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Spring 2011

chunky chicks

CHIC ART celebrate the

YEAR OF ALABAMA MUSIC where the twentysomethings go

KARAOKE PLUS, MAKE-AHEAD MENUS FOR MOTHER’S DAY


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Unexpected Beauty & Flair Already Andalusians have enjoyed the use of Springdale for a variety of special events. Join us Saturday, May 7 when we co-sponsor the AJWC Three Notch Market. Not what you’d expect from a small town, is it? Expect the Unexpected.

City of Andalusia www.cityofandalusia.com


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100 TOP HOSPITALS

IN THE COUNTRY

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again

For the third time in six years, Andalusia Regional Hospital has been named one of the nation’s 100 Top Hospitals by Thomson Reuters. How did we do it? By achieving excellence in clinical, financial and operational performance. Mark J. Dooley, CEO of Andalusia Regional Hospital states, “Acheiving this honor once is a significant accomplishment. To be recognized three times in six

years is a remarkable testament to the work done each day by our employees and medical staff. We are truly honored to be included in this elite list once again.” Andalusia Regional Hospital offers patients both the sophisticated technology and the compassionate personal attention and caring that are part of being a community-based hospital.

www.AndalusiaRegional.com 849 South Three Notch Street

Andalusia, Alabama

(334) 222-8466


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contents spring 2011 EDITORIAL Michele Gerlach Editor Stephanie Nelson Bob Brooks Tom Gerlach

ADVERTISING Ruck Ashworth Marketing director Jill Prevett Marketing consultant Jason Killingsworth Marketing consultant PRODUCTION Erin Johnson Graphic Designer PHOTOGRAPHY Robert Evers Robert Evers Productions www.robertevers.smugmug.com South Alabama Living is published four times per year by Andalusia Newspapers, Inc. PO Box 430 Andalusia, AL 36420 www.andalusiastarnews.com (334) 222-2402 Advertising rates and information available upon request. Subscriptions are $16 annually. Please make checks payable to Andalusia Newspapers, Inc., PO Box 430, Andalusia, AL 36420

Welcome “Who does Suzy take from?” Yes, Joe Wingard, that question is grammatically incorrect, but colloquially spot-on. It is the vernacular of another era, one in which most little Southern girls and a goodly number of their brothers were expected to “take” music. Perhaps it is the old expectation that led to such a rich musical history for our state, which is being celebrated in the Year of Alabama Music, so proclaimed by Alabama’s Department of Tourism. There’s a rich tradition of music here that encompasses blues, rock, country, jazz, and gospel. Montgomery native Nat King Cole (19191965); “father of the blues” W.C. Handy (1873-1958) of Florence; The Temptations (1960s– ); Alabama (1977–2003); and Jimmy Buffett (1946- ) are just a few of the music artists who hail from the state we call home. Here in the Heart of South Alabama, the old-timers remember a wiry musician named Hank who played in River Falls and married a woman named Audrey in front of a gas station on East Three Notch Street. Today, the location of the Williams’ 1947 wedding boasts a historic marker and will soon be home to a mural celebrating his music. In this edition of South Alabama Living, we introduce you to some talented local musicians, and one of the legions of Southern women who have helped plant that seed by teaching piano to children. We also talked to some twenty-somethings who kraoke on Thursday nights, an artist who’s turned her hobby into a business and, a couple of collectors. Enjoy!

mad hats, Page 17 it’s a chick thing, Page 23

karaoke, Page 19 proms, Pages 12-16

passion for opera Page 25

make-ahead menu for moms Page 37


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CCB

community bank

AND YOU WILL TOO! SWITCHING IS EASY.

www.bankccb.com

Andalusia (334) 222-2561

Opp (334) 493-2259

Crestview (850) 682-0484 Member FDIC


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If I gave you Diamonds and Pearls...

SANDERS

FINE JEWELRY Covington Mall • Andalusia, Alabama 36420

(334) 427-4367

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what to do

04/28 - OCAC Singer Songwriter Open Mic Night The Opp Cultural Arts Center will showcase local talent; original material only. Performance: 7 p.m. Admission: $5. Location: OCAC, 107 N. Main St. Contact Wesley Laird at 334.493.9716 to participate. 04/29 – LBWCC Ensemble’s Family and Friends Night Performance: 7 p.m. Location: Dixon Center for the Performing Arts, Andalusia campus. 05/07 - OCAC’s Pickers and Grinners night The Opp Cultural Arts Center will showcase local talent. Performance: 7 p.m. Tickets: $5. Location: OCAC, 107 N. Main St. 05/07 – Three Notch Market (See Page 9 for details). 05/13 & 05/14 - Andalusia Ballet’s Spring Showcase. The performance will open with "Minkus Suite,”incorporating musical excerpts from several famous ballets including Paquita, Don Quixote and La Bayadere, followed by two modern pieces choreographed by Foy DuBose, and A Western Tale, set to the popular music of Aaron Copeland's Rodeo. The show also includes tap, jazz and acrobatic pieces. Performances: Fri., 7:30 p.m., Sat., 2:30 p.m. Tickets: $10 and $5. Dixon Center for the Performing Arts, LBWCC Andalusia.

05/14 - OCAC presents Shades Mountain Air The Opp Cultural Arts Council presents the Birmingham-area’s Shades Mountain Air. Performance: 7 p.m. Location: OCAC, 107 N. Main St. 05/15 – Fantasy Houses, Paintings and Pottery Margo Russell’s art students will present a show of their recent works. Show: 2 p.m. until 5 p.m. Location: Andalusia Farmer’s Market. 06/06 - 06/10 - LAAC Art Camp This camp is for rising kindergarteners through rising 2nd graders. $60. Call 2223205. 06/13 - 06/17 LAAC Art Camp This camp is for rising 3rd graders through age 12. $60. Call 222-3205.

06/11 – Swamp Gravy The LBWCC Foundation presents “Swamp Gravy: The Big Picture.” Georgia’s official folk art play chronicles the lives of residents of Colquitt, Ga. Performance: 7:30 p.m. Tickets: $15, general admission; $100, VIP reception and reserved seating. Location: Dixon Center for the Performing Arts, Andalusia campus of LBWCC.

06/18 - 06/25 Masonic Celebration Florala will host the 141st consecutive annual June 24th celebration, also known as St. John’s Day. The week of events includes an Anything Goes Children’s Parade and Water Battle, beauty contests, and culminates on Sat., June 25, with a Masonic March, a parade, car show, fireworks and a street dance. 06/27 – 07/14 - Andalusia Ballet’s Dance With Us Dance With Us is a three-week, fun-filled, action-packed experience for boys and girls ages 3 and up. No dance experience is necessary to attend this exciting summer workshop. 07/06 – 07/15 – Drama Camp The Lower Alabama Arts Coalition will host a drama camp taught by Cathy Powell. Students will present “Aesop’s Fables” at the conclusion of the camp. 222.3205 07/25 – 08/05 – Andalusia Ballet’s Summer Intensive The Summer Intensive is an in-depth dance experience in a small and nurturing yet challenging environment. Classes will include ballet, pointe, men's class, variations, pas de deux, yoga, conditioning, and enrichment.

regional events 4/28 – 5-21 – To Kill A Mockingbird The Mockingbird Players stage the play in the Monroe County Courthouse on Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays (7 p.m.) and Sundays (5 p.m.). Tickets are $35. www.tokillamockingbird.com.

5/05 – 5/07 – Alabama Writers Symposium Two days of author readings, and literary entertainment featuring Mark Childress, Sena Jeter Naslund, Sonny Brewer, Watt Key, Joshilyn Jackson and Wayne Greenhaw. Alabama Southern Community College, Monroeville.

Through 05/29 – Moonlight and Magnolias The Alabama Shakespeare Theatre presents this play about the production of the epic Gone with the Wind. www.asf.net.

6/03 – 7/09 – The Miracle Worker The story of Helen Keller and her teacher is presented outdoors at Keller’s birthplace in Tuscumbia. Performances on Fridays and Saturdays only. Gates open at 6:45 p.m. www.helenkellerbirthplace.org.


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news + notes Three Notch Market, concert set for May 7th The Andalusia Junior Woman’s Club’s Three Notch Market Arts and Crafts Festival will have a decidedly different feel in this, its second year. Set for May 7, this year’s festival will be held on the grounds of historic Springdale. Admission is free, and a hometown girl who usually entertains on the Gulf Coast will be in town to close out the show with a late-afternoon concert. The City of Andalusia is cosponsoring the appearance of the Rochelle Harper Band. Harper is an Andalusia native and AHS grad who has taken her original and cover music to the Gulf Coast, and who has performed at Montgomery’s Jubilee City Fest, and Mobile’s Bayfest. Vendors Arts and crafts vendors include: • Sharon Hopkins, Three Notch Cottage • Kathy Little, Kathy's Kreations • Carmen Martin, Usbore Books & More • Harry Peacock, Harry's Woodwork • Kevin Andrews, Whispering Pines Creations

• Claire Walters, Gifts - handbags, totes, make-up cases, etc.

5K The Andalusia High School Volleyball team will host the Three Notch Market Run, which will begin at Andalusia High School. Registration is at 7:30 a.m. Entertainment Three Notch Market will close with Band. • Erin Johnson, Erin Johnson Photography • Renee Henderson, Sewing, embroidery items • Christy Copeland, Tastefully Simple • Carmen Day, Moonstone Art • Angelo Agro, Agro Photography • Nancy Wiggins, Fairy Tales • Stephanie Dillard, Willow House • Andalusia Ballet, baked goods, balloons, tattoos • Shirley Colvin, Wrapped Jewelry • Kaye Whitworth, Two K's • Mick Miller, Caricatures • Rick Long, Long Folk Art • Dana Barefoot, Handmade girls clothing

concert by the Rochelle Harper • Sandra Holland, Hair bows, wreaths, etc. • June Simpson, Harold's • Linda Cuevas, art and pottery • Jama Ketcham, Lilies of the Field - children's clothes • Celeste Jones, J & J Birdhouses • Melinda Fuller, Full of Sass women & children's clothes • Tara Dalton, T. Dalton Folk Art w/ Ting Ting & Hoosh • Amanda Konsavage, AMK Creations - handmade jewelry • Robert Evers,Robert Evers Photography • Rachel Wood, jewelry - handmade beaded and bottlecap • Terri Jones, handstitched kids shirts • MaryAnn Johnson, MaryAnn's

9:45 - Ted Watson, National Anthem 10 - Mickey Mouse Clubhouse 10:15 - Brad Ingram, Praise Music 11 - Katie Howell's Cheer Group 11:15 - AHS Choral Department 11:45 - Sweet Magnolia Gypsies (bellydancers) 12 - Peyton Prevett 12:15 - Scott Rogers and Tambry Nix 12:45 - The Company Dance Center 1:15 - The Chase, Christian Music 1:45 - Andalusia Ballet 2:15 - Sisters by Grace 2:30 - Callow 3 - Carroll Williams Band (Tripp Bass) 4:15 - Madison Castleberry (sings with Southland) 4:30 - Southbound River 6 - Rochelle Harper Band

For updates and additional information, visit ajwcthreenotchmarket.webs.com.


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news + notes ‘CommUNITY’ block party to highlight LAAC project Think of them as building blocks to a more unified community. Add the creativity of the dozens of people they hope will participate, and the Lower Alabama Arts Coalition should have something resembling a “crazy quilt” when they put together a display this summer. The LAAC will kick off its “Unify the Community Through Art” project by selling $1 wooden blocks during Three Notch Market, set for May 7 in Andalusia. Those who purchase blocks will be encouraged to “step outside the box” and put their creativity on the square. “Any medium will work as long as it adheres to wood,” said LAAC board member Janet Beste. “Designs can be drawn, painted, glued, burned, etc. on the face of the wooden block,” LAAC board president Barbara Tyler said. “Your imagination is your limitation.” Tyler said the purpose of the project is to bring the community together in a creative spirit. “It is a reminder that art is all around us, it is important to our lives in ways we don't always think about, and that we can all show an "artistic" touch if we just make the effort,” she said.

Azland Trotter, 3, paints one of the blocks for the LAAC project. Local residents are asked to use their creativity and build unity by painting or decorating a block.

Participants will have a deadline of June 17, 2011, for submitting their blocks to LAAC for inclusion in the larger work. Participating artists will be invited to a “block party” reception where their collective work will be on display.

Blocks also will be available at the LAAC and Cagle’s Jewelers, both located on East Three Notch Street, and at Brooks Hardware. For more information call Mira Walker at the LAAC arts center, 222-3205.

Local artists part of Montgomery show

Margo Russell, right, with awardwinning ‘Woods Behind the Fort.’

Local artists Margo Russell and Jo Kelley both had work selected for the Montgomery Art Guild’s annual museum exhibition. Juror Lisa Tuttle selected 77 works by 69 artists to be displayed at the Montgomery Museum of Fine Arts, including Russell’s “Woods Behind the Fort,” a watercolor and graphite; and Kelley’s “Cracked Tile,” which was mixed media on stoneware and wood. Russell received the Emily B. Gassenheimer Memorial Purchase Award, which was $2,500. All 69 artists were honored at an opening reception in March.


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FHS PROM (1) Angela Radford, Savannah Cassady, Keri Bess, Hilary Thames, Keerie Kimbril and Katelin Cassady of Florala stepped out in style for this year’s prom; (2) Kendyl McDaniel, Paige Irwin and Dilan Manring take a break from all the dancing; (3) Henry Stewart dances with Emily Evans.

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PHS PROM (1) PHS seniors Beau Grissett and Reggie Hamilton; (2) senior, valedictorian and senior class president Kaitlin Brookshire and last year’s val, her date Josh Godwin.; (3) seniors Cody Whilhite, Brittany Carnley, and Heather Hall, and D.L. Bryant; (4) Brentin Fuller. 1

PHOTOS BY CINDY MARTIN

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south alabama scene AHS PROM

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(1) Andalusia High School students do the Cha Cha slide; (2) Junior Stephen Caton and senior Anna Bay McCord dance to "Thriller" by Michael Jackson; (3) Junior Greeley Foshee, senior Morgan Palmer and senior Bethany Godwin; (4) AHS alumnus Brandon Bedsole, senior Lee Miles, senior John Starr and junior Grayson Gantt; (5) senior Dylan Seavey sported a tux made entirely of duct tape; (6) Ander Helms and Susie Watson. PHOTOS BY CATHERINE WOFFORD

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ANSLEY PLACE

south alabama scene

Special People & Occasions Special Gifts & Apparel

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SHS PROM

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(1) Austin Creel, Colton Ward, Victoria Barnes, Dillon Worley, Haley Odom, Andrew Adams, Chad Joyner, Emily Townson and Abbie Gibbs; (2) Bradley Benton, Payton Mitchell and Kari Biggs; (3) Josh King and Danielle Peters; (4) Anjelica Bonham; (5) Waylon Barnett, Kerry Averill and Zach Averil; (6) Holly Driver and David Messick; (7) Austin Alvarado and Tori Ainsworth; (8) Kyle Lee

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MAD HAT TEA Whatley Street First Baptist held its annual Mad Hat Tea in March. (1) Marjorie Pryor. (2) Willie Simmons, Minnie Shakespeare, Sharon Daniels; (3) Cora Shepherd, Thelma Scott; (4) Myrtle Bradley, Gail Blue; (5) Mary Greer; (6)

3

Rachel Stallworth; (7) Hazel Griffin and Thelma Thomas ; (8) Ellie Smith; (9) Georgia Lee Terry; (10) Emma Armstrong (11) Beautifully arranged fruit tempted the senses. PHOTOS BY MICHELE GERLACH

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AES FATHER-DAUGHTER DANCE “See no evil, hear no evil, speak no evil,” from left, Holly Taylor with her dad, Tony; Anabell Bryant with her dad, David; and Michaelyn Russell with her grandfather, Mike Beste. Photo courtesy of Cara Russell

DON’T MISS AN EDITION! Have the magazine delivered to you! $16 annually. Call Lisa at 334.222.2402.

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If it’s Thursday, it’s

KARAOKE story and photos by michele gerlach

Jonathan Griggs performs on a recent Thursday night.


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thursday + twentysomethings = karaoke or those still young enough to start the weekend on Thursday night, karaoke is a happening thing in the Andalusia area. Carroll Williams, who runs karaoke at The Pitt Stop every week, said, “They get started about 10 or 10:30 and they’re still going at 2 a.m.” The crowd is mostly twentysomething, he said. And it’s a good crowd. “Andalusia has done a good job with this generation,” he said. “They’re very polite, very courteous.” And very faithful to the Thursday night event. Pitt Stop co-owner Darren Raines said as word’s gotten out about karaoke, people from surrounding counties have begun showing up. “We get a lot of people from Evergreen and a lot from Greenville,” he said.

F

Girls perform, above; Hanna Bush and Kaytlin Enzor enjoy the show.

Jason Cook of Opp is among the faithful. He says it’s great. “Carroll has everything anybody wants to sing,” he said, adding that the selections range from country to classic rock to Motown. “This is kind of a slow night,” he said on a recent Thursday night. “There are usually 10 to 15 people waiting in line.” Others said the most fun nights are during holidays and spring break “when everybody comes home.” “It’s packed, and it’s so much fun!,” one patron said. “Write that we go bar hopping,” another patron encouraged. “The Idle Hour has karaoke, too. Like, we went there to eat tonight, and then we came here.” There’s no cover for admission.■


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ANY MUSIC THAT’S GOOD Lamar Morris, right, picks guitar with Wesley Laird, left, after last year’s Rattlesnake Rodeo.

After successful career in Nashville,

singer, songwriter, picker now teaches in Opp

W

Morris’s 2009 album, “Amnesia,” features original songs. You can listen at http://lamarmorris.com.

hen Lamar Morris was a kid growing up in Andalusia, he got a chance to play his guitar and sing on the stage at a Hank Williams Sr. concert. Years later, he went on the road with the famous man’s son, Hank Williams Jr. Morris has recorded solo and as a member of Hank Jr.’s band. He’s written songs that topped the charts; has gold records, a BMI award, and has been teaching guitar for 19 years. And after all that, Morris said he learns something every time he picks up his guitar. “Music’s been good to me,” Morris, now a resident of Opp, said. “Every time I get

my guitar out, I learn something new every time. “ Listen to him talk about musicians – particularly guitarists - who’ve influenced him and a certain phrase reappears in the conversation. “I was watching his fingers ……” Born in Loango, schooled in Red Level until the family moved to Andalusia when he was a sixth grader, Morris explained that he was reared in a musical family. “My mom played guitar. I had a sister who played guitar,” he recalled. “All three of my sisters sang. Two of my sisters dated pickers and they played at our house. I was See MORRIS, page 22

story by michele gerlach; photos courtesy of Wesley Laird


April South Alabama Living:2006FYIINSIDEPAGES

He almost upstaged Hank Sr. Don Helms went to Nashville with Hank Williams Sr., and came with him to Andalusia when he was booked for a performance in the Andalusia High School stadium. “Momma and Daddy took me out there with my guitar. Just in case,” Morris recalled. “I’d never seen that many people before,” Morris said. “Hank was hot. ‘Louisiana Blues’ had just come out. Don (Helms) asked Hank if I could sing one.” So Morris set up and sang a Hank Williams song. “The band backed me up,” he recalled. “The crowd applauded. I was a kid. They said, ‘do another one,’ so I did.” At the time, he could play the works of two artists – Hank Williams and Eddie Arnold. The youngster thought it would be bad form to play Arnold’s music at Williams’ concert. Morris said he was looking down as he was playing. Soon, a pair of shiny boots appeared. He smelled perfume. “I’d never smelled anything like that before,” he said. The famous man spoke. “Boy, you have to get off this stage or I won’t have anything else left to sing,” he told Morris. “I should have sung Eddie Arnold,” Morris chuckled at the memory. “Of course, he was joking, but it scared me to death.”

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him to hire him for the band. Ray Price came to 7 and 8 at the time and town one Saturday loved it.” night. As usual, He watched their Morris was playing hands, trying to get the with Shorty. same sounds from a “Shorty called me guitar. off the side and asked “So finally, my mom me if I still wanted to taught me three or four play in his band,” he chords,” he said. Morris, right, peforming at Jus’ Folk recalled. “My parents It was a lesson that Coffehouse in Elba. wanted me to stay in set him on his life’s school, but Dad knew path. where my heart was. “If it was summer, I was outside playing “Shorty said, ‘Let me talk to your folks.’ ” sotball and baseball or inside playing guitar,” They agreed. Two weeks later, they he said. “If it was winter, it was football or packed up their son and met Sullivan in guitar. Usually guitar.” Atmore. With Sullivan, the young Morris did Soon, he was sitting in with bands for two radio shows a day and was on the road radio performances. at night. “Don Helms was from New Brockton, “We were on the air one day – I was about and he had a Saturday morning radio show. 17 by then – and he said, ‘Lamar, there’s Don lived in the apartment comples where something I want to tell you. You remember my sister and her husband did. Saturday the night I hired you?” mornings, they’d let me sing on the radio.” “Yes, sir.” He got another great chance to watch a “Ray Price was there. He wanted to know musician’s hands when he was 16. who that kid was playing guitar. I said, ‘He “Donald Cotton brought Chet Atkins in works for me.’ ” and he was one of my heroes,” Morris said. Looking back, Morris says maybe it was a “He played at the Ritz Theater on South good thing. Cotton Street. “I didn’t get mad with Shorty,” he “Like I said, he brought Chet in and I recalled. “If I had gone straight to Nashville, went.” I might not have stayed. It was good experiAs had been his habit for many years, he ence.” was watching the performer’s hands. Later, Sullivan died in an accident. But “He had a method of playing the melody while Morris was still traveling with him, with his fingers and the chord and rhythm they played at a feed store in Troy one with his thumb for a two-guitar sound,” he Saturday morning, and he made another said. important connection. “There was a record store in town. I went “Hank Jr.’s grandmother and grandfather there the next day and they had two of lived in Banks,” he said. “When we played Chet’s records. I bought both of them – old at a feed store in Troy, I met members of the 78s. I worked hard to learn that method. Williams family. Nobody did it like Chet.” He began to correspond with Audrey At about the same time, Shorty Sullivan Williams’ daughter, Lycretia,, who would had a show on WBAM in Montgomery. become his first wife. “I was listening to him and his band on the Soon, he was on the road with Hank Jr. He radio,” he said. “We would go up on weeklaughingly recalled a time when another ends and listen to him at the Fort Dixie “junior,” George Wallace Jr., developed an Graves Armory.” interest in music and traveled with them. Soon, Sullivan was letting Morris sit in “I had my hands full with those boys,” he and play. And Lamar Morris was begging MORRIS, continued from page 21


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MORRIS, continued from page 23

said. Hank Jr. first entertained as an imitator of his father. Later, as he was developing his own style, he recorded a Lamar Morris song, “Eleven Roses.” It was Hank Jr.’s first No. 1 hit. “Roses” has since been recorded by Trace Adkins, Al Martino, Don Gibson, Loretta Lynn and Jerry Lee Lewis. Morris had a contract with MGM and recorded a number of singles. “I had some chart records, but I never had a No. 1 as a singer. The highest was to No. 16 on Billboard.” Many encouraged him to go solo, but he said he was comfortable leading Williams’ bands, and needed the security to support his family. “I’d seen a lot of people do that and fail,” he said. “I wasn’t afraid to fail for me, but I had a family to feed.” For years, the group traveled out of Cullman. Morris was living in Panama City at the time, a five-and-a-half hour trip before the bus cranked. When Williams moved the operation to Paris, Tenn., that meant an eight-and-a-half hour drive, one way, for Morris. After almost 20 years, he’d had enough. “I didn’t know what I’d do,” he said. Hank Jr.’s former manager encouraged Lamar to put together a group and entertain on a gambling boat that cruised from Panama City to Tampa. “Eighteen months later, I was tired of that,” he said. “J.R. said, ‘Have you thought about teaching guitar?’ ” In 1992, he started doing just that, and he’s been at it ever since, now teaching 43 students, mostly from the Opp Cultural Arts Center. Along the way, he’s taken a couple more shots at recording and continues to write. He also does acoustic performances. He and Wesley Laird started a recording label. His wife, Cathy, whom he met in Nashvile, had always encouraged him to do

an album, so he did. But music is a different ball game now, he said. “It was political then, but nothing like it is now,” he said. Besides, he believes country music in America is a young artist’s world. But Europe … Europe is different. “Overseas, it doesn’t matter,” he said. His album debuted at No. 2 on the European charts and one of the singles he released went to No. 1. “They liked it well enough to listen,” he said. His second album came as a result of a songwriting project. “Billy Henderson – from the Rose Hill area – has had great success as a writer. He’s been in Nashville for years. “Two or three years ago, he asked me to write melodies for some lyrics he’d done. I’d gotten out of that, but the fact that he thought I could do it meant something.” They collaborated on 22 songs. “One day he said, ‘Why don’t you do an album?’ ” Morris gave him the same argument: “You’ve got to be young.” Henderson was persuasive. Cathy was more persuasive. “She said, ‘Do it.’ ” Henderson put together a group of studio musicians and Morris told them to keep it “loose.” “I said ‘do what you feel and let it out.’ That’s what they did and they were tremendous pickers.” The result, “Amnesia,” was released two years ago. Looking back, he has no regrets. “I’m glad I did it all,” he said, “I saw parts of the world and parts of this country I never would have seen. I made so many friends. Writers. Pickers. Singers. DJs across the country. I loved what I did. “I love country music,” he said “It’s been my life for years. “I love jazz, love big band, like the blues,” he said. “I just appreciate any music that’s good.”

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Still teaching, performing Morris teaches 43 students, mostly at the Opp Cultural Arts Center. He recommends that students don’t start until at least age 9. They need time for their fingers to grow, he said, and to develop an attention span. Among his students are members of the band The Springs, who are seeing success in Nashville. To inquire about lessons, contact him at 334.488.8568.

Lew Childre show May 7 Morris will be a part of the fourth annual Lew Childre Memorial Steel Guitar Show, an all-day event set for Sat., May 7, in the conference center at the LBW Community College Opp campus. Childre, an Opp native, was a Grand Ole Opry favorite. Morris is a staff musician for the show, which features 10 musicians. $10 donations will be accepted at the door.


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Lyndsey Hand, left, performing with the Janiec Opera Company at Brevard Music Center in Candide.

passion for

opera When she fell in love, moved home and married, she learned to share her passion for music with students.

story by stephanie nelson, courtesy photos

sk most people in Florala about “Suzuki” and they’ll tell you it’s a motorcycle. Ask Lyndsey Hand and she’ll bring tears to your eyes with her mezzo-soprano performance as the maid in Puccini’s Madama Butterfly. Hand, a native of Paxton, Fla., and the daughter of Dr. Joe and Karen Johnson, grew up performing throughout the community and the greater Walton County, Fla., area. At 15, she was a member of the original cast of Grit & Grace of

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Walton County and started her voice lessons and college career at Okaloosa Walton College. She is now bringing her talent and instruction to the Florala and Paxton communities. “I always loved to sing,” Hand said. “When I was 15, my mother volunteered me to sing a solo at a church. I had never sung in public before, and when I finished, people came up to me and said how See VOICE page 26


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26 south alabama living VOICE, Continued from Page 25

it was. “And, I thought, if I can do something that I love and people enjoy it, then there was something to what I had,” she said. “After that, Mom signed me up for voice.” There, Hand continued to wow instructors and audiences, alike. “One day my teacher came and said, ‘OK. It’s time to take it to the next level,’ and I said, ‘Huh?’” she said. “He brought back this brochure and said, ‘Go do this.’” It was information on the Brevard Music Center’s opera program in North Carolina, an eight-week intensive Lynsey and her broth- course. er, Scott Johnson, will From that moment, Hand was hooked. perform jazz and She continued her vocal studies at blues on the lawn of Berry College in Rome, Ga., and graduthe Lakehouse Bed and Breakfast from 4 ated magna cum laude with a bachelor’s p.m. until 6 p.m. on degree in music, vocal performance. Sat., May 14. “While I was there, I met my voice teacher from the University of Houston. I sat in on a voice lesson, and he put me on the spot. I sang, and he said to come back after class. “I was so afraid,” she said. “When I got there, he said, ‘I want you to come to my school.’ ” It was a decision that opened up a new world for her, she said. In 2007, Hand was a member of the Janiec Opera Company at the Brevard Music Center in North Carolina performing in Candide, Camelot, Susannah and La Boheme. So, one might ask how a rising opera star ends up back in her hometown. If you guessed “love,” you’d be right. “I came home for summer before I went to Houston, and my sister said there is this lifeguard you have to meet,” Hand said. “We did, and we just clicked. I knew he was the man I was going to marry.”

So on Nov. 28, 2009, Hand took on a new role – that of supportive and loving wife of a U.S. Army solider. It was a decision that brought her back home to the area. Her husband, Davin, is a career soldier in the U.S. Army Reserves, whose family lives in Defuniak Springs, Fla. He is pursuing a bachelor’s degree before going active duty. While Hand said she knew she could easily pursue her career, she elected to stay home with her husband while he achieved his goal. Still, she looked for a way to utilize her talents at home. When friend Heather Connelly told her of the plan to begin teaching dance at the old National Guard Armory in Florala, it was like “it was meant to be.” “My goal is to give back to the community what they’ve given to me,” Hand said. “I had my first voice student in Houston, and I saw my passion for music transfer to that student. “Then, the progress that student made every week, and to see the excitement in their eyes, which was just like my own, I realized I have the ability to inspire someone, and I thought, ‘This is why people love being a teacher.’ ”■ For contact info, visit www.lyndseyhand.com.

EXCLUSIVELY AT

156 Covington Mall Andalusia, AL (334) 222-4925


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making music with

MISS MARTHA! story and photos by Michele Gerlach


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When Martha Givhan’s not teaching piano, she’s usually practicing to accompany the FBC Senior Adult Choir. If she just played for Martha? “Oh, I’d play jazz, probably.”

her daddy was so sure she’d be musical,

he bought his baby a grand

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ften, when students begin piano lessons with Martha Givhan, their parents get them a keyboard for practicing. Givhan’s father was so certain his daughter would keep playing, he bought her a baby grand when her lessons began. She was 5. “I don’t recommend that,” she laughed. “My aunt that I absolutely adored played at church,” Givhan recalled. “She played organ and that’s what I really wanted to do.” For all the years of school, she continued with music lessons. When she was asked to play hymns at church, her teacher, who taught strictly classical works, told her “it’ll ruin your playing.” When she was ready for college her father dangled another carrot. He’d buy her an organ like she’d always longed to

play if she’d study music at the University of Alabama. But by then, she was tired of music lessons. It was in her early 30s, after the birth of her second child, that Martha got back to music. “I made up my mind to learn,” she said. “First Baptist Church had just put in a brand new pipe organ and Louise Brown agreed to take me on as a student.” She said she spent all of her free time at the church practicing. “I put my children in something like mother’s day out two days a week and I would go practice – still in my hot rollers,” she said. “The janitors would see me slip in with my curlers and a scarf. They didn’t know what to think.” Soon, Martha had committed to play the organ two Sunday nights a month. Her music responsibilities at First

Baptist continued to grow, and she now is the Sunday morning organist and is the accompanist for the senior adult choir. Along the way, she said, she also learned a lot about organ music from John Beasley, with whom she sometimes played on Sunday nights. “He’s an excellent math teacher and musician,” she said. “He taught me to open the organ up. It’s a magnificent instrument.” It was another member of First Baptist’s music staff, Mary Clyde Merrill, who convinced her to teach piano. “She started begging me to take piano students because she needed a back-up,” Martha recalled. But it was the father of her first student who convinced the education major to try her hand at teaching music See MARTHA page 41


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George Gannt said he hadn’t seen a pack of labels like this one since childhood.

Wondering why anyone would keep it, he opened it and found the inside blank.

And then he flipped it over to find a rare Hank Williams Sr. autograph.

Sometimes you find

the strangest things eorge Gannt says it’s been a lifelong habit. “I’ve loved old junk all my life,” he said. He’s collected Indian arrowheads, knives, and all kinds of things. His wife, Brenda Gantt, collects antique valentines, pottery and costume jewelry. And these days, when they’re not swamped with events at Hickory Lodge or Cottle House, the lodge and bed and breakfast they run, they also deal in antiques at Sweet Gum Bottom Antiques. “I buy from individuals,” Gantt said. Sometimes, that means people bring things to him and ask him

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if he’d be interested. Other times, he buys full estates, or just the contents of a house. It was just such an occasion that led to one of his must unusual finds. “When you do that, you take everything in there,” George said. “That means you load it, sweep the floors behind you, and then go home and look at what you’ve got. And that means every single piece of paper.” A few years ago, he was sorting through the papers brought from an area when he came to a pack of labels. “The last time I’d seen some of those, I was a boy,” he said. Wondering why anyone would keep the labels, he opened them to look. Empty. And then he looked on the back, where he found scrawled these words: Hey, Good Lookin’ Hank Williams “That’s why they kept it – for the autograph,” George said. He has no doubt of its authenticity, but says there aren’t many of those autographs floating around,

mainly because Williams died young. He has no idea what its value is, nor any inclination to sell it. He does, however, buy and sell musical instruments and music memorabilia. “I buy fiddles, banjos, guitars, dulcimers – old country-type stuff. We have had accordions and bugles, but they don’t sell. If somebody’s got a big house, they’ll buy horns to put on their Christmas tree.” Old records in good shape sell, he said. But the real collectors’ items are those still in the packaging. “If it’s the Beatles or Elvis, it’s collectible. If you can find a 33 1/3 still in the cellophane, you can good money for those. Elvis on a 78-speed also is collectible. “Lot of folks don’t even know what a 78 is,” he said. “They made ‘em, but they’re scarce, and they are expensive.” ■ Sweet Gum Bottom Antiques closed last summer while Gantt was recovering from heart surgery, but is reopening this spring. It is located on Straughn School Road.


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stomping grounds

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here are Hank Williams Sr. stories all over Covington County. Before Williams went to Nashville in about 1947, he played often at the Riverside Inn in River Falls. “It was a service station,” Sidney Waits recalled. “First they put a skating rink out back. When that played out, they connected it to the store and made a dance hall.” Between the Riverside Inn and the river was a flowing (artesian) well, Waits recalled, which would come to be an important feature. “Our mothers wouldn’t let us go in (the Riverside Inn),” Waits said. “But we could sit in our cars and listen to the music.” He recalled that the building was shuttered with no windows, so the shutters were propped open with a stick. But back to the flowing well. Williams had a reputation as a drinker, and at least once showed up to play ta the Riverside Inn

while under the influence. “They took him outside and put him under that cold spring flowing well to sober him up,” Waits said. Tripp Bass recalled hearing a similar story from his father. “The Jaycees had him at the Andalusia High School stadium right after he went to Nashville,” he said. “I think Daddy and some of them had to go find him at the motel and give him some coffee to sober him up.” In addition to drinking and playing music around here, Hank Williams Sr. also married Audrey Williams in Andalusia at a service

station on East Three Notch Street in the location that is now home to Pirate Graphics. A historic marker in front of the location details the story and officially puts Andalusia on the Alabama Department of Tourism’s “Hank Williams Trail.” It is not unusual to see people posing for photographs in front of the marker. Soon, there’ll be even more to be photographed. The next project of the City of Andalusia’s murals committee is planned for the side of that building and will feature the country music singer, who died in 1953 at age 29. Committee chairman Pat Palmore said Dothan artist Wes Hardin will paint the mural, likely beginning in late May or early June. ■ To learn more about the state’s Hank WIlliams Trail, or to download the brochure, visit www.alabama.travel/activities/tou rs-and-trails/hank-williams-trail/

a mural depicting Hank’s marriage to Audrey will soon give fans one more reason to stop in Andalusia. annual festival in may

eorgiana pays tribute to Hank Williams Sr. every year with a festival at the city park bearing his name. This year, the event is set for Fri. and Sat., May 20 and 21. Appearing on Fri., May 20, will be Gene Watson, Jeff Whitlow,

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Brad Magness, and others. On Sat., May 21, Hank’s daughter, Jett Williams, will perform and then host a “Country Mini Opry” in two, on-hour segments to be filmed for later broadcast on the “Ernest Tubb Midnight Jamboree.” Nashville

recording artists Jimmy Fortune, David Frizzell, Jim Ed Brown, Helen Cornelius, and Alabamian Razzy Bailey are all scheduled to perform. Weekend tickets are $30; Friday admission is $15 and Saturday admission is $25.


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cool music attractions in alabama • Alabama Jazz Hall of Fame 1631 4th Ave. N., Birmingham, AL 35203 205-254-2731 www.jazzhall.com Exhibits convey the accomplishments of the likes of Nat King Cole, Duke Ellington, Lionel Hampton and Erskine Hawkins, and the music that made them famous. • W.C. Handy Birthplace, Museum and Library 20 W. College St., Florence, AL 35630 256-760-6434 Blues fans should tour the log cabin home of William Christopher Handy, the father of blues, in Florence. View original sheet music, memorabilia and musical artifacts such as his famous trumpet and personal piano. A great time to make the pilgrimage is during the annual W.C. Handy Music Festival in July. • Alabama Fan Club and Museum 101 Glenn Blvd. S.W., Fort Payne, AL 35967 256-845-1646 www.thealabamaband.com Visit the museum dedicated to one of the state's most famed country groups, Alabama. All hailing from Dekalb County, the boys of Alabama recorded 32 No. 1 hits and were named country group of the century by the Recording Industry of America. • Hank Williams Boyhood Home and Museum 127 Rose St., Georgiana, AL 36033 334-376-2396 www.hankmuseum.com Visit Hank's boyhood home in Georgiana, which has been turned into a museum honoring the life of the country star. Photos, records, clothing and other memorabilia are on display. •Hank Williams Museum 118 Commerce St., Montgomery, AL 36104 334-262-3600 thehankwilliamsmuseum.com The Hank Williams Museum is perhaps Hank fans' most important stop on this tour. See original artifacts from Hank’s life and walk in the presence of the originator of country music. • FAME Studios 603 E. Avalon Ave., Muscle Shoals, AL 35661 256-381-0801

www.fame2.com Before the Muscle Shoals Sound Studio was built, the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section recorded at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals. Opened in the late 1950s, everyone from Aretha Franklin to The Osmonds recorded there. FAME Publishing and its subsidiary label, Muscle Shoals Records, are still shaping American music today. Alabama native Wilson Pickett recorded some of the biggest hits of his time, including "Land of a Thousand Dances," "Mustang Sally" and a distinctive soul cover of the Beatles’ "Hey Jude," all at FAME Studios. • Alabama Blues Project 712 25th Ave., Northport, AL 35476 205-752-6263 www.alabamablues.org This nonprofit organization was founded to preserve Alabama's blues heritage through research, concerts, art, artist residencies, educational programming and an innovative blues camp for children. • Alabama Music Hall of Fame 617 Hwy 72 W, Tuscumbia, AL 35674 800-239-2643 www.alamhof.org Visit the Alabama Music Hall of Fame to learn about the rich history of music in Alabama, including musicians such as Lionel Richie, Nat King Cole and Hank Williams. There's even a studio where you can record your own covers of famous songs from Alabama musicians. • Commodores Studio Tuskegee University, 208 E. Martin Luther King Hwy., Tuskegee, AL 36083 334-724-0777, 334-727-9196 Call ahead to arrange a tour of the personal recording studio of the Commodores on the campus of Tuskegee University. Front man Lionel Richie was born and raised on the Tuskegee campus, where he also met fellow Commodores members while attending the university. In 1976 the group purchased a studio on campus to use as their private space for rehearsals and recordings. Original Commodores outfits and memorabilia are on display. The Tuskegee University Golden Voices Choir still uses the space for rehearsals to this day.

did you know? Billy Henderson Rose Hill native Billy Henderson has enjoyed a successful career as a Nashville songwriter. The Alabama Music Hall of Fame lists him among the state’s “music achievers,” noting him as a Top Ten songwriter for T.Graham Brown, Mindy McCready, Michael Martin Murphey, Gus Hardin, and Travis Tritt. His work alo has been recorded by Ty Herndon, Jerry Reed, Billy Ray Cyrus, and Marty Stuart. Annette Powell Cotter Country music fans will recognize these titles, even if they didn’t realize Andalusia native Annette Powell Cotter wrote the songs. Among the titles she wrote were: • “My Heart Won’t Wander Very Far From You” was recorded by George Strait on the Ocean Front Property album. • “Some Kinda Woman” was recorded by Linda Davis on album In a Different LIght • “Cleopatra, Queen of Denial” was recorded by Pam Tillus on the album Homeward Looking Angel Cotter currently lives in Atlanta. Her brother, Andalusia attorney Ab Powell, said he believes her best work wasn’t recorded. “She has a great one she really wanted Loretta Lynn to record. It’s called ‘Bitchin’ in the Kitchen.’ ”

To learn more about Alabama musicians, visit www.yearofalabamamusic. com.


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12 quirky places to hear live music juke joints, hangouts and honkytonks

In December, the Oxford American published its 12th Anniversary Southern Music Issue. The issue featurs Alabama music and includes a compilation CD of music recorded in Alabama. The 27 tracks range from “New Mule Skinner Blues” by The Maddox Brothers & Rose (circa 1948) to “The Times They Are A-Changin’ “ by Odetta (1965) to “Precious Lord Lead Me On” by Sister Gertrude Morgan (2005). Available for $5 at http://store.oxfordamerican.o rg/

The Blind Boys of Alabama are a gospel group from Alabama that first formed at the Alabama Institute for the Negro Blind at Talladega, Ala., in 1939. The three main vocalists of the group and their drummer/percussionist are all blind. In May, they’ll release their latest album, “Take the High Road,” which explores the association between country and gospel music. Country music’s Jamey Johnson strongly infuenced the effort and joins in on “Have Thine Own Way.” Other musicians who collaborated include The Oak Ridge Boys, Lee Ann Womack, Vince Gill, Willie Nelson, and Hank Williams Jr., who joined them for “I Saw the Light.”

The Alabama Tourism Department has compiled a list of more than “100 places to hear live music,” but the dozen places below are not typical music venues and include juke joints, honkytonks and neighborhood hangouts. These places offer up several genres of music from country, bluegrass and blues to pop, rock, and jazz. • Peerless Saloon — Anniston Called the “Oldest Little Rockin’ Saloon” Peerless is located in historic downtown Anniston and is listed on the U.S. Register of Historic Places. It was built in 1899, was home to a brothel and still has a turn-of-the-century bar. Visitors can hear live music Thursday through Saturday nights. • Gip’s Place — Bessemer An authentic juke joint with live blues performed in the backyard of Henry Gipson’s home that sits beside the big curve along the 3100 block of Avenue C in Bessemer. Gipson is a gravedigger by day and a musician at night. There is no exact schedule, only most Saturday nights, which is part of the charm of this juke joint. • The Bottletree — Birmingham A live music venue, electic arts haven and restaurant in the Avondale neighborhood with bottle trees on the front porch and the side patio. Esquire magazine called this eclectic café “a place that is already stealing thunder from every small music venue in the region.” 3719 Third Ave. S. • The Garage — Birmingham Named by GQ magazine as one of the “World's Best Places To Fly To,” The Garage has a delightful split personality. By day, its lush, enchanting courtyard brimming with eclectic antique decorations for sale is a prime spot for antiquing. At night, a friendly neighborhood pub comes to life, often with live music. 2304 10th Terrace S. • Rattlesnake Saloon — Colbert County

On what was once a Native American Bluff now sits the Rattlesnake Saloon, built in the shadows of a cave just past the Seven Springs Lodge in Tuscumbia in Colbert County. Bands perform ThursdaySunday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. 1292 Mt. Mills Rd, Tuscumbia. • The Red Caboose — Elkmont Nashville song writers perform Saturday nights twice a month in charming, historic Elmont at the Red Caboose. • The Smokehouse Billiards and Grill — Florence This pool hall, dating back to 1890 with six original Brunswick pool tables, offers live music nightly. 118 East Tennessee Street, • Fred’s Pickin’ Parlor — Loachapoka An old feed & seed store in Loachapoka, just outside Auburn, is now the location for live music jam sessions on Thursdays and live local bands on Friday and Saturday nights. • Blues Tavern — Mobile Considered Mobile’s only Blues Room, the Blues Tavern offers live music every Wednesday through Sunday. • Sous-La-Terre — Montgomery Montgomery jazz and blues keyboard musician Henry Pugh has been playing for the late night crowd for years in this underground jazz club on Commerce Street. Look for the stairs leading to the basement to enter the club that opens weekends at midnight. • Flora-Bama — Orange Beach The Flora-Bama has been a cultural landmark on Alabama’s beaches since 1964. It’s touted as being America's “Last Great Roadhouse.” The Flora-Bama takes its name from its legendary location on the Florida – Alabama state border line. • Tacky Jacks — Orange Beach This grill and tavern on the back bay features live music Thursday-Sunday nights starting at 6 p.m.


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it’s a

chick story and photos by michele gerlach

thing


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Andalusia’s Shelli Cotton Smith started her business, Chunky Chicks Tin Art, quite by accident.

this business was born on facebook

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hen Shelli Cotton Smith made a Straughn footballthemed decoration for her front door, her husband encouraged her to post a picture of it to Facebook. She was hesitant, but he insisted. And voila! A cottage industry was born. From that photograph, she got 10 orders. Now, she has a Facebook page for her work which is marketed under Chunky Chicks Tin Art, and the mother of three pre-school aged children wholesales throughout the Southeast. Since her first order, she’s hired her mother, Debbie Stuckey, to help her. She’s done one show, in Montgomery, which was a big success. “I wanted to do more shows,” she said, adding that she has so many orders, she can’t find time to build the inventory for a show. Shelli said she’s always been creative, and thinks she inherited that creativity from both sides of the family. Her paternal uncle, Alan Cotton, is well known for his floral

arrangements, and her mother and five maternal aunts are all creative. Initially, when people ordered, some asked her to copy work they’d seen. “But I wasn’t interested in copying,” she said. “Now I’ve found my own niche.” Her designs, which are weather-resistant, include initials, palm trees, flamingos, beach cocktails, mermaids, flags, crosses and flowers, to name a few. She recently added wreaths with small tin elements to her line, and they’ve been a great success, she said. Her work retails for $35 to $90. Shelli and her husband, Matt, are the parents of twin boys, Dylon and Houston, 5, and Laeton Reid, 3. “This has been a blessing for our family,” she said. ■

In Covington County, Chunky Chicks Tin Art is available at Image Island in Opp and in a booth at Blue Goose


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Make-ahead for Mother’s Day hen I was asked to put together a Mother’s Day menu, I thought back to the many menus I prepared or was a part of in my culinary life. Mother’s Day is traditionally the busiest restaurant day of the year. I recalled huge buffet spreads at the resorts and country clubs where I have worked; from ceiling-high centerpieces, white-gloved servers, multiple carving stations, and tableside

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story and menus by Tom Gerlach

cooking to entrees served under silver domes as guests sipped mimosas or flutes of champagne. The desserts were a showpiece - all garnished with fresh berries, dark and white chocolate curls, or fresh fruit sauces. Of course, all of this was set against a background of live piano and violin or lively bands. And I thought of my own mother and the many delicious

meals served at her table. No doubt, she’s still preparing her favorites in heaven’s kitchen. And if she looks down and sees you preparing her recipe below, she’ll be grinning from ear to ear. This menu is designed so that most of the work is done in advance and the meal can go on the table after church. Happy Mother’s Day and bon appetite! See MENUS page 39


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south alabama living MENUS, Continued from Page 37

Bibb lettuce salad with fresh fruit and poppy seed dressing. Slice fresh fruit. This salad is delicious with mango, orange, grapefruit, blackberries, strawberries and avocado. Place fruit over lettuce leaves and top with poppy seed dressing. Poppy Seed dressing 3/4 cup white sugar 1 teaspoon mustard powder 1 teaspoon salt 1/3 cup cider vinegar 1 onion, grated, juice reserved 1 cup vegetable oil 1 1/2 tablespoons poppy seeds Whisk together the sugar, mustard, salt, vinegar, onion juice, oil and poppy seeds. Cover and refrigerate until ready to serve. Fresh asparagus Clean one bunch of fresh asparagus (I peel with a potato peeler). Blanch and shock quickly. This is a process of bringing very salty water to a boil, then dropping the asparagus in for two to three minutes. To keep color and texture, drop the asparagus in ice cold water to stop the cooking process. Reheat to serve. Tomatoes Florentine 4 medium sized tomatoes 2 bags fresh spinach 2 TBS olive oil 5 pods chopped garlic Feta or parmesan cheese Saute spinach and garlic in olive oil. Core tomatoes and stuff with sautéed spinach. Top with cheese. Bake in 350-degree oven for 20 minutes. Mother’s Shrimp Newburg ½ cup butter ¼ cup flour 1 1/3 cup light cream 2/3 cup milk 2 TBS sherry 3 cups diced shrimp 3 egg yolks ½ tsp. prepared mustard ½ tsp. grated onion 1/3 cup grated sharp cheddar cheese 1 TBS chopped pimento Dash Worcestershire sauce Lemon juice Salt and pepper to taste

39

First, you make a roux! Melt butter with flour. Add milk and stir until thickened. Add cream, stirring constantly. Then add all other ingredients, adding shrimp last. The sauce can be made ahead and reheated. If you choose this method, add shrimp when reheating. Serve over puff pastry shells, rice or noodles. Serves 8. Pound cake with fresh berries and fresh whipped crème. This is a very versatile dessert. The pound cake and berries can be prepared in advance, but the fresher the homemade whipped crème the better. Guests may have the cake alone or with both toppings; alternately, they may choose just fruit and crème. Everyone has a favorite pound cake. Rissie McNeel of Century, Fla., shared this one. It makes a large cake and is recommended with a citrus glaze if you’re not topping with fruit and crème. Rissie McNeel’s Buttermilk Pound Cake ½ cup butter ½ cup Crisco 3 cups sugar 5 whole eggs 2 tsps. Vanilla 3 cups plain flour ½ tp. Salt 1 cup buttermilk 1/3 tsp. Pound cake makes a versatile option for dessert. Here, soda 1 TBS very it’s served with seasonal berries and freshly whipped cream. Cake stand and flower pots courtesy of Ansley hot water Place. Cream butter, shortening and sugar thoroughly in mixing bowl. (Turn on the mixer and walk away, scraping bowl occasionally.) Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Add vanilla. Combine salt with flour and add alternately with buttermilk, tarting and ending with the flour. Dissolve the soda in the water and beat into mixture. Pour into a well-greased and lightly floured tube pan and bake at 300 degrees for about an hour and 15 minutes. Let rest in pan 10 minutes before you turn it out. Citrus Glaze (Optional) 2 TBS butter Grated rind of one lemon Grated rind of one small orange Juice of the lemon and the orange 1 ¾ cups confectioner’s sugar Mix and heat. Pour on cake which you have turned out on rack. Let cool completely. If you don’t want the cake to absorb so much of the glaze, let the glaze and cake cool about 15 minutes first. ■


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WHEN MAKING FINAL ARRANGEMENTS FOR YOUR

the lasting tribute LOVED ONES GIVE THEM

THEY DESERVE

ANDALUSIA, ALABAMA COVINGTONCASKET.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT YOUR FAMILY’S FUNERAL DIRECTOR


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south alabama living

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index to advertisers Andalusia Ballet ...........................................................................9 Andy Cable .................................................................................24 Andalusia Ford...........................................................................14 Andalusia Manor .........................................................................4 Andalusia Regional Hospital ..................................................3 Andalusia Regional Hospital ...............................................35 Ansley Place ...............................................................................16 Barrow’s Furniture....................................................................34 CCB Community Bank..............................................................6 Christopher’s Diamonds & Fine Jewelry..........................24 Christopher’s Diamonds & Fine Jewelry..........................26 City of Andalusia .........................................................................2 Covington Casket.....................................................................40 Covington Electric Cooperative...........................................14 Covington Metals .....................................................................44 Darby’s Village Pharmacy .................................................... 10 Harold’s........................................................................................20 J.M. Jackson ...............................................................................43 LBW...............................................................................................36 Madi’s Place ...............................................................................27 Massey Automotive ...................................................................7 Oasis Spa and Salon .................................................................7 Picket Fence Antiques ............................................................14 Professional Hearing Aid Center ........................................36 Sanders Fine Jewelry.................................................................7 Savannah Terrace........................................................................4 Sears .............................................................................................13 Southern Bone & Joint Specialists.........................................................................12 Steamboat ..................................................................................26 Vicki Popwell ..............................................................................18 Walker Electric ..........................................................................36

MARTHA, from page 28

“He had a way ….., “ she said. “I had been turning people down for years. But I said I’d try and that was the beginning of it.” These days, she has 35 students. Kids today are so involved, she said, that she’d amazed at how they’re able to juggle things. “Band is a big job,’ she said. “Football, baseball, cheerleading, softball, volleyball – so much is offered. Some mothers say ‘pick one,’ and wisely so.” Martha said she loves working one-on-one with

students, and unlike her teacher, she lets students choose the music they’re interested in playing. “Every child is a little different,” she said. “After they learn the basics, we can be flexible about that.” Even though there are almost countless activities competing for children’s attention these days, Martha still believes a background in music can be helpful. “It makes you interested in the arts, and I believe it makes you more well rounded to have arts in your background,” she said. “You may not pursue it, but it helps to have had a taste of it.” ■


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42 south alabama living

scrapbook

remembering

uncle broughton story and photo by Bob Brooks

B

roughton Tisdale, a.k.a. Uncle Broughton. This one may take some “splaining.” I always look for a Bible story or verse to share about our subject. The prodigal son comes to mind and yet it goes deeper than that. Maybe the loving father or beloved family man, Uncle Broughton was all of these and mega much more. The Fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom, and that’s where Aunt Lois has her part of the story. Born one of the 14 children of Uncle Bob Tisdale, Broughton had, or thought he had, some rather large shoes to fill. We all know in retrospect that rarely ever happens, but Uncle Broughton did his best.

Solomon, his brother and politician, was known as a deer hunter. Uncle Broughton was a DEAR hunter, or at least he was until Aunt Lois showed him the way of Wisdom. She put the fear of the Lord right in him sho’nuff. My grandmother, Mrs. S. D. Brooks, his sister, was about to die. Uncle Broughton was used for a transfusion that was credited with saving her life. He would share his wealth, his love and even his blood for his family, thereby making him the beloved family man. He moved to Troy as a young businessman. His father had given him the Dr. Pepper and other soft drink franchises from Montgomery, Ala., to Panama City, Fla. He lost it in a poker game that may have had some hard drink involved.

He returned to Andalusia and had a successful Orange Crush bottling company and was a loyal member of the First Methodist Church. I only told all the above to get to this. After he retired, he worked at Brooks Hardware for about 20 years and was one of the most influential people in my life, both business-wise and personally. A smart man learns from his mistakes; a wise man from other’s. I have never gambled more than I had in my pocket, I have never chased after money, and I could care less about deer hunting. Uncle Broughton helped me learn the value of family love and the pure pleasure of being happy with what you have. I love life just like Uncle Broughton. ■


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109 E. Hart Avenue, Opp, AL New: 334.493.3527 • Pre-owned: 334.493.3098 • www.jmjacksonopp.com


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The possibilities are endless.

“A Family Tradition Since 1925” Serving Andalusia, Covington County, and the Surrounding Area For 5 Generations

Industrial Scrap & Demolition Roll off Container Service James Jones, Jim Jones, and the late Brown Jones

Buyers of Scrap Metal Iron • Tin • Aluminum • Copper Brass • Aluminum Cans • Junk Cars

COVINGTON METALS CO. Open Mon-Fri 8 a.m. -5 p.m.

318 Montgomery St. Andalusia AL

South Alabama Living April Issue  

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