the entire group an opportunity to connect the overall themes or questions that are now present.

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World Café Guidelines FOCUS ON WHAT MATTERS ♦ CONTRIBUTE YOUR THINKING ♦ SPEAK YOUR MIND AND HEART LISTEN TO UNDERSTAND ♦ LINK AND CONNECT IDEAS ♦ LISTEN TOGETHER FOR INSIGHTS AND DEEPER QUESTIONS PLAY, DOODLE, DRAW, WRITE ♦ HAVE FUN!

WAYK2 World Café Walkthrough Introduction • • •

Jasminder is attending a World Café! She signs in and sticks on a name tag, then grabs a coffee and sits down at the table of her choosing. There she meets Alex, Sung-Li and Ella, as well as the table’s facilitator. The World Café host takes the microphone and, with the aid of a short (5 min) PowerPoint presentation, introduces everyone to the World Café process, to the Environics findings and the WAYK2 process, as well as mentions some guidelines for effective participation. The host announces the start of the first conversation, which will last 20 minutes.

Conversation #1 •

To get the conversation started, the table host asks the participants an open-ended question.

The table host writes down key points on separate index cards, taking care to check in with the speakers and make sure they have been understood. The participants themselves are also welcome to jot down or even doodle their ideas on index cards.

The table host keeps the conversation going, encouraging everyone to participate, and asking additional questions to spur discussion.

Eventually, the host announces that there is only 5 minutes left. The table host reads off each of the index cards to the group, and gives everyone one last chance to put a word in and/or to clarify their point(s). At the end of the 5 minutes, the host invites people to move on to another table of their choice.

Conversations #2 - 6 • •

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Once everyone is settled, the host announces the beginning of the next round, which will last only 15 minutes this time. The table host welcomes the new participants and begins by sharing the essence of the conversation so far. They also read off some of the index cards collected from the previous group and lay the cards on the table so that everyone can see them. The table host asks the participants whether they would like to comment on any of those index cards. Do they agree? Disagree? Have a different perspective entirely? The table host may also ask additional questions to encourage discussion on the topic. The rest of the process is the same as in the first discussion.


Closure •

Once everyone has visited all 6 of the tables, the host takes the microphone again and thanks everyone for participating.

The host invites people to stay longer, if they wish, to have more treats and/or revisit any of the tables to provide additional feedback.

Touching Up Our Facilitation Skills Facilitating Discussions Here is a quick overview of some techniques you could use to encourage participation and facilitate discussions at your tables. These are only suggestions; you are not expected to use all of these skills. Active Agreement • •

A useful ground rule, in which everyone agrees to take an active part in making decisions. When the group is asked a question or has to make a decision, the facilitator must insist on active agreement. Too many bad decisions are made because people stare at their feet rather than clearly agree or disagree. Later on those same people may feel that the decision was not one they supported, leading to tension in the group. By insisting on active dis/agreement this can be avoided and decisions that represent the views of all can be reached.

Active Listening (or "think and listen") •

A technique for developing ideas and boosting confidence.

People pair up and speak to each other, uninterrupted, for anything from 30 seconds to 5 minutes depending on the issue being discussed. They then swap.

It's important that the listener makes a real effort to listen, including keeping good eye contact and remaining attentive! Each pair can then feed back their opinions to the whole group.

Brainstorming •

In which people shout out ideas without fear of comment or criticism - an excellent way to get the creative juices flowing.

Check with the Group • •

Regularly find out how group members are feeling, whether they need a break, want the agenda modified, and/or are happy with the decisions being made. After all, you are there to serve the group, and it encourages a sense of ownership.

Consensus Techniques • •

Perhaps the ultimate group tool, consensus decision making is a process that enshrines all the values of a well facilitated group, and attempts to reach decisions that the whole group can actively support. With consensus, everyone can support the group solution as the best one possible – “I can live with this decision”. People’s different viewpoints are carefully listened to and understood.

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An individual can choose to stand aside to allow the group consensus to move ahead. In this situation the person’s reasons for standing aside are noted in the minutes.

GoGo - Rounds •

Where everyone in turn is given the same time to speak uninterrupted and without comment or criticism.

Groundrules • • •

A set of basic rules about how the meeting should run, agreed by the group at the start of the meeting. For example "no interrupting", or "show respect for each other's opinions". The facilitator can then say "we agreed that we wouldn't interrupt each other - is everyone still happy that we try to abide by that rule?" instead of barking "stop interrupting!” Groundrules are adopted by the group, and can be revised at any time. Groups can tailor groundrules to solve obvious problems - so a "stick to time" rule is useful if you often overrun.

Handsignals •

Hand signals eliminate the need to shout or jump in to make your point, and help the facilitator see emerging agreements and common ground. They're a way of communicating without interrupting the flow of the meeting. Three simple signals suffice: 1. Raise a hand or forefinger when you wish to contribute to the discussion. The facilitator can then call on you to speak in turn. 2. If what you have to say is directly relevant to the issue at hand, raise both forefingers. The facilitator can then get you to speak before someone who wants to make a new or separate point. This essentially allows you to jump to the head of the queue, in front of all those people raising just one finger, so don’t abuse it! 3. A third useful signal is "silent applause" - when you hear an opinion with which you agree you can simply wave a hand, or the fingers of one hand. This saves the group a lot of time with people chipping in to say they agree, and lets the facilitator see that a majority of people are/are not sympathetic with a view.

Keeping Kee ping a Speakers List (or "stacking") •

The facilitator notes down people's names as they raise a finger to show they want to speak, then invites them to speak in that order. The group will soon become impatient with people that ignore this protocol and just barge in and interrupt.

Other M eeting R oles (consider these when you have extra facilitators) •

You can separate some of the facilitator's tasks off into separate roles, for support and to make your task easier! For example:

• •

Recorder/Notetaker takes down the key decisions, who's going to do what, and by when. Timekeeper keeps an eye on the clock and points out when the allotted time for an agenda item is running out. Doorkeeper meets and greets people on the way in, and checks they know the purpose and process of the meeting. Especially important for making new people feel welcome, and bringing latecomers up to speed without interrupting the meeting.

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Vibeswatcher watches the vibe of the meeting to note tension rising, lack of focus, flagging energy etc. By suggesting times for breaks, games, adjournments, a vibeswatcher can help prevent conflict or boredom. They can also make sure the group pushes on when things are going well. Most essential in larger groups. Co-facilitator someone to step in and facilitate if the facilitator is flagging, or wants to join in the discussion on an issue.

Reframing • • •

Another key listening skill that helps show people that they have been listened to. It means listening carefully to what someone says, then repeating it back succinctly in your own words, to check that you have understood their point. It's a useful tool for clarifying and moving forward discussion. Make sure you personalize your statements "it sounds to me like what you're saying is…"

Talking Sticks/Matchsticks •

There are a number of tools that limit the number of times any one person can contribute to the discussion, which allows everyone an even space to talk and be heard. You might not use these techniques in a normal meeting, but they are useful to examine your group dynamic, or to address problems with it out in the open.

In the talking stick or conch shell exercise, an object is placed in the middle of the group. Speakers take the item from the centre, say their piece and return it to the middle. Only the person holding the object is permitted to speak (you can set a time limit if necessary). The next speaker takes the item and so on. This gives everyone the space to talk uninterrupted, and forces the rest of the group to listen.

Throw it Back to the Group •

Your key asset as a facilitator is the group you are working with. If you ever find yourself stuck for an idea on how to move things on, ask the group. Never pretend you have the answer when you don’t - it's vital you retain the trust of the group.

Yes/And Conversations • • •

Yes/And is an exercise used to teach people how to listen and use what the previous speaker said. For example, if someone says “The store was across the street”, the next person can say :Yes, and the street was so wide you could hardly see the store”. People find this very challenging because you can't be thinking of your agenda if you are going to use what the previous person said. It’s used to move people away from Yes/But comments.

A sking Good Questions In World Café, the formulation of powerful questions is a fundamental art and skill. Questions like "What's important to you about this situation, and why do you care?" and "What are we not seeing (or talking about) that is vital to our progress?" can open up new possibilities and energy. A powerful question: • • • • • •

Is simple and clear Is thought provoking Generates energy Focuses inquiry Surfaces unconscious assumptions Opens new possibilities

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How C an I F rame B etter Q uestions? Here are some questions you might ask yourself as you begin to explore the art and architecture of powerful questions. They are based on pioneering work with questions being done by the Public Conversations Project, a group that helps create constructive dialogue on divisive public issues. • Is this question relevant to the real life and real work of the people who will be exploring it? • Is this a genuine question—a question to which I/we really don’t know the answer? •

What “work” do I want this question to do? That is, what kind of conversation, meanings, and feelings do I imagine this question will evoke in those who will be exploring it?

Is this question likely to invite fresh thinking/ feeling? Is it familiar enough to be recognizable and relevant— and different enough to call forward a new response? What assumptions or beliefs are embedded in the way this question is constructed? Is this question likely to generate hope, imagination, engagement, creative action, and new possibilities or is it likely to increase a focus on past problems and obstacles? Does this question leave room for new and different questions to be raised as the initial question is explored?

• • •

NOTE: In Appendix B, there are several examples of specific questions you might find useful in facilitating discussions at your table. Group Dynamics and Problem Solving There are many different models and techniques for resolving conflict situations in a group. Most of these techniques use the basic steps below:

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Accept conflict as natural. Don't be afraid of it. When conflict occurs in your group, treat it as an opportunity to examine the issues involved in-depth and to learn more about the underlying values and assumptions they hold.

Bring hidden conflicts into the open. If you think there is a conflict hidden under the surface that is disrupting the group bring it out at an appropriate time.

Disagree with ideas, not people. No matter how tense a conflict becomes, do not allow a disagreement over ideas, beliefs, procedures or plans to turn into a personal attack against another person.

When defining the problem, always define it as shared. It is the entire group's problem and the responsibility to resolve the problem is shared.

When a problem is apparent between two people, get the viewpoints from others and move away from the two antagonists. For example, "we seem to have a difference of opinion here - are there other points of view?" Sometimes that can move the discussion forward.

If the two antagonists are unable to move forward try to involve the two parties in finding common ground with each other. e.g. "what do you like about Elaine's suggestion?" Often summarizing the two points of view in a non-inflammatory manner can allow people to calm down and think about the ideas.


Try to reach consensus, but if it isn't possible, summarize points of disagreement, check them with the group and move forward.

Sometimes it helps to leave the contentious issue and come back to it later. Re-phrase the problem when bringing it back to the group. Encourage the entire group to participate in the discussion.

Inclusion and Access Acces s ibility General Guidelines o o o o o o o

Facilitators may need to help some participants (e.g., to move furniture out of the way, or to move to the next table). Please offer assistance when you think it would be welcome. To offer assistance, be sure to ask IF someone needs help and HOW you can help; do not make assumptions. If someone has an assistant/interpreter with them, always talk to the person with the disability, not their assistant/interpreter. Remember not to pet service animals – they are working. Do not move or touch someone’s wheelchair/assistive device without their consent. Do not shout at persons who are hard of hearing or deaf. Some people take longer to express and process ideas than others; give them time to respond at their own pace.

Low Vision and Blind Participants o o

When you have a participant who is low vision or blind, ask all participants at the table to identify themselves each time they speak. How to guide a person who is low-vision or blind: • Introduce yourself and ask if they would like some help. • If the answer is yes, touch your hand to the back of their hand as a signal for them to take your arm. Offer your elbow, not your hand. • •

As you walk, describe what is around you and move at a pace they can keep up with. To guide them to sit down, describe where the chair is and ask to place their hand on the chair. Let them seat themselves. Be sure to tell them which table they are now seated at and introduce them to the new facilitator. Let them know when you are leaving.

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Appendix A: WAYK2 Questions Leadership and Community Development o In the Environics survey, Kitchener residents indicated that their satisfaction with public participation in planning and development has increased, but there is still room for us to improve. How can the City make it easier for you to become more involved in municipal planning and development issues and decisions? What kinds of opportunities or feedback methods would you use? o What is the catalyst for young people to truly get involved in leadership opportunities in their community? How can the City and community ensure young people are involved in decision-making? o What would be one or two changes that could happen in our community that would make it easier for you to volunteer? What types of support or investment should the City provide for volunteerism? Downtown o What area of the city do you currently live in? How often do you go downtown? What types of things would attract you to spend more time in downtown Kitchener than you currently do? o In the Environics survey, residents told us that although there has been some improvement regarding safety in downtown Kitchener, they still have concerns in this area. What kinds of things could we do or change that would make you feel safer and more welcome downtown? o In the Environics survey, some residents indicated that their satisfaction with The Kitchener Market had decreased. What do you think needs to change about the Market? How can we improve? Development o Kitchener has to plan to accommodate a growing population. This means there will be more apartments, townhouses and offices in areas supported by transit. How do you usually find out about these kinds of City of Kitchener planning and development initiatives? How can we better inform you about the decisions that are being made about your community? o In the Environics survey, some residents said they want Kitchener to have a small town Ontario feel, while others said they want it to have a big city atmosphere. In reality, this is not an either-or proposition; with careful planning, Kitchener can have a balance of both. What features of big city life, if any, would you like to see in Kitchener? What features of small city life, if any, would you like to see? o The City of Kitchener is reshaping its economic landscape in response to the larger world picture climate change, creative city movements, demographic shifts and so on. At present, our economic development plan is focusing on 6 specific areas: (1) ensuring that the local economy supports a wide range of business and industry, (2) supporting local manufacturers so that they can compete and be successful, (3) developing - and holding on to - a talented workforce, (4) revitalizing our downtown, (5) putting contaminated lands back to work, and (6) growing small businesses. Are we on the right track? Have we missed something? How might we priorize our work in this area?

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Qu ality of Life o What is the one thing you would like decision-makers to keep in mind so that their decisions don't negatively impact the quality of life in Kitchener? o How do you find out about what is happening in the community (e.g., programs, services, events)? o When you have free time available, what do you wish was available here for you to do that you have been unable to find? What role do you think the City of Kitchener should play in making this available? Diversity o How can we foster, support and celebrate Kitchener’s diversity such that all citizens are included and active participants in the community? o There are some groups of people that are often excluded from traditional public engagement opportunities such as public meetings. How can we engage the diverse populations in our community and ensure that everyone has a voice? How can we reach all individuals in our community? o What would it take for Kitchener to be voted the most accessible and inclusive City? How can we provide services in a way that respects diversity but also doesn't create segregation in programming? The Environment o How can the City support you in changing your lifestyle to (1) rely less on cars, (2) reduce energy consumption, and (3) create less waste? o What can the City do to help you "get outside" and participate in local environmental projects such as restoring streams and natural habitat, monitoring natural areas or tree planting? o What would you tell decision makers is the most pressing environmental priority?

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Appendix B: Questions for All Seasons Here is a series of generative questions that can be useful to stimulate new knowledge and creative thinking in a wide variety of situations. Look at these questions to stimulate your own thinking about questions related to the City of Kitchener and your specific table topic. Play. Use your imagination. Questions Ques tions for Focusing Collective Attention on Your Situation • What question, if answered, could make the most difference to the future of (your specific situation)? • What’s important to you about (your specific situation) and why do you care? • What draws you/us to this inquiry? • What’s the deeper purpose (the big “why”) that is really worthy of our best effort? • What opportunities can you see in (your specific situation)? • What do we know so far/still need to learn about (your specific situation)? • What are the dilemmas/opportunities in (your specific situation)? • What assumptions do we need to test or challenge here in thinking about (your specific situation)? • What would someone who had a very different set of beliefs than we do say about (your specific situation)? Questions for Connecting Ideas and Finding Deeper Insight • What’s taking shape? What are you hearing underneath the variety of opinions being expressed? • What’s in the center of the table? • What’s emerging here for you? What new connections are you making? • What had real meaning for you from what you’ve heard? What surprised you? What challenged you? • What’s missing from this picture so far? What is it we’re not seeing? What do we need more clarity about? • What’s been your/our major learning, insight, or discover so far? • What’s the next level of thinking we need to do? • If there was one thing that hasn’t yet been said in order to reach a deeper level of understanding/clarity, what would that be? Questions That Create Forward Movement • What would it take to create change on this issue? • What could happen that would enable you/us to feel fully engaged and energized about (your specific situation)? • What’s possible here and who cares? (rather than “What’s wrong here and who’s responsible?”) • What needs our immediate attention going forward? • If our success was completely guaranteed, what bold steps might we choose? • How can we support each other in taking the next steps? What unique contribution can we each make? • What challenges might come our way and how might we meet them? • What conversation, if begun today, could ripple out in a way that created new possibilities for the future of (your situation)? • What seed might we plant together today that could make the most difference to the future of (your situation)?

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Facilitator Handbook: Who Are You Kitchener 2  

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