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I M A G I N E H O W FA R W E ’ V E C O M E I N 2 0 0 4 Philip C. Ackerman Chairman, Board of Members

David E. Chesebrough President and CEO

Two thousand and four was a year of hard work and focused planning in which we challenged ourselves to take care of current business while simultaneously putting the museum on the path to the reinvention that is so necessary for its long-term vitality. We were successful on each count: The museum ended 2004 with a balanced budget, and we have taken our first confident steps along a business and services track that will enable us to become a nationally recognized science learning hub unique to the museum world. To improve its financial health and proactively diversify how we bring money into the organization, the Buffalo Museum of Science is moving to a business model that values deeper relationships with users and links revenues more closely with actual use of services. We continued to focus on programs and functions that have the longest-term positive impact on services to the community. We concentrated more on total contact hours with our clientele and less on simply driving head count. In many ways our services over last year increased as we created greater impact through increased partnerships, deeper engagement opportunities with individuals, students and teachers and new paths to youth who wouldn’t normally have access to our resources. In 2004 the museum continued to develop educational programs and research activities at its satellite sites, Tifft Nature Preserve and the Byron Ice Age dig. Grants from the John R. Oishei Foundation, West Ferry Foundation, M&T Bank, Tops Markets, Delphi Harrison and The Baird Foundation dramatically increased the museum’s ability to deliver and redefine exemplary science learning programs. A comprehensive master planning process was initiated in 2004 to identify the museum’s new role in meeting community needs. We recruited a dream team of national planning experts including Gyroscope, Inc., Alphonse DeSena, Ph.D., John H. Falk, Ph.D., Tom Krakauer, Ph.D., Roy Shafer and Mac West, Ph.D. to ensure that the finest minds and the best possible thinking are available to us, supporting our strong local team. Increasingly the museum embraced the concept of lifelong learning, a cutting-edge educational concept that takes into consideration where, when and how people learn. Seedlings from a sunflower

IFC

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BMS-0001 Annual Report Mech

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12:49 PM

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I M A G I N E H O W FA R W E ’ V E C O M E I N 2 0 0 4 Philip C. Ackerman Chairman, Board of Members

David E. Chesebrough President and CEO

Two thousand and four was a year of hard work and focused planning in which we challenged ourselves to take care of current business while simultaneously putting the museum on the path to the reinvention that is so necessary for its long-term vitality. We were successful on each count: The museum ended 2004 with a balanced budget, and we have taken our first confident steps along a business and services track that will enable us to become a nationally recognized science learning hub unique to the museum world. To improve its financial health and proactively diversify how we bring money into the organization, the Buffalo Museum of Science is moving to a business model that values deeper relationships with users and links revenues more closely with actual use of services. We continued to focus on programs and functions that have the longest-term positive impact on services to the community. We concentrated more on total contact hours with our clientele and less on simply driving head count. In many ways our services over last year increased as we created greater impact through increased partnerships, deeper engagement opportunities with individuals, students and teachers and new paths to youth who wouldn’t normally have access to our resources. In 2004 the museum continued to develop educational programs and research activities at its satellite sites, Tifft Nature Preserve and the Byron Ice Age dig. Grants from the John R. Oishei Foundation, West Ferry Foundation, M&T Bank, Tops Markets, Delphi Harrison and The Baird Foundation dramatically increased the museum’s ability to deliver and redefine exemplary science learning programs. A comprehensive master planning process was initiated in 2004 to identify the museum’s new role in meeting community needs. We recruited a dream team of national planning experts including Gyroscope, Inc., Alphonse DeSena, Ph.D., John H. Falk, Ph.D., Tom Krakauer, Ph.D., Roy Shafer and Mac West, Ph.D. to ensure that the finest minds and the best possible thinking are available to us, supporting our strong local team. Increasingly the museum embraced the concept of lifelong learning, a cutting-edge educational concept that takes into consideration where, when and how people learn. Seedlings from a sunflower

IFC

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The museum’s vision is to build and support a community of lifelong learners that engages everyone from the youngest visitors to the region’s amateur naturalists to its professional scientists and engineers. Interviews with community leaders, and input from planning workshops, community conversations and focus groups will enable the museum to align its future programs and services with the long-term interests of its most committed customers. Planning and testing for the future included development of hands-on, inquiry-based pilot programs and galleries that encourage personal interaction with the museum’s collections. In 2004 we researched and planned for Science Naturally!, a new relationship-based fund-raising program that will help us take charge of our own financial destiny in 2005 and beyond. Many highlights of the museum’s operations in 2004 and vision for 2005 and beyond are contained in the report that follows.

Sunflowers in full bloom

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The museum’s vision is to build and support a community of lifelong learners that engages everyone from the youngest visitors to the region’s amateur naturalists to its professional scientists and engineers. Interviews with community leaders, and input from planning workshops, community conversations and focus groups will enable the museum to align its future programs and services with the long-term interests of its most committed customers. Planning and testing for the future included development of hands-on, inquiry-based pilot programs and galleries that encourage personal interaction with the museum’s collections. In 2004 we researched and planned for Science Naturally!, a new relationship-based fund-raising program that will help us take charge of our own financial destiny in 2005 and beyond. Many highlights of the museum’s operations in 2004 and vision for 2005 and beyond are contained in the report that follows.

Sunflowers in full bloom

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IMAGINE A LEADING-EDGE SCIENCE EMPORIUM T H AT ’ S U N I Q U E T O T H E M U S E U M W O R L D A total of 293,291 people took part in museum programs and services in 2004 including exhibits, camps, public programs, website research, student outreach, distance learning, grant programs, seminars, lectures and other public and private learning activities. The Buffalo Museum of Science is a nationally recognized science learning hub that is unequaled anywhere in the United States. The museum is unique in part because it manages two outdoor laboratories including an urban nature preserve in South Buffalo and a working Ice Age dig in Byron, NY, and because it is affiliated with the Dr. Charles R. Drew Science Magnet School which shares its building. Authentic artifacts and specimens rather than man-made facsimiles characterize the museum’s priceless collections and place science learning in the thrilling context of tangible historic and prehistoric evidence. A distinguished staff includes highly trained scientists, research scholars and professional educators who participate at the highest level of science education dialogue and are recognized leaders in their fields. The museum’s role is to link the scientific community and the public through experiences and programs that serve children and adults, students and teachers, knowledgeable enthusiasts and professional researchers. As a science organization, the museum understands the crucial need to adapt to a changing environment and is engaged in thoughtful research to shape its future course. A contemplative master planning process is helping to identify the museum’s new role in meeting community needs. A dream team of national planning experts will ensure that the finest minds and the best possible thinking are available for the community. Interviews with community leaders, and input from planning workshops, community conversations and focus groups will enable the museum to align its future programs and services with the long-term interests of its most committed customers. Imagine a leading-edge regional treasure that is unique to the museum world!

Green sea turtle hatchlings

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IMAGINE A LEADING-EDGE SCIENCE EMPORIUM T H AT ’ S U N I Q U E T O T H E M U S E U M W O R L D A total of 293,291 people took part in museum programs and services in 2004 including exhibits, camps, public programs, website research, student outreach, distance learning, grant programs, seminars, lectures and other public and private learning activities. The Buffalo Museum of Science is a nationally recognized science learning hub that is unequaled anywhere in the United States. The museum is unique in part because it manages two outdoor laboratories including an urban nature preserve in South Buffalo and a working Ice Age dig in Byron, NY, and because it is affiliated with the Dr. Charles R. Drew Science Magnet School which shares its building. Authentic artifacts and specimens rather than man-made facsimiles characterize the museum’s priceless collections and place science learning in the thrilling context of tangible historic and prehistoric evidence. A distinguished staff includes highly trained scientists, research scholars and professional educators who participate at the highest level of science education dialogue and are recognized leaders in their fields. The museum’s role is to link the scientific community and the public through experiences and programs that serve children and adults, students and teachers, knowledgeable enthusiasts and professional researchers. As a science organization, the museum understands the crucial need to adapt to a changing environment and is engaged in thoughtful research to shape its future course. A contemplative master planning process is helping to identify the museum’s new role in meeting community needs. A dream team of national planning experts will ensure that the finest minds and the best possible thinking are available for the community. Interviews with community leaders, and input from planning workshops, community conversations and focus groups will enable the museum to align its future programs and services with the long-term interests of its most committed customers. Imagine a leading-edge regional treasure that is unique to the museum world!

Green sea turtle hatchlings

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TA K I N G C H A R G E O F O U R O W N D E S T I N Y Tifft Nature Preserve, the museum’s outdoor natural science laboratory in South Buffalo, served 39,176 learners in 2004. The museum must be able to afford what it creates as it seeks to become a leading-edge science learning emporium. To improve its financial health and proactively diversify how we bring money into the organization, the Buffalo Museum of Science is developing a business model that values deeper relationships with users and links revenues more closely with actual use of services. Individuals who have visited and experienced the hands-on learning attributes of a new and improved museum are more likely to believe in its promise and its potential, and return year after year as lifelong learners and lifelong givers. Through new state-of-the-art fund-raising and business development concepts, the Buffalo Museum of Science is refocusing on deeper relationships with the region’s lifelong learners, individually and through families, schools, affiliate groups, corporations and university partners. Through private, behind-the-scenes tours conducted by the museum’s top staff and volunteers, leaders of business and industry as well as science education professionals and enthusiasts are becoming acquainted with the museum’s unique offerings, revitalized programs and unmatched commitment to science learning. “The Museum’s Attic,” the museum’s annual fund-raising treasure hunt, seeks to build relationships with donors and new prospects through exposure to the real science of authentic collections and unique, hands-on experiences.

LEARNING AT EVERY AGE AND EVERY STAGE Increasingly the museum is embracing the concept of lifelong learning, a cutting-edge educational concept that takes into consideration where, when and how people learn. Lifelong learning is guided by the needs and interests of the individual learner. The museum’s vision is to build and support a community of lifelong learners that engages everyone from the youngest visitors to the region’s amateur naturalists to its professional scientists and engineers. What unites all learners at the museum is a shared interest in understanding the world we live in and the forces that shape our lives. Planning and testing for the future will include introduction of hands-on, inquiry-based pilot programs and galleries that encourage personal interaction with the museum’s collections as well as contemporary science topics. Adult green sea turtles

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TA K I N G C H A R G E O F O U R O W N D E S T I N Y Tifft Nature Preserve, the museum’s outdoor natural science laboratory in South Buffalo, served 39,176 learners in 2004. The museum must be able to afford what it creates as it seeks to become a leading-edge science learning emporium. To improve its financial health and proactively diversify how we bring money into the organization, the Buffalo Museum of Science is developing a business model that values deeper relationships with users and links revenues more closely with actual use of services. Individuals who have visited and experienced the hands-on learning attributes of a new and improved museum are more likely to believe in its promise and its potential, and return year after year as lifelong learners and lifelong givers. Through new state-of-the-art fund-raising and business development concepts, the Buffalo Museum of Science is refocusing on deeper relationships with the region’s lifelong learners, individually and through families, schools, affiliate groups, corporations and university partners. Through private, behind-the-scenes tours conducted by the museum’s top staff and volunteers, leaders of business and industry as well as science education professionals and enthusiasts are becoming acquainted with the museum’s unique offerings, revitalized programs and unmatched commitment to science learning. “The Museum’s Attic,” the museum’s annual fund-raising treasure hunt, seeks to build relationships with donors and new prospects through exposure to the real science of authentic collections and unique, hands-on experiences.

LEARNING AT EVERY AGE AND EVERY STAGE Increasingly the museum is embracing the concept of lifelong learning, a cutting-edge educational concept that takes into consideration where, when and how people learn. Lifelong learning is guided by the needs and interests of the individual learner. The museum’s vision is to build and support a community of lifelong learners that engages everyone from the youngest visitors to the region’s amateur naturalists to its professional scientists and engineers. What unites all learners at the museum is a shared interest in understanding the world we live in and the forces that shape our lives. Planning and testing for the future will include introduction of hands-on, inquiry-based pilot programs and galleries that encourage personal interaction with the museum’s collections as well as contemporary science topics. Adult green sea turtles

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LINKING WITH COMMUNITY SCIENCE PARTNERS In 2004, 1,456 students were directly linked to the museum and real science through distance learning programs which use conferencing technology to connect public and private school classrooms with real scientists. The museum actively pursues partnerships to link its assets and expertise with other learning-minded organizations to serve Western New York’s learning needs. Together Buffalo State College and the museum have hired a research expert who is responsible for developing research programs in environmental genetics. In association with Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., the museum hosts the Pioneers of Science program which honors top scientific thinkers whose body of work has been accomplished in Western New York. Pioneers of Science honorees for 2004 include electrical engineer Eric Boch who is a past director of the National Science Foundation, medical researchers Edmound Egan and Bruce Holm, physiologist Claes Lundgren, medical geneticist Margaret Pericak-Vance, and astronomer and Internet guru Clifford Stoll. Honored posthumously were aeronautics visionary Lawrence Bell and Servo Valve inventor William Moog. The area’s top scientific minds host science education seminars at the museum for 150 area high school students who are selected by their schools to participate in the Pioneers of Science program. Highly trained Buffalo State College graduate students actively collaborate with the museum to preserve and restore precious artifacts and specimens. Experts from University at Buffalo’s Department of Library and Information Studies digitize priceless snowflake images from the Wilson A. Bentley Collection of glass plate negatives and post them on the museum’s website to increase access to the material and limit the need to handle these fragile artifacts. Ph.D. candidates from University at Buffalo participate in the museum’s Summer Science Institute, an industrial archaeology pilot program for high school students that was introduced at Tifft Nature Preserve in August 2004. The museum actively participates in the Centers for Informal Learning in Schools, a National Science Foundation Research Grant program that brings nationally renowned science education experts together to explore the latest science learning principles. Through a generous grant provided by the John R. Oishei Foundation, the museum and Alfred University collaborate to train Buffalo area teachers and students to use the university’s telescope remotely from the classroom and from the museum’s rooftop observatory. Emperor gum moth caterpillar

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LINKING WITH COMMUNITY SCIENCE PARTNERS In 2004, 1,456 students were directly linked to the museum and real science through distance learning programs which use conferencing technology to connect public and private school classrooms with real scientists. The museum actively pursues partnerships to link its assets and expertise with other learning-minded organizations to serve Western New York’s learning needs. Together Buffalo State College and the museum have hired a research expert who is responsible for developing research programs in environmental genetics. In association with Hauptman-Woodward Medical Research Institute, Inc., the museum hosts the Pioneers of Science program which honors top scientific thinkers whose body of work has been accomplished in Western New York. Pioneers of Science honorees for 2004 include electrical engineer Eric Boch who is a past director of the National Science Foundation, medical researchers Edmound Egan and Bruce Holm, physiologist Claes Lundgren, medical geneticist Margaret Pericak-Vance, and astronomer and Internet guru Clifford Stoll. Honored posthumously were aeronautics visionary Lawrence Bell and Servo Valve inventor William Moog. The area’s top scientific minds host science education seminars at the museum for 150 area high school students who are selected by their schools to participate in the Pioneers of Science program. Highly trained Buffalo State College graduate students actively collaborate with the museum to preserve and restore precious artifacts and specimens. Experts from University at Buffalo’s Department of Library and Information Studies digitize priceless snowflake images from the Wilson A. Bentley Collection of glass plate negatives and post them on the museum’s website to increase access to the material and limit the need to handle these fragile artifacts. Ph.D. candidates from University at Buffalo participate in the museum’s Summer Science Institute, an industrial archaeology pilot program for high school students that was introduced at Tifft Nature Preserve in August 2004. The museum actively participates in the Centers for Informal Learning in Schools, a National Science Foundation Research Grant program that brings nationally renowned science education experts together to explore the latest science learning principles. Through a generous grant provided by the John R. Oishei Foundation, the museum and Alfred University collaborate to train Buffalo area teachers and students to use the university’s telescope remotely from the classroom and from the museum’s rooftop observatory. Emperor gum moth caterpillar

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IMAGINE A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS A total of 7,645 children benefited from the museum’s Science in the City outreach programs to inner city youth. Under the banner of Science in the City, the museum works with a wide range of urban community centers and schools to provide after-school and summer-break programs that empower children to learn and set the stage for lifelong learning. As part of its effort to create a community of lifelong learners, the museum actively works to create access to its programs for all interested youth and their families. The museum’s community outreach programs are designed to provide science enrichment for students and professional development programming for the adults who teach them. Through Great After-School Science Programs (GRASP), the museum provides weekly programs for students from 5 to 13 years of age at four community centers where the youngest children delight in activities such as making ice cream and kaleidoscopes and pre-teens handle investigative science assignments such as plant and insect identification. Centered on Science is an after-school and summer-break outreach program, offered in conjunction with the Buffalo Community Center Collaborative, that takes place at 12 community centers. Through a shared program with Bethel Head Start that is supported by Tops Markets, the Buffalo Museum of Science uses classroom kits, books, puppets and field trips to the museum to teach pre-schoolers at eight different community locations about animals and animal homes. The museum recently launched Teen Skills Initiative, a pilot program that brings teens to the museum once a week for three hours to learn about employment skills required to work in a museum. Sunsational Science is a summer program that teaches 5 to 8 year-olds and 9 to 13 year-olds at five community centers about the wonders of weather, clouds and nature. In conjunction with its community partner schools, Makowski Early Childhood Center, School 90 and the Dr. Charles R. Drew Science Magnet School, the Buffalo Museum of Science provides professional development programs for teachers and free museum membership for all interested school families, participates in special events and engages in science programming outreach.

Cecropia moths hatching from the chrysalis

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IMAGINE A COMMUNITY OF LEARNERS A total of 7,645 children benefited from the museum’s Science in the City outreach programs to inner city youth. Under the banner of Science in the City, the museum works with a wide range of urban community centers and schools to provide after-school and summer-break programs that empower children to learn and set the stage for lifelong learning. As part of its effort to create a community of lifelong learners, the museum actively works to create access to its programs for all interested youth and their families. The museum’s community outreach programs are designed to provide science enrichment for students and professional development programming for the adults who teach them. Through Great After-School Science Programs (GRASP), the museum provides weekly programs for students from 5 to 13 years of age at four community centers where the youngest children delight in activities such as making ice cream and kaleidoscopes and pre-teens handle investigative science assignments such as plant and insect identification. Centered on Science is an after-school and summer-break outreach program, offered in conjunction with the Buffalo Community Center Collaborative, that takes place at 12 community centers. Through a shared program with Bethel Head Start that is supported by Tops Markets, the Buffalo Museum of Science uses classroom kits, books, puppets and field trips to the museum to teach pre-schoolers at eight different community locations about animals and animal homes. The museum recently launched Teen Skills Initiative, a pilot program that brings teens to the museum once a week for three hours to learn about employment skills required to work in a museum. Sunsational Science is a summer program that teaches 5 to 8 year-olds and 9 to 13 year-olds at five community centers about the wonders of weather, clouds and nature. In conjunction with its community partner schools, Makowski Early Childhood Center, School 90 and the Dr. Charles R. Drew Science Magnet School, the Buffalo Museum of Science provides professional development programs for teachers and free museum membership for all interested school families, participates in special events and engages in science programming outreach.

Cecropia moths hatching from the chrysalis

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R E A L S C I E N C E , R E A L S T U F F, R E A L C O O L ! The museum’s website received 4.9 million hits in 2004. Visitors to the museum’s website researched an average of 33 pages each. An important characteristic that separates the Buffalo Museum of Science from other science centers is its priceless collections which infuse the learning process with authentic artifacts and specimens rather than representations. The museum’s collections feature more than 500,000 artifacts and specimens many of which are rare, ancient or one-of-a-kind items. At the museum learners of every age are exposed to credentialed scientists who develop and lead programs and interact with visitors on a daily basis. Authentic Learning Communities (ALC) programs at Tifft Nature Preserve teach scientific investigation by casting students in the role of scientist. From September through November 2004, 775 4th grade students and 30 teachers from the Williamsville School District took part in a pilot ALC program dedicated to study of purple loosestrife, an invasive species. A total of 93 hours of contact time was logged with each participant. This learning program included professional development, field trips to Tifft Nature Preserve, distance learning, visits to each school, a citizen science project and resource kits for teachers. Discovery Camps for children ages 5 to 12 are conducted during the summer and long holiday breaks when schools are closed. Camp programs, often coordinated with the themes of major exhibits, use real science and real scientists to present topics such as astronomy, inventing, robotics and technology. Renowned old growth forest authority Bruce Kershner, robotic ant inventor James McLurkin and anthropologist Jeffrey Schwartz lectured at the museum recently as part of the Hayes Educational Series. The museum earned a feature sidebar in Newsweek magazine when it unveiled a new painting of Lucy, the 3 million-year-old evolutionary ancestor of all mankind, exploring the possibility that human beings may be more closely linked to orangutans rather than chimpanzees. Ohio Wesleyan zoology professor and ornithologist Edward H. Burtt, Ph.D. presented a look at the behavior, ecology and evolution of birds at the museum’s Vaughan Lecture Series. Scientists and volunteer archaeologists recently unearthed never-before-seen beveled mastodon tusks believed to be 11,000 to 13,000 years old, at the museum’s prolific Hiscock Site in Byron, NY, one of the most important Ice Age digs of its age in North America. The anomaly will be presented at the American Archaeology Conference in Utah in 2005. Cones from a sequoia tree

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R E A L S C I E N C E , R E A L S T U F F, R E A L C O O L ! The museum’s website received 4.9 million hits in 2004. Visitors to the museum’s website researched an average of 33 pages each. An important characteristic that separates the Buffalo Museum of Science from other science centers is its priceless collections which infuse the learning process with authentic artifacts and specimens rather than representations. The museum’s collections feature more than 500,000 artifacts and specimens many of which are rare, ancient or one-of-a-kind items. At the museum learners of every age are exposed to credentialed scientists who develop and lead programs and interact with visitors on a daily basis. Authentic Learning Communities (ALC) programs at Tifft Nature Preserve teach scientific investigation by casting students in the role of scientist. From September through November 2004, 775 4th grade students and 30 teachers from the Williamsville School District took part in a pilot ALC program dedicated to study of purple loosestrife, an invasive species. A total of 93 hours of contact time was logged with each participant. This learning program included professional development, field trips to Tifft Nature Preserve, distance learning, visits to each school, a citizen science project and resource kits for teachers. Discovery Camps for children ages 5 to 12 are conducted during the summer and long holiday breaks when schools are closed. Camp programs, often coordinated with the themes of major exhibits, use real science and real scientists to present topics such as astronomy, inventing, robotics and technology. Renowned old growth forest authority Bruce Kershner, robotic ant inventor James McLurkin and anthropologist Jeffrey Schwartz lectured at the museum recently as part of the Hayes Educational Series. The museum earned a feature sidebar in Newsweek magazine when it unveiled a new painting of Lucy, the 3 million-year-old evolutionary ancestor of all mankind, exploring the possibility that human beings may be more closely linked to orangutans rather than chimpanzees. Ohio Wesleyan zoology professor and ornithologist Edward H. Burtt, Ph.D. presented a look at the behavior, ecology and evolution of birds at the museum’s Vaughan Lecture Series. Scientists and volunteer archaeologists recently unearthed never-before-seen beveled mastodon tusks believed to be 11,000 to 13,000 years old, at the museum’s prolific Hiscock Site in Byron, NY, one of the most important Ice Age digs of its age in North America. The anomaly will be presented at the American Archaeology Conference in Utah in 2005. Cones from a sequoia tree

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2 0 0 4 A L L - G I V I N G ($100 and more)

$10,000+

$1,000 - $2,499

Mr. Philip C. Ackerman Alfred University The Baird Foundation The Estate of Mr. George S. Blackmer Buffalo Board of Education Delphi Harrison Erie County Budget & Management Erie County Environmental Education Institute The Estate of Mr. Carlos M. Heath M&T Bank New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, & Historic Preservation Mr. & Mrs. George F. Phillips, Jr. Mr. Robert E. Sadler, Jr. West Ferry Foundation Wynne Creative Group

Boncraft Printing Group Bristol Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Donald Britt The Buffalo News The Edward H. Butler Foundation Cannon Design Mr. & Mrs. John F. Carey Dr. & Mrs. David E. Chesebrough Mrs. Elizabeth B. Conant Digicon Imaging, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Richard B. Dopkins Dopkins & Company Ellicott Development Company Eric Mower and Associates, Inc. First Niagara Bank Gernatt Asphalt Products Inc. The Hahn Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Ralph W. Hinds Dr. Muriel A. Howard Mr. & Mrs. Morgan L. Jones, Jr. Keystone Film Productions The Kingsley Family Seymour H. Knox Foundation Mr. Roy E. Kratzat The Krukowski Family Ms. Leslie A. Loibl Michael J. Michalski Design Services of WNY Miller, Gesko & Co., Inc. Mr. Carl J. Montante Mr. & Mrs. Robert Montgomery Moog, Inc. Multisorb Technologies, Inc. Mr. Carl Paladino Pearce & Pearce Company, Inc. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

$5,000 - $9,999 Herbert F. Darling, Jr. Dwight C. & Moira H. Moldenhauer Praxair, Inc. The VIYU Foundation

$2,500 - $4,999 Mr. Randall E. Burkard Mrs. John W. Buyers Mr. & Mrs. James A. Chesebrough City of Buffalo Ms. Laurie Dann Hodgson Russ LLP Mr. Thomas C. Hunt Installs Inc., LLC Science Kit Inc. Turner Construction Co.

14

Printing Prep Inc. Research Foundation of the State University of New York Rigidized Metals Corp The Joseph R. Takats Foundation The Peter & Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Peter R. Travers, Jr. U. C. Coatings Corp. Verizon Foundation

$500 - $999 American Chestnut Foundation Ms. Anne D. Astmann The Balbach Family Foundation Buffalo Equity Foundation, Inc. Buffalo Niagara Partnership Buffalo Wheelchair Ms. Lise Buyers Mr. Mark E. Celmer Clover Capital Management Inc. Mrs. Annette Cravens Delaware North Companies, Inc. Digital Inc. The Fatta Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Flickinger Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Flickinger Ms. Linda Francis & Mr. Tim Mayer Gibraltar Steel Corporation The Hennig Family Mr. & Mrs. Frederic K. Houston Ms. Mary C. Hughes Independent Health Mr. & Mrs. John T. Jankowiak JCharlier Communication Design Kavinoky & Cook Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Kresse

Lawley Service Inc. Mr. Theodore L. Lownie Lumsden & McCormick Dr. & Mrs. J. Arthur Mattern Mr. & Mrs. Sanford M. Nobel Mr. Saburo Okazaki Osmose Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Albert P. Parker Mr. Dale A. Parrish Ms. Miriam S. Reading Ms. Claire Schen & Mr. Gregory Cherr Paul & Cheryl Spengler Wal-Mart Foundation Mr. Harry Warren Willcare xpedx

$100 - $499 Mrs. Anne S. Allen Mr. Carl Almeter Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Cary Anderson Mr. & Mrs. Dean C. Anderson Mr. Charles E. Balbach Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Banks Mrs. Maxine Barber Mr. & Mrs. Max Becker Mr. Paul W. Beltz The Berlow Family Mr. & Mrs. Raymond S. Bernhardt Mr. & Mrs. John L. Beyer III Mr. & Mrs. Michael Biscotto Bomi-Grelick Corp Mr. Ernst E. Both The Bradley Family The Buffalo Bills Buffalo Ornithological Society Mr. & Mrs. Steven C. Bunce Mrs. Charmion A. Burke Ms. Liza Callahan Canisius College Castellani Art Museum

The Charlier Family The Cieslik Family Mr. & Mrs. William M. E. Clarkson Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Cohn Mr. & Mrs. Anthony C. Conte Dr. & Mrs. Donald Copley Dr. & Mrs. Eugene Cunningham Mr. Richard W. Cutting John W. Danforth Co. Foundation The Dann Family The Day Family The Dayer Family Mrs. Elizabeth S. Deichman Derrick Corporation Dr. Paul R. DiBenedetto Mr. & Mrs. John E. Dickinson Mr. John Dicky Mr. & Mrs. John J. DiStefano Mr. Eugene F. Dobbins Ms. Joan M. Doerr The Dowdell Family Mr. & Mrs. John Duffner Ms. Ruth Irene Dwigans Ms. Pamela Earl Mrs. Jeanne C. Eaton Mr. Joseph G. Eicheldinger & Ms. Susan Wells Drs. Avery & Nitza Ellis Dr. William E. Engelbrecht Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Evans Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Falk Mr. Neil R. Farmelo Ms. June Farrington Mrs. Josephine P. Feeney Whitworth & Dorothy Ferguson Foundation Mrs. Marian S. Ffield Mr. Carl Fila Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Finlayson First Choice Evaluations Fisher-Price Inc.

15

Ms. Terry Fleig Mrs. Marion R. Flemming Foit-Albert Associates Architect PC Mr. George A. Forman, Jr. Fox Valley Golf Club Ms. Nancy Fredrickson The Freudenheim Family Ms. Mary Lou Frost Mr. & Mrs. Gregory D. Galloway Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Garman Dr. Robert Genco Georgetown Capital Group Dr. & Mrs. Franz E. Glasauer Dr. & Mrs. Allen L. Goldfarb Mrs. Samuel Goodloe Dr. Max V. Grabiec Mr. James Gramkee Great Pumpkin Farm Mr. Ed Greenway Dr. John Grehan Mr. & Mrs. Carmelo Gugino Habermehl Printing Mr. & Mrs. John T. Hall Mr. Edwin P. Hart The Hartz Family Mr. & Mrs. Theodore S. Herman The Herzog Family Mr. & Mrs. Donald A. Hess The Hill Family Ms. Lisa Hoffman Mr. & Mrs. John D. Holland Mr. Stanley J. Horab Ms. Audrey Horbett The Hughes Family Ms. Laree P. Hulshoff The Hunt Family Walter & Alison Johansson Dr. & Mrs. D. Bruce Johnstone The Kahn Family Mr. & Mrs. Elias J. Kaufman Mr. Joseph Keefe


BMS-0001 Annual Report Mech

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2 0 0 4 A L L - G I V I N G ($100 and more)

$10,000+

$1,000 - $2,499

Mr. Philip C. Ackerman Alfred University The Baird Foundation The Estate of Mr. George S. Blackmer Buffalo Board of Education Delphi Harrison Erie County Budget & Management Erie County Environmental Education Institute The Estate of Mr. Carlos M. Heath M&T Bank New York State Office of Parks, Recreation, & Historic Preservation Mr. & Mrs. George F. Phillips, Jr. Mr. Robert E. Sadler, Jr. West Ferry Foundation Wynne Creative Group

Boncraft Printing Group Bristol Myers Squibb Pharmaceutical Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Donald Britt The Buffalo News The Edward H. Butler Foundation Cannon Design Mr. & Mrs. John F. Carey Dr. & Mrs. David E. Chesebrough Mrs. Elizabeth B. Conant Digicon Imaging, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Richard B. Dopkins Dopkins & Company Ellicott Development Company Eric Mower and Associates, Inc. First Niagara Bank Gernatt Asphalt Products Inc. The Hahn Family Foundation Dr. & Mrs. Ralph W. Hinds Dr. Muriel A. Howard Mr. & Mrs. Morgan L. Jones, Jr. Keystone Film Productions The Kingsley Family Seymour H. Knox Foundation Mr. Roy E. Kratzat The Krukowski Family Ms. Leslie A. Loibl Michael J. Michalski Design Services of WNY Miller, Gesko & Co., Inc. Mr. Carl J. Montante Mr. & Mrs. Robert Montgomery Moog, Inc. Multisorb Technologies, Inc. Mr. Carl Paladino Pearce & Pearce Company, Inc. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

$5,000 - $9,999 Herbert F. Darling, Jr. Dwight C. & Moira H. Moldenhauer Praxair, Inc. The VIYU Foundation

$2,500 - $4,999 Mr. Randall E. Burkard Mrs. John W. Buyers Mr. & Mrs. James A. Chesebrough City of Buffalo Ms. Laurie Dann Hodgson Russ LLP Mr. Thomas C. Hunt Installs Inc., LLC Science Kit Inc. Turner Construction Co.

14

Printing Prep Inc. Research Foundation of the State University of New York Rigidized Metals Corp The Joseph R. Takats Foundation The Peter & Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Peter R. Travers, Jr. U. C. Coatings Corp. Verizon Foundation

$500 - $999 American Chestnut Foundation Ms. Anne D. Astmann The Balbach Family Foundation Buffalo Equity Foundation, Inc. Buffalo Niagara Partnership Buffalo Wheelchair Ms. Lise Buyers Mr. Mark E. Celmer Clover Capital Management Inc. Mrs. Annette Cravens Delaware North Companies, Inc. Digital Inc. The Fatta Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Peter B. Flickinger Mr. & Mrs. Thomas R. Flickinger Ms. Linda Francis & Mr. Tim Mayer Gibraltar Steel Corporation The Hennig Family Mr. & Mrs. Frederic K. Houston Ms. Mary C. Hughes Independent Health Mr. & Mrs. John T. Jankowiak JCharlier Communication Design Kavinoky & Cook Mr. & Mrs. Robert J. Kresse

Lawley Service Inc. Mr. Theodore L. Lownie Lumsden & McCormick Dr. & Mrs. J. Arthur Mattern Mr. & Mrs. Sanford M. Nobel Mr. Saburo Okazaki Osmose Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Albert P. Parker Mr. Dale A. Parrish Ms. Miriam S. Reading Ms. Claire Schen & Mr. Gregory Cherr Paul & Cheryl Spengler Wal-Mart Foundation Mr. Harry Warren Willcare xpedx

$100 - $499 Mrs. Anne S. Allen Mr. Carl Almeter Alpha Kappa Alpha Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Cary Anderson Mr. & Mrs. Dean C. Anderson Mr. Charles E. Balbach Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Banks Mrs. Maxine Barber Mr. & Mrs. Max Becker Mr. Paul W. Beltz The Berlow Family Mr. & Mrs. Raymond S. Bernhardt Mr. & Mrs. John L. Beyer III Mr. & Mrs. Michael Biscotto Bomi-Grelick Corp Mr. Ernst E. Both The Bradley Family The Buffalo Bills Buffalo Ornithological Society Mr. & Mrs. Steven C. Bunce Mrs. Charmion A. Burke Ms. Liza Callahan Canisius College Castellani Art Museum

The Charlier Family The Cieslik Family Mr. & Mrs. William M. E. Clarkson Mr. & Mrs. Fred C. Cohn Mr. & Mrs. Anthony C. Conte Dr. & Mrs. Donald Copley Dr. & Mrs. Eugene Cunningham Mr. Richard W. Cutting John W. Danforth Co. Foundation The Dann Family The Day Family The Dayer Family Mrs. Elizabeth S. Deichman Derrick Corporation Dr. Paul R. DiBenedetto Mr. & Mrs. John E. Dickinson Mr. John Dicky Mr. & Mrs. John J. DiStefano Mr. Eugene F. Dobbins Ms. Joan M. Doerr The Dowdell Family Mr. & Mrs. John Duffner Ms. Ruth Irene Dwigans Ms. Pamela Earl Mrs. Jeanne C. Eaton Mr. Joseph G. Eicheldinger & Ms. Susan Wells Drs. Avery & Nitza Ellis Dr. William E. Engelbrecht Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Evans Mr. & Mrs. Theodore Falk Mr. Neil R. Farmelo Ms. June Farrington Mrs. Josephine P. Feeney Whitworth & Dorothy Ferguson Foundation Mrs. Marian S. Ffield Mr. Carl Fila Mr. & Mrs. Michael D. Finlayson First Choice Evaluations Fisher-Price Inc.

15

Ms. Terry Fleig Mrs. Marion R. Flemming Foit-Albert Associates Architect PC Mr. George A. Forman, Jr. Fox Valley Golf Club Ms. Nancy Fredrickson The Freudenheim Family Ms. Mary Lou Frost Mr. & Mrs. Gregory D. Galloway Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Garman Dr. Robert Genco Georgetown Capital Group Dr. & Mrs. Franz E. Glasauer Dr. & Mrs. Allen L. Goldfarb Mrs. Samuel Goodloe Dr. Max V. Grabiec Mr. James Gramkee Great Pumpkin Farm Mr. Ed Greenway Dr. John Grehan Mr. & Mrs. Carmelo Gugino Habermehl Printing Mr. & Mrs. John T. Hall Mr. Edwin P. Hart The Hartz Family Mr. & Mrs. Theodore S. Herman The Herzog Family Mr. & Mrs. Donald A. Hess The Hill Family Ms. Lisa Hoffman Mr. & Mrs. John D. Holland Mr. Stanley J. Horab Ms. Audrey Horbett The Hughes Family Ms. Laree P. Hulshoff The Hunt Family Walter & Alison Johansson Dr. & Mrs. D. Bruce Johnstone The Kahn Family Mr. & Mrs. Elias J. Kaufman Mr. Joseph Keefe


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Giant sequoia trees Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Kellner Ms. Susan Kempf Mr. & Mrs. James Kieffer Ms. Rhoda E. Kittelsen The Kramer Family Ms. June W. Kreutzer Dr. & Mrs. Michael Kuettel Mrs. Dorothy Lamale Ms. Rebecca Landy & Mr. Robert Tell Mr. Lyle Lascelle Ms. Grace D. Lawrence Mr. & Mrs. Devan Lawton Ms. Kathy Leacock & Mr. Doug White The Leacock Family The Liberatore Family Mr. & Mrs. James J. Lichtenthal Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Little Ms. Marcella Maj Ms. Linda B. Matt Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Matthews The McDonald Family McGard Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Stan Medinac Mr. Larry E. Meister William & Laura Metzgar Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Miller Mrs. Jean C. Millholland Mr. & Mrs. John A. Mitchell Wallace & Ruth Mohn Mr. Joseph H. Morey The Morrison Family Mr. Gerhard J. Neumaier Ms. Bonnie Northrop & Mr. Gordon McGuire The Nutting Family The O’Brien Family Ms. Frances R. O’Rourke Dr. Elizabeth P. Olmsted P22 Type Foundry The Paul Family The Penfold Family

Ralph F. Peo Foundation, Inc. Pepe Rodem’s Construction Co Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Perryman The Pietruszka Family Mrs. Betty Pigut Ms. Elaine Pond Positively Main St. Reverend Lorene H. Potter Prime Buchholz The Prince Family Mr. & Mrs. Kevin M. Proulx Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Redlinski Mr. Kevin G. Reilly Mr. & Mrs. Victor A. Rice Rev. & Mrs. David A. Rich Ms. Joy Richardson Mr. William L. Rieth Mrs. Diane K. Rittling Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Ruggiero The Ruh Trapp Family The Sahr Family Mr. Kevin M. Saunders Mrs. Fannette H. Sawyer Mr. Jerome J. Schentag Drs. Albert & Helen Schlisserman Mr. & Mrs. Darwin W. Schmitt The Schultz Family The Schwartz Family Dr. & Mrs. Bruce R. Sckolnick Mr. Eugene M. Setel The Shapiro Family Sheridan Pediatrics Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Shulman Ms. Carroll Ann Simon Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Sloan Mr. & Mrs. Scott A. Smith The Snell Family Mr. & Mrs. Sidney G. Spector Ted & Ruth Steegmann Dr. & Mrs. Alfred M. Stein Mrs. Richard A. Stockton

16

Sweet Home High School Dr. Kenneth & Dr. Esther Takeuchi The Thomas Family The Titran Family The Tompkins Family Ms. Diana Traver Mrs. Donald M. Turner Miss Mary Tzetzo UCC Constructors Inc. The Unger Family Mrs. Helen Urban Vern Stein Fine Art Visionary Dispensing Opticians Wagner Charitable Trust Dr. Bernard D. Wakefield The Wallace Family Dr. & Mrs. Robert Warner Edward O. Watts, P.E., P.C. Mr. & Mrs. Steven Weiss Wendel Duchscherer Architects Engineers, PC Ms. Delcene Annette West The Whistler Family Ms. Doris E. Wiegand Mrs. Sarah B. Wilson Wilson Greatbatch Ltd. Wire Electric Contracting Co Inc. The Wisbaum Family Dr. R. A. Wodehouse & Ms. Anne D. Ehrlich Mr. & Mrs. Howard L. Wright Mr. John Yates & Ms. R. Lorraine Collins Dr. John Yeh & Ms. Barbara Watson Mrs. C. Jean Yarwood Mr. Howard Zemski Ms. Debra Zibreg Mr. David Zmitrewicz & Ms. Cathy Barish Dr. & Mrs. C. Richard Zobel

17


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Giant sequoia trees Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Kellner Ms. Susan Kempf Mr. & Mrs. James Kieffer Ms. Rhoda E. Kittelsen The Kramer Family Ms. June W. Kreutzer Dr. & Mrs. Michael Kuettel Mrs. Dorothy Lamale Ms. Rebecca Landy & Mr. Robert Tell Mr. Lyle Lascelle Ms. Grace D. Lawrence Mr. & Mrs. Devan Lawton Ms. Kathy Leacock & Mr. Doug White The Leacock Family The Liberatore Family Mr. & Mrs. James J. Lichtenthal Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Little Ms. Marcella Maj Ms. Linda B. Matt Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Matthews The McDonald Family McGard Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Stan Medinac Mr. Larry E. Meister William & Laura Metzgar Mr. & Mrs. Robert L. Miller Mrs. Jean C. Millholland Mr. & Mrs. John A. Mitchell Wallace & Ruth Mohn Mr. Joseph H. Morey The Morrison Family Mr. Gerhard J. Neumaier Ms. Bonnie Northrop & Mr. Gordon McGuire The Nutting Family The O’Brien Family Ms. Frances R. O’Rourke Dr. Elizabeth P. Olmsted P22 Type Foundry The Paul Family The Penfold Family

Ralph F. Peo Foundation, Inc. Pepe Rodem’s Construction Co Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Raymond M. Perryman The Pietruszka Family Mrs. Betty Pigut Ms. Elaine Pond Positively Main St. Reverend Lorene H. Potter Prime Buchholz The Prince Family Mr. & Mrs. Kevin M. Proulx Mr. & Mrs. Ronald Redlinski Mr. Kevin G. Reilly Mr. & Mrs. Victor A. Rice Rev. & Mrs. David A. Rich Ms. Joy Richardson Mr. William L. Rieth Mrs. Diane K. Rittling Mr. & Mrs. Vincent Ruggiero The Ruh Trapp Family The Sahr Family Mr. Kevin M. Saunders Mrs. Fannette H. Sawyer Mr. Jerome J. Schentag Drs. Albert & Helen Schlisserman Mr. & Mrs. Darwin W. Schmitt The Schultz Family The Schwartz Family Dr. & Mrs. Bruce R. Sckolnick Mr. Eugene M. Setel The Shapiro Family Sheridan Pediatrics Mr. & Mrs. Herbert Shulman Ms. Carroll Ann Simon Mr. & Mrs. Thomas P. Sloan Mr. & Mrs. Scott A. Smith The Snell Family Mr. & Mrs. Sidney G. Spector Ted & Ruth Steegmann Dr. & Mrs. Alfred M. Stein Mrs. Richard A. Stockton

16

Sweet Home High School Dr. Kenneth & Dr. Esther Takeuchi The Thomas Family The Titran Family The Tompkins Family Ms. Diana Traver Mrs. Donald M. Turner Miss Mary Tzetzo UCC Constructors Inc. The Unger Family Mrs. Helen Urban Vern Stein Fine Art Visionary Dispensing Opticians Wagner Charitable Trust Dr. Bernard D. Wakefield The Wallace Family Dr. & Mrs. Robert Warner Edward O. Watts, P.E., P.C. Mr. & Mrs. Steven Weiss Wendel Duchscherer Architects Engineers, PC Ms. Delcene Annette West The Whistler Family Ms. Doris E. Wiegand Mrs. Sarah B. Wilson Wilson Greatbatch Ltd. Wire Electric Contracting Co Inc. The Wisbaum Family Dr. R. A. Wodehouse & Ms. Anne D. Ehrlich Mr. & Mrs. Howard L. Wright Mr. John Yates & Ms. R. Lorraine Collins Dr. John Yeh & Ms. Barbara Watson Mrs. C. Jean Yarwood Mr. Howard Zemski Ms. Debra Zibreg Mr. David Zmitrewicz & Ms. Cathy Barish Dr. & Mrs. C. Richard Zobel

17


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F I N A N C I A L R E S U LT S

B U F FA L O S O C I E T Y O F N AT U R A L S C I E N C E S Board of Managers

REVENUE

2004 Unaudited

EXPENSES

2004 Unaudited

Admissions

179,027

6%

Personnel (Salary&Benefits)

1,442,576

47%

Membership

161,905

5%

All Other Expenses (Departmental)

1,634,690

53%

Museum Shop Sales (Net)

45,963

1%

Total Expenses

3,077,266

100%

Public Sources

1,752,489

55%

Net Change in Assets From Operations

$75,287

Contributions

337,791

11%

Depreciation

$242,009

Education and Other Fees

152,110

5%

Net Investment Activity

753,525

Proceeds from Endowment Designated for Operations

523,268

17%

Net Gain On Sale Of Assets

$3,152,553

100%

Net Change In Assets

Total Revenue

17%

6%

0 $586,803

1% 5%

Personnel (Salary & Benefits)

Admissions Membership

5%

All Other Expenses (Departmental)

Museum Shop Sales Public Sources

11%

53%

47%

OFFICERS 2004-2005 Mr. Philip C. Ackerman, Chairman National Fuel Gas Company Mr. Robert E. Sadler, Jr., Vice Chairman M&T Bank Mr. Arthur W. Cryer, Vice Chairman First Niagara Risk Management Dr. David E. Chesebrough, President Buffalo Museum of Science Ms. Kathleen S. Carey, Treasurer Freed Maxick & Battaglia, CPA’s, PC Mr. Dwight C. Moldenhauer, Secretary Moldenhauer Advisory Services Mr. Michael R. Winter, Executive Secretary PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP MEMBERS Mr. Douglas C. Bean Eric Mower and Associates Mr. Donald K. Boswell WNY Public Broadcasting (WNED) Ms. Rosemary Brewer Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems Mr. Randall E. Burkard Science Kit & Boreal Laboratories

Mr. Mark Celmer MultisorbTechnologies, Inc. Mr. Paul F. Ciminelli Ciminelli Development Co., Inc. Ms. Laurie Dann Mr. Herbert F. Darling, Jr. Herbert F. Darling, Inc. Dr. Robert J. Genco State University of New York at Buffalo Mr. Jay Hennig Moog, Inc. Dr. Muriel A. Howard Buffalo State College Mr. Morgan L. Jones, Jr., Esq. Earl, DeLange, May, Seaman, Jones, Hogan & Brooks LLP Dr. Jeffrey P. Kingsley Praxair, Inc. Mr. Ronald A. Krukowski Turner Construction Company Ms. Bonnie Kane Lockwood Congressman Brian Higgins Office Dr. Esther S. Takeuchi Wilson Greatbatch Ltd.

Ms. Annette West Dr. Charles R. Drew Magnet School H O N O R A RY M E M B E R S Ms. Anne Allen Rev. Lorene H. Potter EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Mr. Sheldon M Berlow Berlow Real Estate, Inc. Hon. Joel A. Giambra Erie County Executive Ms. Charlene Ritter-Lester Erie County Department of Environment & Planning Mr. Laurence Rubin Erie County Department of Environment & Planning CHAIRMAN’S COUNCIL Mr. Richard B. Dopkins Esq. Hodgson Russ LLP Ms. Mary Ann Kresse Mr. George F. Phillips, Jr. Ms. Miriam Reading

Contributions

55%

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N , P L E A S E C O N TA C T T H E F O L L O W I N G S TA F F M E M B E R S AT 7 1 6 . 8 6 9 . 5 2 0 0

Education and Other Fees Proceeds from Endowment Designated for Operations

Museum personnel can be e-mailed by using the following format without spaces: first initial plus last name@sciencebuff.org After-school outreach programs: Monika McFoy, ext 343 Bequests, contributions and estate planning: Nell J. Mohn, ext 312 Byron Ice Age archaeological dig participation: Dr. Richard Laub, ext 368

18

Docent program: John McDonald, ext 306 Membership: Kathleen Hill, ext 310 Research activities and inquiries: Dr. John R. Grehan, ext 372

IBC

School group programs: John McDonald, ext 306 Science research library: Kathy Leacock, ext 321 Tifft Nature Preserve education programs: Lauren Makeyenko 716.825.6397


BMS-0001 Annual Report Mech

4/14/05

12:50 PM

Page 21

F I N A N C I A L R E S U LT S

B U F FA L O S O C I E T Y O F N AT U R A L S C I E N C E S Board of Managers

REVENUE

2004 Unaudited

EXPENSES

2004 Unaudited

Admissions

179,027

6%

Personnel (Salary&Benefits)

1,442,576

47%

Membership

161,905

5%

All Other Expenses (Departmental)

1,634,690

53%

Museum Shop Sales (Net)

45,963

1%

Total Expenses

3,077,266

100%

Public Sources

1,752,489

55%

Net Change in Assets From Operations

$75,287

Contributions

337,791

11%

Depreciation

$242,009

Education and Other Fees

152,110

5%

Net Investment Activity

753,525

Proceeds from Endowment Designated for Operations

523,268

17%

Net Gain On Sale Of Assets

$3,152,553

100%

Net Change In Assets

Total Revenue

17%

6%

0 $586,803

1% 5%

Personnel (Salary & Benefits)

Admissions Membership

5%

All Other Expenses (Departmental)

Museum Shop Sales Public Sources

11%

53%

47%

OFFICERS 2004-2005 Mr. Philip C. Ackerman, Chairman National Fuel Gas Company Mr. Robert E. Sadler, Jr., Vice Chairman M&T Bank Mr. Arthur W. Cryer, Vice Chairman First Niagara Risk Management Dr. David E. Chesebrough, President Buffalo Museum of Science Ms. Kathleen S. Carey, Treasurer Freed Maxick & Battaglia, CPA’s, PC Mr. Dwight C. Moldenhauer, Secretary Moldenhauer Advisory Services Mr. Michael R. Winter, Executive Secretary PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP MEMBERS Mr. Douglas C. Bean Eric Mower and Associates Mr. Donald K. Boswell WNY Public Broadcasting (WNED) Ms. Rosemary Brewer Delphi Harrison Thermal Systems Mr. Randall E. Burkard Science Kit & Boreal Laboratories

Mr. Mark Celmer MultisorbTechnologies, Inc. Mr. Paul F. Ciminelli Ciminelli Development Co., Inc. Ms. Laurie Dann Mr. Herbert F. Darling, Jr. Herbert F. Darling, Inc. Dr. Robert J. Genco State University of New York at Buffalo Mr. Jay Hennig Moog, Inc. Dr. Muriel A. Howard Buffalo State College Mr. Morgan L. Jones, Jr., Esq. Earl, DeLange, May, Seaman, Jones, Hogan & Brooks LLP Dr. Jeffrey P. Kingsley Praxair, Inc. Mr. Ronald A. Krukowski Turner Construction Company Ms. Bonnie Kane Lockwood Congressman Brian Higgins Office Dr. Esther S. Takeuchi Wilson Greatbatch Ltd.

Ms. Annette West Dr. Charles R. Drew Magnet School H O N O R A RY M E M B E R S Ms. Anne Allen Rev. Lorene H. Potter EX-OFFICIO MEMBERS Mr. Sheldon M Berlow Berlow Real Estate, Inc. Hon. Joel A. Giambra Erie County Executive Ms. Charlene Ritter-Lester Erie County Department of Environment & Planning Mr. Laurence Rubin Erie County Department of Environment & Planning CHAIRMAN’S COUNCIL Mr. Richard B. Dopkins Esq. Hodgson Russ LLP Ms. Mary Ann Kresse Mr. George F. Phillips, Jr. Ms. Miriam Reading

Contributions

55%

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N , P L E A S E C O N TA C T T H E F O L L O W I N G S TA F F M E M B E R S AT 7 1 6 . 8 6 9 . 5 2 0 0

Education and Other Fees Proceeds from Endowment Designated for Operations

Museum personnel can be e-mailed by using the following format without spaces: first initial plus last name@sciencebuff.org After-school outreach programs: Monika McFoy, ext 343 Bequests, contributions and estate planning: Nell J. Mohn, ext 312 Byron Ice Age archaeological dig participation: Dr. Richard Laub, ext 368

18

Docent program: John McDonald, ext 306 Membership: Kathleen Hill, ext 310 Research activities and inquiries: Dr. John R. Grehan, ext 372

IBC

School group programs: John McDonald, ext 306 Science research library: Kathy Leacock, ext 321 Tifft Nature Preserve education programs: Lauren Makeyenko 716.825.6397


BMS-0001 Annual Report Mech

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Page 1

HOW TO GROW YOUR SUNFLOWER SEEDS

B U F F A L O M U S E U M O F S C I E N C E 2004

(Helianthus) Polyunsaturated oil. Wild bird food. A calcium-rich snack. Towering 10-foot flowers. Imagine what this mighty seed could become! To cultivate: Plant seed in early to mid-May when soil temperature of flower beds is 42 to 50 degrees Fahrenheit. Soil that is rich in phosphorus and potassium is recommended. Plant seeds in moistened soil one to two inches deep spaced about 12 inches apart. Consecutive rows should be 2 to 2 1â „2 feet apart. Seeds can also be planted indoors in four-inch peat pots and transplanted outdoors. Plants will mature and flower in 80 to 90 days.

WHERE HANDS-ON LEARNING PLACES THE FUTURE WITHIN OUR GRASP. 1020 Humboldt Pkwy Buffalo, NY 14211 P:716.896.5200 F:716.897.6723 buffalomuseumofscience.org Creative Team: Susan D. Wells, Marketing Communications

OBC

Rob Wynne, Andalyn Bardo, Wynne Creative Group

OFC

Buffalo Museum of Science Annual Report  

Annual Report for the Buffalo Museum of Science.

Buffalo Museum of Science Annual Report  

Annual Report for the Buffalo Museum of Science.

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