Page 1

ANASTASIA

ALATSIS 2018


resume+contact experience

education

EARL SWENSSON ASSOCIATES Co-op | Nashville, OH | Aug 2017 - Present Worked with interior design team on multiple healthcare projects; completing wall protection and finish plans in Revit, Photoshop rendering plans, elevations, and perspectives for client presentations; making FF+E selections; finishing contractor books for projects, etc.

UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Cincinnati, OH | 2013 - Present GPA 3.47 Anticipated graduation in April 2018, BS in Interior Design EASTLAND FAIRFIELD CAREER AND TECHNICAL SCHOOL Architecture and Construction Management Gahanna, OH | 2011 - 2013 GPA 4.00

NBBJ Co-op | Columbus, OH | Jan - May 2017 Worked along side interior designers to create RCPs, elevations, floor plans, and millwork and detail drawings in Revit for GAHANNA LINCOLN HIGH SCHOOL local behavioral health clinics and large-scale international Gahanna, OH | 2009 - 2013 healthcare projects; completed Photoshop renderings for client GPA 3.68 presentations; put together FF+E presentation boxes, made material selections; 3D modeling and model making, etc. STUDIOSIX5 Co-op | Austin, TX | Aug - Dec 2015 + May - Aug 2016 Worked with design teams on senior living projects; tasks and responsibilities heavily included: AutoCAD redlining, Photoshop renderings for client presentations and advertisement boards; made FF+E selections and substitutions; compiled budgets for furniture and artwork packages; specification book editing, etc. MSA ARCHITECTS Co-op | Cincinnati, OH | Jan - May 2015 Aided lead interior designer with tasks and responsibilities that included: modeling and redlining floor plans in Revit; material selections and presentation preparation for clients; met with reps to discuss library resources and stock, etc.

skills AutoCAD Bluebeam Drafting + Illustration Indesign, Illustrator, + Photoshop MAC + PC OS Revit Rhino SketchUP

about I’m an avid reader (and writer) that’s slowly working on improving my kayaking and yoga skills. I also tend to stress bake, just so you know.

https://issuu.com/anastasiaalatsis/

(614) 507 1817 | ALATSIAN@MAIL.UC.EDU 658 REINDEER LANE, GAHANNA, OH 43230

activities+accolades CINCINNATI EXCHANGE PROJECT Cincinnati | Volunteer | May - Aug 2017 Working to complete exchange kits and helping customers with paperwork and supplying resources

PUBLIC INTEREST DESIGN STUDENT LEADERSHIP FORUM Design Futures | Conference Attendee | May 2017 Interdisciplinary forum bringing together students, faculty, and practitioners for collaborative and innovation workshops and lectures to aid under-served communities

ONESIGHT OneSight: Rwanda | Volunteer | Dec 2016 A group of students were tasked with taking site documentation of proposed hospitals that the OneSight clinics would operate out of, working on millwork drawings for the glasses display, and creating a “How to Site Survey” booklet CITY OF CINCINNATI Keep Cincinnati Beautiful | Volunteer | Aug - Nov 2016 Completed administrative tasks; organized and cleaned supplies for volunteer clean-ups; created artwork for event signage CITY OF COLUMBUS The Annunciation Greek Orthodox Cathedral Greek Language School | Volunteer | 2008 - 2015 The Greek Festival | Volunteer | 2008 - 2016 Bridge Credit Union Scholarship Recipient UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI Cincinnatus Scholarship Recipient | 2013 - Present UC Sustainability Clean-up | Volunteer | Jan - Apr 2016 Dean’s List | 2015 - Present Bearcat Buddies Tutor | Volunteer | Jan - Apr 2014 CITY OF GAHANNA Tria Psaria | Artist | 2012 Designed piece of public art displayed in Creekside Park


TABLE OF CONTENTS WORKPLACE: MAKERS SPACE RETAIL: ONESIGHT FURNITURE: TABLE HOSPITALITY: HAMPTON CO-OP: HEALTHCARE CO-OP: HEALTHCARE NON-PROFIT: ONESIGHT ONGOING: PUBLIC INTEREST: H.O.P.E. PERSONAL WORK

04 10 18 22 34 40 48 54 64


WORKPLACE: MAKERS SPACE summer 2015

FAB HUB was born from the idea that future generations will realize the impact of mass manufacturing as the makers’ movement is growing. Along with the Internet of Everything (IoE), the idea of individual manufacturing becomes a reality for people; a practical solution. Much like the public libraries of today, FAB HUBs will be located in neighborhoods. They become a convenient place for community residents to come together and build the products they need. The Fabricator is anyone in the community with a desire to make their own products. The Internet of Everything (IoE) will be integrated into the space, bridging the gap for inexperienced fabricators. IoE controlled devices allow the fabricator to streamline their process. IoE gives suggestions and tips to better develop the product the fabricator is creating. The tools respond to how each individual works, knowing and understanding when that individual is in need of a certain machine. The tool gathers knowledge from past use, and applies it to when the individual uses that tool next.

4

CONEPT WITH: CHRISTINE RUHE + SARAH SHEDLOSKI + AMY ZYLKA


fab hub

5


6


FIRST FLOOR PLAN STORAGE MATERIALS STORAGE ASSEMBLY AREAS LOADING DOCK MACHINE ROOMS 3D PRINTING CASTING AND MOLDING ELECTRONICS LASER CUTTING CNC MILLING

SECOND FLOOR PLAN ENTRANCE COMMUNITY SPACE + COFFEE BAR PRODUCT DISPLAY IoE INDIVIDUAL + COLLABORATIVE DESIGN DEVICES

TRANSVERSE SECTION

7


A COMMUNITY-BASED ALTERNATIVE TO MASS MANUFACTURING

8


9


RETAIL: ONESIGHT spring 2016

OneSight came to our studio with the hopes of finding a design they can use to systematically standardize the new clinics they’re building; they offered three of their proposed sites in Rwanda for us to implement our ideas in. Kigali, Kibuye, and Huye, which we chose to develop further. Orbit came about from identifying the primary, secondary, and tertiary visual zones in both plan and section. These viewing zones outlined “Pivotal Visuals,” areas of the clinic where we chose to concentrate information, way finding, and cultural overlays. PVC piping is used as a design element throughout the space, to denote information, for way finding, as cultural overlay, and in lighting fixtures. It is also used to create partitions; a screen wall to separate pretesting from the waiting room, and focal wall as a means to focus patients’ viewpoint from the waiting room so that they see the end goal of their visit: glasses and clear vision. CONCEPT WITH: CHRISTINE RUHE

10


orbit

11


US E O F P VC PIPES

LI G H T F IXTUR E

SC R EEN WALL

T U BE WALL

WAY FIN D IN G

KIBUYE CHECK-IN

PRETEST EXAM ROOM

WAITING CHECKOUT

EXAM ROOM

RR

STORAGE DISPENSE

OFFICE

Scale: 3/32” = 1’

KIGALI CHECKOUT

OFFICE

EXAM ROOM

STORAGE

DISPENSE RR

EXAM ROOM

EXAM ROOM

RR

EXAM ROOM CHECK-IN

12

PRETEST

WAITING

EXAM ROOM

Scale: 3/32” = 1’


HUYE

RCP

CHECK-IN PRETEST EXAM ROOM

CHECKOUT OFFICE

STORAGE WAITING

RR EXAM ROOM

DISPENSE

SECTION

Scale: 3/32” = 1’

13


The waiting room pivotal visual includes looking through the gradient feature wall and seeing the eye wear display area and other patients trying on glasses. The patients are reminded this is the goal and purpose for their visit. The experience of having an eye exam is the next pivotal visual for the patient. The act of finding the correct prescription with the doctor’s help and seeing clearly for the first time is celebrated and embraced, becoming the visual turning point for the patient.

14


Picking out a pair of glasses becomes the next pivotal visual. The glasses are displayed in circular cabinets with circular mirrors. This area becomes all about the patient and their experience with the glasses. The checkout leaves the patient with information about maintaining both their eye wear and their eye health. The patient’s path now comes full circle, and they leave the sustainable vision center with improved vision.

15


16

For the final critique, we had to design and assemble a mock-up of our glasses display. It was required to be easy to build, out of local materials, and preferably lockable. Pulling from our “orbital� theme, we chose to reflect and enlarge the shape of the PVC so that it became the shelving unit and the front door and mirror could be closed and locked when the clinic was not operating.


17


FURNITURE: TABLE fall 2017

Steelcase hosted a competition for local design firms in Nashville. The design team at Earl Swensson Associates wanted a table that highlighted the city and utilized a variety of materials. Inspired by Zaha Hadid figure ground studies, a laser cut interpretation of Nashville’s downtown and popular Broad Street. The canvas cast in concrete draped across the table represents the Cumberland River. Myself and the other co-op, Samantha Kelly, worked along side each other in the schematic design phase. We continued the project through the construction drawings phase and assembly of the final piece of furniture.

18


bassline

19


20


21


HOSPITALITY: HAMPTON fall 2016

Hampton approached our studio with the challenge of cobranding their hotels with any other brand. With a desire to partner with a healthcare brand, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital immediately came to mind, especially with their new approach to the hospital atmosphere and their strong brand image. We decided we could interrupt the standard process of healing with the addition of “hotel,” allowing for the hotel to become a third place to support healing.

CONCEPT WITH: CHRISTINE RUHE

22


hamptoncare

This walkway was added as a means of direct access between the hospital and hotel. It would allow quicker and easier access for patients, families, and hospital staff to go between the two buildings.

1. Mezzanine Walkway

23


care support system

hospital

hotel

home

In a hospital setting, the patient is surrounded by a team of doctors, staff, and family to care for them. Then, when patients are discharged, families become their main caretaker, a drastic change. Inserting the hotel step in the journey allows for a more gradual change to help all of those involved in the healing process.

1. arrival Patient can let go of “illness� and become a guest at HamptonCare, a calming and welcoming atmosphere puts guests at ease.

2. wellness Guests experience a changing mindset. More emphasis is put on wellness and guest care.

3. hamptonality Families are welcomed into the hotel with comfort, care, and community support.

4. home Patients and their families are comfortable and feel ready to take on the next step in their journey to wellness.

24


Cincinnati Children’s Hospital

Guests and Resources

traveling families There are well over 5,000 hospital in the Families travel from all over the country and United States. Over 200 of those hospitals the world to receive care from Cincinnati are dedicated to the health of children. Children’s Hospital. Our goal is to accommodate these families who may not This third place of healing can be have the care they need closer to home. implemented across the healthcare system. We are focusing on the incorporation of the other guests path to wellness in the Cincinnati Children’s Traditional hotel guests will also have the opportunity to stay in the HamptonCARE Hospital community. facility. People who have business with Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Children’s Hospital, or other hospitals in the Provide 584 beds area can stay here and know they are within Serve all 50 states walking distance. Also families affiliated with Serve over 60 countries other hospitals have the opportunity to take advantage of HamptonCARE’s amenities. need A place for patients to improve and heal needs outside the hospital while still being close by, and has the potential for a lasting Community spaces to grow and share. partnership because the need for this kind Kids rehab play area that encourages wellness. of facility will never disappear. Siblings daycare / activity area for inclusion. Parent dedicated spaces to ease them mission home. “Cincinnati Children’s will improve child health and transform delivery of care Close proximity to hospital and ER. through fully integrated, globally recognized Meeting space for doctor or nurse visits. research, education and innovation. Adequate food area to meet nutritional needs. For patients from our community, the nation and the world, the care we provide will achieve the best: Medical and quality-of-life outcomes Patient and family experience Value today and in the future.”

25


FIRST FLOOR PLAN

11. 9. 8.

6.

7. 5. 4.

26

3/64” = 1’ 0”


SECOND FLOOR PLAN

entrances lobby and wellness areas kids areas

parent areas bonus amenities

10. 12.

2. 1.

3.

3/64” = 1’ 0”

key features

1. walkway 2. mezzanine lobby 3. wellness feature 4. check-in 5. community space 6. family room 7. kidszone 8. daycare 9. family kitchen 10. parent lounge 11. therapy room 12. open laundry

27


2. Mezzanine Lobby A second lobby was needed to greet guests on the second floor walkway

3. Wellness Wall The interactive art piece allowed for children to add to the legacy of healing as they strive for wellness

28


4. Main lobby The main lobby acts as a touchdown space for families to check in and receive more information concerning their child’s health and recovery

6. Family room A familycentered room created a home atmosphere that guests could feel more at ease as they’re going through this journey

29


10. Parent room A “parent only” space was added so that parents could complete paperwork, pay bills, or do laundry among other chores, and to take a momentary break from the stress of having a sick child

9. Family kitchen Cincinnati Children’s has a large number of international patients, so this space allows for those families to cook their traditional meals; as well as for families that are staying for an extended time can have a more “normal” meal experience.

30


8. daycare A space where all children will be taken care of, especially when parents have other responsibilities to tend to.

7. kidszone Kids can play while parents are in the family room, during check-in process, or in the dining room, etc.

31


GUEST ROOMS

Going a step beyond the overall plan, individual guest rooms were also part of the scope of design. With a children’s hospital, comes the need to house families with infants or multiple children, so I decided to design a nursery-style suite with a separate living area that could be utilized for a child’s play space.

32

The ADA room can cater to the typical disabled guest, with improved amenities in the bathroom and to the work area that make it a more inclusive environment.


NURSERY ROOM

1. Touchdown Desk

2.

2. Bedroom Space

1.

3.

3. Living Space

ADA ROOM

1. 1. Living Space

1. Living Space

2.

elevations

33


CO-OP: HEALTHCARE spring 2017

While working with NBBJ, I was assigned to a project team, working on a new build behavioral health clinic that would be an addition to the larger campus of Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Specifically, I worked on the family and guest amenity spaces within the scope of the clinic. For all of the spaces, I was involved in design charrattes, millwork design, furniture plans, materiality choices, and throughout the entire rendering process.

34


nationwide child ren’s

35


36

The Family Resource Center was a place families could take a step back from the hospital environment and focus on other parts of their life. With a kitchen, lounge area, laundry room, bathroom, offices, and a gym, it gave families the chance to complete day-to-day tasks while still remaining close to the hospital and their children.


37


38

The “Mindfulness Room” was an adaptation of the average hospital chapel. Bringing forward the curvature found throughout the rest of the clinic’s design, it focused on creating an ethereal and calming atmosphere through its form and materiality.


39


CO-OP: HEALTHCARE fall 2017

At Earl Swensson Associates, I worked primarily on health care projects. I worked in the schematic design, the design development, and the construction document phases. For the following two projects, I worked mainly on the graphic design elements. The designs were originally outsourced to a graphic design firm, but the lead interior designer did not approve of the designs, so she asked me to try my hand at the graphics. Here are the final results to be used. The graphics range from vinyl wall applications, to metal panels, to colored glass. For the pediatric hospital, I also worked on the floor pattern plan, helping choose the carpet pattern and layout in the exam rooms.

40


graphic

elements

41


VINYL GRAPHICS ON GLASS

These graphics were applied to the different glass walls in the gym / physical therapy spaces in the hospital. The sharp angels were used to convey a sense of movement.

Benjamin Moore Topaz 070

42

Benjamin Moore Peach Brandy 112

Benjamin Moore Grand Canyon 118


Sherwin Williams Cruising 6782

Sherwin Williams Jamaican Bay 6781

Sherwin Williams Rapture Blue 6773

43


VERTICAL PANELS

Vertical panels in the lobby were going to hang on the walls to define the entrance to the gift shop. The trees would be cut sheet metal, applied on top of a mesh metal screen.

44


HORIZONTAL SHADES

Horizontal panels were going to provide shade in the double height lobby / walkway. The organic design cast by the panels represents the shadows of light shining through leaves on trees.

45


3rd Floor Pattern Plan

2nd Floor Pattern Plan

1st Floor Pattern Plan

46


GRAPHICS AND CARPET

This pediatric hospital had a heavy design influence from nature. The carpet tiles used had different grass, moss, and stone textures. The walls were covered in vinyl graphics of trees and animals corresponding to their representative floor: undergrowth, trees, and canopy.

47


NON-PROFIT: ONESIGHT winter 2016

CHUK

48

University of Rwanda

Kibungo

Ruhango

Ruli

Bushenge

In December 2016, on behalf of OneSight, a group of classmates, our professor, and myself were given the opportunity to go to Rwanda. We were assigned three responsibilities by Luxottica: draw the millwork sets in a way that they are easily understood by millworkers and craftsmen in the various countries OneSight was working in, do the same with a “How to Site Survey” package that we had to create, and site survey the six hospitals we would be visiting so that the Luxottica team could properly build and implement the design. WITH: ANN BLACK + KAT COOPER + CALEB TAFFER + AMY ZYLKA


rwanda

49


Millwork

50


51


Kibungo

52

SCALE: 1/8” = 1’


Ruli

53


ONGOING: PUBLIC INTEREST cu rrent

For a compilation of more thorough research and findings, and continuing designs and ideas, see my issuu.com publications: Volume 1 - Research: HOPE Volume 2 - Schematic Design: HOPE

54


H.O.P.E.

1 in 9

heroin deaths across the u.s. happen in ohio 55


BREAK DOWN WALLS

The window of opportunity is minute, for those with substance abuse problems that reach out to seek help. They need to know where to go when they are experience a moment of clarifying strength. A space that will accommodate the many needs of users going through various levels of recovery and their different ongoing journeys.

How might we address the needs of users and engage the community through acknowledging the stigmas surrounding substance abuse?

Using Space

Spaces that will accommodate the needs of current substance users

Seeking Space

Spaces that allow varying degrees of structure and support for those considering recovery

Recovering Space

Spaces that provide choices, education, and more support for those continuing their recovery

Recovered + Public Space

Spaces that allow those who are recovered a chance to share their story and provide support for others

56


FLOOR PLAN 1408-1414 MAIN STREET

RR

Child Care

Flex Space ADA RR

Small Classroom

a

Gallery Space

Large Classroom

Exam Room

Therapy

Wound Care

a

Shower

Waiting

Counseling Space

ADA Shower

Syringe Exchange Intake

ENTRANCE

57


58


Upon entering HOPE, clients are presented with the option to choose: art gallery or to enter the clinic. Some users who need the clinic services may not yet have the courage or energy to enter the clinic, so they are given a space between the clinic and the public to transition until they are ready to move forward. Along the right lives a curved inset to welcome and inform clients of the services that HOPE offers to users.

Once in the clinic, clients have a the option once again to choose how they wish to proceed in their journey. They can take a moment to sit in the more residential-style furniture (that puts users from different backgrounds onto similar footing) and acclimate to their surroundings before going to the syringe exchange, entering the waiting room for the exam room or wound care. There sits a millwork piece, grounded to the column, that gives clients of sense of security and the option to sit alone while being a comfortable distance from another individual, or allowing for conversation to occur, if desired. Group counseling or activities can take place at the tables underneath the skylight. At the exchange, aside from receiving harm reduction supplies, customers can fill out intake information, check in for appointments, reserve time for the showers, sign up for classes, counseling, and case management.

59


Clients then can achieve a variety of counseling and therapy sessions within this space. In the capsules, they can have a relaxed and comfortable, while private, conversation with other users, peers, or mentors. Behind the gallery wall sits the two therapy spaces , which exist in tandem to each other, not succession. The glass ceilings and the angled pitch allow for as much light as possible form the skylight to enter the therapy space.

Both the large and the small classrooms reflect the angled ceiling and glass clerestory of the therapy spaces. They also have sliding panels that can be opened up to create one large space that larger lectures, group meetings, and classes can be held in. A more open space with flexible seating allows for impromptu group sessions or interaction between the general public who visit the gallery and recovering users.

60


61


The wall that runs the length of the gallery reflects the use of each space on the other side of it through its materiality. There are acoustic panels for the therapy spaces, giving a softer and quieter material to private space. There is a glass display case to hold three-dimensional art pieces that users have created, as well as allow for a visual transparency between the classroom and the general public; a curtain can be pulled across when more sensitive activities are happening inside. The vertical wood screen gives the most connection between the gallery and clinic, inviting guests to mingle between the spaces and feel welcome in both.

SECTION A

62


63


PERSONAL WORK

64


65


Tria Yaria

2012 competition at Gahanna Lincoln High School to design a piece of public art for instillation. Installed at Creekside Park in Gahanna, Ohio. Sculpted by SmART Works owner Steve Bush.

66


67


thank you,

(614)-507-1817 | alatsian@mail.uc.edu | 658 Reindeer Lane, Gahanna, OH 43230

2018 Portfolio  

A sampling of my work, including studio coursework, co-op experiences, and personal and volunteer projects.

2018 Portfolio  

A sampling of my work, including studio coursework, co-op experiences, and personal and volunteer projects.

Advertisement