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Contents 7

Introduction

13

Colour

27

Format

37

Stock

49

Processes

67

Preparations

81

Proofing

89

Finishes

101 Tips & Tricks


Introducing the World of Commercial Print


8


Introduction to Designing for Print

9


Breakdown of the Print Process

10


11


Colour For Print


14


Introducing Colour For Print

15


RGB vs. CMYK Colour Models RGB - Red, Green, Blue

Additive Colour Additive color describes the situation where color is created by mixing the visible light emitted from differently colored light sources. In additive color models such as RGB, white is the “additive� combination of all primary colored lights, while black is the absence of light. Computer monitors and televisions are the most common form of additive light, and he additive reproduction process usually uses red, green and blue light to produce the other colours. Combining one of these additive primary colors with another in equal amounts produces the additive secondary colors cyan, magenta, and yellow. The colored pixels in displays do not overlap on the screen, but when viewed from a sufficient distance, the light from the pixels diffuses to overlap on the retina.

16


CMYK - Cyan, Magenta,Yellow, Key

Subtractive Colour A subtractive color model explains the mixing of paints, dyes, inks, and natural colorants to create a full range of colors, each caused by subtracting (that is, absorbing) some wavelengths of light and reflecting the others. The color that a surface displays depends on which colors of the electromagnetic spectrum are reflected by it and therefore made visible. Subtractive color systems start with light, presumably white light. Colored inks, paints, or filters between the viewer and the light source or reflective surface subtract wavelengths from the light, giving it color. If the incident light is other than white, our visual mechanisms are able to compensate well, but not perfectly, often giving a flawed impression of the “true� color of the surface.

17


Colour Separations

18


19


Spot Colours In offset printing, a spot color is any color generated by an ink (pure or mixed) that is printed using a single run. Generally the cost and potential for problems for a print job increase as one adds more spot colors, due to the increased cost and complexity of added process inks and films, and requiring more runs per finished print.

20


Pantone

21


Pantone

22


Hexachrome

23


Image Manipulations for Print

24


25


Formats For Print


28


Paper - A Brief History

29


ISO Paper Sizes

30


A Sizes

31


B Sizes

32


C Sizes

33


Newspaper Sizes and Formats

34


Envelope Sizes and Formats

Book Sizes and Formats

35


Stock For Print


38


Introduction to Stock

39


Weights of Stock

40


41


Finishes of Stock

42


43


Stocks for Different Dimensions

44


45


Paper vs. Non Paper Based Stocks

46


47


Print Processes


50


Introduction to Print Processes

51


Screen Printing and Traditional Methods of Printing

52


53


Offset Lithographic Printing

54


Flexographic Printing

55


Rotogravure Printing

56


Six Colour Printing

57


Pad Printing

58


Digital Printing

59


Embossing and Debossing

60


61


Letterpress

62


63


Preparations - Setting Work Up For Print


66


Introduction to Preparing Work for Commercial Printing

67


Adobe Photoshop

68


69


Adobe Illustrator

70


71


Adobe InDesign

72


73


File Saving

74


75


Setting Up A Document

Layouts and Grids

76


Bleeds and Printers Marks

77


Magic Numbers

78


Pagination

79


Before Printing Proofing


82


The Importance of Proofing Work Before Printing

83


Proofing Work and Pre-Flight Checks

84


85


Check Lists

86


87


Finishings


Paper Folding Techniques

90


91


Book Binding Techniques

92


93


Foil Blocking

94


Die Cutting

95


Other Finishes

96


97


Tips and Tricks For Graphic Designers


100


How to make life easier for yourself as a graphic designer...

101


Costing and Quotes

102


Contacting Printers

103


Collecting Stock and Printing Samples

104


105


‘10 Things Clients Wish Designers Would Do...’ 1 Listen to what a client wants and then make helpful suggestions 2 Think commercially rather than just feeding your creative ego 3 Don’t design things that can’t be changed and adapted at a later date without causing unnecessary cost. 4 Check you have done all of the revisions, clients don’t like doing (or paying) for revisions that are not done. 5 Keep within budget, no matter how great the idea is, if it costs a fortune to produce it becomes worthless.

106


6 Build in contingency plans so that you are able to stick to the deadline. 7 Clients don’t like nasty surprises, especially on invoices. 8 Ask questions if you don’t understand, don’t make assumptions. 9 Make an effort to understand the culture of the client’s company and the market they aim to communicate with. 10 Involve clients in the design process.

By Bee de Soto

107


Notes

108


Notes

109



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