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Energy Generation As described in the NCREDC Strategic Plan, electricity generation is and will continue to be an important component of the North Country’s economy. The GHG Inventory reported that the region generated 11 million MWh of electricity in 2010. The North Country produces most of its commercial electricity through hydropower and wind, with small amounts of electricity generated from a variety of both renewable and non-renewable sources, as presented in table 3-1 and figure 3-1 on following page. Small “behind-the-meter” generation sources, such as solar and small wind generators, are not included in these totals.

Black River Facility eliminates the use of coal, petroleum coke, tires, and most fuel oil used for electricity in the region (based on total 2010 EIA 923 data reported for the region and by Black River Generation, LLC in 2010). The high contribution from renewable electricity generation in the North Country far exceeds the statewide goal of 30% energy generation from renewable sources by 2015. This places the region in a unique position: it is able to make a substantial contribution to this statewide goal while fully providing for its own electricity needs and generating large quantities of renewable electricity for export to surrounding regions.

In 2010, approximately 94% of the grid-tied electricity commercially produced in the North Country came from renewable sources: hydropower - 78.5%, wind - 12.8%, and biomass -2.36%. A majority of hydropower comes from the Robert Moses Power Dam in St. Lawrence County, which generated 6,611,236 MWh in 2010, or 76% of the total hydropower generated in in the region. The remainder of hydropower generation (over 2 million MWh) was generated by over 70 smaller hydro facilities throughout the region. Wind-generated electricity comes from the region’s five large wind projects. Biomass electricity comes from facilities in Essex and Franklin counties, and in 2013 will also include the converted ReEnergy Black River Facility located in Jefferson County, which is projected to provide 400,000 MWh of electricity each year.

Electricity Consumption Electricity is supplied to residents, businesses, and organizations in the region by two investor-owned utilities—National Grid and New York State Electric and Gas (NYSEG)—and seven municipally owned utilities in Lake Placid, Tupper Lake, Massena, Philadelphia, Plattsburg, Rouses Point, and Theresa. Electricity consumption data for 2010 was provided by these utilities and categorized by county and by sector. It is estimated that approximately 3.4 million MWh were consumed in the region in 2010 and 7.6 million MWhs of electricity were exported to other areas of the state, after accounting for transmission and distribution losses within the region.

In 2010, non-renewable electricity in the region was generated from a mix of sources, with the largest source, natural gas, generating almost 4% of total non-renewable electricity supply. The shutdown of the ReEnergy

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Profile for Adirondack North Country Association

Final report 6 14 13  

North Country Region Sustainability Plan

Final report 6 14 13  

North Country Region Sustainability Plan

Profile for anca_1955
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