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msa M Arch

atelier qed 2016 - 2017


qed members Atelier tutors Colin Pugh Siobhan Barry Matt Ault

M Arch 1 Adriann Jeevananthan / Alex Macbeth / Anita Olaye-Felix / Arnaud Rossi / Charlotte Mercan / Connor Templeman / Georgia Kritioti / Haseef Rafiei / Ioana Andrada Calin / James Killeavy / Jia Ai Siaw / Jialing Shi / Ka-Ho Fu/ Nur Fazuin Binti Ramli /Katherine Kann / Mohand Boussaid / Sofia Jassim / Stephen Sullivan / William Davidson / Wu Junru

M Arch 2 Shahrukh Ahmed Sheikh / Shengxin Justin Chong / Danson Wei Ee Choo / Florence CookeSteed / Chris Doherty / Arron El-Ammar / Dominic Garret / Harry Harrison / Jessie Yang Hu / See Sern Khor / Nuoya Liu / Ashlin Milton /Panayiotis Paschalis / Panikos Pittakas / Oliver Pozegic / Polys Christofi / Enran Zhang / Christopher Hau Wai Lung/ Sam Bennington


Contents Atelier qed Atelier qed Collaborators qed Members 2016-2017 M Arch 1 March Y1

Metals in Construction Venice Study Trip London Study Trip Biomimicry Workshop Biomimicry Competition Cuba Winterschool Severfield Site Visit Evolo Competition Cybernetics Competition

M Arch 2 qed: air Cornwall Study Trip qed: water qed: land


atelier qed Civilization is intrinsically rooted in the built environment, the development of science and technology and related societal organisation. Architecture reflects human aspiration and embodies our relationship with the worlds we know and imagine. The contemporary epoch is characterised by the development of a more profound understanding of how the human species affects the global ecosystem of which it is an integral part. This emergent field of knowledge is informed by the increasing capacity and sophistication of computational processing that enables complex models to be developed that simulate our existence and cultural operation. This evolution is beginning to affect the way we both understand space and anticipate architecture by informing the concept of developing urbanism and the capacity of our world to support civilized cultures in perpetuity. We are poised on a threshold where systematic and holistic ecological models will promote a paradigm shift in the concept of development as it is applied to operations that take place in, on, over or under land. The atelier is concerned with the operation of buildings over time and as a result promotes simulation as a point of departure for conceptual thinking and a methodology for presenting the flow of design construction, use and adaptation. Rethinking the ecology of building and landscape use and the instrumental competence of materials, construction and environmental systems in an increasingly urban world is a critical aspect of the unit agenda. Understanding the concept of ecology promotes the development of strategic attitudes to sustainability and ecologically viable approaches to building design, use and adaptation that meet the challenges or exceed the expectation of aspirations for our relationship with the environment in a global ecology. qed has successfully employed international competitions (for teams and individual students) as an embedded part of our learning culture to measure the acuity of our approach within a global discourse. This method also reinforces excellence in the communication of research led design consistent with the professional aspirations we promote in our students. The outward facing nature of our pedagogy is enhanced through active collaborations with professional practices in architecture and related disciplines characterised by the operation of `open studio` events and specialized studies across the academic year. Students have also been engaged in international workshops including the 4th Caribbean Winter School:Habana, Cuba (organised by Munster School of Architecture) and a collaborative workshop with the University of Nicosia (Cyprus) that explored scenarios for the future of urbanism in Nicosia. Live collaborations were initiated this year and included a research laboratory project in Montserrat (with atelier ten ) and projections for a campus development in Manchester (with MMU). A `Digital Fabrication` symposium (organized jointly with atelier remap) developed the computational capacity of students through hands on scripting workshops and presentations

qed

‘qoud erat demonstrandum` signals the completion of a proof or argument when what was specified at the outset has been demonstratively restated in the conclusion’


collaborators qed wishes to thank our collaborators and contributors for their valuable support: Venice Study Tour Negozio Olivetti - Elena Borghello, Claudia Busato Palazzo Grassi, Punta della Dogana – Elisabetta Bonomi Aviation Workshop British Council - Grace Bremner, Gwendoline Webber Biennale di Venezia - Francesco Raccaneli Grimshaw Architects - Eduard Ross Biennale di Venezia - Francesco Raccaneli Grimshaw Architects - Eduard Ross Universita degli Studi di Firenze – Maria Antonietta Esposito, Filippo Bosi Digital Design and Fabrication Symposium Pattern Architects – Alexandr Valakh ImaginationLancaster (Lancaster University) – Dr. Daniel Richards

University of Manchester – (Structural Engineering) Professor Yong Wang, V Xim Tee, Ioannis Avgerinos Helford River Children`s Sailing Trust – Johnathan Thornton Wheal Jane Group – Bernard Ballard University of Florence Professor Maria Antoinetta Professor Maria Antoinetta Esposito, Filippo Bosi Interface Carpets Louise Swift Severfield Steel Daniel Hudson Helford River Children`s Sailing Trust Johnathan Thornton Wheal Jane Group – Bernard Ballard

Biomimetics Workshop Exploration Architecture – Michael Pawlyn Queen’s University, Belfast – Prof. Greg Keeffe Caribbean Winterschool (Spring 2017) CUJAE (Havana) Professor Dr. Reuben Bancroft, Professor Dr. Jorge Pena-Diaz, Munster School of Architecture Professor Dr. Jorge Pena-Diaz, Munster School of Architecture - Professor Herbert Buhler qed `global thesis` Foster + Partners - Michael Gentz Grimshaw Architects – Andrew Thomas, Eduard Ross Pascall + Watson – Paul Ruggles Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners – John Dent SimpsonHaugh and Partners – Nick Fleming, Mark Savage, Christian Male 5Plus Architects – Phil Doyle Buro Happold – Sara Lonsdale Green Triangle – Ian McHugh MAG (Manchester Airports Group) John Twigg, Jon Bottomley CATE – (Centre for Aviation, Transport and the Environment, MMU) Professor Callum Thomas University of Exeter (Environment and Sustainability Institute) Dr. Chris Bryan University of Exeter (Camborne School of Mines) Neill Wood

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METALS IN CONSTRUCTION Group Competition


METALS IN CONSTRUCTION 2017 - Design Challenge M(Arch) 1 - Group Brief extract

The Metals in Construction magazine 2017 Design Challenge invites architects and engineers to reduce embodied energy by submitting their design for a high-rise building that integrates its enclosure with its structure. Substituting a hybrid frame and skin structure for the typical aluminum-and-glass curtain wall can eliminate material that is structurally inert in the typical 10 to 15 pounds-per-square-foot facade assembly, minimizing the materials used in the building’s construction. Studies show that the amount of CO2 emissions embodied in producing construction materials accounts for more than 50 percent of the energy consumed during a building’s lifetime. In highly energy efficient buildings, embodied emissions can account for almost 300 percent of that energy consumption. Your design must fully integrate the building’s systems that provide environmental protection and resistance to wind and seismic forces. Entries will be judged on the amount of embodied energy reduced in the form of building mass, as well as on the overall performance of the enclosure.

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METALS IN CONSTRUCTION 55 HUDSON YARDS, New York The 55 Hudson Yards is strategically designed to best utilize the sites solar energy as well as create unexpected spaces andmoments of surprise unique among projects in New York City. This process of ‘connecting inside to the outside’ is used to create a grand sense of arrival into a fully integrated, energized urban space that offers areas of connection as well as moments of escape from the city, capped by the delight of an incredible garden in the sky. The framework of our proposal starts with a simple idea: 55 Hudson Yards Building is not a monolith, but rather a collection of different environments and experiences that coalesce into a rich ‘city within a city.’ The building’s amenities, from gardens to day-lit offices to rooftop program, are about prioritizing the health and wellness of users, create an urban dynamism and encourage active lifestyles. The structural design concept originated from the typical high rise “tube in tube” structural system. The outer and inner tubes act jointly in resisting both gravity and lateral loads in steel framed buildings. This configuration was adapted in combination with the diagrid facade to provide maximum structural stability. the core with the facade structure to embrace architecturally how these two components work together to provide structural stability but also to create a visually strong and enjoyable space. The structure of the building environmental conditions. At the bottom where the wind loads are less the number of diagrid reduces to allow better views out of the building and an open urban plaza. CONNOR TEMPLEMAN, GEORGIA KRITIOTI HASEEF RAFEI JAMES KILLEAVY


maximum FAR MAXIMUM FAR

OPTIMUM DAYLIGHT

FLUSH SETBACKS base and tower seamless

CLASS A OFFICE SPACES Stretched for premier office spaces

GREEN SPACE

green amienity levels

twisted top views diagram... sunlight diagram...

TWIST

PASSIVE VENTILATION

IMPROVED VIEWS

POKE

DIVIDE

STRUCTURAL FACADE

STRUCTURAL FACADE + CORE SYSTEM

passive ventilation

articulatied roofcortyard

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METALS IN CONSTRUCTION LCT 55 HUDSON YARDS, New York The site is located in the Eastern part of the Hudson Yards development scheme – 55 Hudson Yards. This is the largest development in New York since the Rockefellar Centre. The development will have new and improved transportation links and amenities which include shops, a cultural centre and schools. The design is set out as a simple rectangular form folllowing the site boundary, following New York’s planning code and height restrictions. Further, the chamfered design allows for - a more elegant visual, wind load reduction and maximum daylight throughout the day. Following the chamfer to the base allows for a more welcoming approach, funneling people into the building. The thoroughfare provides for a connected and vibrant retail space, connecting people from park spaces and the street. In an attempt to allow for reduction in the floor slab thickness and an increase in the possible cantilever span of the floor plates without the need for internal columns, pre-stressed steel cables integrated into the façade system are attached to a steel plate, which is in turn shot blasted through the perimeter universal beam into the concrete floor slab to provide additional support and prevent deflection. In all this proposed system would result in a 1350m2 reduction in steel through the scheme, equating to a carbon reduction of over 50% in comparison to traditional steel frame high-rise construction methods. ADRIANN JEEVANANTHAN ALEX MACBETH WILL DAVIDSON KA-HO FU JIA AI NUR FAZUIN RAMLI


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read how innovation in tectonics now permits the use of hybrid frame façades; a system that integrates a building’s enclosure with its structure, which provides opportunity for material optimization and structural METALS IN CONSTRUCTION rigidity against wind and seismic loads. GREAND CENTRAL TOWER Our proposal takes a more sustainable approach that modifies the standardi ed approach to orthogonal For steel many years New York’s skyline structures by using theiconic diagrid structure. The hasability beenofundergoing a transformation the diagrid to carry all lateral loading withallows high-rise; residential spaces, and a highly for more both open column-free commercial, featuring forms of structural transparent facade, and different considerations in surfaces while their enclosures remain the design and materiality of the service core. non-load bearing curtain walls. At the same time we read how innovation in We also now realizepermits that ‘a sense place’ of fundamental tectonics the of use of ishybrid value to people -especially in such a high density frame façades; a system that integrates region within central New It is a fundamental a building’s enclosure withYork. its structure, reality that all too often is missing when it comes to which provides opportunity for material the architecture and designrigidity in the city. Along with its optimization and structural against wind and seismic loads. the skyscraper, located at striking hybrid structure, Ourthe proposal moreTerminal, sustainable corner oftakes Grand aCentral will be a bold approach thatstatement modifiesof the standardized architectural civic value. t’s ground floor approach to orthogonal steel structurescreating a lifts up over public gardens, subsequently by using the diagrid structure. The ability lively space when busy working hours push people of the diagrid to carry all lateral loading in from across all street corners. ven its reflective allows for more open column-free ceiling mirrors will mimic the context; a friendly nod spaces, a highly transparent facade, and to its older neighbours. different considerations in the design and materiality of the service core. We also realize that ‘a sense of place’ is of fundamental value to people -especially in such a high density region within central New York. It is a fundamental reality that all too often is missing when it comes to the architecture and design in the city. Along with its striking hybrid structure, the skyscraper, located at the corner of Grand Central Terminal, will be a bold architectural of ELEGANCE civic value. It’s GROUND statement FLOOR TRANSPORT ground flEXPERIENCE oor lifts up over public gardens, subsequently creating a lively space when busy working hours push people in from across all street corners. Even its reflective ceiling mirrors will mimic the context; a friendly nod to its older neighbours. CITY CONNECTION

MASSING FORM

CEMAKING

me meets the re uirements for Grade A office to create a place that connects with the wider KANN CityKATY streetscape - both for members of the SOFIA JASSIM ANDRADA CALIN d office visitors and workers alike. The structure STEPHEN SULLIVAN ilding will actMERCAN as a demarcation between the CHARLOTTE JIALING SHI t and street with a 16 metre high covered zone ents can take place. Our skyscraper sits adjacent to Grand Central Station, with a direct route from the underground transport which is linked to the core of this scheme. Subsequently, this improves pedestrian flow providing ease of access to your final working destination without the need to confront morning or evening traffic movement. Positioning this pedestrian link below ground level frees up street level for public use and encourages movement under Vanderbilt Avenue. In addition, GCT extends the Vanderbilt corridor vertically below ground as well as horizontally with a quadruple height public realm at the base of the tower.

such as a mirrored curved ceiling, escalators waterfalls will illuminate the exterior providing movement and reflecting the vitality of ifth

The form of this high-rise transpired following multiple iterations, including a lower chamfer to allows passersby to have visual access to Grand Central Station and an upper chamfer to create an illusion at ground level making the skyscraper appear less dominant. The lower tapering also created a larger public space adjacent to the station.

Grand Central

STRUCTURAL PERFORMANCE Structural System

The Tower is constructed of reinforced concrete typical to many of the commercial towers in Manhatten, New York. The primary vertical load of the building is placed on a diagrid “tube” of canted round columns forming an shaped structural frame at the perimeter of the floor plan that also takes 75% of the lateral wind-bracing loads. These interwoven diagonal reinforced columns with an eight floor module tapering slightly at the top are located within the structural curtain wall system and take up the primary load Wof the building, with further structural support provided by the two offset cores and post tensioned ring beams at every level. This diagrid structure allows for four metre floor heights and open floor space. The steel and glass dome at the top of the building has a crisscrossing lattice-steel structure distinct from the diagrid columns.

800mm

General Rule of Thumb Limiting Drift Total Movement at Peak

Diagrid Members

The diagrid elements are made from welded steel plates, 00mm thick at the bottom floors, and progressively lightening to 00mm at the top floors. ach diagrid member is a different length, depending on the angle at which it leans. They carry floors m high.

Façade Strategy

The line of facade is within the build up elements of the structure, adding to the stiffness and reduction in material consumption.

Rigid External Steel Grillages

As the height to breadth ratio is larger then 4, the core would not suffice as the structure, hence the need for a perimeter diagrid structure.

Height 500 400 500 0.8m

Structure under Gravity Loads

Structure under Lateral Loads

Seismic Loads

Optimizing the modules for structural performance

The modules of the diagrid on the south elevation use a variation of angle and module height to respond to the changing lateral forces on the tower. This type of geometry also allows for the tower to be constructed with approximately 27% less steel then a conventional steel-frames tower.


Features such as a mirrored curved ceiling, escalators and small waterfalls will illuminate the exterior providing a flow of movement and reflecting the vitality of ifth Avenue and NYC. A sympathetic lighting scheme with uplift light, together with the mirrored ceiling will illuminate the space during the evening and night. It is intended the mirror ceiling will reflect the celestial ceiling founded at Grand Central station next door.

ION

wn, wn and ural GCT wo ty’s

ent ces. yer with ers

ree oss the and nce int.

structural surfaces while their enclosures remain non-load bearing curtain walls. At the same time we read how innovation in tectonics now permits the use of hybrid frame façades; a system that integrates a building’s enclosure with its structure, which provides opportunity for material optimization and structural rigidity against wind and seismic loads.

2nd Floor Mezzanine

We also realize that ‘a sense of place’ is of fundamental value to people -especially in such a high density region within central New York. It is a fundamental reality that all too often is missing when it comes to the architecture and design in the city. Along with its striking hybrid structure, the skyscraper, located at the corner of Grand Central Terminal, will be a bold architectural statement of civic value. t’s ground floor lifts up over public gardens, subsequently creating a lively space when busy working hours push people in from across all street corners. ven its reflective ceiling mirrors will mimic the context; a friendly nod to its older neighbours.

Sky Garden

Street / Undercroft Level The two cores punctuate the street space. This is necessary due to load re uirements, fire escape egress and goods lifts to the basement. First Floor (Entrance) Escalators up to reception with small waterfalls either side provide a sense of arrival while allowing for the use of the ground for the public at street level. This elevated reception also allows for the creation of a walkway between both cores.

Our proposal takes a more sustainable approach that modifies the standardi ed approach to orthogonal steel structures by using the diagrid structure. The ability of the diagrid to carry all lateral loading allows for more open column-free spaces, a highly transparent facade, and different considerations in the design and materiality of the service core.

GROUND FLOOR EXPERIENCE

ELEGANCE

TRANSPORT

Typical Office Level

1st Floor Reception

A ground floor reception or indeed two for each core Office would have split the street level plan into two which would have unsympathetically divided the space. Second Floor (Mezzanine) A first floor me anine will be a waiting area for office visitors with a small attached cafe.

Creative Layout

Street/Undercroft Level

Middle Green Layer

Professional Layout Office

MASSING FORM The form of this high-rise transpired following multiple iterations, including a lower chamfer to allows passersby to have visual access to Grand Central Station and an upper chamfer to create an illusion at ground level making the skyscraper appear less dominant. The lower tapering also created a larger public space adjacent to the station.

Ground / Lobby Financial Layout

Grand Central

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VENICE 2016 The trip to Venice was a very educational experience. Visiting a wide range of architecture and being shown the techniques of architects have used to construct buildings on the island has made me think about architecture more through a technological and practical aspects. The Zaha Hadid exhibition was a great insight on how the architect grew over the years and her inspiration behind her designs. The exhibition was extremely valuable in the aspect on how to design a high-rise building, seeing Hadid’s models of variations of a single project was interesting. Experiencing the Venice Biennale was a very valuable, the trip offered a variety of knowledge on how architects have tackled problems through practical and creative solutions. This year’s Biennale, was named ‘Reporting from the Front’, the theme was to allow architects to address problems in disaster zones or suffering extreme need – “humanitarian architecture”.

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Venice Study Trip October 2016


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London Study Trip October 2016


LONDON TRIP 2016 M(Arch) 1 The London trip allowed us to visit ongoing live projects around London and attended lectures by Foster & Partners, Rodgers Stirk Habour + Partners and SimpsonHaugh Partners on some of their most notable high rise projects.

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BIOMIMICRY WORKSHOP M(Arch) 1 A lecture series was held Michael Pawlyn teaching us about how architects should be inspired by nature when designing buildings in the future.

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BIOMIMICRY Group Competition


BIOMIMICRY COMPETITION 2017 - Eleven Magazine M(Arch) 1 - Group Project Brief extract

The competition invited thinkers, architects, designers, artists, academics and visionaries from around the world - to imagine innovative projects in the fields of Architecture, Technology, Design, and Fashion inspired by Nature. Designs should showcase Biomimicry practices in either form, function or both. Projects should clearly show the link between the outcome and the natural inspiration behind it. Entries are not limited to conceptual ideas. They can also be works in progress or prototypes which the entrant is currently developing or has recently produced. You can choose to work in multiple fields (architecture, product design, fashion, technology, materials, etc) and scales (from tiny to extra-large) for your entry. Think outside the box! Your design has to be inspired by nature - true - but this does not necessarily mean it has to look like the object. An example would be Photovoltaic Cells, inspired by leaves and their power to transform solar energy into food through photosynthesis.

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URBAN HABITAT The increase in air temperature produced by urbanization, a phenomenon known as the Urban Heat Island effect, has affected human health by contributing to general discomfort, respiratory difficulties and heat-related mortality. Urban Habitat proposes an alternative management strategy to fuel plant productivity through two integrated technologies: concentrated solar power and water collecting system, both integrated within a structure that simultaneously shields the crops from intense sun rays. By incorporating pollinators and human activities, the pavilion functions as an ecosystem that manages recovery of biodiversity while delivering social and environmental benefits. The ecosystem model was developed based on using resources available in nature, much like desert plants when adapting to extremes of heat in deserts. The intensive sun will be harnessed for solar power to electrify the multifunctional space. Moisture from the humid atmosphere will be captured and funnelled through collecting gutters and fed into the ground, a ‘biomimicry’ process inspired by the Saguaro cactus. Similarly, to plants ability to turn carbon dioxide into glucose the prototype will be 3D printed using modern technology of turning carbon dioxide into material. The ETFE cushions, which, just like the contracting phenomenon of the Saguaro cactus, will expand and contract in response to integrated PV cells that open and close to regulate plants exposure to sunlight. As well as their flexible nature, the ETFE cushions form a complex geometry able to reduce drag effect of fluctuation forces. This process has been inspired by grooved patterns within nature, sharks skin to cacti cavities. ADRIANN JEEVANANTHAN, KATY KANN, ANITA O’FELIX


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HYDROMIMICRY With climate change causing steady growth of the worlds arid regions, a more sustainable solution than those currently employed is needed to allow for comfortable population of these climates. The Hydromimicry project presents a model for passive environmental control through adaptive shading, insulation, airflow manipulation and sustainable fresh water production based on local biological solutions.. The hydro-façade consists of three layers – an outer mesh, a mid-mesh level and an inner skin. Hydrophilic apertures in the outermost skin encapsulate the water gathered from the overnight fog through condensation and capillary action. As the apertures are filled, it creates an air pocket between the layers providing additional insulation during the cold nights. Excess water runs down the hydrophobic mesh into a reservoir for use by inhabitants. In scenarios of direct solar gain, a portion of collected water is passed through the mesh causing it to expand. This expansion closes the mesh apertures, decreasing internal solar gain whilst heating the water contained within the mesh for use within the applied building’s services. The trapped water pockets gradually dissipate over the course of the day and the cycle restarts during the night. With the potential for freshwater collection, provision of agricultural facilities, and harnessing the energy of the desert sun through solar panels, the façade enables the creation of self-sustaining oases in the desert. Inspired by climate-specific biodiversity as well as adapting other complimentary biomimetic phenomena, Hydromimicry attempts to redefine the potential of architectural façade systems within increasingly arid climates.

FARMING

COOLING IRRIGATE

FERTILISE

THERM OCH RO MIC

02

POLLINATE

STORAGE

H2O

£

MIC HRO OC OT PH

SOFIA JASSIM STEPHEN SULLIVAN ALEX MACBETH

G

IN

G ST FO RVE HA


Competition Page 1 or 2

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FILTRE - SYNTHESIS Globally, air pollution has become a real concern for many people and within the metropolises around the world, there is a physical lock in effect that makes simple things such as walking down a street a real problem. Pollution is one of the largest global killers, affecting over 100 million people worldwide. Observing many major cities’ real time “Air Quality Index”, we are able to distinguish that the air quality is in fact dangerous and the high level of pollutants produce a 20% higher risk of death from lung cancer for the inhabitants. The build-up of the air surrounding every one of us is what can also be dangerous. Fine parties such as PM2.5, Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) and Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) are all particles and gases that are part of the physiognomy that is understood as “pollution”. There are all harmful to the human body and, are causes of cardiovascular diseases and as a discontenting impact on the respiratory system.

S U N LI G H T

T IO 2

solar shading in summer and contract in winter to allow for maximum amount of sunlight.

2 ND P H OT

ON B OU

MM ER RD

3

W

IN

TE

PH

O

TO

N

BO

NCE

U

N

C

POLLUTED AIR

E

+

+

+

R

CLEAN AIR

+

+ +

A I R F I LT E R : T i t a n i u m d i o x i d e ( T i O 2 ) and sunlight

ELECTRIC CURRENT

AIR MOVES OUT

High pressure inside polycarbonate pushes air out from ETFE bubbles

A I R F I LT E R : E l e c t r i c c u r r e n t

SU LIG

N

RA

HT

JIAAI SIAW JIALING SHI NUR FAZUIN RAMLI KAHO FU

SOLAR SHADING - pneumatic modules ETFE “bubbles” at 450mm will expand and contract in response to the vacuum created (- pneumatic modules) that allows for

SU

Consequently, “Filtre-Synthesis” is one that purifies the air using a nature inspired solution. Learning from leaves and the action of the stomata, we are able to incorporate this into our design through biomimicry. Applying a coating of titanium dioxide on the structure and utilizing an ionisation process, it filters and collects the pollutants from the surrounding air. Our aim is to produce cleaner and healthier air for people who live in cities that are affected on a daily basis due to air pollution and make simple daWy tasks much easier. The ionisation process integrated into the voronoi form, manipulates an electric current to positively charge the dust parties, will collect the pollutants and this will be recycled into fertilizer in agriculture. We believe in a circular system that is self-regulating to create a self-sustaining filtering system to be implemented in real life cities.

IN

WA

TE R

+ Electric Current Passing an electric current through the structure, will positively charge the dust parties. This in turn will be collected at our negative grounded cathode. The smog collected here will be recycled.

R AI

N WATER

OPENING IN STRUCTURE

Ti02

AIR MOVES IN

ETFE

Low pressure inside polycarbonate draws air into ETFE bubbles

BUBBLES

Water Drainage System

Solar Shading


F I L T R E

- S Y N T H E S I S

“A l e a f i n sp i r ed ci t y so l u t i o n t h a t f i l t e r s a i r t o p ro d u ce a c le a n e r, h e a lt h ie r m e t ro p o lis e nv iro n men t”

Global issue: Air pollution

‘‘ E T F E S O L A R S H A D I N G ’’ Pneumatic responsive shading modules

VEHICLES

FACTORIES

TRAFFIC DUST

COAL COMBUSTION

CO

2

O

2

‘‘A I R F I L T R A T I O N ’’ Outdoor air purifier

‘‘ E V E N T P L A Z A ’’

BIOPMASS COMBUSTION

‘‘ I N T E G R A T E D R A I N W A T E R F L O W S Y S T E M ’’

engaging the public

‘‘ D U S T C O L L E C T I O N ’’

Charged columns to attract dust particles

Biomimicry - Gaseous exchange via leaf stomata

LEAF SECTION

WAX CUTICLE UPPER EPIDEMIS SPONGY MESOPHYLL SPONGY MESOPHYLL (A I R S PAC E) LOWER EPIDEMIS WAX CUTICLE

O

2

CO

2

OPENING OF S TO M ATA FOR GAS EXCHANGE INFLUENCED BY WAT E R PRESSURE

EXCHANGE OF GASES T H R O U G H S TO M ATA

NOX O

2

NOX

VOC S

O

2

Vo r o n o i S t r u c t u r e s f r o m l e a f c a p i l l a r i e s & ce l l s

LEAF CAPILLARIES

CELLS

CAPILLARY NETWORK

VO R O N O I PAT T E R N S VOC

Choices of materials

S

P O LYC A R B O N AT E ETFE CORTEN STEEL T I TA N I U M D I OX I D E

P O LYC A R B O N AT E R O O F SANDWICHING ETFE BUBBLES

CORTEN STEEL COLUMNS COAT E D W I T H T I TA N I U M DIOXIDE

“ B R E A T H E I N . M O V E O N .”

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LUMIN-ESSENCE, London Due the abundance of abandoned infrastructure currently in disuse, our proposal re-appropriates subterranean links in London’s underground system. Through harnessing the light emitting capabilities of bio-illuminessence bacteria, we have created a sustainable light source as an alternative to artificial lighting, drastically reducing energy costs. Bio-illuminessence produces light through organic chemical reactions. The duality of day and night is emphasised through the interchanging directions of parabolic light collectors, orientating light underground throughout the day, while inverting at night allowing the underground bacteria light source to be channelled to the surface. This will illuminate the park becoming a beacon of light. The proposed form uses an innovative closed loop system where water will run towards the large glass sponge structure. The water owing in the structure causing the bacteria to glow will provide a strong visual experience for the people that use the space. The dense smaller scale lace diagrid will function in a similar way to optical fibres transmitting light across the roof, at the areas between the thick glass sponge structure. Glass and metal tubes will be shaped into a grid that mimics the skeletal lattice of the glass sponge. Each glass tube will be installed with fibre optic cables to transmit light. The bioluminescent wall acts as a natural light source using living bacteria as a primary light source. The optic fibre mesh mimics the nature of the Venus Flower Basket. This creates an efficient medium of light transmission. JAMES KILLEAVY GEORGIA KRITIOTI HASSEEF RAFIEI CHARLOTTE MERCAN

Selection of Images from the other page 1 or 2


Competition Page 1 or 2

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FERTILIZE THE DESERT Tomorrow we will be much more on earth. Therefore this will lead to changes in our way of life. To respond to our needs in terms of agriculture, energy and water, we need to find new solutions. So to finds solutions to these problems we can observe the nature. Some of plants and bugs inspired us because they have develloped capacities to live in extreme weather. We were interested into different phenomenon from nature such as magnetism, the phenomenon of condensation on the skin of a bug and how a desertic plant could capt water in the desert. Our project, a tower self sufficient which can produce its energy and water. We capture moisture from the air with the facade. An engine inside of the building can produce water too by condensation. The produced water will be used to fertilize the area all around the tower. Then we will able to grow food and plants. Our tower is designed for the dry areas, even in the desserts, to fertilize and transfom the surrounding regions to be habitable. So the tower is the first step of a colonisation of extrem weather areas all around the word.

PERSPECTIVE

ARNAUD ROSSI MOHAND BOUSSAID

TODAY

TOMORROW

TOMORROW : Tomorrow, thanks to our project, our technology, we can imagine that we can produce a lot of water to respond to this need in this kind of dry areas all around the word. The goal of our project is to produce water by differents ways to fertilize dry areas. Maybe in the futur thanks to projects like ours dry areas, deserts could become green areas, where the life will be back.


COMPETITON SHEET

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URBAN WATER CYCLE The natural environment’s flourishment is dependent on the continual process of the water cycle, giving any ecological system nourishment and life. Yet, there is a problem in the urban environment, where there is a lack of contribution to protecting this cycle. Surface run off, pollutants and deforestation has resulted in a water system that is effectively contaminated; flash floods and acid rain are symptomatic of this. Thus, we are in need of implementing intelligent processes to assist in our decontamination of the water urban flow. An urbn water cycle provides a system that can test, adapt and inform. pH indicators and in-built monitors allow for an intelligent sysyem that provides a playful environment; the grey urban pavements of yesterday are transformed into a bounitful, positive space. By designing a skin that can be implemented throughout the city for the purpose of testing, feedback and control of neglected environments, an intelligent system is in place. In nature, we look towards the process of adaptability; this being in the realm of environmental response. Having dissected the shapes and structures of several flowers, there has been identified several key features of radial and nonradial movements. The ability of a flower to curl up for reduction of water loss via evaporative cooling and then open for water channeling has inspired the way in which we look at the water cycle. We ask, what natural cycles can educate us on the way water is treated and dispersed?

First, a mechanism that reacts to light and precipitation sensors provides the primary requirement of water retention and testing. Second, water is filtered through a root and a biological network before being freed into the environment below for consumption and play. ANDRADA CALIN WILLIAM DAVIDSON CONNOR TEMPLEMAN


35


Our proposal kept in mind the lessons from the theoretical framework regarding tourism gentriÞcation and socio spatial effects of entrapraneurial planning. In doing so we stepped away from the conventional ‘tourist hubs’ which many of the other groups proposed and focus directly on the neighborhood of Atares to create a proposal which directly beneÞted the community. Any of the existing buildings which were salvagable where kept, given an environmental upgrade and the proposal was phased to allow evolution and ßexibility within the site.


CUBA WINTER SCHOOL 2017 M(Arch) 1 - Group Project

Havana is on the verge of vast sociological and economic change. Cuba is opening up to the world and to accommodate for the predicted increase in trade, Havana Harbour within the Atares neighbourhood of the city is soon to be moved to a larger site North of the City. As a result, proposals for the soon to be disconnected industrial harbour and the unused historic castle are the focus of the Winter School. The practicality and feasibility of the strategies will be judged and discussed weekly with a range of international tutors and scholars. Throughout the workshop events, students were given the opportunity to explore the historic, political, cultural and social background of Havana. They were also challenged by the design constraints that come from these contexts. Within the three-week workshop, students were asked to propose a conceptual master-plan and conceptual renovation strategy along the Atares Harbour within groups. The students benefited from engaging themselves in designing for a vastly different culture while working with the people from different parts of the world as a team. In the final week QED participant Charlotte Mercan and her peers were asked to individually develop and design a new building to be added to the site.

37


ATARES METAMORPHOSIS Based on the theoretical framework of tourism gentrification and the sociospatial effects of entrepreneurial planning. Atares Metamorphosis stepped away from the conventionally proposed ‘tourist hubs’ focusing on directly benefiting the local community. The demographics of the surrounding neighborhood of Atares comprised of low income, isolated communities with few public facilities and extremely unsanitary standards of living. Through interviews, we established waste was a large issue, waste collection was infrequent and large piles of garbage were piled up throughout the neighborhood. We proposed a help scheme, providing them with an informal way of earning extra income through the sorting of their garbage, followed by bringing it to our recycling facility which aimed to educate the community on what can be done with their waste. A limit was set per household, as of course.. No waste is the best waste. Any of the existing buildings which were salvageable where kept, given an environmental upgrade and the proposal was phased to allow evolution and flexibility within the site. By redirecting the traffic to an existing main traffic artery through an articulated traffic light system the main physical barrier isolating the site from the surrounding neighborhood was eliminated. This provided Havana with a large continuous green space for public functions, leading to the extension of Parque Atares.

SITE VISIT PHOTOS

SITE VISIT PHOTOS


0

EAST ELEVATION

change the greenery zoom in animated

SECTION TITLE

0

MASTERPLAN – SECTION A

39


ATARES METAMORPHOSIS Unpolluting the water from the harbor is essential for longevity. An organic filtration system using sea plants will be implemented creating an iconic waterscape. Public spaces were integrated throughout the site and were connected with an education path which also linked buildings and allowed visitors to learn by seeing the process of recycling taking place in an attempt to raise awareness of the importance and possibilities of recycling. Outdoor university areas were designed as community plazas where residents of Atares could relax, socialise while also being exposed to the recycling process. Industrial warehouses were renovated as shown and included passive sustainable alterations such as rain water harvesting, solar panels and harnessing the sea breeze to regulate temperature within the buildings. The sole newly created addition to the site came in the form of a research center. As development of the site was to be staggered to promote organic growth, the research center was to be constructed in the final stage of Phase 1 leading the way for future development of the Harbor area. Keeping in context with the rest of the site, it features public learning and education facilities along side key research labs forging a connection with the Havana research University in an attempt to develop the water sanitation methods, ensuring the longevity of the site.

1

RECYCLE FACTORY Elevations

1

PUBLIC SPACE

ADD NEW BUILDING UPDATE FUNCTIONS

Public spaces are integrated throughout the site. A key aspect of them is informal education, where visitors coming to use the Change size of key and label it key public amenities will also RECYCLE be educated about FACTORY recycling through the outdoor university areas.Elevations

1

Multifunctional Office Space Integrated learning Space Outdoor learning Area Glass, metal & plastic collection & recycling Arts & crafts area Paper collection, recycling & processing Biowaste collection & storage facility Research facility & interactive gallery

1.1

1.2

2 4

5

3 6

1.1

1.2

Multifunctional Office Space Integrated learning Space Outdoor learning Area Glass, metal & plastic collection & recycling Arts & crafts area Paper collection, recycling & processing Biowaste collection & storage facility Research facility & interactive gallery

Multifunctional OďŹƒce Space Integrated Learning Space Outdoor Learning Area Glass, Metal & Plastic Recycle Arts & Crafts Area Paper Collection & Recycle Bio-waste Collection and Storage Research Facility & Interactive Gallery


ATION

1

RESEARCH CENTER north elevation 1 RESEARCH CENTER ground Ã&#x;oor

1

RESEARCH CENTER Underwater Gateway

41


Severfield Site Visit March 2017


SEVERFIELD SITE VISIT Prior to the presentation delivered by Severfield at the university, we were asked to come up with some questions. By having previous experience with designing with steel for the competition ‘Metals in Construction’ this year, we managed to come up with some detailed and engaging questions for the day. Our research into steel manufacturing, with particular focus on Sevenfield, highlighted an awareness of the high embodied energy in the finished products we are accustomed to dealing with as they arrive on site. First hand observations of the treatments and processes which were exhibited during our visit illustrated this clearly.

43


EVOLO Individual Competition


eVOLO 2017 - Skyscraper Competition M(Arch) 1 - Individual Brief extract

The competition invited thinkers, architects, designers, artists, academics and visionaries from around the world - to imagine innovative projects in the fields of Architecture, Technology, Design, and Fashion inspired by Nature. Designs should showcase Biomimicry practices in either form, function or both. Projects should clearly show the link between the outcome and the natural inspiration behind it. Entries are not limited to conceptual ideas. They can also be works in progress or prototypes which the entrant is currently developing or has recently produced. You can choose to work in multiple fields (architecture, product design, fashion, technology, materials, etc) and scales (from tiny to extra-large) for your entry. Think outside the box! Your design has to be inspired by nature - true - but this does not necessarily mean it has to look like the object. An example would be Photovoltaic Cells, inspired by leaves and their power to transform solar energy into food through photosynthesis.

45


ADRIANN JEEVANANTHAN Adaptive Capacity: A Socio-ecological Vertical Community Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s largest city, due to its huge shift in economy, the poverty rate has declined to approximately 28%. However, one in six people still live below the national poverty line, almost unchanged due to the high population rate. While the city is growing, it is also rapidly urbanizing, but countless cannot afford to live within the city which leads to falling into informal settlements. 80% of informal settlements are overcrowded, lack clean water and adequate sanitary and are surrounded by garbage and toxic materials. With the expanding population, these problems will only escalate, putting more people’s livelihoods at risk. The proposal seeks to address these problems by adapting and reconfiguring an alternative solution for slum-dwellers, by the means of a ‘Vertical Village’. This vertical village aims to provide a higher quality of life to the inhabitants, eliminating rough and unsanitary conditions for a cleaner and safer environment. The design also recognises the key factors associates with slum communities – autonomy, flexibility and a strong sense of community. This offers dwellers the opportunity to develop in synchronisation with the rest Dar es Salaam.


47


WU JUNRU PROJECT NOAH “Noah” is a radical skyscraper, designed to ensure mankind’s survival after global devastation in the coastal cities. Like an emergency toolbox, it will be the starting point to the reestablish order through population and resource concerntration. In the future century of global warming, the sea level will experience a severe rise causing the coastal areas to become flooded. Building new residential projects is the primary proposal which accomodates the large population in the coastal cities by accumulating the population and resources in vertical dimension. Noah’s buoyant super-structure becomes a statement for the solution of future loss of our habitants and urban facilities in ooded coastal region. Through its desalinization and power facilities, this ocean skyscrap- er becomes a oating metropolis equipped with NOAA research laboratories, renewable power stations, dormitory-style housing units, eco-tourist attractions, and ecological habitats for wildlife. A series of these structures would be strategically located in the most affected areas. Salt water is used to produce a renewable source of energy through a (salinity gradient power) power facility housed within the building’s outrigger basement. In addition, the structure’s penertrating facade allows for the ventilation and heat gain on the sea surface while harvesting solar energy. The outrigger basement ther- mal power facility boasts a series of modules that are composed of a polyethylene piping system that pumps brackish water. Finally, the control at the bottom of the tower makes the outrigger thermal power facility able to ascend and descend, which means the tower can descend down under the sea level in stormy weather.


49


small

increase support 1

Submerged City Caused by Global Warming Tuvalu Kiribati Nauru The Maldives Islands Water city of Venice The Hawaiian Islands Vanuatu Tonga Papua New Guinea American Samoa Atafu Tokelau Australia Great Barrier Reef Japan 1/3 of the Philippines

JIALING SHI SELF SUFFICIENT MIGRATION

:

big external bracket

amount of body

steel nodes

REBIRTH

Minamisoma, Japan (as model, could be use in any required area) In recent years, the climate change has been repeatedly mentioned. It is becoming an important factor affecting the urban development. Some coastal cities are in danger of being overwhelmed by climate change, at the same time resulting in irreversible damage to human societies. This program is a proposed spatial solution to this land / urban crisis, which integrates the local factors and spatial information from the surrounding context so the skyscraper could provide an alternative for the environmental disastrous areas. “Destruction”, “Regeneration”, and “Self Sufficient” are the key elements of the program, aiming to create a vibrant space in the desolate environment.

The design is not based on a definite site, it can be use in any required area. The Minamisoma is a model to show the design process and how does the self sufficient tower work.

Site Case: Minamisoma, Japan Minamisōma was partially inundated by the tsunami which resulted from the Tōhoku earthquake on March 11, 2011, and suffered heavy damage.

voronoi diagram

distinguish groups

points --- stronghold, settlement line --- defining the scope surface --- different levels of activities in the area

set points

connect points

conic carve in face

generated the amount of body

main structure

1

[ salt ]

2

[ alum ]

[ unit stack ]

500ml : 250g water

material

500ml : 368g water

material

cell structure

truss


FOOD TRADITIONAL AGRICULTURE GROWING

ENERGY in its operation the building will be completely carbon neutral

NEW TECHNOLOGY

(17,845 sqm)

YIELD

15.6mil cal/yr aeroponics (6000 sqm)

inverter

food: 655,754 lbs/yr

consumer unit

1000 chickens: 10,933 lbs of manure/yr

500 residents: 2,44 mil lbs of sludge/yr

anaerobic digester

separator non-digstible by-products

fertilizer 646,651 lbs/yr

agriculture

WIND ENERGY GENERATED: 1.288 GWR/YR

TOTAL WATER ACQUIRED: 5.63 MIL GAL/YR

medium scale generator: (diameter 37.5 units 16) 1 gwh/yr

small scale generator: (diameter 12 units 27) 0.216 gwh/yr

manufacturing inverter

manufacturing 2 mil gal/yr

battery bank

145 mil cal/yr 26.2 mil cal/yr

aquaponics (6000 sqm, tanks 2-5 sqm)

TOTAL CALORIES: 351 MIL CAL/YR

4.17 mil cal/yr poultry (9500 sqm, 1000 chickens)

household

pv cells on tubes: 0.424 gwh/yr pv cells on facade: 5.12 gwh/yr

206mil cal/yr

16.7 mil cal/yr apple trees (2,500 sqm/tree, trees 420) pear trees (4000 sqm/tree, trees 100) plum trees (4000 sqm/tree, trees 100)

WASTE

TOTAL ORGANIC WASTE PRODUCED

methane: 7.73 mil m3/yr

PV COLLECTIOIN: 6.076 GWH/YR vegetable garden

WATER

TOTAL CALORIES: 62.7 MIL CAL/YR

TOTAL YIELD CALORIE ONE YEAR: 413.7 MIL CAL/YR TOTAL CALORIE REQUIREMENS FOR 500 PEOPLE: 405 MIL CAL/YR

ENERGY GENERATED FROM METHANE: 1.12 GWR/YR

agriculture 607,690 gal/yr

methane: 218,900 mil m3/yr generator food: 655,754 lbs/yr

500 residents: 2.44 mil lbs of feces/yr

rainwater harvested 2 mil gal/tr

1000 chickens: 10.933 lbs of manure/yr

total energy supply: 8,484 gwh/yr total energy demand: 8.09 gwh/yr supplying energy demands

electricity: 2.26 gwh/yr

living machine ecological sewage treatment 2 mil gal/yr

rainwater storage

water pump

household 2,7 mil gal/yr

GREY WATER PURIFIED: 11.5 MIL GAL/YR (10% ANNUAL LOSS)

TOTAL DEMAND: 5.3 MIL GAL/YR anaerobic digester

purified water ciuculated in the closed loop

51


JIA AI SIAW E-waste Recycling Factory The goal of the entire project is to create a zero-waste and self-sufficient vertical electronic waste recycling factory, mimicking the nature’s processes that view materials as nutrients circulating in healthy and safe metabolisms. Sitting in Manhattan, this project’s inspiration builds upon cradle-to-cradle design concept. The recycled electronic wastes and products are developed for closed-loopsystem in which every output ingredient is safe and beneficial – either to biodegrade naturally and restore the soil or to be fully recycled into high-quality materials for subsequent product generations. This vertical factory recycles e-waste collected from donation points around city, accessible by public. Underground “waste mover system” transfers the e-waste to the skyscraper. This helps to save a lot of foctory spaces for loading/ unloading bays and storages. E-waste is collected in basement for manual disassembly and sorting, and are moved vertically upwards by megahoists for magnetic and infrared sorting or manual segregation. All the separated materials then enter the ‘assembly’ section where testing, assembling, and manufacturing of new products occur. The process happens vertically downwards to the retails where end products are sold. Learning laboratory, gallery and auditorium are provided to educate the public the importance of recycling e-waste. The data and operation rooms on top of the building acts as the central nerve that control the waste recycling system of the factory. Observatory deck with Manhattan skyline view, together with restaurants and roof gardens also humanize the machine in the sky.

Cradle-to-cradle design concept

Closed-loop e-waste recycling system

Conceptual diagrams


Building Section & 3D

53


HASEEF RAFIEI POD VENDING MACHINE

In response to the global housing demand and economic uncertainty, the proposal envisions a skyscraper that would dispense 3D printed homes on site. Each personalized unit is manufactured with the rooftop 3D-printer and autonomously delivered using its robotic crane system. Rather than an upfront investment in developing a completed building, the proposed structure would gradually grow in tandem with the city’s housing demand. The term “vending machine� is used as a metaphor to represent a machine that dispenses necessities according to demand. With high-precision construction method of 3D printing, the structure is designed to potentially alleviate the issues of material wastage. The concept was inspired by the avantgarde capsule buildings of the Metabolist Movement of Japan in the sixties. The basic unit of a home is explored as tectonic objects. Inspired by the minimalist living culture of Japanese homes, the house is broken down into basic amenities where users can select which amenities they need. The homeowner could determine what type of pods they wanted by combining multiple sub-pods to form their home. Unused pods will be disassembled or placed in storage to be re-used, thus saving material and creating a metabolic cycle within the skyscraper.


55


To avoid the notion of degrading the surrounding environment and draining the economy of a host country, the entire complex of The Safehouse is designed to be self-sustainable. The whole development is divided into 2 main areas, with the area above reclaimed for nature, and the space below ground a unique opportunity for human use. It is believed than the area above ground (vertical park) gives many benefit while provide more spaces to integrate a public park within the skyscraper, more or less giving back the space to the public.

NUR FAZUIN BINTI RAMLI THE SAFEHOUSE; A WAR-FREE ZONE Conceptualizing the city through the scenario of war, The Safehouse is a new conceptual bunker prototype of a newly high density underground living, in which the best living environment harmonizes within the skyscraper itself, allowing the residence to move through the post-war period. The definition of a conventional safe bunkers is very well known to specifically accommodate the government higher officers and commisioners. It is more or less almost similar saying that there is no bunkers for the public.

Having an independent system allows users to make a living without having to depend on financial aid. Every dwelling is designed in a way that encourages hybrid activities. Wide public areas allow social interaction between users. Each space is injected with personal and cultural elements recollect memories of their home. Communal spaces provide a central ground to house cultural celebration and festivities. Integrating hybrid concept into the development, the vertical bunker could fulfill the functions in 2 different scenarios of event; “Pre-war or without war period”, as well as “During and Post-war period”. This is mainly to avoid energy wastage for maintenance and unused space. All spaces below ground are designed to become hybrid as possible. The urban farming and agricultural parks provide sufficient food products for the resident in the area during normal days, and as the main source of food for the users in the bunkers during the incident of war.

The Safehouse is a prototype of a war-free zone (no weapons policy), taking advantage of the site located within range to a hospital. There will be only minimal impact to The Safehouse in the event of war, as attacks on medical facilities and personnel completely outrageous and profoundly immoral, and also grave breaches of the laws of war and international humanitarian law. The site is also located near to residential area and to target as many public and residents as possible. However, the objective of this project is to explore the possibilities of the development; how resilient it is in different scenario of event, how it is adaptive responsive it is on its surrounding, and to explore possibilities of a self-sustaining living in different environment conditions - rather than focusing on how bulletproof the building envelope is towards a direct, physical attack. Ranelagh Gardens, Chelsea, London


Contaminated air is filtered through the ducting before supplying into the dwelling

Operable protective louvers. Adaptive responsive to the internal and external condition

Hotel / Safe Bunkers

Public Park

Sunlight passes through Lobby + Facilities

Existing scenarios in conventional bunkers bunkers: - Underground - Horizontally Oriented (Scattered) - Not meant for public use

fins to enlighten spaces below ground level

Carpark

Reinventing the horizontal concept of conventional underground bunkers. This scheme proposes the layering of programmes in a vertical arrangement

Exploring the idea of vertical community living, while acting as bunkers for public during the incident of war / post-war period

Urban agricultural park access Urban market place Air management facilities

Water Tank

Facilities Taking advantage of the nearby

Public plaza

Hall + Common Room

Water management facilities

Fresh air intake

Public plaza

Command centre / Common Area

river as the source of water

The facade is designed to act as a protective armour to the body of the tower. In the event of war, the operable facade conceal the tower. The facade component moves inwards or vice

k

an Water T

versa depending on the scenario of the event. Urban

k

g + Par

Farmin

This is one component where titanium is used extensively as armour plating. The armour facade cover the surface

taurant

Sky Res

ge

+ Stora

of the tower, entirely. Given that the shape of the building is not flat, the facade follows the flow of the building envelope. Sloping and curving armour can both increase its protection by reducing

ral Park

gricultu

Urban A

the force impacting perpendicularly. Angled surface increases

Tower Facade

the chance of deflecting any possible debris, increasing the users survivability.

This operable facade system operates in either two modes. The first is the natural ventilation mode which allows sunlight to penetrate deeper into the park, and uses fresh external air from operable windows or dampers to cool the internal spaces.

Place Market Urban rea A n io ct + Produ

s Facilitie kers l + Bun + Hote

It also relies predominantly on the stack effect for hot air to be expelled through high-level exhausts. The second is the mechanical mode and sees the facade components closed and the HVAC switched on, and is used only when the building completely concealed.

Underground Hotel / Bunker

57


GEORGIA KRITIOTI MEGATOPIA: A new restorative high rise paradigm for Hong Kong Hong Kong qualifies as the definitive example of how extreme housing demand can drive the genesis of urban jungle environments. People’s longing to be in this place of “opportunity” is such that they are willing to compromise to having significantly reduced space (at extortionate cost) and also having to compete on a daily basis for virtually everything, from food, to transport and public amenities. The High rise tower typology so extensively used in striving to satisfy demand is violently (due to scale) deforming the natural environment. The concrete jungle with hardly any green, inadequate daylight, sunlight and ventilation further oppresses its citizens affecting their psyche. Towers nurture isolation and loss of community for their dwellers while also instilling feelings of exclusion to those who can never hope to be able to afford decent living conditions. The spatial resolution of the problem is a new proposed CITY ABOVE THE CITY which will be reconfigured by elevating both the neighborhoods and the streets thus integrating housing and commercial functions at higher levels, achieving simultaneously decongestion of the ground level and stress free servicing of sky communities. Clusters will be spaced out to ensure that they enjoy abundant sunlight, daylight and ventilation while introduction of green spaces will contribute towards a more humane and healthy environment.


59


CONNOR TEMPLEMAN MONOLE SPIRE Susta,nbility is Key with n every design. lhis design ncorporoles Ifs surrounding by using lhe not�rcl wind and light obove the tropical climate. Res.earchers are able to examine thesurroundings and test what is the ldeol solution for re-growfng defore!ted oreos. Notvrol Vl.’O·er con then be collected through a rolnwoter harvesting system. Drones can deli\’er the necessary water ond nutrtents to loco! deforested oreo;, I design through nature. Our spinal chord Is one of the strongest syslems within nature, The design proposal uses fhis system in a similar way by also opplying o diogrid structure once the form is created. This ollows outbreak oreos to assemble down the sides of the structure for sc,enhsts to toke direct samples ol neighbouring trees.


I explored this idea of how the spine can twist and using rhino I started to create a form. Once I had decided on my form I applied a diagrid script which myself and James Killeavy had made during our other project and applied it to create a diagrid bamboo structure for my design.

My initial concept was to see whether it would be possible to collect water through the center of the building. The other aspect I wanted to develop was the idea of connecting the building to the surrounding trees.

61


CYBERNETICS Individual Competition


INNOVATIVE MINDS 2017 ‘CYBERNETICS’ - gURROO M(Arch) 1 Brief extract eVolo Magazine is pleased to invite architects, students, engineers, designers, and artists from around the globe to take part in the 2017 Skyscraper Competition. Established in 2006, the annual Skyscraper Competition is one of the world’s most prestigious awards for high-rise architecture. It recognizes outstanding ideas that redefine skyscraper design through the implementation of novel technologies, materials, programs, aesthetics, and spatial organizations along with studies on globalization, flexibility, adaptability, and the digital revolution. It is a forum that examines the relationship between the skyscraper and the natural world, the skyscraper and the community, and the skyscraper and the city. The participants should take into consideration the advances in technology, the exploration of sustainable systems, and the establishment of new urban and architectural methods to solve economic, social, and cultural problems of the contemporary city including the scarcity of natural resources and infrastructure and the exponential increase of inhabitants, pollution, economic division, and unplanned urban sprawl. The competition is an investigation on the public and private space and the role of the individual and the collective in the creation of a dynamic and adaptive vertical community. It is also a response to the exploration and adaptation of new habitats and territories based on a dynamic equilibrium between man and nature – a new kind of responsive and adaptive design capable of intelligent growth through the self-regulation of its own systems.

63


CHARLOTTE MERCAN HMP SANITATEM This project uses a cybernetics system, enhanced with virtual reality and site specific sensory treatments to re-purpose the spatial organisation and procedures within a conventional prison encouraging rehabilitation of mentally unwell inmates. The cybernetic feedback orientated system will have the ability to alter treatment referral and experiences through algorithms creating different virtual reality experiences based on the data it receives. Bio-sensors and medical records will be used to provide real time data on patients mental stability through using physicochemical detectors. These algorithms and the variation in data provides countless possibilities of VI experiences ensuring a totally unique experience each time. As people who suffer from mental illness can struggle to relate to their context and spatially place themselves, to counteract the ‘black box’ feeling of VI, site specific qualities will be harnessed such as vibrations, sounds, sunlight and views and used within therapies to create a unique holistic treatment plan connected to context. This system is aimed at reducing the strain on the prison system in the Greater Manchester area by reducing incarceration time through treating mentally unwell inmates as patients rather than convicts. Studies have shown the relationship between mental illness, crime and re-offending rates, therefore this proposal should in the wider context reduce crime rates in general within the area.

Cybernetic Building Management System BIO-SENSATIVE DATA COLLECTION SYMPTONS FEAR

High Crime

AGGRESSION

Paranoia Night terrors

Aggression Voilence

Stress Anxiety Panic

Loss of Control Frustration

PERCEPTION

DEPRESSION

Distorted Perception Real Vs Unreal Hearing Voices Confusion

Despair Self Destruction

ANTISOCIAL

Loss of memories Fake memories

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

Loss of social interaction Lack of responsibility Cannot process emotions Detachment to Actions Guitless

Low Crime Rochdale Corrcetional

HMP Strangeways

Stockport Correctional

DATA COLLECTION TESTING: PHYSICAL / METAPHYSICAL

Antisocial: Interaction analysis Therapy discussion

Perception: Maze VR Perception

Depression: Void Scale VR Despair

74%

chance of reo ending within their rst year of release from strangeways

Crime Rates in Uk and Manchester.

The UK prison population currently stands at more than 80,000 and re o ending rates top in some prisons rime rates show that Manchester faces the highest crime in the outside of ondon, with MP Strangeways eing the most notorius, high security prison in ngland, housing some of the most dangerous, atergory A criminals with re o ending rates twice as high as the average It is also full to capcaity with inmates having to e ept in Stoc port and Rochdale correctional facilities while waiting incarciration

TREATMENT

Meditation

Vibration Therapy

Water Therapy

Colour Therapy

Cognitive Behavioural

AcknowledgeHeights Sight lines VR Stress VR Accept

Confined Spaces VR Anger


The sanity facility will provide support to conventional prisons using holistic treatments to treat mental illness of inmates

H MP S anitatem.

Occupied Space

Structure and Circulation

Final Form

F inal S p atial A rrang ement.

Hydrotherapy

65


ALEX MACBETH TEMPORAL REGIONALISM Urban gamification as social catalyst and urban restoration mechanism through public displays of temporal regionalism and adaptive augmented landscapes. The dawn of the digital age has brought with it a complete reimagining of the ways in which people interact. Urban spaces recently became the host of congregations thanks to augmented gamification of geographical landscapes. Adaptation of this framework, combined with the digital profile data each individual player accumulates though consumption of media and online purchases, can be used to individually tailor the virtual landscape to reflect local demographics and their compatibility with the player. Additionally, through adapting the reward for visiting the nodes to be inversely proportional to the typical frequency of interactions with it encourages more even footfall throughout the network. To amplify the social catalysis offered by the frame work, each node can be deployed by players who have earned enough rewards. Deployment results in the game notifying those who it identifies as sharing similar interests to the player that activated it, offering them unique rewards for their attendance. The enclosed radial form of the deployed node directs attention inwards towards other players, while projecting the common themes within the present players’ digital activity onto the skin of the structure. This display serves as a social instigator, while also attracting non-players with common interests to investigate and become part of the community, propagating the game’s network. Bringing individuals and communities together in a celebration of commonality.

䘀愀挀攀戀漀漀欀 䄀洀愀稀漀渀 一攀琀昀氀椀砀 匀瀀漀琀椀昀礀 䜀漀漀最氀攀

眀椀昀椀 愀渀搀 挀栀愀爀最椀渀最 愀瘀愀椀氀愀戀氀攀


+250 +400

New players introduced to game Purchases Digital Profile

Photovoltaic and triboelectric fabric

Media Consump�on

Projections dispersed by curded prisms

Personalised Augmented Landscape Node profile formed by demographic Urban naviga�on informed by uniquely tailored augmented landscape Congrega�on prompted by digital profiles Social interac�on

Profile benefits from local interac�on

Battery and motor housing Deployment

Shared interests displayed Non-player witnessing display

Electric motor controls deployment

67


JAMES KILLEAVY SYNTHESIA One common condition of an industrialised capitalist society is the stratification and isolation of its populace, this is no more apparent than in mega-cities such as New York. New technologies provide the capability to diminish this condition, yet, so far, these technologies have remained in the virtual realm. The intersections of information, life, machines and matter display complexities that suggest the possibility of a much deeper synthesis. Synthesia is a project that aims to eliminate social divisions and develop a new state of human connectivity through blurring the boundaries between local and regional scales, virtual and physical realms and internal and external conditions. Utilising regional data sets from analysis of online social activity and local environmental data through various instruments, (including motion detectors, microphones and a wireless emotional sensor developed by MIT.) Initial predetermined functions are employed to initiate the process of developing a heightened sense of collectivity, these functions alternate periodically. Synthesia then uses intelligent, cybernetic systems to learn and adapt the primary functions to create a hybrid, evolving model therefore enhancing the experience. The pavilion is both reactive and interactive, encouraging users to communicate, play, react in virtual and physical space and therefore become part of one holistic connected system. Thus Synthesia has the potential to become much more than an environmental or emotional prosthesis, it unites all aspects of humanity into one collective nervous system.


ELECTROCHROMATIC GLASS

VAPOUR PLUG ALUMINIUM FLASHING MARBLE CLADDING RUBBER ROLLERS VAPOUR CONTROL LAYER

MOTOR UNIT

69


KA-HO FU In such density such as Hong Kong, land is scarce and the space for the homeless is becoming a significant problem throughout the city. Cramped conditions are inevitable and simple amenities and basic shelter is not available. To provide squatters and the homeless a space to rebuild their lives is key. Creating this inhabitable structure that is cybernetic and responsive to unused space in the city will allow them a basic shelter and ownership of space which they did not have in the streets. Morevoer, it creates a platform to rebuild thier lives through education, work, living spaces such as rest and relaxing space which are all situated within the structure. This community feel to the inhabitable structure will assist the dwellers in integrating with the surrounding and immediate community, one where they were unable to do so beforehand. Being able to respond to data from Hong Kong Government: Home Affairs Department is key to identifying empty and unused space (spillout space) within the city. To respond to it in a cybernetic methodology, construction must be achieved after analysing the datasets and building typology through the database and provide spaces that then can be used by those in need and provide a city with opportunities and one that increases its occupancy levels - maximising efficiency and productivity of a city. Moreover, this has the oppotunity to then become a responsive (almost) organism that can sense systems, processes and information through datasets and produce a cybernetic framework in the physcial world.

AC T I VAT I N G

FEEDBACK

U S I N G U N O CC U P I E D S PAC E (P R OV I D I N G S H E LT E R +M O R E)

COMPUTING

INTERACTION

A N A LY S I N G DATA

SENSING E M P T Y S PAC E I N T H E C I T Y


COVERING/ROOF PA RT I T I O N PA RT I T I O N W I T H DOOR REMOVABLE PA RT I T I O N S

I N S U L AT E D WA L L PA RT I T I O N

PA RT I T I O N W I T H WINDOW FLOOR PA RT I T I O N

SPACE MODULE E XPLODED

S T R U C T U R E A S S E M B LY

TONG LAU SHANGHAI STREET

LANGHAM PLACE SHOPPING CENTRE

CORDIS HOTEL

MTR RAIL S TAT I O N

K W O N WA H H O S P I TA L

YA U M A T E I MARKET R E S I D E N T I A L F L AT S

C H E R R Y T R E E PA R K

M o n k K o k : Va c a n t H OT S P OT S Re a d i n g t h e d a t a o n Va c a n t B u i l d i n g s i n H o n g Ko n g , i t w i l l p r o c e s s t h i s i n f o r m a t i o n and highlight the areas with the most amount of vancancy.

P L AY SLEEP SHOPS

HOME E AT EDUCATION WORK

M o n k K o k : R E S P O N S I V E t o Va c a n t H o t s p o t s P r o c e s s i n g t h i s d a t a f r o m t h e V I RT UA L W O R L D , t h e s e structures will be build around and into the unused space, to provide an inhabitable shelter for those in need.

71


SOFIA JASSIM EXTROVERSION Social life in this century and centuries to come is that lived in social media,. It is time we embrace this and associate it with urban growth. The internet and digital realm continues to dominate and exponentially grow, particularly as a replacement for communication and interaction in person. Instead of humanity becoming socially introverted and lost in this digital era, architecture and the built environment should embrace and integrate the digital into every facet of architecture, evolving and developing with technology. Extroversion aims to revive public spaces by making users completely immersed in a new networking realm to form a social discourse. The digital and physical, virtual and real worlds merge removing the need for personal electronic devices within the city, by projecting real-time trending feeds on existing faรงades, encouraging humanity to interact with others via the built environment as a digital communications medium. The boundary is blurred and the two intertwine, with society being closer than ever as they transgress through both worlds simultaneously. This project reconnects the increasingly urbanised context with its inhabitants, whilst addressing the undeniable evolution of information technology and how people could use it to interact with the world. The idea of physical interaction gives us an opportunity to bring architectural faรงades and streetscapes that enclose urban public spaces back into relevance. The reformed animated space will provide a social platform, resulting in an open digital integrated culture.

Real-Time Continuous Streaming

Public Display

Event Space Creation

Holographic Advertising

Sharing on the City Faรงade


projector

ting

exis

infrastructure

sharer

observer

P U B LIC

neural interface

ls pv cel

smart lens

haptic feedback

illumination

light processing

fisheye lens

projector

existing observer

sharer

infr

ast

ruc

tur

e

73


EXTERIOR PERSPECTIVE

MOHAND BOUSSAID / ARNAUD ROSSI SWS TOWER, NEW YORK The SWS tower, a tower of 45 meters high situated at the 143 Madison Avenue in New-York city. The tower is composed of a housing part with 33 apperments around 50m² a sport hall reserved to the resident and a commercial part ont the ground floor. The façade can react in function of its environment according to three mods. ln function of the sun, in function of the wind and in function of the sound. So according to these three mods the facade will managed to reduce or to increase the opening of the facets, to create shade, to protect people from wind or to reduce the noise inside of the appartments. The facade is composed of many modules made of articulated facets. These facets are articulated by small engines, two per facets. Each facet is perforated by hales of differents sizes to alow the view through it. All of these elements are attached to the main structure. So each facets is independant, and each facet can move independently from another.

SHOP PERSPECTIVE

PROGRAMMATIC DIAGRAM THE FAÇADE APPARTMENT PART SHOP PART

REVERBERATED SOUND


STUDY OF THE FACADE

EXPLODE PROJECT

HOUSING PART SHEARS WALLS STRUCTURE

DETAILS FACADE

D I A G R I D STRUCTURE

OPEN

FACADE

SEMI OPEN

CLOSE

STRUCTURE ENGINE

DETAILS FACET

SUSPENDED C E I L I N G SECONDARY STRUCTURE

THE SHOP PART SHEARS WALLS

PERFORATED FACET

STRUCTURE

MAIN STRUCTURE

75


WILLIAM DAVIDSON SWARM TRACERY THE TURBINE HALL, TATE MODERN, London Swarm behaviour, when applied to architectural systems, has the opportunity to manipulate users in a space; this, in turn, can create unpredictable and playful gestures back as generative form. This process relies on a fundamental principle of swarms - when acting as one, behaviour is regulated, but when acting as many, these behaviours react to each other. In doing so, something greater and altogether different than the original behaviour is generated. Project ‘Swarm Tracery’ reimagines the fundamental building elements within a cybernetic system. The notion of a roof as a uniform plane is instead envisaged as part of a responsive and generative feedback system. This speculative proposal posits a design methodology based on the emergent capacities of swarm behaviour as part of a responsive and autonomous driver in an architectural system. An application of this logic to a wider realm of urbanism may be possible, as this behaviour is polyscalar; in short micro-reactions generate complex urban systems. By looking at architecture through this lens, swarm behaviour can lay the foundations of an autonomous environment that is reflexive of evolving, social, economic and environmental circumstances.


1 - nodes

Cohesion : Separation : Alignment :

2 - arcs

80 60 60

3 - tracks

Cohesion : Separation : Alignment :

Cohesion : Separation : Alignment :

30 80 60

4 - braids

80 30 80

Cohesion : Separation : Alignment :

80 60 30

77


KATY KANN SWARMING INTERVENTIONS

The design considers specific interventions to form shaded resting spaces in urban landscapes in an attempt to offer an alternative perspective to the motionless architecture blocks we see on an everyday basis. This system is unit based where reaction diffusion is a principle growth algorithm controlled by a set of rules, parameters and time. Through the module-to-module communication and module-to-human communication, in the different scales and configurations, new computation design systems could produce continuous formations and actively engage with the environment. Behaviour becoming the main instrument for creating the deeper sets of relations with surrounding environment and respond at the level of individual and collective formations. Studies show that engaging your creative mindset can help reduce stress and anxiety (Walker, C., 2016). The brief presented an opportunity to engage peoples creative minds, helping them look beyond the everyday and the ordinary, and helping young adults consider what might be possible if we think a little differently.


79


STEPHEN SULLIVAN CYBER CUBE The Cyber Cube explores the potential of Cybernetics both internally and externally. A century on from Le Corbusier’s Domino, the architectural paradigm on which much of Modernist architecture was built on and continues to this day, represents the static nature of architecture that has not evolved in similar fields of art and science. Located in Manchester, England, a city associated with the Industrial Revolution, the Cyber Cube juxtaposes the technological potential of Cybernetics with industry to form a striking idea of what a future interactive architecture could be. The mesh symbolises a cloud - itself a mass which does not have a fixed ‘site’ and is almost always unique, continually adapting to the pressure differentials in the air. These clouds, like the interactions in Cybernetics are invisible in how they are processed but the result can be seen. The cloud will use cybernetics to respond to the environment around it in terms of pollution, humidity, noise and wind levels and will continually adapt in illuminance and form to reflect its ever-changing context. Juxtaposing with the lightness of the cloud, internal cubes are articulated on the exterior and enclosed behind the cloud consisting of a series of spatial experiences without a site. Cybernetics will allow users to solve challenges in cubes as well as more practical purposes such as ensuring they do not get lost in the labyrinth. Ultimately, Cybernetics allows for a re-imagining of architectural experience in which the user can experience space without becoming ‘lost’ as well as a deeper interaction with the immediate environmental context as reflected in the mesh cloud.


81


ANDRADA CALIN IN PARTIO (SHARING EXPERIENCES) In the context of city life, public squares are the heart of public manifestations and participation to public life. They host protests, ash mobs, public holidays and represent the perfect scene for spontaneous human activities. Physical qualities such as rich façades of the surrounding buildings, soft edges and pedestrian routes that led to these squares are particularly important for setting the scene for the public engagement. My wall system challenges traditional notions of public art, which is static and non responsive to users. This installation not only emphasizes on compression and expansion in the city, but encourages public engagement by being able to record, respond and initiate spontaneous activities for users such as dance. In the virtual realm, this experimental architectural installation provides another layer of experience for live performances in public squares. The system is responsive wall system which records, analyses and displays human movement. The wall system designed specifically to be set up in public squares.


Kinetic Wall Build Up 1. Incorporated Vicon Motion Scanner 2. Pin Elements with LED and Ardruino Boards 3. Punched Wall with hidraylic motors 4. Steel Frame 5. Mega Ardruino 6. Vicon Control System

Feeback Loop Cybernetic System Second Order of Cybernetics System The feedback loop of the wall system is using Vicon Scanners and distance trackers in order to record and analyse human movement in public squares. In this loop, movements are recorded , processed and sent to the screen which starts to form the moves at real life speed. Once this happens other users engage and start mimicking the moves done by the wall. The scanner then records the new moves and sends them to another public square some where else in the world. VISUAL PERCEPTION Cognitive processes that receive input from eyes and interpret what we see; visual intelligence

Feedback Loop System Feedback Loop / The Mimicking Wall

Responsive Wall starts to interact

The system is a second order of cybernetic principle relying on a feedback loop enabled by the constant dynamics of public squares.

Responsive Wall

Responsive Wall is mimicked by the public

Public Square with 3d Movement Scanner System

PHYSICAL MECHANISM Eyes (Mechanism); Retina (Color and Value Input); Optic Nerve; Brain (Input Receipt)

SPATIAL COGNITION Spatial Ability; Mental Visualization; Mental Relations; Mental Orientation Processing and Cotrol System

Feedback from Squares around the world 3D Scanner of Moves

83 52


qed : AIR


qed : AIR M(Arch) 2 A prototypic terminal building that will explore contemporary development in design for aviation in respect of functional organisation, passenger experience, construction / operational systems and the dynamics of changes in use patterns within a range of timescales. The development of proposals in abstraction of any specific location will explore materials / systems ecologies and the potential for adaptation to a variety of generic climatic contexts and variations in architectural language or narrative defined by different political and cultural settings. A key starting point in this process is the discourse between the generic nature of rapidly deployabale (pop up) `systems` and processes contrasted with the potential for the unique manifestation of any iteration. The second stage of the programme would incorporate the `grounding` of the project in a specific setting and explore the particular inections generated by climate, culture and other aspects of `location`. Opportunities to explore systematic infrastructures, complementary and hybridised programmes are critical factors in defining and characterising `grounded` proposals.

85


OLIVER POZEGIC GAO: planestation Situated on the boundary of the Sahara Desert, the city of Gao, Mali, is experiencing a huge population increase due to the countries move away from a gold dependent economy. New exports in Iron, Bauxite and Copper have seen an increase in capital and skilled labourers within cities such as Gao with the necessity for improved infrastructure in such places becoming more apparent. The GAO: planestation utilises a Climate Modifier to create a large passively cooled civic space that reduces the climatic conditions of the arid climate found in Gao. These climatic conditions are predicted to worsen due to the effects of climate change on sub-Saharan settlements. This reduction in habitable and agricultural land is counteracted by the implementation of the climate modifier allowing the planestation to accommodate and feed the future populations of Gao.

1

Car Park

Green Lung

The terminal building is designed using a ‘single level: side by side’ model that incorporates local road networks into the terminal circulation. The material design and construction techniques derive from ecological strategies that focus towards the contextual and economic framework defined within the project.

1

2

Market Hall

Terminal Savannah with Airport Operations

Security & Customs with Miners

Terminal Gates

Green Lung

Shuttle Buses to Aircraft


87


Bridges Secondary Structure

DOMINIC GARRETT SHIP Sustainable Harbour Internation Port What if an airport could be designed in such a way that it comes with a multitude of positive social side effects. To protect the city from floods this requires an 8km long barrier of hard engineering, but to make it socially successful it needs to take place in a dialogue with the community of New York City. Parts of NYC are actually built upon landfill waste including La Guardia airport. This projects proposal looks to make use of landfill waste as a resource to help to develop a storm surge barrier to protect the city using what it usually sees as being a useless entity. This socially responsible idea enables NYC to retain its role as a gateway to America and free up valuable urban space currently occupied by lack luster airports. The project doesn’t aim to throw a blanket over the issue of climate change but today we somehow have to live with the consequences of our existing lifestyle. Sustainable architecture does not have to be a myriad of sacrifices to save the planet. This project looks to flex and adapt in a way that provides a holistic approach to the global and local communities by protecting and connecting them in inventive ways.

Primary Structure

Skin

Skin

Foundations


Competition Page 1 or 2

89


HARRY HARRISON Black Rock International In 1965, Reyner Banham published a journal in which he stated; ‘A home is not a house’. By identifying the fundamental objects and systems necessary for people to be happy and comfortable(see figure 1), Banham created an ‘Enviro-Bubble’ (figure 2). Through the analysis of this ideology we have identified a paradigm for the modern day. Rather than mass produced electronics, society is now a mass connectivity hub with digital consumption far surpassing the physical, dominating the needs and desires of the modern man. In contemporary society, location has become increasingly meaningless. In this sense, we could omit the need for any bulky system and focus on a solution that allows the individual to feel at ‘home’ wherever they are, a modern day ‘Enviro-Bubble’. Our design concept is inspired by colonies of ants that thrive in most ecosystems due to their social organisation and ability to modify their environments using swarm intelligence methods. It is an adaptable, flexible environment in which the everyday activity of modern day individuals is promoted through an intelligent structure of super organisms. Through the division of labour and sophisticated communication the system has a fundamental ability to solve complex problems.


Competition Page 1 or 2

91


FLORENCE COOKE STEED Pavana Once every twelve years, the flood plains east of Allahabad, India, hold the world’s largest religious festival, the Kumbh Mela. This celebration is the manifestation of traditional Hindu spirituality and attracts over one-hundred million pilgrims to bathe in the convergence of three holy rivers over a period of 55 days. When the Mela is over, the site is renewed and every trace of the festival is washed away by monsoon flooding. The Pavana terminal acts as a ‘pop-up’ airport for the festival with distributed airport functions integrated within the Mela in hubs. Pavana explores the constraints put upon aviation design in a hot and humid climate, while also facilitating agricultural resilience for the areas permanent communities in the face of threats to their livelihood from flooding. Pavana will benefit the wider Uttar Pradesh region economically, socially and environmentally by providing more efficient transport, self-sustained energy, clean water, material resources and educational opportunities. In addition, the terminal draws upon traditional cultural elements that ground the building in its contextual roots.


93


SHAHRUKH AHMED Airport Farming in the Yemen Airport Farming in the Yemen is an ecologically holistic scheme that aims to introduce an inux of agriculture and business into a deteriorating Yemeni economy. The scheme consists of the Agroport building and surrounding facilities that utilise cheap but effective environmental technologies to facilitate the needs of a productive farm and international terminal buildings within the arid coast of Yemen. The Agroport itself is an innovative design that utilises an undulating canopy that can be adapted according to a Hexgrid system and acts as a primary climate modifier. The canopy and the surrounding cooling walls create a pleasant interior environment for users to travel through and also enables the growth of vegetation. The building is intended to be both highly functional and also a cultural landmark introducing an inux of international visitors to the recovering country. The design utilises the cultural language of pattern to create an internal aesthetic that remains appropriate. The diagrid structured buildings under the canopy create a kinesthetic landscape in keeping with the primarily perambulatory users. The scheme is an environmental, social and economic generator in a hostile context that can be achieved rapidly and cost-effectively.


95


PANIKOS PITTAKAS Al Rayan International Airport Al Rayan International Airport it will be the spectacular new gateway to Saudi Arabia. The airport has a highly self sustained efficient design, which has been inspired by local traditions, and is based on a flexible modular solution that allows for future expansion – the new building secures the city’s position as the main hub for the Tabuk region. In response to Saudi Arabia’s climate, where summer temperatures vary markedly between day and night time, the building is constructed largely from concrete, the high thermal mass of the material providing passive environmental control The tessellated roof canopy comprises a series of shallow concrete shells, which extend to shade the facades – each component provided a modular unit for construction. Echoing the veins of a leaf, a geometric pattern based on traditional Islamic forms is applied to each exposed component. The airport typology is linear type of 20 gates which contains the main processing areas and shops, lounges and restaurants. Between these volumes, interior oasis are designed, as a feature of vernacular architecture in the region – contribute to the building’s environmental strategy.


POLYS CHRISTOFI Forest City International Airport Forest City International Airport project is set in South-West Malaysia, near the new development of Forest City on the border of Malaysia and Singapore; and is testing the distributed model for an airport as a piece of research. Building on the theme of ‘eco’ and ‘smart’ cities, Forest City International Airport will integrate with the light rail infrastructure of Forest city, which will be also linked to the planned Kuala Lumpur-Singapore High Speed Rail system, connecting passengers to Singapore and the rest of Peninsular Malaysia. The prototypic airport system, locates the functions of check-in, baggage drop-off and security & immigration checks within train stations in different cities, and utilises a just-in-time delivery system with train shuttles to the airport terminal which is essentially only the gates. This allows for an automatic, faster and more efficient processing of passengers, creating a simpler and more pleasant airport experience.


99


CHRIS DOHERTY Aarport International In 2017, Aarhus and the Central Denmark Region hold the title of European Capital of Culture, inspired by the theme ‘Rethink: Think the new, think anew, think again!’, where culture will be celebrated and promoted in all of its forms. Culture is a driving force and a key to resolving many of the challenges that cities and societies face, now and in the future. Aarport International intends to become a new gateway, providing a sustainable and efficient airport experience that promotes Scandinavian culture as an important brand. Through the integration of a high speed rail network, it is intended to help make the region attractive to new citizens and businesses.


101


ARRON EL-AMMAR Vaasiluvun (Arrive) The project seeks to speculate and articulate the possibilities and inevitability of sea level in the country of the Maldives, namely the island of Maafushi. Through the implementation of a new passenger terminal building typology combined with advanced techniques in BiorockŠ to lagoon the many island in the country. Growing BiorockŠ at a mass scale gives opportunities far beyond those capable of traditional sea defence, allowing a passenger terminal space to become a key part of a masterplan. Considerations for hybrid programme and new technologies are essential in the airport of the future, all of which are explored throughout the project. Traditional methods of airport expansion have proved ineffective in the country over the many years and the immediacy of sea level mitigation coupled with the need for mass tourism has recently halted and here become possibilities to engage in speculative research in the Maldives. Over the next 80 years it is predicted that the country will have vanished and it is vital to rethink the current strategies of the country and ensure the survival of a remote community and rich history. The project provides a link between my interests in sustainable design and technological advancements, to develop my intellectual position in architecture. The Maldives provides a rich historical context and culture that allows exploration in adaptability and designing for time in architecture. The project provides opportunities for country survival allowing adaptation into its inexorable future.


103


CHRISTOPHER LEUNG Extension of Haneda Airport, Tokyo According to Japanese Culture - History, Japanese’s form of culture is supported by aesthetic of plants. For Japanese people, the nature is their god, without the god, they could not survive, which means, history of Japan would not be existing (Yip, 2003). In traditional Japanese culture, Zen, every elements of nature are representing different meaning of life. Back in 2500 years ago, they created the Zen garden within walled garden as a micro universe, which were intended to imitate the intimate essence of nature, not its actual appearance, and to serve as an aid to meditate about the true meaning of life, respect and live with nature. As the airport is first and last space for visitors, the terminal design is trying to incorporate with traditional Japanese Zen culture elements to let visitors to experience the transitional space to make people’s heart and spirit calm, and prepare their mind for the journey. Also, it is to let people understand Japanese culture, respect and live with nature.


105


Cornwall Study Trip October 2016


CORNWALL TRIP 2016 M(Arch) 2 The interest in Wheal Jane to university students has been further extended with a visit by a group of architecture students from Manchester University. A recommendation from Exeter University’s Environmental and Sustainability Institute, whose students visit Wheal Jane every year, led to this first visit by students from Manchester and the first from a group studying architecture. The students, on a field trip looking at the effects of mining on the architecture of Cornwall, were, after a presentation and tour, able to appreciate how the legacy of mining on the site is being transformed to provide economic benefit and job creation as well as restoration, remediation and a sustainable future for the site.

107


qed : LAND


qed : LAND M(Arch) 2 A prototypic terminal building that will explore contemporary development in design for aviation in respect of functional organisation, passenger experience, construction / operational systems and the dynamics of changes in use patterns within a range of timescales. The development of proposals in abstraction of any specific location will explore materials / systems ecologies and the potential for adaptation to a variety of generic climatic contexts and variations in architectural language or narrative defined by different political and cultural settings. A key starting point in this process is the discourse between the generic nature of rapidly deployabale (pop up) `systems` and processes contrasted with the potential for the unique manifestation of any iteration. The second stage of the programme would incorporate the `grounding` of the project in a specific setting and explore the particular inections generated by climate, culture and other aspects of `location`. Opportunities to explore systematic infrastructures, complementary and hybridised programmes are critical factors in defining and characterising `grounded` proposals.

109


JESSIE Y. HU Work, Live, Play at Wheal Jane Due to the evaporation of industrial functions, Wheal Jane is a post-industrial site that benefits a redevelopment proposal, to fulfil the economic and social needs of today’s standards. The introduction of a knowledge-based business park encompassing environmental, economical, social-cultural, historical and aesthetic prominence will add extra value to reconstructing this piece of unique landscape. With elements taken from everyday life ‘Work, Live, Play’ is redefined within the Cornwall context, so that the scenic values of the area is emphasised with visual corridors and elevated platforms which all integrate different components in creating a successful knowledge-based business park that can serve all kinds of social, cultural and physical activities. Meeting the needs of the site owner, the main function of each sector of proposal is to foster a comfortable and positive working environment. The structure and position of project very much becomes a conceptual element that is used to create a bridge of specific relationship between environment and knowledge.


111


SAM BENNINGTON Meridian Meridian -– A surveying term that establishes a line of reference. The bearing is used to designate direction. Situated north of Falmouth, on the site of the Wheal Jane Group, ‘Meridian’ sits in the unique position of acting as the flagship centre for global mining. The focal nature of the building is a necessity within, not only the public eye, but more locally within the context of the site. It’s long ribbon form (dimensioned to create a visual language with the on-site architecture and adjacent topography enables for it to become it’s own horizon line within the context of its locality. Contained within the building, as well as a number of public amenities and a landscape of accommodation, are the necessary resources for the study and experimentation of biologically cleansing and rejuvenating an eco-system once greatly affected by a history of pollutants from a history of invasive tin mining. Materially drawn from the context of a mining landscape, the building also visually evolves throughout the course of it’s active life; at once aging as it seeks to find a means of reinvigorating its surroundings.

Selection of Images from the other page 1 or 2


Competition Page 1 or 2

113


NUOYA(CHRISTINA) LIU Garden by the Office Garden by the office becomes a site that has high concentration for collaborations. This makes the users themselves the assets and a Wunderkammer gardenexperimentation of secret occurrences on site that inventively penetrate an otherwise flat territory of cultural spaces that facilitates it. Different types of people then come to Wheal Jane to share their sets of skills or knowledges while enjoying the serendipity of Wheal Jane. Creating this environment for the transfer of ‘value’ then becomes the new information work environment. Which preserve past knowledge and human creation, and to encourage contemporary thought. The concept helps Wheal Jane to upgrade the stage of the site by using architecture to improving its image-ability, spatiality, functionality. Using the co-existence between the past and the present, old and new, creating a contrast of space. View sequence provide curious for visitor to rich experience, spatial change between solid and void, dark and light, thin and thick. Use the past to enrich the present and positions history as a foundation upon which new ideas evolves.. This rich body of knowledge regarding mining is a valuable public resource, alive with thoughts and experiments. Yet it remains inaccessible and intangible to most. The proposal stores and displays the content, making it accessible to a curious public with an information working environment.


115


WEI EE (DANSON) CHOO Institute for Post-Mining Ecology The Institute for Post-Mining Ecology is an overall strategy that involves a multi facade program involving three primary functions - information work, recreation (Bath Tower) and a fly fishing school situated in a post-mining era tapping on the past mining site’s potentials. Combined, the institution fosters a new relationship between cultivation and consumption, producing site-specific and site-sensitive architecture that mimics, changes, adapts and refines itself with the passing of time, the changing seasons and its occupants’ responses within the culture of knowledge, food, arts, tourism and ultimately reintroduce community into these inhospitable lands In essence, the proposal complements the current long term strategy in socioeconomical production whereby the tailings pond changes in the coming 60 years as part of the current re-mediation process undertaken. A ‘territorial’ environment is built upon in anticipation of a future larger environment, integrating exploration and recreational constructs (social) that transform architecture into a tool to expand economic developments.


117


SHENGXIN JUSTIN CHONG TOR The design concept is inspired by the stunning rock formations all around Cornwall, with the famous Cheesewring granite as a significant attraction that forms part of Cornwall’s identity. The design concept blends well with the site due to its mining identity and the unique tailings dam. The idea is to have a building that draws similarity of rock boulders ‘tumbling down the slope’, a unique sculptural form that will shape the new identity of Wheal Jane and place it under international limelight as part of the Wheal Jane Earth Science Park development. The spaces of Tor are fitted in within the concept of rock formation which produces walls at unconventional angles which further makes the spaces more dynamic and appealing, a strong identity for the architectural language for the Tor. The key space of the Tor is at the atrium where a feature staircase is made up of multiple components, an undulating lattice envelopes a four meter wide grand staircase which ascends three stories from the ground level through the sky-lit central atrium, which itself extends into narrower stairs until it reaches to the full height of the building. This vertical piazza is the social heart of the building, providing a place for impromptu and planned meetings.


119


ASHLIN NICOLE MILTON Chapter House An isolated, serene retreat in the heart of the Cornish mining landscape, the Chapter House creates an work environment inspiring reflection and collaboration. Global specialists in their fields of mining come together to research and share their findings with Wheal Jane as a idyllic backdrop as well as a source of skills and history unique to the disused mining site. The spaces within the building provide a variety of environments for the many users that will be visiting who will benefit from collaborative, research based work as well as quiet individual reflection. The building is organised around these users’ journeys, framing views out across the tailings pond and Wheal Jane’s natural landscape.


121


qed : WATER


qed : WATER M(Arch) 2 A facility for the Helford River Children`s Sailing Trust to support activities at Trevassack Quarry. The immediate brief to generate designs for facilities for changing etc related to sailing activities for children with disabilities will be complemented by a more extensive masterplan to develop the larger site taking account of adjacent programming (Goonhilly Earth Station, SSSI owned by English Nature / Natural England ) and further development related to HRCST that may include on site short stay residential functions, skywatching and themes connected with the original function of the site (serpentine quarry).

123


Routes to residential area Routes to entrance & parking

Routes to Sailing

ENRAN ZHANG Trevassack Holiday Resort B/W Head/Shoulder Picture

ENRAN ZHANG Trevassack Holiday

Routes to Museum of Serpentine

Biogas Heat

Electricity

High temperature

Fuel cells Hot water

System engineering

Algae panels Biomass

Local power network

Local heat network

User

Heater

Year 2 M(Arch) Architecture

Low temperature

PV panels

Heat pump Storage borehole

The development of the Trevassack Quarry Holiday Resort starts from designing a fully accessible sailing club for Helford River Children’s Sailing Trust, a real time client for this thesis project. The vision for this holiday resort is creating a disabled-friendly site that uplift children with special conditions and their family. It also celebrates the special but often forgotten history relating to Serpentine on the Lizard. Sustainability and the protection of the ecology of the site is a prerequisite for Resort this project. The resort aims to become an exemplar

The development of the Trevassack Quarry The sailing club-Five Sense Stone is my individual reHoliday Resort starts from designing a fully sponse to a sailing club design project. It caters to the accessible sailing club for immediate Helford River need for teaching space and changing facilChildren’s Sailing Trust, a realities timewith client thefor ability to evolve into a permanent base for this thesis project. The vision for this holiday the organisation. ZHANG resort is ENRAN creating a disabled-friendly If the sailingsite club project is the one that brings new life Trevassack Holiday Resort that uplift children with special conditions Year 2 M(Arch) Architecture to the site, the Museum of Serpentine is what put the ead/Shoulder and their family. It also celebrates the site on the map. I went even further in the journey of Picture The development of the Trevassack Quarry Holiday Respecial but often forgotten history relating sort starts from designing a fully accessible sailing club to Serpentine Lizard. for Helfordon Riverthe Children’s Sailing Sustainability Trust, a real time clistory about serpentine and the site through a unique for this thesis project. The a vision for this and the ent protection of the ecology ofholiday the resort is creating a disabled-friendly site thatexperience. uplift chilspatial I was looking for a design that joins with special conditions and their family. It alsoThe celsite is a dren prerequisite for this project. the history, the nature and art together. Museum of Serebrates the special but often forgotten history relating resort aims to become an exemplar offto Serpentine on the Lizard. Sustainability and the protection of the ecology of the site is a prerequisite for grid development in the UK. this project. The resort aims to become an exemplar The sailing club-Five Sense Stone is my Theresponse sailing club-Five Stone isclub my individual reindividual toSense a sailing design to a sailing club design project. It caters to the project. sponse It caters to the immediate need immediate need for teaching space and changing facilities with the abilityand to evolve into a permanent base for for teaching space changing facilities the organisation. with the Ifability toclub evolve athat permanent the sailing project isinto the one brings new life the site, the Museum of Serpentine is what put the base for tothe organisation. site on the map. I went even further in the journey of If the sailing club project is the one that a story about and the siteMuseum through a unique brings new life toserpentine the site, the of spatial experience. I was looking for a design that joins Serpentine is what put the site on the map. the history, the nature and art together. Museum of SerI went even further in the journey of finding the true self of the quarry. The key aim is to ENRAN ZHANG tell a story about serpentine and the site Trevassack Holiday Resort through a unique spatial experience. I was Year 2 M(Arch) Architecture B/W Head/Shoulder looking for a design that joins the history, Picture The development of the Trevassack Quarry Holiday Resort starts from designing a fully accessible sailing club the nature and art together. Museum of for Helford River Children’s Sailing Trust, a real time client for this thesis project. The vision for this holiday Serpentine will be a place of memory and resort is creating a disabled-friendly site that uplift children with special conditions and their family. It also celreflection. ebrates the special but often forgotten history relating

to Serpentine on the Lizard. Sustainability and the protection of the ecology of the site is a prerequisite for this project. The resort aims to become an exemplar

Routes to residential area Routes to entrance & parking

Routes to Sailing Routes to Museum of Serpentine

Biogas Heat

Fuel cells System engineering

Algae panels Biomass

Local power network

Local heat network

User

Heater

Low temperature

PV panels

Heat pump Storage borehole

ENRAN ZHANG Trevassack Holiday Resort B/W Head/Shoulder Picture

Year 2 M(Arch) Architecture

The development of the Trevassack Quarry Holiday Resort starts from designing a fully accessible sailing club for Helford River Children’s Sailing Trust, a real time client for this thesis project. The vision for this holiday resort is creating a disabled-friendly site that uplift children with special conditions and their family. It also celebrates the special but often forgotten history relating to Serpentine on the Lizard. Sustainability and the protection of the ecology of the site is a prerequisite for this project. The resort aims to become an exemplar The sailing club-Five Sense Stone is my individual response to a sailing club design project. It caters to the immediate need for teaching space and changing facilities with the ability to evolve into a permanent base for the organisation. If the sailing club project is the one that brings new life to the site, the Museum of Serpentine is what put the site on the map. I went even further in the journey of a story about serpentine and the site through a unique spatial experience. I was looking for a design that joins the history, the nature and art together. Museum of Ser-

Timber panel facade & Operable double glazing

150*300mm GlueLam Structural frame

Timber panel facade & Operable double glazing

The sailing club-Five Sense Stone is my individual response to a sailing club design project. It caters to the immediate need for teaching space and changing facilities with the ability to evolve into a permanent base for the organisation. If the sailing club project is the one that brings new life to the site, the Museum of Serpentine is what put the site on the map. I went even further in the journey of a story about serpentine and the site through a unique spatial experience. I was looking for a design that joins the history, the nature and art together. Museum of Ser-

Electricity

High temperature

Hot water

300*300mm GlueLam Structural tripod system

150*300mm GlueLam Structural frame

300*300mm GlueLam beams


Low temperature

Heat pump Storage borehole

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SEE SERN KHOR Kres Awel Dowr Kres Awel Dowr is a water sport facilities and wellness retreat set in Trevassack quarry, an abandoned Serpentine quarry in the centre of Lizard Peninsular in Cornwall. The design is respectful of the balance that nature has struck on the site between harsh forces of wind and water and a delicate layer of soil that provides a scant foothold for vegetation among Serpentine outcroppings – some of which have been hewn by time, and others split and left behind as a visible memory of the once prevalent quarrying industry of Cornwall. Given the remote nature of the site, and the very fragile conditions of the Temporal Temporal evolution evolution building location, a prefabricated crosslaminated timber (CLT) panel system was chosen. This system is a highly sustainable and cost effective construction solution, reducing labour, travel, and impact on the remote site. The structural capacity and ruggedness of the panels reinforce the minimalist form and material palette of the building, creating a clean, simple building form with material warmth that showcases the construction system. The scheme appreciates the spectacular view of the quarry, inspires to create a social, economic and environmental sustainable development in the natural wilderness.0

The project The is project set outisto setbe out developed to be developed in stages, in stages, Similar construction Similar construction technique technique is applied is applied over over where construction where construction process process of the building of the building can can the site,the where site,the where architecture the architecture create acreate sense a sense be duplicated be duplicated and multiplied and multiplied with time. with Spaces time. Spaces of coherence. of coherence. The minimal The minimal intervention intervention will turnwill turn are flexible are to flexible be adapt to beinadapt futureinuse future while use views while views a forgotten a forgotten landscape landscape at the centre at the of centre Lizardof Lizard are engaging are engaging the site the itselfsite as itself inspiration. as inspiration. peninsular peninsular into a learning into a learning and recreational and recreational area area while leaving while the leaving site the unspoilt. site unspoilt.

applied over reate a sense ntion will turn ntre of Lizard reational area

Temporal Temporal evolution evolution The project The is project set outisto setbe out developed to be developed in stages, in stages, Similar construction Similar construction technique technique is applied is applied over over where construction where construction process process of the building of the building can can the site,the where site,the where architecture the architecture create acreate sense a sense be duplicated be duplicated and multiplied and multiplied with time. with Spaces time. Spaces of coherence. of coherence. The minimal The minimal intervention intervention will turnwill turn are flexible are to flexible be adapt to beinadapt futureinuse future while use views while views a forgotten a forgotten landscape landscape at the centre at the of centre Lizardof Lizard are engaging are engaging the site the itselfsite as itself inspiration. as inspiration. peninsular peninsular into a learning into a learning and recreational and recreational area area while leaving while the leaving site the unspoilt. site unspoilt.

Temporal Temporal evolution evolution The project isThe set project out to be is set developed out to be indeveloped stages, inSimilar stages,construction Similar construction technique is technique applied over is applied over where construction where construction process of the process building of the can building the site, can where thethe site,architecture where the create architecture a sense create a sense be duplicatedbeand duplicated multiplied and with multiplied time. Spaces with time.ofSpaces coherence.ofThe coherence. minimal intervention The minimal will intervention turn will turn are flexible toare beflexible adapt intofuture be adapt use while in future views use while a forgotten views landscape a forgottenatlandscape the centreatofthe Lizard centre of Lizard are engagingare theengaging site itself the as inspiration. site itself as inspiration. peninsular into peninsular a learning into and a learning recreational and area recreational area while leaving while the site leaving unspoilt. the site unspoilt.

Inspired by Inspired the rich byhistory the rich of history sailing of with sailing the fishing with the harbour fishingand harbour pier, as andwell pier, asas the well painting as the by painting local artists, by local theartists, project the project aim to bring aimintothe bring pierinelement the pierfor element the sailing for the facilities sailingon facilities site. The onwatch site. The tower watch provides tower an provides observation an observation deck for deck wildlife for wildlife watching watching and security andoverlooking security overlooking the wholethe quarry. whole Besides, quarry.its Besides, landmark its landmark characteristic characteristic works similarly worksas similarly the light astower, the light tower, guiding the guiding sailingthe fleet sailing backfleet to the back pier. toUsing the pier. theUsing periscope the periscope theory, limited theory, mobility limitedusers mobility can users enjoycan the enjoy same the wilderness same wilderness views as on views top as of on thetop tower. of the tower.

view

view

view

Inspired by Inspired the rich byhistory the rich of history sailing of with sailing the fishing with the harbour fishingand harbour pier, as andwell pier, asas the well painting as the by painting local artists, by local theartists, project the project aim to bring aimintothe bring pierinelement the pierfor element the sailing for the facilities sailingon facilities site. The onwatch site. The tower watch provides tower an provides observation an observation deck for deck wildlife for wildlife watching watching and security andoverlooking security overlooking the wholethe quarry. whole Besides, quarry.its Besides, landmark its landmark characteristic characteristic works similarly worksas similarly the light astower, the light tower, guiding the guiding sailingthe fleet sailing backfleet to the back pier. toUsing the pier. theUsing periscope the periscope theory, limited theory, mobility limitedusers mobility can users enjoycan the enjoy same the wilderness same wilderness views as on views top as of on thetop tower. of the tower.

view view

view

view

receptionreception view changing changing places places classroomclassroom

tists, the project edeck for wildlife s the light tower, same wilderness

storage storage

Inspired by the rich Inspired history by of thesailing rich history with the of sailing fishing with harbour the fishing and pier, harbour as welland as the pier,painting as well by as the localpainting artists, the by local project artists, the project aim to bring in the aimpier to bring element in the forpier the element sailing facilities for the on sailing site.facilities The watch on tower site. The provides watch an tower observation provides deck an observation for wildlifedeck for wildlife watching and security watching overlooking and security the overlooking whole quarry. the Besides, whole quarry. its landmark Besides, characteristic its landmark works characteristic similarly as works the light similarly tower, as the light tower, guiding the sailing guiding fleet back the sailing to thefleet pier.back Using tothe theperiscope pier. Usingtheory, the periscope limited mobility theory, limited users can mobility enjoy users the same can wilderness enjoy the same wilderness views as on top views of theas tower. on top of the tower.

phase 1 phase 1 The first priority The firstofpriority the project of theis project the changing is the changing facilities that facilities is crucial that is crucial for the sailing for theand sailing water and sport water activities. sport activities. The changing The changing facilities facilities with placed withonplaced the existing on the concrete existing concrete foundation foundation with a temporary with a temporary reception.reception. A floatingApier floating is constructed pier is constructed to allow people to allow topeople board and to board and sail to moor. sail to moor.

view

phase 1

phase 1

The first priorityThe of the firstproject priorityisofthe thechanging project isfacilities the changing that is crucial facilities that is crucial for the sailing for andthe water sailing sport andactivities. water sport The changing activities. The facilities changing facilities with placed on with the placed existingon concrete the existing foundation concrete withfoundation a temporary with a temporary reception. A floating reception. pier isAconstructed floating piertoisallow constructed people to to allow boardpeople and to board and sail to moor. sail to moor.

phase 2

phase 2

A reception withAareception staff roomwith thena add staff on room to welcome then add the on to visitors welcome and the visitors and managing the paper managing work. the Thepaper first floating work. The learning first floating space islearning attached space is attached onto the pier with onto where the pier children withcan where learn children more about can learn sailing. more about sailing.

phase 3

phase 3

The extended classroom The extended will be classroom build with willthe besimilar build with module the as similar the module as the learning space, increase learning the space, educational increase the spaces. educational A watchspaces. tower isAbuilt watch tower is built on top of the staff onroom, top ofoverlooking the staff room, the overlooking quarry site. The the quarry storagesite. areaThe storage area will housed the will fleethoused and equipment the fleet and and equipment a ramped pontoon and a ramped into the pontoon into the water. water.

phase 2 phase 2 A reception A reception with a staff with room a staff thenroom add then on toadd welcome on to welcome the visitors the and visitors and managingmanaging the paperthe work. paper Thework. first floating The firstlearning floatingspace learning is attached space is attached ontoview the pier ontowith the where pier children wherecan children learn can more learn about more sailing. about sailing. view with

phase 4

phase 4

With the sailingWith hub getting the sailing more hubincome gettingand more funding, income theand wellness funding, the wellness centre is constructed centretois form constructed a waterfront to form courtyard. a waterfront Another courtyard. verticalAnother vertical tower ease the process tower ease of positioning the processon of water positioning using triangulation on water using of triangulation of coordination when coordination sailing around whenthe sailing quarry. around the quarry.

restaurantrestaurant therapy room therapy room

phase 3 phase 3

phase 4 phase 4

The extended The extended classroomclassroom will be build will with be build the similar with the module similarasmodule the as the learning space, learning increase space,the increase educational the educational spaces. Aspaces. watch tower A watch is built tower is built on top of on thetop staff ofroom, the staff overlooking room, overlooking the quarrythe site. quarry The storage site. Thearea storage area view view reception reception will housed willthe housed fleet and the fleet equipment and equipment and a ramped and apontoon ramped into pontoon the into the water. changingwater. placeschanging places

With the sailing With the hub sailing getting hubmore getting income moreand income funding, and the funding, wellness the wellness centre is constructed centre is constructed to form a to waterfront form a waterfront courtyard.courtyard. Another vertical Another vertical tower ease tower the process ease theofprocess positioning of positioning on water using on water triangulation using triangulation of of coordination coordination when sailing when around sailing the around quarry.the quarry.

phase 1 phase 1 The first priority The firstofpriority the project of theis project the changing is the changing facilities that facilities is crucial that is crucial for the sailing for theand sailing water and sport water activities. sport activities. The changing The changing facilities facilities with placed withonplaced the existing on the concrete existing concrete foundation foundation with a temporary with a temporary reception.reception. A floatingApier floating is constructed pier is constructed to allow people to allow topeople board and to board and sail to moor. sail to moor.

phase 2 phase 2 A reception A reception with a staff with room a staff thenroom add then on toadd welcome on to welcome the visitors the and visitors and managingmanaging the paperthe work. paper Thework. first floating The firstlearning floatingspace learning is attached space is attached onto the pier ontowith the where pier with children wherecan children learn can more learn about more sailing. about sailing.

The extend Th learning spa le on top of on th reception will housed wi water. changingwa p

classroom

classroom

storage

storage

storage

restaurant

restaurant

restaurant

therapy room

therapy room

classroom

therapy roo

phase 1

phase 1

The first priorityThe of the firstproject priorityisofthe thechanging project isfacilities the changing that is crucial facilities that is crucial for the sailing for andthe water sailing sport andactivities. water sport The changing activities. The facilities changing facilities with placed on with the placed existingon concrete the existing foundation concrete withfoundation a temporary with a temporary reception. A floating reception. pier isAconstructed floating piertoisallow constructed people to to allow boardpeople and to board and sail to moor. sail to moor.

phase 2

phase 2

A reception withAareception staff roomwith thena add staff on room to welcome then add the on to visitors welcome and the visitors and managing the paper managing work. the Thepaper first floating work. The learning first floating space islearning attached space is attached onto the pier with onto where the pier children withcan where learn children more about can learn sailing. more about sailing.

phase 3

phase 3

The extended classroom The extended will be classroom build with willthe besimilar build with module the as similar the module as the learning space, increase learning the space, educational increase the spaces. educational A watchspaces. tower isAbuilt watch tower is built on top of the staff onroom, top ofoverlooking the staff room, the overlooking quarry site. The the quarry storagesite. areaThe storage area will housed the will fleethoused and equipment the fleet and and equipment a ramped pontoon and a ramped into the pontoon into the water. water.

phase 4

phase 4

With the sailingWith hub getting the sailing more hubincome gettingand more funding, income theand wellness funding, the wellness centre is constructed centretois form constructed a waterfront to form courtyard. a waterfront Another courtyard. verticalAnother vertical tower ease the process tower ease of positioning the processon of water positioning using triangulation on water using of triangulation of coordination when coordination sailing around whenthe sailing quarry. around the quarry.


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PANAYIOTIS PASCHALIS TOPIA The proposal seek to provide Sailing related facilities and activities for children with disabilities at Cornwall’s Travassack Quarry for the Helford River Children’s sailing trust. This project frames the idea of a TEMPORARY and SYNERGISTIC design, the creation of a design that integrates and intercommunicate with the surrounding context. A system that can be altered allowing the design to adapt to future challenges. A design that can be constructed along the network of paths allow CONNECTIVITY with opportunities within and outside of the side. The paths are based on compliance, integration, mobility, texture and views. All parameters that allows to quantifies the requirements for a SENSORY experience: Touch, textures, friction, colours, luminosity, shape, pattern; sounds, movements & smell. An end product that promotes an architectural language that addresses the needs of the widest possible audience regardless of their abilities or age - UNIVERSAL Design. An environment that offers a wide range of diverse sensory experiences and responses. An environment that it has been designed so that the user can explore, destinations and journeys; allowing a deeper connection to the natural habitat and connectivity with nature.


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msa M Arch

atelier qed 2016 - 2017

Manchester School of Architecture qed catalogue 2016-2017  
Manchester School of Architecture qed catalogue 2016-2017  
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